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CHANGEOUT

Big dreams

Opportunity Village offers hope to the homeless

JANUARY 2018

SC RECIPE

Super soups HUMOR ME

Laughter is the best medicine


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THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS VOLUME 72 • NUMBER 1 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240) Read in more than 584,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033 Tel:  (803) 926-3 1 75 Fax:  (803) 796-6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop EDITOR

Keith Phillips Tel: (803) 739-3040 Email: Keith.Phillips@ecsc.org

2018 | jan 16 Tiny houses, big dreams Learn how a Pickens County charity is using a village of tiny houses to give homeless clients a chance at a better life.

4 CO-OP NEWS

Updates from your cooperative

ASSISTANT EDITOR

Diane Veto Parham

6 AGENDA

FIELD EDITOR

Walter Allread PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

Travis Ward ART DIRECTOR

Sharri Harris Wolfgang

Show your support for cooperative lineworkers with a new specialty license plate. Plus: The Southern Sound Series brings top musical acts home to the Carolinas.

10 DIALOGUE

DESIGNER

16

Shepherds in a world of change

Susan Collins

Retired educators share their wisdom and prayers for today’s teachers and students.

PRODUCTION

Andrew Chapman WEB EDITOR

12 ENERGY Q&A

Chase Toler

Water heater efficiency and maintenance

COPY EDITOR

L. Kim Welborn CONTRIBUTORS

Jayne Cannon, Mike Couick, Tim Hanson, Jan A. Igoe, L.A. Jackson, Patrick Keegan, Sydney Patterson, Belinda Smith-Sullivan, Brad Thiessen

Our energy experts offer advice on repairing and replacing your home water heater to maximize energy savings.

14 SMART CHOICE

New year, new you Put candy canes and fudge behind you. It’s 2018 and time to get healthy with these fitness gadgets.

PUBLISHER

Lou Green ADVERTISING

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739-5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop

21 STORIES

21

Holy replicas, Batman!

NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

American MainStreet Publications Tel:  (800) 626-1181 Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor. ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send to your

local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above. Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices. The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor.

© COPYRIGHT 2018.

is brought to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

Learn how Sumter dermatologist Dr. Phillip Latham came into possession of two functional Batmobiles.

22 SCENE

Serving up the World’s Largest Meatball The Italian-American Club of Hilton Head Island sinks its teeth into a Guinness World Record.

26 TRAVELS

EdVenture’s Flight inspires dreams to soar A new hands-on exhibit allows kids to take the controls of a jetliner and learn about the wonders of modern aviation.

30 RECIPE

Cold-weather comfort When it’s nippy outside, let these delicious soups and stews keep you cozy on the inside.

32 GARDENER

Chillin’ with winter daphne

26

Welcome to the delightfully sneaky world of winter daphne, a broadleaf evergreen that blooms with fragrant flowers in the coldest months.

34 MARKETPLACE 36 SC CALENDAR 38 HUMOR ME

Big dreams

Just call me Joe

PHOTOS, TO P A N D CENTER: M I LTO N MORRIS; BOT TOM: STACE Y MONTEB E LLO

Opportunity Village offers hope to the homeless SC RECIPE

JANUARY 2018

Member of the AMP network reaching more than 9 million homes and businesses

A strange twist of fate brings humor columnist Jan Igoe face to face with the dark side of modern healthcare.

Super soups HUMOR ME

Laughter is the best medicine

Chris Wilson, executive director of The Dream Center, joins client Angela Johnson at the charity’s tiny-house community, dubbed Opportunity Village. Photo by Milton Morris


SC | agenda Time to apply for 2018 WIRE scholarships Two S.C. women got a wel­ come assist last year with financing their college educations, thanks to scholar­ ships from Women Involved in Rural Electrification. Applications are now avail­ able for the 2018 WIRE ­scholarships for women. The annual WIRE Jenny Ballard Opportunity Scholar­ ship provides a one-time $2,500 award to a woman who is an electric cooperative member, who has been out of school for several years and who is working to complete her college education. Bonnie Hill of Iva, a mem­ ber of Little River Electric

program is open to women who may not have been able to attend college after high school but now want to fur­ ther their education. WIRE awards the scholarship based on financial need and per­ sonal goals. An applicant for the WIRE scholarship must Bonnie Hill (left) and Patti Hansen were winners of 2017 WIRE scholarships.

Cooperative, was one of last year’s winners. She received a $2,500 award to help pay college expenses as she works toward an associate’s degree in applied science from Tri‑County Technical College, hoping to become a registered

nurse. The second winner last year was Patti Hansen of Fort Mill, a York Electric Cooper­ ative member working toward an ­associate’s degree in busi­ ness management from York Technical College. The WIRE scholarship

u be a member of a South Carolina electric cooperative u have graduated from high school or earned her GED at least 10 years ago u be

accepted into an accred­ ited S.C. college or university, and u demonstrate financial need and personal goals.

Powering the Palmetto State

M IC SM ITH

Drivers across South Carolina can now show their appreciation for the hardworking men and women who keep electricity flowing to our homes and businesses by ordering a new specialty license plate Gov. Henry McMaster and state lawmakers unveiled the license plate design from the S.C. Department of during a Lineman Appreciation Day ceremony at the S.C. State House. Motor Vehicles. Available for $10 in addition to normal registration fees, the “Powering the Palmetto State” ­specialty plate was unveiled at a Lineman Appreciation Day ceremony during the 2017 legislative session. Gov. Henry McMaster and state law­makers recognized the co-op employees who build and maintain the state’s power grid with a proclamation stating, “Linemen are the backbone of South Carolina’s electric utility system and deserve recognition for their work when the weather is good, after catastrophic events, and at all times in between.” Legislators referenced Ice Storm Pax in 2014, the record-breaking rain and flooding in 2015, and Hurricane Matthew in 2016 as examples of the extreme conditions linemen face during repair work. “It takes a special type of person to do that work,” says Rep. Bill Sandifer, R-Seneca. “Most people know you have to be brave, but it takes a heart for service and the ability to be content doing hard work often without thanks, fanfare or attention.”

6

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

Women who have previ­ ously obtained a four-year college degree are not ­eligible. Applicants may have previ­ ously earned a two-year degree or some college credits. The scholarship, which can be used for the fall 2018 or spring 2019 semester, will be paid jointly to the winner and her college of choice. Applications are available at your local electric coopera­ tive or by download from SCLiving.coop. The deadline to apply is June 1. Mail your completed application to WIRE Scholarship Committee, c/o Peggy Dantzler, The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, S.C. 29033, or fax it to (803) 739-3055. —DIANE VETO PARHAM


ONLY ON SCLiving.coop

Hang up on scammers

Celebrate S.C. seafood and win $100

never call to demand this form of immediate payment or request financial information over the phone. If you receive a call asking for immediate payment, gather as much information as you can from that ­individual, hang up the phone, and contact the local ­authorities and your coopera­ tive. If you have any doubts about your utility bill, contact your co-op directly. A listing of all South Carolina electric cooperatives is available at SCLiving.coop/coop-finder.

