Page 1

Fighting back

CHANGEOUT

Women find confidence and camaraderie in self-defense training SC SCE NE

Lineworkers’ rodeo SC RECIPE

JUNE 2018

Takeout favorites


KEEPING THE LIGHTS ON ISN’T ENOUGH.

We’re not your typical electric company, we’re a local not-for-profit electric cooperative. We power our community with more than just electricity. We work to bring jobs and investment to the area. To learn more about the cooperative difference, visit TouchstoneEnergy.com

YOUR SOURCE OF POWER. AND COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP.


THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS VOLUME 72 • NUMBER 6 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240) Read in more than 584,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033 Tel: (803) 926‑3175 Fax: (803) 796‑6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop

2018 | june 16 Outer peace, inner beast South Carolina-based SASS Defense is training an army of women to defend themselves.

EDITOR

Keith Phillips Tel: (803) 739‑3040 Email: Keith.Phillips@ecsc.org

4 CO-OP NEWS

FIELD EDITOR

Walter Allread

Updates from your cooperative

PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

Travis Ward

6 AGENDA

Take a look under the hood of the new, all-electric John Deere tractor. Plus: Enjoy this month’s roundup of weekend festivals and events.

ART DIRECTOR

Sharri Harris Wolfgang DESIGNER

Susan Collins PRODUCTION WEB EDITOR

Steve Ware worked hard to achieve business success. Now he works even harder helping children in need.

Chase Toler COPY EDITOR

L. Kim Welborn CONTRIBUTORS

Jayne Cannon, Mike Couick, Tim Hanson, Jan A. Igoe, L.A. Jackson, Patrick Keegan, Kaley Lockwood, Diane Veto Parham, Sydney Patterson, Susan Hill Smith, Belinda Smith-Sullivan, Brad Thiessen

12 ENERGY Q&A Play it cool this summer Learn how to stay comfortably cool all summer long while keeping your electricity bills on ice.

14 SMART CHOICE You can take it with you

PUBLISHER

Lou Green ADVERTISING

Read up on portable electronics that roll with you when it’s summer vacation “go” time.

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739‑5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

American MainStreet Publications Tel: (800) 626‑1181

21 STORIES Bubbling up

ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send to your

local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above.

22

of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor. is brought to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network. $5.72 members,

At the top of their game

27 TRAVELS Camden honors a native son Learn about the remarkable life of baseball great Larry Doby at the African-American Cultural Center of Camden.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

$8 nonmembers

SCENE

Electric cooperative crews showcased their skills during the 2018 Lineworkers’ Rodeo.

Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices. © COPYRIGHT 2018. The Electric Cooperatives

22

Learn how a simple act of kindness led to a new nonprofit in Greenville—and more than 4.4 million YouTube views in a single week.

Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor.

30

RECIPE

Takeout made easy With a few easy-to-find ingredients and these simple recipes, you can turn “takeout” into “make-at-home,” and give the delivery guy the night off.

32

30

GARDENER

Strange beauty: the pineapple lily Dress up your summer flower garden with a dazzling display of pineapple lilies.

34 36 38 Member of the AMP network reaching more than 9 million homes and businesses

MARKETPLACE Fighting back

CALENDAR

Women find confidence and camaraderie in self-defense training

HUMOR ME

Hang a left past Jupiter Some say the world will end in fire. Some say in ice. Jan Igoe’s money is on a global-killer asteroid. TO P A N D CENTER PHOTOS: M IC SM ITH; BOT TO M: G I N A M OO RE

SC SCE NE

Lineworkers’ rodeo SC RECIPE

Takeout favorites

JUNE 2018

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS:

16

10 DIALOGUE Who becomes a shepherd?

Andrew Chapman

Instructors Michele Ridd (left) and Lauren Lamendola lead a SASS Defense workshop and demonstrate a technique to break the grip of an attacker. Photo by Andrew Haworth.


SC  agenda BY THE NUMBERS

When lightning strikes June 24–30 is Lightning Safety Awareness Week, a reminder that 70 percent of all lightning strikes occur in the months of June, July and August. If you’re outdoors and hear thunder or see lightning bolts, seek safe shelter immediately because the danger of death and serious injury is real. Check out these shocking statistics from the National Weather Service.

30 Average annual number of lightning deaths reported from 2007 to 2016, according to the National Weather Service.

270 Average number of annual lightning injuries reported from 2007 to 2016.

1 in 1,083,000 Odds of being struck by lightning in any given year in the United States.

1 in 13,500 Odds of being struck by lightning in the span of an 80-year life.

1 in 292,201,338 Odds of hitting the Powerball lottery jackpot, just for comparison.

300 million/30,000 Estimated volts/amps in a typical lightning strike—enough energy to power a 100‑watt incandescent lightbulb for about three months.

80/20 Male/female ratio of reported lightning fatalities between 2006 and 2017, according to the National Weather Service. For safety tips, visit lightningsafetycouncil.org and weather.gov/safety/lightning. SOURCES: WEATHER.GOV AND POWERBALL.COM

6

PLOWING NEW GROUND John Deere introduced the world’s first fully battery-powered tractor in 2017. Nicknamed SESAM, for Sustainable Energy Supply for Agricultural Machinery, this all-electric prototype is built on a standard John Deere 6R chassis.

Meet the electric John Deere

In rural America, green and yellow are arguably the second-most American set of colors, right behind red, white and blue, so when John Deere unveiled the world’s first fully battery-powered tractor in 2017, it got people’s attention. Nicknamed SESAM, for Sustainable Energy Supply for Agricultural Machinery, this all-electric prototype is built on John Deere’s 6R chassis, and according to the company, it has “all the features and functionality of a ‘conventional’ tractor while offering the benefits of electric power.” Pop the hood and you’ll find the traditional internal combustion engine has been replaced by a massive battery pack. This emissions-free machine produces less noise than traditional tractors and operates using two independent electric motors with a combined peak output of 400 horsepower, according to Farm-Equipment.com. The website claims the tractor takes three hours to fully charge and can run up to four hours in the field at speeds ranging from 2 to 30 mph. Although SESAM’s battery capacity can’t yet handle a full day of sunrise-to-sunset farming, the arrival of an all-electric tractor is the first step toward electrifying a wide range of agricultural machinery. As energy storage technology improves, experts predict it’s only a matter of time before John Deere manufactures tractors that will stay powered up for a long day’s work. The push toward electric farm machinery is part of the growing “environmentally beneficial electrification” movement, which seeks new ways to use electricity in daily activities as an alternative to fossil fuels. Frequently promoted as a means to reduce greenhouse gases, beneficial electrification also helps consumers by providing products that are cleaner, quieter and easier to maintain. —KALEY LOCKWOOD

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JUNE 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP


ONLY ON SCLiving.coop Stir-fry secrets u No wok? No problem. Learn how to make Asian stir-fry dishes at home with a hot skillet, some advance prep and Chef Belinda’s tips in this how-to video at SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda.

Community solar engagement

SHARED SOLAR FARM

The co-op builds a solar array. Members voluntarily buy a share of the project.

PARTICIPANTS

Solar-farm members receive credits for that electricity on their monthly bills. SOURCE: SHELTON GROUP, INC.

t

Top-of-the-line competitors Turn to Page 22 for the full story of the 2018 South Carolina Lineworkers’ Rodeo, then visit the “Featured Videos” section of SCLiving.coop for the video of cooperative crews demonstrating their skills.

Celebrate summer with an extra $100 June 21 is the first official day of summer. To help you make the most of long, lazy, sun-drenched days, we’re offering the chance to win a $100 Visa gift card in our Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes. We’ll draw one winner’s name at random from all eligible entries received by June 30, so don’t delay. Register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply.

GONE FISHIN’ The Vektor Fish & Game Forecast provides feeding and migration times. Major periods can bracket the peak by an hour. Minor peaks, ½ hour before and after. Minor

UTILITIES

The renewable electricity is distributed to the power grid.

Electric cooperatives across South Carolina and the nation are leading the development of community solar following a model that allows members to voluntarily purchase the power from solar farms. These programs make solar power more equitable for all co-op members, and they spare homeowners the hassle, expense and maintenance chores of installing rooftop panels. To learn more about cooperative-led community solar initiatives in South Carolina, visit myscsolar.com. —KALEY LOCKWOOD

Perfect potstickers

Potstickers are fun to make, and even more fun to eat. Get this month’s bonus recipe at SCLiving.coop/food/recipes.

M IC SM ITH

Recent advances in panel technology put solar power one step closer to becoming a practical source of renewable energy across the national power grid. So how do solar panels actually generate electricity? Inside every solar panel there is an array of connected photovoltaic (PV) cells; “photo” meaning light and “voltaic” meaning the production of electricity. These cells consist of two layers of a semiconducting material, typically silicon, which are the meat of the solar panels. The silicon is infused with additional elements, giving the top layer a negative charge and the bottom layer a positive charge. The sun emits massive amounts of solar energy each day in the form of photons, which are small particles of light. When these photons collide with PV cells, electrons are knocked loose from atoms in the top silicon layer, leaving gaps to be filled by electrons from the bottom layer. The loose electrons circulate in a single ­direction, out toward the metal sides of the solar panel, creating ­electricity with a direct current (DC). The newly generated electricity flows out of the panels to the inverter system. This system exists because the majority of our home appliances and electronics operate on an alternating current, or AC power. The inverter converts the power from DC to AC, allowing it to be transmitted over the network of power lines in a useful form.

GW ÉN A Ë L LE VOT

How solar panels work

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

JUNE 15 2:07 16 2:52 17 3:52 18 5:22 19 6:52 20 8:07 21 9:07 22 2:37 23 3:07 24 3:37 25 4:07 26 — 27 — 28 12:52 29 1:37 30 2:07

Minor

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

J U LY 6:52 7:37 8:37 9:37 11:22 1:22 1:52 9:52 10:37 11:07 11:37 4:52 5:22 5:52 6:22 6:52

9:52 2:22 10:37 3:07 11:37 4:07 12:22 4:52 — 5:52 1:22 7:07 3:22 8:07 9:22 4:37 10:07 5:37 10:52 6:22 11:37 7:07 7:37 12:07 8:07 12:37 8:37 1:07 9:22 1:37 9:52 2:07

1 2:52 7:22 10:22 2:37 2 3:37 7:52 10:52 3:22 3 4:37 8:52 11:22 3:52 4 9:52 5:52 12:07 4:22 5 11:52 6:52 5:22 12:37 6 — 7:52 2:07 6:37 7 1:22 8:52 8:07 3:52 8 2:07 9:37 9:37 4:52 9 2:52 10:22 10:37 5:52 10 3:52 11:07 11:37 6:37 11 4:37 11:52 12:22 7:22 12 — 5:22 7:52 12:37 13 1:07 6:07 8:37 1:22 14 1:52 7:07 9:22 2:07 15 2:37 7:52 10:07 2:52 16 3:37 8:52 10:37 3:37

SCLIVING.COOP  | JUNE 2018  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

7


|

SC   agenda HIGHLIGHTS JUNE 15–JULY 15

JUNE 15–24

Have you ever wanted to ask Harriet Tubman what it was like guiding slaves to freedom on the Underground Railroad, or quiz Gen. Francis “Swamp Fox” Marion on his tactics for harassing the British in the American Revolution? Here’s your chance. Greenville Chautauqua’s summer festival lets guests interact with living historians who look and speak the parts of famous historical figures. This year’s roster also includes portrayals of Clara Barton, founder of the American Red Cross; Winston Churchill; and women’s rights activist Alice Paul.

SALUTE FROM THE SHORE JULY 4

Be part of a growing Independence Day tradition by taking to the beach on July 4 to cheer squadrons of modern and vintage military planes as they pass along the coast from Myrtle Beach to Hilton Head Island. Don’t forget to bring your American flag and wear your best red, white and blue clothing as the Palmetto State pays tribute to the men and women of the armed forces. (803) 331‑8881; salutefromtheshore.org

(864) 244‑1499; greenvillechautauqua.org AG + ART TOUR WEEKENDS IN JUNE

South Carolina’s 12-county celebration of agriculture and rural artisans kicks off June 2–3 and repeats every weekend this month at multiple locations across the state. From Horry County to Spartanburg County, visitors can take self-guided tours of farms, farmer’s markets and artist studios as part of the nation’s largest tour of its kind. (803) 981‑3021; agandarttour.com

SOUTH CAROLINA AND RECONSTRUCTION, 1865–1876 ONGOING

When the African-American soldiers of the 55th Massachu­ setts Volunteer Regiment marched into Charleston on Feb. 21, 1865, to the shouts and cheers of newly freed slaves, they ushered in the Reconstruction era. The newest exhibit at the South Carolina State Museum in Columbia explores this tumultuous time in South Carolina history with displays that include busts of the regiment’s soldiers and many other artifacts, including a Columbia ­soldier’s Union discharge papers and a fan made from Confederate money. (803) 898‑4921; scmuseum.org

8

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JUNE 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

BEAUFORT WATER FESTIVAL JULY 13–22

Pace yourself if you plan to indulge in all 10 days of music, entertainment and games on the Beaufort waterfront. Don’t miss Motown Monday, the Grand Parade and the always colorful bed race, in which teams push a gurney through the city’s streets while onlookers bombard them with water balloons, buckets of colored water and powdered dye. (843) 524‑0600; bftwaterfestival.com

For more happenings this month, turn to our Calendar on page 36, and see the expanded Festivals & Events roundup on SCLiving.coop.

H A RRI E T TU B M A N REEN AC TO R PHOTO BY B ECK Y STO N E

HISTORY ALIVE FESTIVAL


Cogongrass

is invading SC forests! REPORT COGONGRASS:

864-646-2140 or invasives@clemson.edu

Find out more at clemson.edu/invasives Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org

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SCLIVING.COOP  | JUNE 2018  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

9


|

SC   dialogue

Who becomes a shepherd? graduating, Steve discovered a natural talent for on business. At one point, he owned three car dealthe theme of “shepherds in a world of change,” profiling people who help others through the erships, a mortgage company, a clothing store and ­challenges in life. Considering how important commercial real estate holding company. He set a they are to the fabric of our society, I wanted personal goal to become a millionaire by age 30, to understand more about what, exactly, makes missing the mark by only one year. someone become a shepherd. “My whole identity was wrapped around the The work of shepherding others is never easy. things I owned,” explains Steve. “I had a big, fancy But the desire to help is a uniquely human trait house that looked like Al Capone lived there. I that has a positive impact on the receiver, and was making $80,000 a month, but I was miserthe giver. Social scientists have noted that human able. Everything was about the next conquest. nature is generally hardwired for kindness and If there was an apple in the middle of the table, empathy. In order to survive, people are designed my response for most of my life was: ‘If I don’t to cooperate and share knowledge in community grab that apple, you’re going to get it, so I have to with one another. Sometimes, however, life circumget it.’ ” Anxiety-ridden despite his success, Steve’s next stances deaden those impulses and lead people to step was a surprising one. In 2008, he look out only for their own survival. GET MORE purchased the Gardendale Tennis and Steve Ware has lived on both sides of For more Swim Club just outside of Columbia, renthe equation. As the founder of River’s on Steve Ware and Edge Retreat, Steve works to provide ovated it and reopened the property in his work at River’s enrichment programs and camps for 2010 as a nonprofit summer camp called Edge Retreat, visit underserved youth in the Midlands. As River’s Edge Retreat. ­riversedgeretreat.org. a child, however, Steve went through “When I saw that piece of property, I 30 different foster homes—including 14 homes thought, ‘Maybe if I take my eyes off myself and start helping other people, maybe then I’ll become in one year—before he ended up, at the age of 14, healthy.’ And that’s exactly what happened,” Steve in the Greenville Rescue Mission. says. “When you start doing good, then you run “I was scared. Lonely. I was at the end of the into other people who are doing good and they rope, holding onto the knot, trying to figure out inspire you.” where I was going to land,” he says. He held on “I want to live with the mindset of ‘Let me push there for six months, living among grown homeless that apple to you and God will provide for me— men until a coach and youth pastor noticed him, believed in him, mentored him, and got him into a as he always does.’ So now my first response is not good school. to grab the apple. My first response is to help feed As Steve sees it: “One person made a difference other people’s kids, knowing God will make sure in my life. One person stepped in where others there’s still a piece for me and my family,” he says. had failed.” “Ultimately, I want to help kids like me know Steve has ultimately followed that example, there are people who genuinely care about them working, in turn, to mentor the next generation. and that they don’t have to rely on the outward But his path to becoming a shepherd was not a surface stuff for a good life.” straight or simple one. After his experience with homelessness, Steve’s story took a happier turn. He settled into a new family home, found academic success, and went to college on a basketball scholarship. After OVER THIS PAST YEAR, I’VE BEEN WRITING

MIKE COUICK

President and CEO, The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina

10

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JUNE 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP


EMPOWERING VISION With our low-cost, reliable electricity and choice industrial sites, Santee Cooper is working with the South Carolina Power Team to help new businesses picture a better future – and to power South Carolina toward Brighter Tomorrows, Today.

www.scpowerteam.com • www.poweringsc.com


|

SC   energy Q&A

Play it cool this summer

t South Carolina

efficiency experts recommend upgrading attic insulation to R-38. Most homes don’t measure up because current building codes only require R-30.

BY PATRICK KEEGAN AND BRAD THIESSEN

Q A

12

q Have your HVAC system inspected and serviced annually to ensure it’s operating at peak efficiency ahead of summer’s sweltering days.

When the sun is beating down, attics can become extremely hot and radiate heat through the ceiling into your living space. demands of summer. Replace filters ­regularly and open your supply registers to ensure the system is operating at peak efficiency. Window units can be an efficient cooling option if they are Energy Starcertified and they are only used to cool part of the home, part of the time. Make sure to seal any openings around the window unit to keep the cool air in where you need it. Even when your AC is functioning well, it’s smart to use ceiling fans or portable fans. Moving air can make you feel up to 10 degrees cooler, but keep in mind, fans cool people, not rooms. Turn them off when you’re not in the room or you’re just wasting electricity. For a cooling breeze during summer, make sure adjustable ceiling fans are set to spin counterclockwise (as you look up at the blades). This creates a downward air flow that should make you feel comfortable enough to resist adjusting the thermostat below the recommended summer setting of 78 degrees. You can also boost comfort and help keep energy use low by reducing the amount of heat generated in your home using these tried and true tips:

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JUNE 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

TH E E LEC TRIC COO PER ATI V ES O F SOUTH C A RO LI N A

The first step to lowering energy use during warm summer months is to reduce your home’s solar gains—the heat energy it collects from the sun. Since most solar gains originate through your home’s windows, awnings are an effective solution. They can reduce solar heat gain by as much as 65 percent on south-facing windows and 77 percent on west-facing windows, according to the U.S. Department of Energy. For a less expensive option, try adding reflective films to windows, and always keep shades, shutters and blinds closed during the hottest parts of the day. When was the last time you checked your attic insulation? When the sun is beating down, attics can become extremely hot and radiate heat through the ceiling into your living space. A professional contractor can make sure your attic is properly vented to prevent excessive heat buildup, and can measure the R-value of your attic insulation. R-values are a measure of how well the material resists heat flow. In South Carolina, efficiency experts recommend an R-value of 38 for attic insulation, but most homes— especially older ones—fall short. Another important step to making your home comfortable and efficient is to seal air leaks around windows, doors, plumbing and wiring penetrations to keep warm air out and cool air in. A few dollars invested today in weather­ stripping, caulk and sealing foam will pay d ­ ividends year-round. It’s always a good idea to have your central HVAC system checked ­annually to make sure it’s ready for the high

OW ENS CO RN I N G

My energy bill was pretty high last summer. Do you have any tips for how to keep comfortable this year and keep energy use low?