GONE FISHIN’ The Vektor Fish & Game Forecast provides feeding and migration times. Major periods can bracket the peak by an hour. Minor peaks, ½ hour before and after. Minor

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

JANUARY 16 — 17 7:31 18 8:01 19 8:31 20 8:46 21 9:16 22 9:46 23 3:31 24 4:16 25 5:46 26 8:01 27 9:16 28 10:16 29 11:01 30 11:46 31 7:01

Minor

AM Major

Minor

12:01 5:01 12:31 5:31 1:16 6:01 1:46 6:46 2:31 7:31 3:16 8:16 9:31 4:16 11:31 5:31 — 6:46 12:01 7:46 1:01 8:46 2:16 9:46 3:16 10:31 4:01 11:16 — 5:01 12:31 5:46

1 7:46 2 8:16 3 8:46 4 9:16 5 9:46 6 3:31 7 12:31 8 4:16 9 7:46 10 9:31 11 10:16 12 10:46 13 11:16 14 11:46 15 7:01 16 7:16

12:46 1:31 2:01 2:31 3:01 10:16 10:46 11:46 4:46 5:16 5:31 5:46 6:16 6:31 12:01 12:31

Fresh from the oven While a pot of soup simmers on the stovetop, whip up a batch of steaming-hot popovers to serve alongside. Chef Belinda reveals the magic behind the perfect popover at SCLiving.coop/ food/chefbelinda.

Like us on Facebook If you love South Carolina, follow South Carolina Living on Facebook, where we celebrate all that’s great about the Palmetto State. Add your voice to the conversation and share your photos at facebook.com/SouthCarolinaLiving.

PM Major

FEBRUARY 7:01 12:16 12:46 1:16 1:46 2:16 2:46 10:16 11:01 1:46 3:31 4:31 5:16 6:01 6:31 12:01

South Carolina Living and the Hilton Head Island Seafood ­Fes­tival have teamed up to celebrate our state’s rich seafood ­tradition—and put some extra clams in your pocket. Sign up today for our Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes and your chance to win a $100 Visa gift card and a Hilton Head Island Seafood Festival prize package, which includes two VIP tickets to the festival, a gift bag and admission to the Celebrity Chef Tour, Pig Pickin’ & Oyster Roast, and Seafood Sunday Brunch. One lucky winner’s name will be drawn at random from entries received by Jan. 31. Register online today at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply. For dates and details on all festival events, visit hiltonheadseafoodfestival.com.

DI A N E V E TO PA RH A M

Utility scams are a sad reality these days as con artists seek to steal money, bank-account numbers and personal infor­ mation from unsus­ pecting consumers. Scams often involve an individual posing as an employee of your electric coop­ erative, warning that your power will be disconnected unless you make an immedi­ ate payment. In a common version of the scheme, the caller will demand payment in the form of a prepaid credit or debit card, such as a Green Dot card. Some scam­ mers will sound sympathetic, while others will use threat­ ening language and attempt to frighten you into provid­ ing your credit card or bank account information. Don’t fall for either tactic. Your electric cooperative will

1:01 1:46 2:31 9:01 10:16 — — — 12:46 2:01 2:46 3:31 4:16 — 12:16 12:46

6:31 7:16 8:01 3:31 4:31 5:46 7:16 8:31 9:16 10:01 10:31 11:01 11:31 5:01 5:31 6:16

Looking for an easy way to make your home cozier? Try using an area rug to increase the insulation levels of your floors. Area rugs are stylish and can keep cool air from entering through your floors. Your toes will thank you! SOURCE: NRECA

SCLIVING.COOP  | JANUARY 2018  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SC   agenda HIGHLIGHTS JANUARY 15–FEBRUARY 15

“REQUIEM FOR MOTHER EMANUEL”

SOUTHERN SOUND SERIES

OPENS JANUARY 27

JANUARY 20

Farming with an eye to the future is the focus of this event at Florence Civic Center, showcasing innovations in agriculture and agribusiness, with special sessions for women and youth in agriculture. Look for the purple Survivor Tractor (above), which New Holland Agriculture displays to raise funds for cancer charities and honor survivors; there’ll be a giveaway of a small purple ride-on tractor at the show. Admission to the trade show is free; the Taste of SC and Commissioner’s Breakfast are ticketed events.

Hearts broke across South Carolina after the tragic shootings at “Mother Emanuel” AME Church in Charleston in 2015. In tribute to the nine men and women who lost their lives, the South Carolina State Museum in Columbia will exhibit nine powerful paintings by S.C. artist Leo Twiggs, who describes his works this way: “My paintings are testimonies to the nine who were slain. But I also record another moment: our state’s greatest moment … a response that moved us from tragedy to redemption. For one shining moment, we looked at each other not as different races, but as human beings.”

(864) 237-3648; scagribizexpo.com

(803) 898-4921; scmuseum.org

The best contemporary music with roots in the Carolinas gets the spotlight at McCelvey Center in York. Kicking things off this season is Greenville girl Nikki Lane, the “First Lady of Outlaw Country,” coming home to perform while riding high on her Nashville fame. Closing the concert series on April 27 will be N.C. native and crowd favorite Rhiannon Giddens, always a showstopper. Go ahead and mark your calendars for The Steel Wheels on Feb. 17 and the Mark O’Conner Band on March 17. (803) 684-3948; chmuseums.org/southernsoundseries For more happenings this month, turn to our Calendar on page 36, and see the expanded Festivals & Events roundup on SCLiving.coop.

8

Rhiannon Giddens

SC AGRIBIZ & FARM EXPO JANUARY 17–18

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP


AADVERTISEMENT DVE RTISE M E NT

PalmettoPride Says Secure Your Load We’ve all seen random items along our roadways: a recliner, a broken piece of wooden furniture, the bags of trash, scraps of paper, fast-food wrappers. These items are not just on interstates, but roads in town as well. Most of the litter on our highways comes from unsecured loads. The sight pictured above is not unusual. Several truck drivers have strapped their items down, but this is not a proper way to secure all loads. South Carolina law states that no vehicle may be driven or moved on any public highway unless the vehicle is constructed or loaded so as to prevent any of its load from dropping, shifting, leaking, or otherwise escaping from the vehicle. In a state where pickup trucks are a popular mode of transport, this law is particularly important for those of us concerned about litter on our roadways. Litter on roadways is not just an eyesore. It is not just an annoyance to those of us who enjoy the beautiful landscape that our state has. It is not just a deterrent to the well-being of our state and local economies. Litter on our roadways is a hazard to pedestrians and drivers. We’ve all heard stories about injuries and even death caused by trash in our roadways. Most everyone has had to swerve to avoid litter in the middle of the road. In 2012, a Clarendon County man was killed when the mattress he was holding down on the back of a pickup truck flew off the truck. Loads need to be tied down or covered by tarps in order to be properly secured. Even smaller items that are not full loads should be secured. Scenario 1: It’s Tuesday afternoon, and you knock off work early to go fishing with your buddies. You pack a cooler, grab your tackle box and go. After your fun time, you pull out your boat, secure everything down and pick out the empty bottles and food wrappers from the boat. You place those items in the back of your pickup truck and head home. You pull onto the highway, and whoosh! The wind carries your empties off into the evening air.

Scenario 2: You are doing the right thing: packing your week’s worth of trash and recyclables to take to the landfill. You load them up in the back of your truck or your sedan trunk, trunk gate tied to the car to keep it from flying up and blocking your view. You get on the highway, you hit a bump in the road and bam! Out goes a bag or two of trash. In both of these scenarios, you are doing the right thing by not littering the river and not illegally dumping your trash in a secluded spot in the woods. But, you need to take the extra step to properly secure your loads, no matter the items. Loose items need to be secured in a bag or covering. Bags need to be tied down to prevent them from falling out of the vehicle. Tarps are an economical and easily transported solution to securing your loads. Tarps of all sizes, weights, thicknesses and colors can be found at hardware stores, automobile stores and online. Some counties in our state have even given tarps out for free at landfills. PalmettoPride will also launch a tarp program in 2018 to provide tarps to citizens for free on designated education days. Take the time to properly secure your load. Keep South Carolina beautiful, and remember that litter trashes everyone.

For more information about PalmettoPride’s upcoming Tarp It Program, visit their website at www.palmettopride.org or call 877.PAL.PRDE.


|

SC   dialogue

Shepherds in a world of change about the enormity of challenges facing our state, our nation and, quite frankly, our planet, I tried to bring forth a problem only when I could suggest a solution already “lab tested” in our local communities. Thankfully, there are plenty of local solutions out there. One common theme I discovered is how community members are helping others deal with the inevitable changes during life. Rather than surrendering to the fear of change, these problem solvers, or “change shepherds,” view life challenges as opportu­ nities for growth and development, and they respond accord­ ingly. They share from the perspective of experience. I wrote to you about college communities that help stu­ dents recovering from substance abuse ease into new lives on campus. I wrote about groups like the Distinguished Gentlemen’s Club and its work helping boys grow into young men. And I wrote to you about my own trials with the changes that come in later middle life, and the wisdom I’ve gleaned from Bernie, my canine companion. The Greek philosopher Heraclitus believed that “change is the only constant.” For many of us, our families, friends and faith communities help walk us through the difficult changes in life. And, for our children and young adults, teachers add another critical layer of support. I recently shared a meal with a diverse group of retired York County educators. With an average of 37.5 classroom years per teacher, the room collectively represented more than 1,000 years’ worth of teaching experience in every grade level from pre-K to college. These retired educators meet regularly throughout the year to stay connected and engaged, enjoy each other’s company and reflect upon a lifetime of teaching. Over a luncheon of chili and cornbread, I asked them what would be their prayer for today’s teachers and students. Touching on themes that ranged from parental support to classroom environments, these teachers also addressed the importance of recognizing the needs and life circumstances of each individual student. With the hindsight that comes from a lifetime of classroom experience, these educators recognize the best legacy teach­ ers can leave their students is the security and confidence that LAST YEAR, AS I BEGAN TO WRITE IN THIS COLUMN

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

come from being known, loved and understood. By appreci­ ating the unique qualities of each child, these veteran teach­ ers developed true connections to help their students better acquire the knowledge and skills needed to move on to the next phase of life. “I would pray that teachers have an understanding that chil­ dren come from all backgrounds,” one of the teachers said. “I’d pray to give teachers understanding of that diversity, making sure the children know you care for all of them.” Another educator with 29 years’ experience prayed, “I would like every child to have someone to tell them they are loved each day and that they believe in that child.” Finally, a veteran of 35 years in the classroom offered this touching thought: “My prayer would be that all find a God of their understanding who would show them how wonderful they are—just as they are.” At the start of their educational careers, our children climb onto a bus and head off to kindergarten, not knowing what to expect. When they are greeted in the classroom by a caring and engaged teacher, that moment is transformed from a point of uncertainty into an opportunity for confident growth. Throughout the school years, teachers help serve as a child’s life roadmap, giving each one the guidance and knowledge nec­ essary to take on new terrain. Even for those of us who have graduated to adulthood, life continues to be full of changes. Life transitions—whether they are job, health, family or relationship changes—can feel over­ whelming. With that in mind, this year’s columns will focus on how we as South Carolinians are growing and changing through the support of our local communities. Please share your stories and ideas by emailing me at Mike. Couick@ecsc.org, and then meet back here each month for the next installment. Happy New Year!

President and CEO, The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina MIKE COUICK


EMPOWERING VISION With our low-cost, reliable electricity and choice industrial sites, Santee Cooper is working with the South Carolina Power Team to help new businesses picture a better future – and to power South Carolina toward Brighter Tomorrows, Today.

www.scpowerteam.com • www.santeecooper.com


|

SC   energy Q&A

Water heater efficiency and maintenance BY PATRICK KEEGAN AND BRAD THIESSEN

Q

J I M TROTH , HO M EI NS PEC TIO NS I N O H IO.COM

My water heater is 15 years old. About how long should it last? Are there things I can do to maintain it and make it more efficient, or should I just replace it?

A

It’s hard to say how long your water heater will last. Certified home inspectors estimate the life span to be about 10 years. Some manufacturers suggest 12 to 13 years, but I had a water tank that lasted more than 40 years before the heating element finally gave out. It’s wise to replace a water heater before it fails, because sometimes failure includes a ruptured tank or a massive leak that can do a lot of damage. The life span of a conventional water heater (one with a tank) depends on factors such as the volume of water cycled through it, the hardness (mineral content) of the water and the tank’s interior coating. Many water heaters come with warranties as long as 12 years; a longer warranty may be an indicator of higher quality and possi­ bly a longer life span. These warranties usually cover only the cost of a replace­ ment tank; they typically do not include the cost of labor to install it or the costs

GET  MORE Give your house an energy upgrade. When it’s time to renovate, consider replacing HVAC systems and major appliances, including water heaters, for maximum energy savings. scliving.coop/energy/give-your-house-anenergy-upgrade/ Give your electric water heater an efficiency boost. A few simple upgrades and adjustments will keep you in hot water without raising your utility bills. scliving.coop/energy/give-your-electricwater-heater-an-efficiency-boost_1/

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Mineral deposits on pressure-release valves or corrosion on fittings coming out of the water heater are signs of leakage that should be addressed.

Installing a carbon-monoxide detector near your natural gas or propane water heater is a critical safety measure.

from flood damage if the tank fails. You can check for warning signs that your water heater tank or heating element may be failing: XXWater leaking from the tank or pooling on the floor underneath it XXRust, corrosion or mineral deposits around fittings or release valves XXA decrease in water temperature from your faucets Many experts say an important waterheater maintenance practice is to drain the tank every year or two. Others rec­ ommend that if your tank has not been drained in the past six to seven years, you should avoid doing so, because draining could remove sediment in a way that allows leaks to develop. Consult the owner’s manual for your model for the recommended maintenance tips.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

Here are a few simple steps you can take to increase the efficiency of your water heater: XXInsulate the first six to 10 feet of easily accessed hot-water line where it exits the tank. XXIf the tank is warm to the touch or is in a cold location, such as a garage, consider insulating it with a heater blanket. But, check the owner’s manual to make sure doing so won’t void the warranty. If you have a gas or propane water heater, make sure the blanket doesn’t block the unit’s air supply. XXKeep your water temperature to 120 degrees or less. This will help you save money and ensure longer life for pipes and gaskets. Keep safety in mind. If you have a gas or propane water heater, protect your family from the “silent killer” of ­carbon-monoxide gas. Pick up a carbon-­ monoxide detector from the hardware store, and install it near the heater. Looking for more ways to save money on your hot-water bill? Showering accounts for almost 17 percent of indoor water use, so you can save money by installing efficient showerheads. Replace older dishwashers and washing machines with more efficient models. Repair any leaky faucets; a drip every second can add up to $35 a year. When it’s time to purchase a new water heater, check out all the options. Some co-ops offer rebates on energyefficient models. Others offer incen­ tives for water heaters with large tanks or for installing load-control devices that remotely turn the water heater off during brief periods of high-energy demand. Send questions to Energy Q&A, South Carolina Living, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033, email energyqa@scliving.coop or fax (803) 739-3041.