If you’re still using old-fashioned incandescent lightbulbs, it’s time to switch to LEDs, which don’t generate nearly as much excess heat and use about 75 percent less energy to start with. You’ll also save energy if you make it a habit to turn off lights, TVs, ­computers and other consumer appliances when you leave the room. Every second these devices are powered up, they are using electricity and generating heat. Grill outdoors or cook indoors with microwave ovens, slow cookers and toaster ovens instead of the full-sized oven and stove. The smaller appliances use less electricity and don’t warm up the kitchen. Don’t run washing machines, dishwashers or clothes dryers during the hottest part of the day. Send questions to Energy Q&A, South Carolina Living, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033, or email energyqa@scliving.coop.


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|

SC   smart choice

You can take it with you For most people, summer is go-go-go time. And when you’re on the move, you need electronics that will move with you. Here are a few that may make your days a bit sunnier.  BY JAYNE CANNON

YOU’RE TALKING DIRTY

Your mobile phone is a real multitasker. But you don’t need an app for that phone to pick up dirt and grime and germs. It’s too awful to think about, so clean up your act with the PhoneSoap Smartphone Sanitizer. Insert phone, close the lid and in about 10 minutes, your device is germ-free and ready for duty. $60. (888) 365‑0056; uncommongoods.com.

MUSIC ANYWHERE

It’s not a day at the beach without your killer playlist, but do you really want to risk turning your smartphone into a sandy, soaked mess? Enter the Drifter Action Speaker. Download your favorite songs and playlists from Spotify or Apple Music, leave the phone at home and enjoy eight hours of jams on a single charge. $200. (888) 365‑0056; uncommongoods.com.

LIGHTEN YOUR LITERARY LOAD

You love to read—but all those books are heavy. Take your entire personal library with you on the Kindle Oasis, the first Kindle that will let you listen to books as well as read them. And it’s waterproof, so take it to the bathtub or the pool without fear of soggy pages. From $250. (888) 280‑4331; amazon.com.

TRANSLATION TO GO

No matter where you roam, you’ll speak the local language with the Live Conversation Speaking Translator. Just speak into this handheld device and it translates your words into one of 12 languages. When locals speak to you, the device will translate their words. You’ll never feel lost again. $350. (800) 321‑1484; hammacher.com.

POWER TO THE PEOPLE

Storms, hurricanes, tornadoes—around here, we see it all. When bad weather is on the horizon, grab the Best Emergency Radio/Charger. Get NOAA alerts, listen to the radio and charge your devices as you weather the storm. It’s a powerful flashlight, too. $100. (800) 321‑1484; hammacher.com. 14

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JUNE 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

THINNER THAN EVER

We’d love to know the secret of the techno diet that lets Apple make each new generation of the iPad so skinny. Until then, we’ll settle for having the super-light, ultrathin, iPad mini 4 as a worthy traveling companion. With a crisp, 7.9-inch Retina Display, 8MP camera, 1080p HD video recording and a speedy A8 processor, it’s your perfectly portable digital media center. From $399. (800) 692–7753; apple.com.


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Outer peace,

INNER BEAS SASS is training an army of women to defend themselves BY DIANE VETO PARHAM | PHOTOS BY ANDREW HAWORTH

I feel Terry closing in from behind

even before she grabs me. Barely a moment later, her right arm wraps around my neck, pinning me against her, her forearm pressing on my windpipe. It’s hard to breathe; all I can think about is how to break loose. But she has a solid grip on my left arm, daring me to try to move. My mind scrambles for escape options. What are my strengths? Where are her weaknesses? It plays out in seconds. I latch my hands around her forearm and swiftly spin my body to break her grip—and ­possibly, if I didn’t happen to like Terry, her arm as well. But Terry is my training buddy, so I execute my escape with care, inflicting no damage. Had she been a real ­assailant—someone intent on harming me—there would be no such mercy. This is SASS—Surviving Assault Standing Strong. SASS Defense is a training program born in Columbia 21 years ago, now spreading across the country, designed to empower any woman with the skills to protect herself and to escape or fight back against physical assaults. “There are thousands upon thousands of self-defense programs, but there’s nothing like us,” SASS Defense CEO Shannon Henry says. “Our goal is to give as many women as we can the tools and the power and the education to defend themselves. And it is a force to be reckoned with.”

Girl fight club

BREAKING FREE Training with partners, SASS Defense students learn how to execute moves that can free them from physical attacks by using their strengths against a man’s weaker spots.

16

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JUNE 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

Among the first things Henry does with each new class is ask the women to raise a hand if they or someone they know have been victims of assault. Nearly every woman does. It shocks many to see so many hands go up, she says, but comforts those who have felt alone in their fears. Guiding these women through training, instructors must be “a mix of Wonder Woman and Mother Teresa,” Henry says. “We love them, and we take great care of them with a


ST

SASS Defense empowers my core For the world awaits outside my door. I’ve got what it takes to preserve outer peace And I protect what I love with my inner beast. —FROM SASS DEFENSE

curriculum we know works for their bodies and minds,” says Henry, who smiles often and exudes the calm demeanor you’d want in your child’s preschool teacher. At the heart of SASS training is a simple premise: Women’s bodies are different from men’s, with strengths in ­different areas—mainly, hips and legs. SASS teaches women how to use their strengths against an attacker’s weaknesses. They review common assault scenarios—for example, attacks from the front or behind, choke holds, multiple assailants—as well as tactics attackers use to win their victims’ trust and tips for avoiding dangerous situations. Mother to three young girls, Melissa Genova of Columbia was inclined to worry about safety, both for her daughters and for herself. “There are a lot of terrifying stories in the news,” Genova says, referring to media reports of abductions and assaults. “It occurred to me that, if I ever found myself in a situation like that, I wouldn’t know what to do.” Genova discovered SASS online and has taken three training classes; one was a mother/daughter class with her oldest girl. As a working mom, she found she could fit SASS classes into her schedule and acquire skills to feel confident about protecting herself and her children. “It’s scary stuff that we learn—hard-core ­material,” she says. “But it was fun, and it wasn’t intimidating.” Cleverly named to help students remember how to execute them, many of the moves connect to visual clues about what they look like: the Seven O’Clock, Ghost, Starfish, Ballet/ Soldier/Rock Star and Take Him to Church. One University of South Carolina student with SASS training quickly recalled the Seven O’Clock to free herself from a stranger who grabbed her ponytail from behind as she walked across SCLIVING.COOP  | JUNE 2018  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

17


Outer peace,

campus. Her elbow striking his nose dropped him to the ground, and she ran to safety, Henry says. The Fight is one technique with a straightforward name. Exactly as it suggests, The Fight is a series of moves that come into play when an attack is unavoidable, escape is not an option, and the woman will have to put her attacker out of commission to get away. The final strike can leave an attacker unconscious. “It’s valuable information to have, and it gives you a sense of peace that there’s something tangible you can do,” Genova says. And, it’s for women only. This is girl fight club; men aren’t allowed, and women are discouraged from sharing what they learn with the men in their lives. Keeping these skills under wraps gives women advantages over would-be assailants— the element of surprise and unexpected resistance.

‘If you train me, I’ll never stop’ So many women have been trained by SASS in the last two decades, its founders can only guess at the total, estimating it in the tens of thousands. No sooner do women finish their

TAKING CONTROL Coaching Lindsey Dellinger (top) and Jessica Splawn in ground-fighting escapes, Brett Brown of SASS takes them step by step through defensive techniques.