ADVE RTISE M E NT

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Easy-to-use remote for massage, heat, recline and lift And there’s more! The overstuffed, oversized biscuit style back and unique seat design will cradle you in comfort. Generously filled, wide armrests provide enhanced arm support when sitting or reclining. The high and low heat settings along with the multiple massage settings, can provide a soothing relaxation you might get at a spa – just imagine getting all that in a lift chair! It even has a battery backup in case of a power outage. Shipping charge includes white glove delivery. Professionals will deliver the chair to the exact spot in your home where you want it, unpack it, inspect it, test it, position it, and even carry the packaging away! Includes one year service warranty and your choice of fabrics and colors – Call now!

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|

SC   smart choice

New year, new you Put candy canes and fudge behind you. It’s 2018 and time to get healthy.  BY JAYNE CANNON THE RACE IS ON

GREASELESS AND GUILT-FREE

You swore you’d eat right in 2018. But, those wings and fries just keep calling your name. Answer the call with the Power 3.4 Quart Air Fryer XL. Swirling hot air cooks your food with little or no oil. But, it’s not just for wings and fries; the Power Fryer also bakes, steams and sautes. $120. (800) 462‑3966; bedbathandbeyond.com.

Can’t get motivated to exercise at home? Enter the Peloton Bike. Hop on the saddle and plug into live classes, or choose from more than 4,000 on-demand rides that cover beginners as well as elite cyclists who need tough challenges. $1,995. (866) 650‑1996; peloton.com.

SMART SOCKS

Are you smarter than a pair of socks? Before you answer, behold the Sensoria Fitness Socks and Anklet. Don these socks before you exercise, and the clip-on electronic anklet counts your steps, tracks speed and distance, and helps you identify moves that may result in injury. That’s a smart sock. $199. (425) 533‑2928; sensoriafitness.com.

SLEEP SENTINEL

You sleep every night. But do you sleep well? Find out with the Jawbone Up Move Activity Sleep Tracker. Available in a variety of colors and designs, the Up Move also tracks food intake and activity, helping you as you try to lead a healthier life. $9 and up. (888) 280‑4331; amazon.com.

WE’VE GOT YOUR BACK

Is lower-back pain keeping you from getting the exercise you need? Get moving with Valedo, a device that offers back therapy via guided exercises. A sensor placed on your back monitors motion and detects incorrect movements and corrects them in real time. Valedo comes with more than 50 games and tracks progress on Bluetooth devices. $359. (877) 944‑2200; valedotherapy.com.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

A HEALTHY GROW

We all vow to eat healthier when the new year rolls around. Now, you can grow fresh herbs for flavor that can replace oils and fats in your food, even if you don’t have garden space. The Smart Garden 3 fits on a countertop, provides its own light and grows herbs from capsule pods that click into the planter. $100. clickandgrow.com.


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Tiny houses,

transformation, however, is on the inside. greet Angela Johnson Opportunity “They literally saved my life,” says Johnson. when she shows up at The Dream Center of Village gives “There’s not enough words to say what’s hap­ Pickens County after her makeover. Clustered around her, the staff and volunteers rain com­ homeless clients pened to me that’s good in my life from here. I’m one whole new creature … in every way.” pliments on Johnson, touching her new hairdo, a fresh start comparing her “before” and “after” appearance. Encourage, educate, empower BY DIANE VETO PARHAM “Oh, my gosh, you’re beautiful!” PHOTOS BY MILTON MORRIS “Look at your hair! It’s gorgeous!” Before The Dream Center existed as a tangible “You look 10 years younger!” place where down-and-out folks could find It’s true. When a homeless and desperate Johnson first help, it was just a glimmer of a vision by a few people. showed up seeking help from The Dream Center last year, she “It began with just seven people—my husband, myself and was worn down, overweight and nearly hopeless. She’d been five other people—asking ourselves, and asking God to teach living on the street. She was suffering from untreated liver us, how to be the church, not just go to church,” says Chris disease. With unkempt hair and a face bare of makeup, her Wilson, executive director of the faith-based, nonprofit Dream appearance reflected a hard-lived life. Center near downtown Easley. They met and prayed for over A year later, with help from The Dream Center, she is a year before settling on a plan in 2012—still with no build­ 40 pounds lighter; she’s getting regular medical treatment, ing—to help needy people in Pickens County help themselves and her outlook is rosy. Post-makeover, with her goldenout of poverty and hopelessness. brown hair cut and styled and makeup giving her face a Behind The Dream Center’s mission “to encourage, new glow, Johnson looks more like her 52 years. The real educate and empower people in need through the love SQUEALS OF DELIGHT

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP


big dreams of Jesus Christ” is a simple concept: instead of a handout, a hand up. Emergency assistance provides temporary help, but too many handouts create a dependency that discourages people from taking steps toward long-term solutions, says Wilson, a member of Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative. With that core philosophy, The Dream Center’s founders and a crew of volunteers started helping destitute clients lift themselves out of poverty. They bought and renovated a 45,000-square-foot former school building that houses an array of services meeting basic needs, including a soup kitchen and food pantry. They guided clients to work toward a GED diploma, get a stable job, manage a household budget, find dental or medical care, start exercis­ ing, learn parenting or anger management skills, stop drink­ ing, smoking or using drugs, get counseling and spiritual guidance—whatever positive steps they needed to improve their lives. The critical missing element was housing. Pickens County had no homeless shelter. Nearly half the clients coming to

A HAND UP Chris Wilson (above, left), cofounder of The Dream Center, celebrates the life-changing steps taken by Opportunity Village resident Angela Johnson. Each tiny house is sponsored by community members. The Dalton House (left) was sponsored by Dream Center cofounder Libby Dalton and her husband, Charles, who retires this month from his position as CEO of Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative. The plaque over the front porch features a Bible verse, Proverbs 3:5–6. The co-op also supports Dream Center operations though its annual Blue Ridge Fest fundraiser.

The Dream Center for help during the day were homeless, Wilson says, but at night, “we didn’t have anywhere for them to lay their heads.” “We had a guy come in that was living in the woods,” Dream Center staff member Stephen Estrada recalls. “He had the willingness, the attitude and the desire to get a job and get back on his feet. But, it’s very difficult to help stabilize someone who is living in the woods.” In 2016, The Dream Center started building the newest feature on its six-acre property: the picture-perfect Opportunity Village, a tight-knit community of 23 tiny houses that give people a place to call home while they are piecing SCLIVING.COOP  | JANUARY 2018  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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TINY HOUSES, BIG DREAMS

ON-SITE GUIDANCE Opportunity Village resident manager Phillip Gilmore (left) and program manager Stephen Estrada help residents focus on their goals. “We get to play a little part in helping them get back on their feet,” says Estrada.

Dream Dollars at work The currency of The Dream Center of Pickens County is Dream Dollars. That’s the “money” clients earn by attending selfimprovement classes—$8 per class. That money covers a lot of ground. First, it’s the money clients use to start learning to budget as they rebuild their lives.

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their lives back together. Each little house is just big enough for a twin bed, a small bathroom, and a bit of space for clothes and a few personal belongings. Residents pay “rent” for the right to live in Opportunity Village houses—16 “Dream Dollars” a day, earned by attend­ ing self-improvement classes on site. Their tiny homes are private retreats at the end of the day; most of their hours are spent in communal spaces at The Dream Center—taking classes, eating meals, exercising or relaxing together. “We want them learning how to live together in commu­ nity and not be isolated,” Wilson explains. Friendship, support and inspiration from staff and volunteers create a family-like environment that contributes to their success, she says. Resident manager Phillip Gilmore lives in the village; he’s there to make sure residents return to their homes each evening, stay focused on their goals, take care of themselves and their living spaces, and avoid straying back into destruc­ tive behaviors. “We have relationships,” Gilmore says. “We talk through what matters.”