COU RTESY O F SA SS

INNER BEAST

Guiding these women through training, instructors must be ‘a mix of Wonder Woman and Mother Teresa.’ —SASS DEFENSE CEO SHANNON HENRY

training than they are prodding friends, coworkers, daughters, mothers and grandmothers to sign up. “It spreads by word of mouth, because everybody who gets it wants to share it,” says Henry. But it started with just one 13-year-old’s assault. Kidnapped, held captive and raped over three days, the young girl managed to escape but was severely traumatized. No counseling seemed capable of drawing her out of the isolated shell she had retreated into. A Columbia pastor, who happened to be a ­second-degree black belt in judo and goju-ryu, was called in to help. “And, the idea came to him, what if I could teach her something to show her how powerful she is, and that there are choices and options and ways, and that she’s worth that,” says Brett Brown, the director of education for SASS and the daughter of that pastor. “He said, ‘Can I show you one move that might have helped you get away from him if you’d known it at the time?’ ” The young girl agreed; one move turned into several, and over time, her confidence, joy and hope were reborn. A protective father of daughters, the pastor developed a program to teach women to defend themselves and escape threatening situations, basing it largely on Krav Maga, a combat system with unarmed street-fighting techniques used by the Israeli military. His first workshops in 1997 were for young women at his church, including Brown, a high school student at the time. Later, Brown and her father brought the workshops to USC and Columbia College, where SASS training is now offered regularly as a physical education class. Enter Shannon Henry in 2013. When she discovered that her pastor—Brown’s father—taught self-defense to women, she begged him to teach her. Henry herself is an assault ­survivor; as a teenager, she was raped by a trusted boyfriend who threatened her with a knife. Many years later, after all the counseling and recovery, she still had nightmares and feared being unable to protect her own daughters. “I took a class with him, and I loved it!” she recalls. “I felt more powerful than I had ever felt in my life. I found my voice. No gym, no workout, no counseling—I had tried it all— could ever do what happened to me in that class. I wanted more, and I wanted everybody else to have it. “After that class, I looked him in the eye and said, ‘If you train me to teach others, I’ll never stop.’ And I haven’t.” Since Henry took the reins of SASS Defense in 2014, it has grown to include 15 instructors, classes that fill to capacity


M IC SM ITH

Start with AWARENESS SASS Defense teaches participants that being alert to potential threats and aware of surroundings are the first steps to safety. These tips offer ways women can protect themselves from harmful situations. Avoid going out alone. Traveling with others makes you harder to harm or abduct. You have witnesses and can look out for each other. Stay in lighted areas, near other people, and away from bushes or other areas where an assailant might be screened from view. Don’t feel compelled to talk to strangers who approach you. Predators use tactics that make them seem friendly to gain your trust. Question why a stranger is trying to be charming. THE POWER OF ‘NO!’ SASS director of education Brett Brown guides her students through intense fight moves, paired with loud and empowering battle cries.

‘It can take weeks and weeks for a survivor to say “no,” but when they do, whoa! It changes everything about them.’ —BRETT BROWN

every semester at USC and Columbia College, workshops on campuses across the state, beginner-through-elite courses held at churches and YMCAs, and trainings for women working in Midlands-area law enforcement agencies, including the S.C. National Guard and U.S. Forestry Service. There are satellite programs in North Carolina; Georgia; Washington, D.C.; California and even Senegal, West Africa, where a trained instructor works for the Peace Corps. Starting this summer, SASS Defense is branching out as a pilot program at state ­colleges and agencies in Utah through the state’s Department of Public Safety.

Battle cry In a sunny room at the Ballentine Family YMCA, SASS instructor Brett Brown is coaching women in a weekend training class how to execute a defensive maneuver with their hips, channeling the power in their lower bodies. “You know how when you get groceries and your hands are full, you have to shut the car door with your booty?” That’s what Brown wants from them. They get it. “Good!” Brown praises. “But I want to hear your ‘NO!’ when you do it!” On paper, “NO!” is silent, even when typed in capital ­letters with an exclamation point. In SASS class, it is the roaring soundtrack to every evasive move and every physical strike. “This is our battle cry,” Henry explains. Not only does it

Trust your instincts. If something doesn’t feel right, it probably isn’t. Get away as quickly as you can while calling for help, making a scene and running to a lighted area where there are people. Even if someone threatens you with a weapon, don’t go with them to a second location. Statistically, the second location is more dangerous. If an armed assailant demands your wallet, throw it far away from you and run in the opposite direction. Don’t advertise on social media where you are going. Predators may use that information for their own agendas. Stay alert to your surroundings at all times. Don’t sit in your parked car to text, and don’t talk on your phone while walking. Scan a parking lot before you walk through it to see if anything looks suspicious. Go to the settings on your smartphone to set up Emergency SOS on iPhones or the SOS feature on Android devices, which can notify emergency services and your chosen contacts if you are in trouble.

alert bystanders, it also releases nitric oxide, helping the body prepare to fight, and the shouting helps prevent a woman from biting her tongue during the confrontation. Over and over, we practice yelling “NO!” in training until its meaning thunders clear. This is not a polite denial or a mild objection; this is a gut-emptying, throat-shredding “NO!” that defies an assailant’s attack, that rejects self-doubt and fear, that spits in the face of anyone who would attempt to belittle, threaten or overpower us. After our first class, I am so hoarse I can barely speak the next day. But I also own my “NO!” It’s not easy for everyone, especially survivors of assault. “One of the biggest things I see in class is how childhood sexual abuse survivors struggle with being able to say their ‘no’s,’ ” Brown says. “Because they weren’t allowed to say ‘no’ for so long, they physically cannot bring themselves to say it. It can take weeks and weeks, but when they do, whoa! It’s so big! It changes everything about them.” Two years ago, Elizabeth (this name is an alias to protect

SCLIVING.COOP  | JUNE 2018  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

19


Outer peace, INNER BEAST

FIGHTING GRANDMA Terry Hutto (left), now known as Gammie Ninja to her proud grandsons, practices choke-hold escapes with Melissa Genova, a mother of three girls.

GET MORE SASS Defense offers beginner, intermediate and elite courses, mother/daughter classes, private group sessions, and training for girls ages 6 to 14. SASS Defense also has a nonprofit component, SASS Go, to help fund training for at-risk and underserved populations who may not be able to afford classes. To learn more, visit sassdefense.com or call (754) 900-7277. 20

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JUNE 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

‘SASS transformed my entire life, and I want every woman to experience that.’

COU RTESY O F SA SS

her privacy) took her first SASS class; she has taken several more since and plans to continue. At 4 feet, 10 inches, Elizabeth wanted to feel more confident during her frequent solo travels for her job. “I was tired of being fearful,” the 52-year-old Irmo woman says. “I wondered if I could fight back if I had to.” In that first class, though, her biggest hurdle was the word “no.” Abused by her father as a child, she says, “I learned early on to not say ‘no.’ ” In class, she found she “couldn’t say it, couldn’t yell it, couldn’t voice it.” “I told Shannon I didn’t think I’d ever be able to say ‘no,’ ” Elizabeth recalls. Finally, while practicing ground-fighting strategies—pinned to the ground with an “attacker” looming over her—her “no” burst through. She practiced yelling “NO!” while driving her car. Weeks later, she dreamed about repeatedly striking her father in the nose, and soon after, she dreamed of chains falling off her body. “It was life-changing,” Elizabeth says. “Now, I know I can do that, and I can be heard. It gave me a sense of freedom.” A former elite gymnast and All-American diver, Lauren Lamendola, too, had to learn to say “no,” because dedicated athletes learn not to question their coaches, she says. Though she was not abused by them, that submissiveness seeped into her personal life. “I got into a lot of situations in college”—including being verbally and physically abused by a boyfriend—“because I

—LAUREN LAMENDOLA

was just doing what I was told,” says Lamendola, 23, a parttime SASS instructor now enrolled at the Medical University of South Carolina. Lamendola took USC’s SASS class just for the PE credit but soon felt empowered by it. “I kind of got my voice back,” she says. “I saw a change in my confidence in school, in my personal relationships with friends and family, and in my athletic performance. It transformed my entire life, and I want every woman to experience that.” She teaches SASS classes at USC to give other athletes that same confidence and “show them they can be strong in ways they didn’t know they could.”

Fight, fight, fight I am supposed to be practicing defensive techniques against an armed assailant with my training partner, Terry Hutto of Lexington. But the plastic toy gun we are using as a prop is giving rise to bad jokes, and we are doing more laughing than fighting. That’s typical of a SASS class. Until these women put their fight faces on, classes are filled with laughter and encouragement. Henry and her team are often the ones cracking jokes, although they are quite serious about what they teach. “You will perform like you practice,” Brown cautions. “Your body remembers.” The moves are not pretty choreography; they are an interchangeable set of tools to use as escape options. “You are never stuck,” Brown preaches. “You fight, you fight, you fight, you fight, you fight.” Henry drives home the need to understand why and how the moves work. To escape an assailant, it may be necessary to inflict pain that can’t be ignored. “Have you hurt him yet?” she quizzes an eager student who has freed herself from a hold but hasn’t yet neutralized the threat. Hutto, a 63-year-old grandmother, was concerned about being physically able to handle the class before she signed up. Henry assured her that SASS is for all ages and fitness levels. “Your bad hip is not going to stop somebody from attacking you,” she says. “You still need to know how to target areas that will cause the most pain for an attacker, regardless of whether or not your hip hurts.” Hutto’s grandsons now call her “Gammie Ninja,” and she feels more assured of her ability to protect them and herself. “I’ve always been super aware of my surroundings, but I wouldn’t have been able to do anything about it if something happened,” she says. “But, now I can.”


|

SC   stories

Bubbling up

Adah Nix 21. RESIDES IN: Greenville with her husband, Justin. Grew up in Pennsylvania. CLAIM TO FAME: Founder of For Frankie, a free laundry service for those in need. MAKING A SPLASH: TV personality Mike Rowe profiled Nix in April on his Facebook show Returning the Favor. The episode got 4.4 million views in the first week. JUGGLING ACT: Works with foster kids at Miracle Hill Children’s Home; student at Greenville Technical College. WORDS TO LIVE BY: “Making friends one wash at a time,” her charity’s motto. AGE:

GET MORE Watch Mike Rowe surprise Adah Nix with the gift of a mobile laundry center in the episode “Adah’s Dirty Laundry,” hosted on facebook.com/ReturningTheFavor. To learn how you can help, visit ForFrankie.org.

When Adah Nix learned at age 17 that her mom had been a homeless teen, she felt a calling “to be that person my mom never had” and soon jumped into helping kids on the streets through ministry work. Three years later, while working at a Greenville thrift shop in early 2017, she saw another opportunity to make a difference thanks to a repeat customer named Frankie, who was struggling to get by. Frankie only kept one outfit that she would replace weekly because it cost less in the short run than using a laundromat. Nix offered to do Frankie’s laundry, and with each bag of clean clothes she returned, she wrote “For Frankie” on top. Before long, Nix was doing laundry for some of Frankie’s friends, and by autumn, she had organized regular Wednesday-night gatherings at Coin Laundry on Poinsett Highway, providing quarters, detergent and even snacks, for people in need. “It’s not just about doing their laundry. It’s about making a laundromat feel more welcoming,” says Nix, whose dimpled smile invites conversation as she greets people each week from 6–8 p.m. “It has turned into a family environment.” Her charity, For Frankie, got a major boost in April when Mike Rowe’s web series, Returning the Favor, profiled her work—and surprised Nix with a custom van outfitted with washers and dryers to help her reach even more people in need. She is rolling out the “mindblowing” gift this summer as she balances college, her job at a children’s home and the demands of running a growing nonprofit. It’s a lot to soak in, but this 21-year-old is living her dream with the confidence “that this is what I’m supposed to be doing.” —SUSAN HILL SMITH, PHOTO BY MILTON MORRIS

SCLIVING.COOP  | JUNE 2018  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

21


|

SC   scene

AT THE TOP OF THEIR GAME Electric cooperative crews showcase their skills at the 2018 Lineworkers’ Rodeo BY TIM HANSON | PHOTOS BY MIC SMITH

W

hen angry storms blow through the Carolinas, cutting electrical power and leaving thousands of homes and businesses in the dark, l­ineworkers​ —​those individuals who brave the elements and very real dangers inherent in their jobs—strap on tool belts, don hard hats and head out into the field with one WORKING WEEKEND goal in mind: Get the lights back on as quickly Although the lines are not and safely as possible. energized, rodeo events are Exactly how these men (and, yes, this is a conducted using the same transmission infrastructure, male-dominated profession) go about their work tools, safety gear and safe is a mystery to most people, but each year the working techniques crews public has a chance to see exactly what they use every day on the job. do during a daylong competition known as the South Carolina Lineworkers’ Rodeo. “This is a chance for lineworkers to showcase for their families the skills they use on the job every day,” says Todd Carter, vice president of loss control and training for the Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina (ECSC). “And it is an opportunity for them to test those skills against other linemen.” a very unique and special group of individuals,” she said, Hundreds of people turned out for the 2018 competition pausing for a moment and scanning the faces in the crowd. at Horry-Georgetown Technical College in Conway. Spectators, “You guys are tough. Hardworking. Dedicated. Thank you for family members, news crews and lineworkers began arriving being here. Be safe.” well before the 8 a.m. opening ceremonies in a field adjacent Then, after linemen hoisted an American flag and a South to the college. Jennifer Wilbanks, the college’s vice president Carolina state flag to the top of two poles, the lineworkers set for academic affairs, welcomed them to the event. off for their first events of the day. She said her husband, Travis, has been a lineworker for more than two decades. One of the first things she learned Let the games begin in the marriage is that if a lineman is on call at home, he will almost certainly receive a phone call beckoning him to work ECSC Senior Loss Control Training Director Nick Adams and just as the family is sitting down to dinner. his crew had spent weeks preparing the competition site, “The second thing I have learned is that linemen are planting nearly 50 wooden utility poles, stringing hundreds 22

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JUNE 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP


their knowledge of job safety. Journeymen, expected to have mastered this material, were exempt. Other events—all aimed at testing physical endurance, attention to detail and practice of mandatory safety ­procedures​—included tying a series of knots (square knot, clove hitch, running bowline) and then raising and lowering by rope an 8-foot-long wooden crossarm to the top of a 40-foot utility pole. Working the rope hand-overhand, the men hoisted and lowered the 35-pound beam three times. Meanwhile, in another event in which a mannequin played the role of an injured lineman, workers had to climb a utility pole and lower the dummy to the ground within a set period of time. Other events required linemen to perform a series of detailed tasks atop a utility pole, replace one of the heavy and awkward wooden cross­arms, work with insulated rubber gloves to replace a 600-ampere switch or change out a couple of dead-end insulators. The men worked quickly, hard hats squared on their heads, high-dollar work boots—Red Wing, Hall’s, Hoffman, Wesco—laced tightly, climbing spurs digging hard into the wood of the utility poles. And fitted securely around their waists and looped around the pole was a literal lifesaver, the Buckingham BuckSqueeze, which— when used properly—will keep a lineman from falling 30 or 40 feet to the ground in the event that he loses his footing.

‘You guys are tough. Hardworking. Dedicated. Thank you for being here. Be safe.’ —JENNIFER WILBANKS, HORRY-GEORGETOWN TECHNICAL COLLEGE

of yards of power line, attaching crossarms and braces to the poles and affixing transformers, insulators, fuses and fuse cutouts to them. While none of the lines carried electrical current, Adams said that all work in the competition was performed as if it were being done under real conditions in the field. About 100 competitors from Santee Cooper and 15 of the state’s 20 electric co-ops were divided into two divisions—one for apprentice lineworkers with less than four years’ experience, and another for journeymen who have been on the job longer than four years. Competition events included a timed 24-question test for apprentice lineworkers that measured

The fact that there is a need for such a device underscores the inherent dangers of this sort of work. And while South Carolina’s electric cooperatives have a remarkable safety record, the profession is routinely ranked among the nation’s most dangerous jobs. In 2016, 26 linemen in the United States lost their lives.

Training saves lives Sometimes, the loss of good young men strikes close to home. ECSC’s Todd Carter was working a power outage during a major ice storm almost 15 years ago when a private contractor on his restoration team failed to follow safety procedures and was electrocuted. The young man left behind a wife and two children. “You can never let your guard down,” Carter says. “Electricity does not give you a second chance.”  uu

SCLIVING.COOP  | JUNE 2018  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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|

SC   scene

SKILL SET From replacing a lightning arrester to demonstrating mastery of knots, every essential skill a lineworker must know is tested during rodeo competition.

PAYING RESPECT Each South Carolina Lineworkers’ Rodeo starts with the raising of the flag and the national anthem. A representative from each participating electric cooperative and Santee Cooper takes part in the moving ceremony. u HUDDLE UP

A journeyman team from Santee Cooper gathers in prayer before competing in the 2018 rodeo.

q GEARING UP A Pee Dee Electric Cooperative lineman carries his gear to the next event station.

HEAVY LIFTING Lineworkers need to be in top physical condition to perform their daily tasks and compete in rodeo events. Joe Wright, a lineman with Lynches River Electric Cooperative, gives his best effort in the challenging crossarm lift competition.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JUNE 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP


SETTING THE STAGE Before the competition begins at Horry-Georgetown Technical College, crews use bucket trucks to rig heavy, life-sized mannequins atop utility poles for the hurt-man rescue competition.

‘When you are up there in a bucket with somebody it’s both of your lives at stake and you have got to trust each other.’   —­ HENRY OWENS, BERKELEY ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LINEMAN

WA LTE R A LLRE AD

TO THE RESCUE Lowering an injured coworker to the ground for emergency medical treatment is a vital safety skill for all utility lineworkers, and the hurt-man rescue is a mandatory event at every rodeo.

FAMILY TRADITION Read this story online at SCLiving.coop to meet Russ Wannamaker (left) and his dad, Rusty. When Russ joined Tri-County Electric Cooperative, he became the third generation in his family to serve the co-op’s members as a lineman.

SCLIVING.COOP  | JUNE 2018  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SC   scene

TOP COMPETITORS Representing Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative, the journeyman team of (left to right) Jacob Kelley, Michael Sims and Anson Perry (shown with ECSC’s Nick Adams), placed third overall in the South Carolina rodeo. Weeks later, they beat out teams from multiple states to win first place in a regional rodeo, qualifying them to compete in the International Lineman’s Rodeo this fall.

Another lineman, Henry Owens, 23, of Berkeley Electric Cooperative, has been a lineman for two years. Dedication, he said, is an essential part of doing a good job as a lineman. “You have got to have a bond with all your fellow linemen,” says the Ladson, South Carolina, native. “You have got to know how everybody thinks. Got to know every person’s move. When you are up there in a bucket with somebody it’s both of your lives at stake and you have got to trust each other. This is very dangerous work. You have got to deal with the elements and the weather and you’ve got to work through ­anything​—​50–60 mph winds, hail, snow, sleet.” William Fleming, the CEO of Marlboro Electric Cooperative, cited dedication, values and selflessness as some of the qualities of a good lineman. “They want to help people,” Fleming says, watching his men compete in one of the rodeo events. “They want to do what is right. And they don’t mind undergoing the burden every day.”