A life transformed Funded by generous donations, construction of the Opportunity Village got a dramatic start in October 2016 when more than 500 volunteers showed up for “Raise a Village” day

It buys toiletries and laundry-care items at the center’s general store, and it buys the right to use the on-site laundry facilities and showers—a great help for homeless folks. It’s the money Opportunity Village residents pay to rent their tiny houses. And it’s the money clients and residents can spend at The Dream Center’s two Resale Stores in Easley and Pickens—thrift stores that help support the center financially. With Dream Dollars, they can buy gently used secondhand clothes, accessories, furniture, kitchen items, baby items and more. “Dream Dollars spend just like cash money” at the Resale Store, Dream Center executive director Chris Wilson says. The items for sale are donated by members of the community, who are also free to shop there, but they spend real dollars. “We’ve never had a month we didn’t at least break even, even though over $50,000 worth of ­merchandise has been purchased using Dream Dollars,” Wilson says.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

GIVING BACK Angela Johnson volunteers at the Resale Store in Easley, where proceeds earned from sales help fund The Dream Center.

The Dream Center has two Resale Store locations for shopping or for dropping off donated items: 5553 Calhoun Memorial Highway, Easley; (864) 306-4577 529 Hampton Ave., Pickens; (864) 999-2012


HEALTHY LIVING Volunteer instructor Dee Lamb leads a morning class about basic nutrition for Dream Center clients, including some Opportunity Village residents. Learning to eat healthier is among the goals many of the clients in the program set for themselves.

and built 13 of the houses—framed and weatherproofed— in a 14‑hour day. Three of the houses were sponsored by area high schools—Powdersville, Easley and Wren—whose students raised $15,000 per school to cover construction costs. “What really happened as a result of that day is a lot of people in this community kind of took ownership in this village,” Wilson says. “It’s like everybody in this community came together for one common good.” Finishing touches are still under way, but seven completed homes now house residents working toward a new life; five more should be ready for occupancy by the end of January. Angela Johnson was one of the first to move in. When she and her husband showed up at The Dream Center looking for whatever help they could get, they were “down to nothing— I mean, literally, starvation,” she says. No home, no car, no jobs, no money, no hope. Three weeks after beginning their

‘I believe in my heart that Jesus Christ brought me here.’ ANGELA JOHNSON, OPPORTUNITY VILLAGE RESIDENT

Dream Center program, Johnson’s husband abandoned her and went back to using drugs. Committed to changing her life, Johnson stayed. “I just threw my husband to the curb,” Johnson says with a laugh that confirms she has no regrets. “In order to get my life together, it was the best thing for me I’ve ever done. I believe in my heart that Jesus Christ brought me here.” After four failed and abusive mar­ riages and more losses than she can count, Johnson is working her way through the Individualized Success Plan her Dream Center counselors helped her create, moving toward selfsufficiency. She’s getting treatment for medical issues and trying to quit smoking. She got her driver’s license and a car and is working as a banquet server at an event center in Greenville. She goes to self-­improvement classes and Bible studies and is exercising and eating healthier. She enjoys fellowship time in the community room reserved for Opportunity Village residents, who support each other through their per­ sonal journeys. “My next goal is to find me a home and pay for it, no rent—woohoo!” Johnson says. “They have given me BUILDING A COMMUNITY Angela Johnson, Rená Owen, Robert Frost and Sheila Wyle (left to right) gather a hope I’ve never had in my whole in the Opportunity Village community room—a shared living room where residents can snack, watch life.” ll television, read and enjoy each other’s company.

SCLIVING.COOP  | JANUARY 2018  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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TINY HOUSES, BIG DREAMS

struggling with drug abuse and homelessness, he’s clean; he has quit smoking, is working toward his GED and hopes to start his own landscape business. After nine years without a driver’s license, he earned it back and got a truck. His Dream Center “family” celebrated with him when he aced a recent English literature exam and found a job as a groundskeeper at a local cemetery. “Every little success is a win,” says Frost, who credits his newfound faith in God and his caring Dream Center team for his turnaround. “Going to bed every night and having hope for tomorrow is a big deal. When you’re out on the streets, doing drugs, not knowing where you’re going to sleep that night, it’s hard to have hope.” Not everyone is a success story, Wilson says. One man came into the program after 25 years as a drug addict and got clean within a few months, then decided to go it alone. “We ONE TO ONE Shannon Leatherwood is Angela Johnson’s mentor and meets with her regularly to assess her progress toward her goals. “We want them to stay healthy in mind, body and spirit,” says Leatherwood, the director of education and discipleship at The Dream Center and one of its founders.

Modeling success Real, sustainable change takes time, says Estrada, the program manager for the Opportunity Village. That’s why they’ve labeled their curriculum CHANGE, emphasizing the steps in the journey: Choice, Hope, Accept, Need, Grow, Empower. Ideally, when a resident completes the program, he or she is ready to be self-sufficient—holding a job, manag­ ing a budget, living independently in his or her own home. “Some residents are thriving after just a few months, some take longer—everybody’s different,” Estrada says. Robert Frost, 26, moved into Opportunity Village last August and expects to stay about a year. After years of

GET MORE The Dream Center of Pickens County is located at 111 Hillcrest Drive, Easley, just a few blocks from downtown Easley. Founded as a nonprofit in 2012, the center occupies the former Simpson Academy Alternative School, which its founders purchased in 2013 by pooling their own funds and those of community donors. Seven other nonprofits operate from this building, working in partnership with The Dream Center to serve Pickens County’s poor and homeless citizens: l SHINE soup kitchen l 5 Point Church Food Pantry l Samaritan Dental Clinic l JC Cares (Biblical counseling and discipleship) l REACH Ministry (Reaching Everyone As Christ Hoped) l PreDestined Teen Outreach l Alston Wilkes Society Learn more at dreamcenterpc.org. Watch a three-and-a-half-minute time-lapse video of the Opportunity Village under construction at youtube.com/watch?v=0pGWQfzyF0M. 20

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

‘Going to bed every night and having hope for tomorrow is a big deal.’ ROBERT FROST, OPPORTUNITY VILLAGE RESIDENT

knew beyond a shadow of a doubt that he was not ready. But, he thought he knew more than we did, and he walked away,” she says. “And less than 24 hours later, he was doing meth.” He still comes for meals at the SHINE soup kitchen located in The Dream Center building. “We cannot want something for someone more than they want it for themselves,” says Shannon Leatherwood, one of The Dream Center founders, now its director of education and discipleship. “Their desire for life change is the most valu­ able resource they bring into this program.” From Charleston to Canada, at least 18 organizations have noticed what Opportunity Village is doing and asked how to replicate the idea in their own communities. Wilson is happy to share details, but she always emphasizes why it works. “We don’t shy away from the fact that the only reason we exist here is because God told us to open The Dream Center. And God has provided for us,” says Wilson. “But, the tiny houses aren’t changing anybody’s life. It’s the program.” Angela Johnson confirms this: “What they’ve got to offer a broken person is amazing. I finally know that I can be some­ body, I’m worth something and that I will be successful as long as I take heart with what they teach me here.”