‘A service for the people’

[FROM PAGE 23]  Despite the dangers of the job, young men Thomas Scacchi, 33, of Palmetto Electric Cooperative, has continue to enter the ranks of lineworkers. The money is been a lineman for almost 15 years. He signed on to the job pretty good, there is a fair measure of job stability and the a month or so after he graduated from high school. Working work is well-suited for those who love spending their days his way up through the ranks, he is now a supervisor. outdoors with a team of like-minded colleagues. For Scacchi, one key to being a good lineman—to getting But the job is not for everyone, as any number of linemen the job done right and keeping himself and others safe at the will testify. Men in this line of work need to be in top physsame time—is patience. “There are challenges every day,” Scacchi says. “So when ical condition, labor in all kinds of weather, be prepared to you get a job, you just step back, look at it and approach it in perform under dangerous conditions and sacrifice time that a safe way. If you get in a could otherwise be spent hurry, that is when acciwith family or friends. “You have got to have a dents happen.” ‘This is one of the hardest ­professions in positive attitude,” says Sean Despite the challenges America. But I love the work and the ­camaStevens, 29, of Palmetto of the job, linemen talk Electric Cooperative, during about their love of the ra­derie and knowing that you are ­doing a a break at the rodeo. “You work, their belief in service service.’ —JACOB DAVIS, BLACK RIVER ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LINEMAN know, I’ve got a 3-yearand the ­profound satisfacold and there are times tion they get in knowing when I go to work—espethat the long, difficult Pre-apprentice training through South So you want hours they sometimes Carolina’s technical colleges is the first cially during the thunto be a spend on the job actually step to a rewarding career as a lineman, derstorm season—when lineworker … pay off when they see the says Todd Carter, vice president of loss I won’t see him that day lights click back on in a control and training for the Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina. and I won’t see him that neighborhood. Certificate programs teach students the basic skills and tools of night. He’ll be asleep when “This is one of the hardI get home at 1 or 2 o’clock the trade, and they provide the best opportunity to earn a comin the morning, and then mercial driver’s license (CDL). The combination of training and a est professions in America,” you never know if the says Jacob Davis, 32, a CDL puts graduates “head and shoulders above other applicants” next night storms will roll lineman with Black River for entry-level apprentice lineworker jobs, Carter says. Once hired, in again. You miss birthElectric Cooperative. “But lineworkers never stop training. It takes five to seven years of onI love the work and the cathe-job experience and formal classroom instruction to qualify as a day parties. Family events. journeyman lineworker. Pre-apprentice training is currently offered Sometimes Christmas. But maraderie and knowing by York Technical College (yorktech.edu), Trident Technical College that is what we do. That is that you are doing a service (­tridenttech.edu) and Horry-Georgetown Technical College (hgtc.edu). part of it.” for people.”

26

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JUNE 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP


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TI M H A NSO N

SC   travels

Katherine Richardson (left), director of the Camden Archives and Museum, and Camden Mayor Alfred Mae Drakeford welcome visitors to the Larry Doby exhibit.

Camden honors a native son 

KEITH PH I LLI P S

WHEN VISITORS ENTER the new African-American Cultural Center of Camden, a giant photograph of baseball great Larry Doby dominates the south wall of the small wooden building. The pic­ture shows Doby and Cleveland Indians teammate Steve Gromek hugging each other, their eyes nearly closed, broad smiles spread across their faces. Doby, a Camden native and the first AfricanAmerican to integrate the American League, always cherished that photo, taken just after their Game 4 win against the Boston Braves in the 1948 World Series. But the image of a black man and a white man with their arms wrapped around each other in joy and friendship infuriated those in the grip of racial prejudice. “The photo evidently caused a huge controversy,” says Rickie Good, curator of collections at the Camden Archives and Museum. “It was just two teammates celebrating a World Series win.” The photo is one of dozens of items—signed baseballs, trading cards, comic books, figurines and other Larry Doby memorabilia—on display at the center, which opened in February as a city ­initiative to celebrate local African-American history. The display honoring Doby’s remarkable career was an immediate hit, says Camden Mayor Alfred Mae Drakeford.

WHILE YOU’RE HERE … Take a selfie with Larry Doby (or at least a life-sized bronze replica of the baseball legend) at the Camden Archives and Museum, 1314 Broad Street. The statue is part of the 2013 “Reconciliation” art installation by local sculptor Maria Kirby-Smith.

BY TIM HANSON

“We had more than 200 people go through the center that day to see the exhibit,” Drakeford says. Doby was born in Camden in 1923 and spent the first years of his life there. Later, his family moved to New Jersey where he attended high school and college. He excelled at many sports, but it was baseball that eventually won his heart. He played in the Negro Leagues throughout the 1940s, except for a two-year stint in the U.S. Navy during World War II. When he signed to play center field for the Indians in 1947—just weeks behind Jackie Robinson joining the Brooklyn Dodgers—he became the second African-American to break the MLB color barrier. Doby enjoyed a stellar career, and let his onfield performance speak for him: seven consecutive appearances on the All-Star roster, a .283 batting average, 253 home runs and 970 runs batted in. He was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1998, says Katherine Richardson, director of the Camden Archives and Museum. “He never really achieved the acclaim that Jackie did because Jackie was the first,” she says. “Larry was just a real quiet, dedicated baseball player who was really good at what he did.”

GET THERE The African-American Cultural Center of Camden is located at 517 York Street in downtown Camden. HOURS: Open from 1–4:30 p.m. on Mondays, ­Wednesdays and Fridays, and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays. The center is closed on Sundays and major holidays. The Larry Doby collection will run through Aug. 30. ADMISSION: Free. DETAILS: Call (803) 425-6050; classicallycarolina.com/​camden-archives-museum/AACCC or facebook.com/AfricanAmericanCamden.

BY THE NUMBERS

Larry Doby’s MLB career highlights

.283 Batting average

253 Home runs

970 Runs batted in

7 Number of times named an All-Star (1949–1955)

2 Number of years as American League home run leader (1952, 1954)

1 World Series championship (1948)

SCLIVING.COOP  | JUNE 2018  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

27


Tour amden from near or far...

PHOTO BY MIKE WATTS

803.684.2327 • Events at chmuseums.org 1444 Brattonsville Rd. McConnells, SC 29726 PROJECT ASSISTED BY CITY OF ROCK HILL AND YORK COUNTY ACCOMMODATIONS & HOSPITALITY TAX PROGRAMS

28

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JUNE 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP


Tunes in the Park

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jj Hammock Coast Tourism jj Hampton County Watermelon Festival jj Kings Mountain Little Theatre jj Lowcountry & Resort Islands Tourism Commission jj South Carolina Living magazine

Summer arrives June 21, and it can’t get here fast enough. At South Carolina Living, we’ve been in a summer frame of mind since March. Just saying … To help you make the most of the sun-drenched days, we’re offering the chance to win a $100 Visa gift card in our Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes. We’ll draw one winner’s name at random from all eligible entries received by June 30. Don’t delay! Mail in the form below or register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply.

READER REPLY TRAVEL SWEEPSTAKES Register below, or online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply YES! Enter me in the drawing for a $100 gift card. Name Address  City State/ZIP Email* Phone

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SCLIVING.COOP  | JUNE 2018  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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|

SC   recipe

Takeout made easy BY BELINDA SMITH-SULLIVAN

Where is it written that your favorite takeout dishes must come in disposable containers—or even from a restaurant at all? With a few easy-tosource ingredients and these simple recipes, you can turn “takeout” into “make-at-home.” Give the delivery guy the night off. Get the whole family involved in making these classic entrees from scratch, and you’ve got a special “night in.”

THAI-STYLE BBQ RIBS SERVES 4–6

RIBS

2 slabs baby back ribs Chinese five-spice powder (or see recipe below)

What’s cooking at SCLiving.coop

PH OTOS TH IS PAG E BY GW ÉN A Ë L LE VOT

p BONUS RECIPE Potstickers are fun to make and always a crowd-pleaser! Find Chef Belinda’s recipe for tasty pork and cabbage potstickers at

SCLiving.coop/food STIR-FRY SECRETS No wok? No problem. Learn how to make a quick Asian stir-fry at home with a hot skillet, some advance prep and Chef Belinda’s tips in this how‑to video at

SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda 30

SAUCE

H tablespoon vegetable oil H shallot, finely chopped 1 garlic clove, grated 3 tablespoons soy sauce 1 tablespoon rice vinegar 1 tablespoon hoisin sauce N cup ketchup 2 tablespoons honey 2 tablespoons apricot preserves 2 tablespoons brown sugar, packed 1 teaspoon fresh ginger, grated 1 H teaspoon Sriracha 2 scallions (green onions) thinly sliced, for garnish Chopped cilantro, for garnish FIVE-SPICE POWDER If you prefer not to buy five-spice powder, make your own. If you don’t have these ingredients, five-spice powder is readily available in most supermarkets in the spice or international-food section.

¼ teaspoon ground cloves ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground ginger ¼ teaspoon ground fennel seeds ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JUNE 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

Preheat oven to 325 F and place rack in middle of oven. Place ribs in a large shallow roasting pan lined with foil. Season ribs on both sides with Chinese five-spice powder. Cover roasting pan tightly with foil. If possible, allow ribs to marinate in refrigerator overnight. Make sauce while the ribs are cooking for 2 hours. In a medium pan over medium-low heat, add oil. When oil is hot, add shallots and saute until translucent, about 2–3 minutes. Add garlic and cook one minute longer. Add soy sauce and vinegar, and using a whisk, scrape up the brown bits on the bottom of the pan. Add hoisin and ketchup and continue whisking until well incorporated. Simmer for about 2 minutes and stir in honey, preserves and brown sugar. Simmer an additional 2 minutes. Add in ginger and continue whisking, keeping to a simmer for 2 minutes. Whisk in Sriracha and let simmer (reduce heat if necessary) for 8–10 minutes until slightly thick. Remove from heat; reserve ¼ cup of sauce in a small bowl. After the ribs have been cooking for 2 hours, increase oven temperature to 400 F. Discard top foil. Pour off pan juices and return ribs to oven. Turn ribs meat-side down and baste with sauce; continue to cook for 30 minutes. Turn ribs over and baste with sauce again and cook another 30 minutes. Continue turning and basting with sauce every 15 minutes until temperature on an instant-read thermometer is 165 F. Remove from oven and tent ribs with foil until ready to serve. Using a sharp knife, slice ribs between the bones and place on a platter. Drizzle with reserved sauce. Garnish with scallions or cilantro.