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SC   stories 

Holy replicas, Batman!

Phillip Latham AGE:

55

Dermatologist Guitarist for Chief Complaint, a musical group of healthcare professionals who have been playing together for more than a decade. MILITARY SERVICE: Lt. Col. Latham serves as a flight surgeon in the South Carolina Air National Guard. AROUND TOWN: Latham often lends his Batmobiles in support of worthy causes, like the Make-A-Wish Foundation and local Christian youth groups. DAY JOB:

HIS OTHER HOBBY:

Whenever Dr. Phillip Latham takes his Batmobile out for a spin, people ask the Sumter dermatologist to have their photos taken with the iconic vehicle. Who could blame them? The car is a dead ringer for the hot rod featured in the original Batman television series, right down to the red trim and bat logos on the leather bucket seats. That perfection, however, was achieved only after a self-imposed apprenticeship in almost every aspect of car restoration and more than seven years of hard work. “With that first car, I learned how to rebuild an engine,” says Latham. “And, I learned about fiberglass and electrical wiring. That is really the reason I build these cars— to learn something new. The fun is not having these cars; the fun is building them.” Latham is halfway through his second Batmobile, modeled on the sleek, jet-black car from the 1989 movie. This one is equipped with replica machine guns that, with the flick of a switch on the driver’s console, rise from hidden gun ports. His unusual hobby stems from a longtime fascination with sophisticated Hollywood props and started when Latham built a replica of the robot from the 1960s television series Lost in Space. “When I turned my attention to the Batmobile, I thought, ‘Well, how hard can this be?’ ” he says. “Turns out, it was pretty hard.” Fortunately, the good doctor was assisted by friends who were delighted to share their car knowledge and encouraged by his wife, Sumter OB/GYN Dr. Helen Latham. “I have a very understanding wife,” he says. “She calls herself a ‘garage widow.’ But, with me in the garage, she says at least she knows where I am and that I am behaving.” —TIM HANSON, PHOTO BY MILTON MORRIS SCLIVING.COOP  | JANUARY 2018  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SC   scene

Serving up the World’s

Largest Meatball

The Italian-American Club of Hilton Head Island sinks its teeth into a Guinness World Record  BY TIM HANSON | PHOTOS BY MIC SMITH IT WAS THE BIGGEST MEATBALL ANYONE,

anywhere, had ever seen—a massive sphere that tipped the scales at more than 1,700 pounds. Volunteers from the Italian-American Club on Hilton Head Island had babysat the big boy around the clock for five days as it cooked away in its custom-made oven. The aroma wafted through the air at Shelter Cove Community Park and prompted more than one passerby to seek out its source. A group of women trying to concentrate on a morning yoga routine jokingly suggested that it was challenging their resolve to live a healthy lifestyle. But, no one was pretending that this huge meatball was in any way a tes­ tament to low cholesterol and a trim waistline. The whole purpose of its 22

creation was to secure a coveted place in Guinness World Records. To do so, they would have to best the admirable efforts of an Italian-American Club in Ohio that had waddled into history in 2011 when it cooked a meatball that weighed in at 1,100 pounds. And, now, a representative—an ­adjudicator—from Guinness World Records was on hand to determine if the Ohio record would fall.

One for the record book It is notoriously difficult to earn a world record. Guinness World Records reviews some 50,000 applications each year; only 3 percent are successful. For the Hilton Head meatball to roll into the record books, Guinness World

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

THE MAN WITH THE PLAN Chef Joe Sullivan of Mulberry Street Trattoria (right) and his son, Chris, admire their creation. Chef Sullivan supplied the recipe, multiplied it 520 times and supervised the multiday cooking process to create the 1,707-pound, 8-ounce meatball. “It is the recipe that I’ve been serving at the restaurant for years.”

Records insisted on three stipulations: it must outweigh the Ohio meatball, it must not fall apart when removed from its cooking pod, and it must be edible. Adjudicator Mike Janela, wearing a blue blazer with a Guinness World Records seal emblazoned on its breast pocket, watched as a forklift removed the meatball from the oven. The forklift set it gently on the ground long enough for volunteers to remove the top of the cooking pod. With the meatball held in place by a well-cooked outer crust, the forklift once again raised its cargo and placed it on a giant scale. Television crews, report­ ers, magazine photographers and scores of curious onlookers armed with camera phones pressed in close to record the


‘Initially, we thought it was a long shot ... then we thought, “We are the Italian-American Club. We can do it.” ’ CLUB PRESIDENT JOHN DECECCO

moment. Someone called out the weight as the crowd cheered, “We broke the record!” The crowd turned to Janela for con­ firmation, but his face showed no expression. “One of the rules is that it must be edible, so I am just doing my job here,” he said, tearing off a small sample of meat and popping it into his mouth. Again, everyone cheered, but Janela revealed nothing. He spoke briefly with Rob Lembo, a spokesman for the ItalianAmerican Club, and then the two men moved away from the group of onlookers to talk in private. Some in the crowd watched the two men carefully and wondered what was taking so long. Was the meatball indeed edible? Was it round enough? Had they overlooked something? “It doesn’t look like it’s OK,” said one man watching Janela and Lembo like a hawk. “Look at their faces. Something’s up.”

Go big or go home The Italian-American Club on Hilton Head has about 180 members. Besides sharing a love of their Italian heritage, the organization holds numerous fund­ raising events throughout the year and then donates proceeds—usually around $30,000—to local charities. There are wine-tasting galas, golf tournaments and Sunday Italian dinners. Their flagship event and biggest moneymaker is the annual daylong Italian Heritage Festival. Two years ago, Rob Lembo and his business partner, Christina Belen, cooked up an idea to boost attendance at the fes­ tival. Why not, they suggested, attempt to break the Guinness World Record for World’s Largest Meatball?

MOMENT OF TRUTH After cooking the giant meatball for days inside a custom-built cooking pod and a 7-foot-square oven, club members used a forklift to deliver the finished product. TASTE TEST As part of the official weigh-in, Guinness World Records adjudicator Mike Janela was the first to sample the meatball to certify that it was edible.

“Well, there was a lot of laughter, and nobody really took it seriously in the beginning,” Lembo recalled. When a little research proved that the feat could be accomplished, the club members went to work, said president John DeCecco. “Initially, we thought it was a long shot, a lot of work. But then we thought, ‘We are the Italian-American Club. We can do it.’ ” Chef Joe Sullivan of Mulberry Street Trattoria in Bluffton provided his recipe, multiplied it 520 times and helped secure the staggering amount of ingre­ dients needed: more than 1,800 pounds of beef and pork, 700 eggs, 250 pounds of breadcrumbs, 25 pounds of oregano, 56 pounds of salt and an equal amount of pepper. There was some Parmesan cheese in there, too, and some milk to keep everything nice and moist. Joe Carpinteri, a retired civil engineer, took on the task of designing a cooking pod, measuring just over 5 feet in height and 3½ feet in diameter, and a 7-footsquare, custom-built oven. Construction of the pod fell to Kevin Lawless, a local

blacksmith, sculptor and artist. The plan called for the club to unveil its creation on Saturday, Nov. 18, 2017, as the highlight of the 2017 Italian Heritage Festival. Preparation of the meatball began the Sunday before when volun­ teers joined Sullivan and his son, Chris, at The French Bakery, where the owners donated their oversized, 200-pound mixer to combine the ingredients. The next morning, the meat was loaded into the cooking pod, and the pod moved into the oven. Carpinteri switched on the oven, and, from that time on, vol­ unteers stood round-the-clock “meat­ ball watches” and recorded temperatures every half hour. Friday night, four days after cooking began, Chef Sullivan personally super­ vised the final hours of cooking. He stood watch all night, catching bits of sleep here and there, but always logging the temperature readings on time. ll

SCLIVING.COOP  | JANUARY 2018  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SC   scene

By Saturday morning, the meatball was cooked through, and the oven was switched off. A loudspeaker played Frank Sinatra tunes as the festival got under way with food vendors, live entertainment, a 5K run and a meatball-eating contest. Hilton Head Mayor David Bennett turned up and, along with ­countless others, peered through the oven window at the meatball. And, the local Italian priest, the Rev. Monsignor Ronald R. Cellini of Saint Gregory the Great Catholic Church, offered up a spontane­ ous prayer at the request of some of the club members.