SHRIMP NOODLE SALAD SERVES 4

In a small bowl, whisk lime juice, fish sauce, chili-garlic sauce and honey. In a medium bowl, place shrimp; add 2 tablespoons dressing and toss to coat. Divide noodles among salad bowls and top with cucumbers, peas, peppers, carrots, mint leaves and cilantro. Spoon shrimp mixture over vegetables and drizzle with remaining dressing. Garnish with nuts.

PH OTOS TH IS PAG E BY G I N A M OO RE

1 14-ounce package rice stick noodles or vermicelli 1 tablespoon sesame oil 4 tablespoons fresh lime juice 3 tablespoons fish sauce 4 teaspoons chili-garlic sauce 1 H teaspoons honey 1 pound shrimp, peeled, deveined and cooked 1 cup English cucumbers, thinly sliced 1 8-ounce package sugar snap peas, cut in half 1 red bell pepper, thinly sliced I cup grated carrots H cup fresh mint leaves H cup fresh cilantro leaves G cup chopped dry roasted peanuts

Place noodles in a large bowl and cover with hot water. Let sit for 5 minutes until soft. Drain, rinse with cold water and drain well. Toss with oil to keep the noodles from sticking to each other.

GENERAL TSO’S CHICKEN SERVES 4

SAUCE

G cup honey G cup soy sauce 1 large garlic clove, grated 3 tablespoons rice vinegar 1 tablespoon Sriracha 1 tablespoon tomato paste or ¼ cup hoisin sauce 1 teaspoon fresh ginger, grated G teaspoon red pepper flakes 3 tablespoons chicken stock CHICKEN

N cup cornstarch (more if necessary) 1 teaspoon kosher salt H teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into 1-inch chunks G cup vegetable oil (more if needed) 2 teaspoons sesame oil Cooked rice, for serving 2 scallions (green onions) thinly sliced, for garnish Sesame seeds, for garnish

In a medium bowl, mix honey, soy sauce, garlic, vinegar, Sriracha, tomato paste, ginger, red pepper flakes and chicken stock. Set aside. In a large bowl, whisk cornstarch, salt and pepper; add chicken and toss to coat. In a large skillet over medium-high heat, add oil and bring to 375–400 F. Heat half of the chicken chunks until thoroughly cooked and crisp on all sides, about 8 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon to a platter. Add more oil, if needed, and cook remaining chicken. Reduce heat to medium-low and remove all but 2 tablespoons oil from skillet. Add sauce and stir until it starts to thicken, about 2 minutes. Return chicken to skillet and stir to coat. Remove from heat and stir in sesame oil. Serve over rice and garnish with scallions and sesame seeds.

SCLIVING.COOP  | JUNE 2018  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SC   gardener

Strange beauty: the pineapple lily

JUNE IN THE GARDEN n Before plant growth shifts into high gear for the summer, spray the handles of your gardening hand tools with bright fluorescent paint so they will be easy to find when left in the lush greenery.

BY L.A. JACKSON

n If aphids have been bothering any of your low-growing pretties, try messing with their minds by placing sheets of aluminum foil under the plants to reflect the sun’s rays. Aphids prefer the undersides of leaves, away from bright sunlight, so stealing their shade can make it just uncomfortable enough that they pack up and go away. n The day after a soaking rain is a good day to pull pesky weeds, as saturated ground easily gives up unwanted plants with their roots still intact.

L . A . JACKSO N

The wildly colorful foliage of sun coleus (Solenostemon scutellarioides) provides razzle-dazzle in the garden from now until the killing frosts of autumn.

TIP OF THE MONTH Visually liven up the summer ornamental garden by adding any of the many sassy-looking cultivars of sun coleus (Solenostemon scutellarioides). Rather than relying on flowers, which can be fleeting, these easy-to-find annuals flaunt wildly colorful foliage to get attention, meaning constant leafy razzle-dazzle in the garden from now until the killing frosts of autumn. Adding 2 to 3 inches of mulch around their root zones and watering once a week will help keep these fancy plants in peak shape.

32

could use a good dose of beauty, a heapin’ helpin’ of pineapple lily (Eucomis sp.) might be the right prescription. And just how strange is this beauty? After its bulb is planted in the late spring, long, strap-like leaves emerge and arch outward, followed in mid-tolate summer by stiff, upright, 2-foot-tall flower stalks. The stalks burst into vertical displays of blooms, which, with some imagination, resemble long, skinny pineapples. This native of South Africa has found South Carolina gardens quite suitable for its needs. Hardy throughout the state, the pineapple lily, while partial to welldraining sites, will do well in almost all soil conditions except soggy, boggy locations. In addition, this perennial is rarely bothered by bugs and diseases, and it will not be found on a deer’s “most preferred” menu. Ideally, pineapple lily should be planted in a site that receives at least six hours of sun daily. At the front of an ornamental bed is an obvious place to put this pretty, but keep in mind that since it likes good drainage, it is also a prime candidate for pot culture. Bulbs should be planted pointedend up about 5 inches deep and spaced around 8 to 10 inches apart. Speaking of bulbs—which are easy to find at garden centers and online—pick the largest you can find for a bodacious blossom parade. Water evenly over the summer and add a diluted solution of low-nitrogen liquid fertilizer about every three weeks. The bloom spikes start opening from the bottom up, and they take their time doing it, usually over a month. Even as cut specimens for indoor arrangements, this extended flower power remains in place—just remember to change the vase water once a week. The Sparkling Burgundy cultivar has

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JUNE 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

PHOTOS BY L . A . JACKSO N

IF YOUR SUMMER FLOWER GARDEN

Sparkling Burgundy is one of the more popular pineapple lily cultivars, while the Reuben cultivar (top) offers a subtle show of soft colors.

long been the attractive poster child of pineapple lilies, and for good reason. This dramatic dazzler starts the season with deep maroon leaves snaking from the earth that gradually fade to an offgreen, setting the stage for bloom bursts of clustered stars tinged in purple. Want a subtler show? Opt for the smaller Reuben cultivar, which displays rose-pink flowers on 18-inch-tall stalks embraced by foliage dipped in a modest, pleasing mid-green. Come autumn, the pineapple lily will call it a season, dying back and settling in for a winter’s rest. At this time, maintenance is simple: Cut out the dead foliage, apply a protective mulch—and wait for the coming of yet another summer of strange beauty. L.A. JACKSON is the former editor of Carolina Gardener magazine. Contact him at lajackson1@gmail.com.


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PALMETTO STATE   marketplace

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|

SC   calendar JUNE 15 – JULY 15

Upstate JU NE

8–30  Bloody Bloody Andrew

Jackson, The Warehouse Theatre, Greenville. (864) 235‑6948. 12–17  Love Never Dies, Peace Center, Greenville. (864) 467‑3000. 14–17  Summer on Augusta, Augusta Street, Greenville. onlyonaugusta@gmail.com. 15  PNC Bank Zoo Tunes Concert Series: Shovels & Rope, Greenville Zoo, Greenville. (864) 627‑4200. 15–24  Chautauqua History Alive Festival – Courage, Greenville Technical College and other venues, Greenville. (864) 244‑1499. 15–30  South Carolina Festival of Flowers, various venues, Greenwood. (864) 223‑8431. 16  Flag Day at the Park, Musgrove Mill State Historic Site, Clinton. (864) 938‑0100. 16  Music in the Park: J-E-T, Trailblazer Park, Travelers Rest. (864) 834‑7958. 19–30  The Tin Woman, Centre Stage, Greenville. (864) 233‑6733. 23  Lessons from Nature, Paris Mountain State Park, Greenville. (864) 244‑5565. 23  Music in the Park: U-Phonik, Trailblazer Park, Travelers Rest. (864) 834‑7958. 23  Summer Fun Run 5K, Paris Mountain State Park, Greenville. (864) 244‑5565. 23–24  Ag+Art Tour: Spartanburg County, various farms and artisans, Spartanburg. agandarttour@gmail. com. 23–24  Ag+Art Tour: Union County, various farms and artisans, Union. agandarttour@gmail.com. 28–30  SC Festival of Stars, Ninety Six Town Park, Ninety Six. (864) 543‑3396. 30  Freedom Blast, Greer City Park, Greer. (864) 848‑2150. 30  Freedom Blast at Lake Russell, Lake Russell, Calhoun Falls. (864) 630‑5771. 30  Music in the Park: Honey & the Hot Rods, Trailblazer Park, Travelers Rest. (864) 834‑7958.

Our mobile-friendly site lists even more festivals, shows and events. You’ll also find instructions on submitting your event. Please confirm information with the hosting event before attending. 30  Pine Needle Basket Workshop, Lee State Park, Bishopville. (803) 428‑4988. JU LY

4  Lexington County Peach Festival, Gilbert Community Park, Gilbert. (803) 892‑5207. 8  XTERRA Harbison Half Marathon & 5K, Harbison State Forest, Columbia. (803) 896‑8890. 11  2018 Business Lexpo, River Bluff High School, Lexington. (803) 359‑6113. 13  S.C. Genealogical Society Summer Workshop, South Carolina Department of Archives and History, Columbia. (864) 369‑2547. ONGOING

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, AMERICA South Carolina abounds in Fourth of July celebrations. Find a local event and join the fun! 13  Art Gallery on Pendleton Square

featuring Lou Peden, Exchange Street, Pendleton. (864) 221‑0129. 13–22  Rock of Ages, Spartanburg Little Theatre, Spartanburg. (864) 585‑8278. 14  Musgrove Mill Kids’ Day, Musgrove Mill State Historic Site, Clinton. (864) 938‑0100. O NG O ING

Every other Wednesday  Music Sandwiched In, Spartanburg County Public Library, Spartanburg. (864) 948‑9020. Third Thursdays  ArtWalk, downtown cultural district, Spartanburg. (864) 582‑7616. Fridays  Starry Nights, Roper Mountain Science Center, Greenville. (864) 355‑8900.