Moment of truth Once the weigh-in was complete and Janela had tasted the meatball, it was loaded back onto the forklift and slowly moved to the center of the stage. Still unsure if the meatball had met the strict requirements imposed by

DIG IN Samples were served to spectators at the Italian Heritage Festival, but most of Hilton Head’s prize-winning meatball was immediately packaged into 3- to 5-pound portions and donated to Second Helpings, a nonprofit agency that distributes rescued food to those in need.

Guinness World Records, many listened as Janela took the microphone. “Hope everyone is doing well today,” Janela told the crowd, which responded with tentative applause and somewhat listless whistles. Janela picked up on the vibe and added, “Everyone sounds a little bit anxious.” Club members stood on stage with Janela; all of them looked anxious, indeed. “What you guys see here is a pretty big meatball,” Janela continued. “It was trying to be the biggest in the world. I am here on behalf of Guinness World Records to see if that is the case.” Still not tipping his hand, Janela

talked about how the club had been in regular contact with his organization as the creation of the meatball progressed. Finally, after keeping the crowd in sus­ pense a bit longer, Janela got down to business. “All right. So, the record to beat was 1,110 pounds, 7.84 ounces,” he said. “Today, the Italian-American Club of Hilton Head made a meatball with a weight of 1,707 pounds, 8 ounces!” The crowd began cheering. “I would like to officially congratu­ late and welcome you to Guinness World Records,” Janela said, holding up a framed certificate. “Congratulations! You are officially amazing!”

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SC   travels

EdVenture’s Flight inspires dreams to soar BY DIANE VETO PARHAM

The takeoff is unnerving. For a rookie at the controls of an airplane for the first time, every ounce of concentration is critical.

GET  THERE EdVenture is located at 211 Gervais St., Columbia. HOURS: Open daily, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ADMISSION: Adults and children 2 and older, $11.50; seniors (ages 62 and up) and military personnel or educators with ID, $10.50; members and children under 2, free. DETAILS: For more information, visit edventure.org or call (803) 779-3100.

26

STACE Y M O NTEB E LLO

THE PLANE PICKS UP SPEED, but not nearly enough to get off the ground. Alerts flash on the cockpit screen: Nose too low! Pull back on the controls! Just in the nick of time, the plane lifts and goes airborne. Below, earthbound land­ marks grow smaller; it’s all calm, clear skies ahead. Relief, however, is all too brief—suddenly, it’s time to land, and the nerves kick right back in. This mini adventure takes place in a matter of minutes and in the safety of a flight simulator in Columbia’s EdVenture children’s museum. But, the sensory experience is remarkably realistic. Now, to truly get a feel for what it’s like sitting in an airplane cockpit, step just a few feet away and climb inside a real one with a two-story-high view over the Congaree River and the Gervais Street bridge. “A lot of our visitors have never been on an airplane; this gives them that feeling,” EdVenture president and CEO Karen Coltrane says of the Flight exhibit that opened last summer. The stand­ out feature of the exhibit is visible from the museum’s exterior—the nose of an

Young visitors to the Flight exhibit love to step into the cockpit and take a seat at the controls, imagining themselves as pilots. The view looks out across the Congaree River in Columbia.

airplane juts out from the west side of the building, intriguing visitors to come inside, where they can sit in the pilot’s seat, toggle the cockpit controls and peer out at the vista beyond. “When one of the first kids in here said, ‘This is awesome!’ I knew we got it right,” Coltrane says. “And, when the parents try to climb in that cockpit, too, that also says we got it right.” Flight is designed as more than an entertaining outing for kids, she says. With experiential learning activities to appeal to guests from toddlers to teens, Flight is also meant to plant the seeds of interest in future aviation careers, espe­ cially in South Carolina’s burgeoning aeronautics industry. “The point is to get more kids ­thinking, ‘Hey, I like that Flight exhibit; I wonder if I could do something like

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

that?’ ” Coltrane says. The exhibit’s Boeing 757 cockpit, rescued from an “airplane boneyard” in Mississippi for display at EdVenture, features mostly illustrated controls, but there are enough moveable switches, knobs and levers to keep kids occupied and engaged and to give them a sense of the pilot’s workspace. Other real-life aeronautical parts include the massive Boeing 747 cowling (that’s the piece that covers a plane’s wing-mounted engine) at the exhibit entrance, as well as a cabin set-up with salvaged airplane seats, still with their original seatbelts and folddown tray tables. Visitors can take a seat just like any airplane passenger (“But we have more leg room,” Coltrane jokes) and watch a video screen at the front of the cabin showing looping footage of views from a plane flying over Columbia and Lake Murray. It’s not all about the pilot’s view, though. “Not everybody wants to be a pilot,” Coltrane says. “There are plenty of jobs here in South Carolina in build­ ing airplanes—jobs as engineers, techni­ cians, jobs that need skills in design and problem-solving.” Kids can learn about lift, one of the forces needed for flight, by stepping into a kid-sized wind tunnel and strapping on a pair of wings while air rushes by. They can manipulate a Kuka robot, which demonstrates the technology used in building airplanes. For a more hands-on approach to learning aerodynamics, there’s a station equipped with plenty of scrap paper and instructions for how to fold paper into a plane that will fly. After testing their handmade aircraft by tossing them through targeted hoops, kids can return to the table to tweak their designs. “We know at any given moment a spark can happen for a child,” Coltrane says. “We’re setting up an environment here for that to happen.”


Come Catch a Memory Santee Cooper Country is home to South Carolina’s great lakes — Marion and Moultrie • 171,000 acres with world-class fishing year-round • Birding, hiking, biking, boating, lakeside camping • 12 championship golf courses • Fascinating museums • Breathtaking gardens • 1 hour from Columbia and Charleston

hiltonheadseafoodfestival.com

Order our 2018 Visitors Guide Call (803) 854-2131 or email tourscc@oburg.net www.SanteeCooperCountry.org/SCL

FEBRUARY 19-25, 2018

R E A D E R R E P LY T R AV E L S W E E P S TA K E S Register below, or online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply YES! Enter me in the drawing for a Hilton Head Island Seafood Festival package and a $100 gift card. Name

Liven up your winter! South Carolina Living and the Hilton Head Island Seafood Festival have joined together to help you liven up winter. Sign up today for our Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes and your chance to win a $100 Visa gift card and a Hilton Head Island Seafood Festival Special Events package, which includes two tickets to the festival, Celebrity Chef Cooking Demonstration, Pig Pickin’ & Oyster Roast, VIP Lounge access, Seafood Sunday Brunch and a Festival Gift Bag. One lucky winner will be drawn at random from entries received by January 31. Register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply or mail in the coupon.