Midlands J UNE

15–16  Juneteenth Rock

JU LY

4  Wells Fargo Red, White & Blue

Festival, downtown, Greenville. (864) 232‑2273. 7  Musgrove Mill Battlefield Guided Hike, Musgrove Mill State Historic Site, Clinton. (864) 938‑0100. 12–14  SC Festival of Discovery, Main Street, Greenwood. (864) 942‑8448.

36

SCLiving.coop/calendar

Hill, multiple venues, Rock Hill. juneteenthrockhill@gmail.com. 15–24  Hampton County Watermelon Festival, multiple venues, Hampton. (803) 943‑8324. 16  Ridge Peach Festival, Trenton Town Park, Trenton. ridgepeachfestival@gmail.com.

16  Snakes LIVE!, Poinsett State Park, Wedgefield. (803) 494‑8177. 16–17  Ag+Art Tour: Fairfield County, various farms and artisans, Fairfield. agandarttour@gmail.com. 17–23  Southeastern Piano Festival, multiple venues, Columbia. (803) 777‑1209. 18  Hopelands Summer Concert Series: Spirit Fiddle, Hopelands Gardens, Aiken. (803) 642‑7631. 20–23  Columbia Fashion Week, downtown, Columbia. columbiafashionweek.com. 23  Blackwater Summer Festival, Aiken State Park, Windsor. (803) 256‑4000. 23–24  Ag+Art Tour: Newberry County, various farms and artisans, Newberry. agandarttour@gmail.com. 25  Hopelands Summer Concert Series: Parris Island Marine Band, Hopelands Gardens, Aiken. (803) 642‑7631. 26–30  Miss South Carolina Pageant, Township Auditorium, Columbia. (843) 857‑9173. 27  Twilight Paddling, Chester State Park, Chester. (803) 385‑2680. 30  4th of July Fireworks Show, Lake Murray, Columbia. (803) 781‑5940. 30  July-o-Lantern, Poinsett State Park, Wedgefield. (803) 494‑8177.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JUNE 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

Daily  “Requiem for Mother Emanuel,” S.C. State Museum, Columbia. (803) 898‑4921.

Lowcountry JU NE

15  Moonlight Mixer, Folly Beach

Pier, Folly Beach. (843) 795‑4386.

15  Paddle with a Ranger,

Colleton State Park, Walterboro. (843) 538‑8206. 15  Sounds of Summer Concert Series: The Paul Grimshaw Band, Sandhills Bank Amphitheater in the North Myrtle Beach Park & Sports Complex, Little River. (843) 280‑5570. 15–16  Juneteenth Celebration, St. James Baptist Church, Hilton Head Island. (843) 255‑7301. 16  Build Your Own Turkey Call, Hampton Plantation State Historic Site, McClellanville. (843) 546‑9361. 16  Homes for Heroes Charity Golf Tournament, Man O’ War Golf Course, Myrtle Beach. (843) 222‑5974. 16  Jim Bost Memorial Fishing Tournament, The Marina at Edisto Beach, Edisto Beach. (843) 631‑5055. 19–26  Surfside Beach Hula Show, Surfside Beach Pier, Surfside Beach. (843) 650‑9548. 20  Marcus Amaker and Quentin Baxter, The Gibbes Museum, Charleston. (843) 641‑0011. 21–23  Charleston Carifest, multiple venues, Charleston. (843) 557‑6258. 22  Reggae Nights Summer Concert: NDKA, James Island County Park, Charleston. (843) 795‑4386.

23  DragonBoat Beaufort, Henry C. Chambers Waterfront Park, Beaufort. (843) 473‑4477. 23  Moonlight Canoe Float, Cheraw State Park, Cheraw. (843) 537‑9656. 23  Open Land Trust Cocktail Party and Auction, Edisto Beach Civic Center, Edisto Beach. (843) 869‑9004. 23–24  Art in the Park, Chapin Park, Myrtle Beach. (843) 446‑3830. 30  Bird Walk for Beginners, Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 852‑4200. 30  Conway Riverfest, Riverfront Park, Conway. (843) 248‑2273. JU LY

4  Firecracker 5K, Shelter Cove Community Park, Hilton Head Island. (843) 757‑8520. 4  July 4th on the MarshWalk, Murrells Inlet MarshWalk, Murrells Inlet. (843) 497‑3450. 4  Indigo Choral Society’s July 4th Concert, Kaminski House Museum, Georgetown. (843) 520‑4750. 4  Myrtle Beach Independence Day 8K/5K/1-Mile, Valor Park at The Market Common, Myrtle Beach. (843) 267‑7443. 4  Surfside Beach 4th of July Celebration, Surfside Pier, Surfside Beach. (843) 650‑9548. 6  Moonlight Mixer, Folly Beach Pier, Folly Beach. (843) 795‑4386. 7  Defending Charles Towne, Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 852‑4200. 11–14  MegaDock Billfishing Tournament, Charleston City Marina, Charleston. (843) 278‑4920. 13  Movies @ McLean: The Lion King, McLean Park, North Myrtle Beach. (843) 280‑5570. 13–22  Beaufort Water Festival, downtown, Beaufort. (843) 812‑4656. 14  Shaggin’ on the Cooper, Mount Pleasant Pier, Mount Pleasant. (843) 795‑4386. ONGOING

Daily until June 30  Hampton Plantation Mansion Tours, Hampton Plantation State Historic Site, McClellanville. (843) 546‑9361. Tuesdays through September 

Mount Pleasant Farmers Market, Pavilion at Moultrie Middle School, Mount Pleasant. (843) 884‑2528. Fourth Tuesdays  Wash Day, L.W. Paul Living History Farm, Conway. (843) 365‑3596. First Saturdays  History in the Landscape, Hampton Plantation State Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 546‑9361.


|

SC   humor me

Hang a left past Jupiter BY JAN A. IGOE

I HAVE GOOD NEWS AND BAD NEWS .

The bad news, as you’ve probably heard, is that none of us is getting out of here alive. The universe has disastrous plans for every living thing that calls Earth home, at least according to Hollywood. The good news is, I’ve analyzed the most likely catastrophes for your convenience, so you can prepare.

Should a monster like that head our way, we’re doomed unless Bruce Willis agrees to blow it up.

Zombie apocalypse Zombies have always been out to splatter your guts, but fortunately, they’re easy to spot. Let’s just say these guys aren’t the life of the party, and not just because they’d eat the guests. The undead rarely shower and aren’t big on conversation. If you’ve seen The Walking Dead, you know they don’t set the bar for personal hygiene very high. They forget to floss, even when flesh is wedged between their teeth. Most of them walk as if they just had a knee replacement, but for some reason, we never seem to outrun them. Zombies are frequently attracted to teenagers and may gather in shopping malls for a spontaneous buffet. Honestly, if they weren’t about to disembowel us, we’d barely notice them. Stay sharp.

Hostile aliens Aliens are harder to pick out than zombies. You could be sleeping with one and not know it. (Picture your ex.) They may hatch from pods and assume human form, or just move in next door. One minute they’ll borrow a cup of sugar, the next, they’ll enslave humanity. Ridley Scott, who directed Alien, suspects that hundreds of extraterrestrial life forms—none of them friendly—would love to add us to their menu. Earth will become one big, blue-planet special when they land. But astrophysicists, who have never directed any sci-fi movies, dispute that. They say the odds of intelligent life traveling 38

gazillions of light years just to see if we are anything more than lowly bacteria are remote. Yeah, that’s probably what they told Sigourney Weaver before the xenomorph mistook her for lunch. Be wary of anyone drooling acid.

One last Sharknado Anyone with half a brain, even zombies, will avoid sharks at all costs. They have way too many teeth and lousy dispositions. At one time, we felt relatively safe from attack if we just remained on dry land, far from Jaws territory. But that was before Sharknado, the movie franchise that showed us sharks can fly when the weather’s right. Apparently, this surprising phenomenon does not diminish the shark’s appetite, so they’ll want an in-flight meal. Unless you’re really handy with a chainsaw (to cut yourself out of a man-eating predator that arrives by tornado and swallows you whole), your days are numbered. We’ve seen rampant carnage in five movies already. If the sharks don’t finish you, watching Sharknado 6 should do the trick.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JUNE 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

Earth-crunching asteroid How much damage can one little ol’ ­asteroid do? Well, a small space rock might put a dent in Des Moines, but that’s practically another planet to East Coasters. When we’re talking asteroids the size of Texas, that’s bad for tourism. Remember that monstrous space rock in Armageddon? “It’s what we call a global killer,” Billy Bob Thornton explained. Should a monster like that head our way, we’re doomed unless Bruce Willis agrees to blow it up. Scientists confirm that some asteroids are indeed ginormous enough to wipe out life on this planet. The only thing saving us is the fact that they are not heading our way. However, if an alien couple is hitching a ride on that rock, we all know it’s only a matter of time until the female stops to ask for directions. I know I would. JAN IGOE spends more time running from insects than zombies, but caution is wise. Please help your fellow readers by reporting all alien, zombie and flying shark sightings to HumorMe@SCLiving.coop. Jan’s ex is already on the list.


DISASTERS DON’ T

PL AN AHEAD

YO U C AN DON’T WAIT. COMMUNICATE. Talk to your loved ones about how you are going to be ready in an emergency.

VISIT READY.GOV/PLAN.


Profile for South Carolina Living

South Carolina Living June 2018  

Women find confidence and camaraderie in self-defense training.

South Carolina Living June 2018  

Women find confidence and camaraderie in self-defense training.

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