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BY ENTERING, YOU MAY RECEIVE INFORMATION FROM THESE GREAT SPONSORS:

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27


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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

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SC   recipe

Cold-weather comfort BY BELINDA SMITH-SULLIVAN

When it’s nippy outside, let these delicious soups and stews keep you cozy on the inside. Easy to prepare and even to make ahead, they’re per fect with buttery corn muffin s, hot popovers or crusty bre ad. Make a big batch to feed the family, or save the left ­ overs for tomorrow’s lunch.

WHITE BEAN AND SAUSAGE SOUP MAKES 6–8 SERVINGS

2 tablespoons olive oil 1 pound kielbasa sausage, cut into ½-inch cubes 1 large onion, diced small 2 red bell peppers, diced small 3 carrots, diced small 4 garlic cloves, minced 2 tablespoons chopped sage 1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary Kosher salt, to taste K A REN H ERM A N N

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste ¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes 4 cups unsalted chicken stock (more if needed) 1 14-ounce can diced tomatoes 3 cans (about 15 ounces each) great northern, navy or cannellini beans, drained and rinsed ½ pound small pasta (ditalini or orzo) 1 pound baby spinach or arugula Freshly grated Parmesan cheese

In a large stockpot over medium heat, heat olive oil. Cook sausage until brown on all sides, about 7 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon to a bowl and set aside. Add onions, bell peppers and carrots, and saute until onions are translucent. Add garlic, and cook 1 minute longer. Add sage, rosemary, salt, pepper and pepper flakes. Stir in stock, tomatoes and cooked sausage. Bring to a boil, lower heat and simmer for 15 minutes. In a medium bowl, mash one can of beans with a fork, and stir into hot mixture. Stir in remaining beans and pasta, and cook an additional 10 minutes. If too thick, add chicken stock. Line soup bowls with spinach, and ladle soup on top. Garnish with Parmesan cheese.

CHICKEN AND CORN CHOWDER MAKES 6–8 SERVINGS

5 slices bacon, sliced crosswise into ½-inch pieces 1 tablespoon unsalted butter 2 small onions, chopped 1 red bell pepper, chopped 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 1 quart unsalted chicken stock 2 medium sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into ½-inch cubes

1 large russet potato, peeled and cut into ½-inch cubes 2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme 1 12-ounce bag frozen corn kernels ½ cup heavy cream 2 cups diced cooked chicken Kosher salt, to taste Freshly ground black pepper, to taste 1 cup chopped green onions, divided ½ cup cilantro, divided

In a large pot over medium heat, cook bacon until crisp, working in batches. Pour off all but 2 tablespoons of drippings, and add butter. Add onions and bell pepper, and saute until translucent, 5–6 minutes. Add flour, and stir 2 minutes. Mix in stock, potatoes and thyme, and bring to a boil. G I N A M OORE

30

Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, until potatoes are tender, about 10 minutes. Add corn and cream, and simmer until corn is tender, about 10 minutes. Add chicken, bacon, half of green onions, half of cilantro, salt and pepper, and simmer 5 minutes. Ladle into bowls, and garnish with remaining green onions and cilantro.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP


CHICKEN BRUNSWICK STEW MAKES 6–8 SERVINGS

1 pound shredded chicken (storebought rotisserie or home-cooked) ¾ cup barbecue sauce ½ cup ketchup ¼ cup Worcestershire sauce 2 cups peeled russet potatoes, cut into ½-inch cubes 1 package frozen lima beans 1 package frozen whole corn kernels 1 28-ounce can crushed or diced tomatoes

1 cup chicken stock (more if needed) ½ large onion, chopped 1 carrot, chopped Kosher salt, to taste Freshly ground black pepper, to taste ½ teaspoon dried oregano ¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper 1 bay leaf Chopped parsley for garnish

Prepare all ingredients in advance, so you can add them to the pot at the same time. In a large stockpot, add all ingredients except parsley, and stir well to combine. Bring to a boil over medium heat. Lower heat, and simmer 30–40 minutes, until desired thickness. If too thick, add chicken stock. Remove bay leaf before serving. Ladle into bowls, and garnish with parsley.

GW ÉN A Ë L LE VOT

Note: Brunswick stew is a perfect dish for using leftover meats, especially chicken and pork. You can also prepare it in a slow cooker, cooking 6 hours on low.

M ICH A E L PH I LLI P S

What’s cooking at SCLiving.coop Hot-from-the-oven popovers are the perfect partner for soups and stews. Get the recipe and video tips from Chef Belinda at

SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda

BLACK BEAN AND HAM SOUP MAKES 6–8 SERVINGS

2 tablespoons olive oil 1 onion, diced 1 large carrot, diced 1 stalk celery, diced 2 cloves garlic, minced ½ jalapeno pepper (seeds and membrane removed), minced 1½ teaspoons dried oregano 1 teaspoon ground cumin ½ teaspoon chili powder ½ teaspoon curry powder

Kosher salt, to taste Freshly ground black pepper, to taste 2 cups unsalted chicken stock (more if needed) 3–4 cans (14.5 ounces each) black beans, rinsed and drained 2 tablespoons tequila (optional) 8 ounces diced ham 1 large green onion, chopped and divided Sour cream for garnish Cilantro for garnish

In a large stockpot, heat olive oil over medium heat. Saute onions, carrots and celery until onions are translucent. Add garlic, jalapeno, oregano, cumin, chili powder, curry powder, salt and pepper; stir and cook one additional minute. Add stock and half of beans. Lower heat, and simmer uncovered 20–25 minutes until thickened. With an immersion or stand blender, puree this mixture. (For a smoother soup, add all beans at once and puree. For chunkier soup, add the rest of the beans after pureeing the first half.) Remove pot from heat before adding tequila (to prevent alcohol from igniting), then add remaining beans, ham and half of green onions. Return pot to heat, stir to combine and cook an additional 15 minutes. If too thick, add chicken stock. Serve with green onions, sour cream and cilantro.

I U LI I A N EDRYGA I LOVA

SCLIVING.COOP  | JANUARY 2018  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

31


|

SC   gardener

Chillin’ with winter daphne

JANUARY IN THE GARDEN

BY L.A. JACKSON

n Don’t kick your Christmas tree to the curb just yet. Set it up in the backyard as a temporary wildbird haven. Make it even more hospitable to your winged friends by redecorating with seed bells, suet bars and strings of edible berries.

DELIGHTFUL: A PLANT THAT OVERWHELMS

the winter garden with a sweet scent you wouldn’t expect until the height of spring. Sneaky: fragrant blooms so shy in size that you’ll likely smell them before you see them. Welcome to the delightfully sneaky world of winter daphne (Daphne odora). Through spring, summer and fall, this broadleaf evergreen isn’t particularly special. Maturing to a modest 3 to 4 feet high and about as wide, the dense,

n If the windows of your home are filled with overwintering plants, make sure their leaves aren’t touching the glass panes. On especially cold nights, glass-hugging foliage of tender plants can get damaged.

L . A . JACKSO N

TIP OF THE MONTH If you enjoy starting plants from seeds, now is prime time to order from catalogs and online sites. Not only will earlybird ordering ensure you have seeds in hand when you’re ready to crank up planting, it reduces the chance of getting skunked by new and superfavorite selections being sold out.

32

rounded bush spends its growing seasons in a slumber of green leaves. Ho-hum. But, during the coldest times of the year, winter daphne weaves its beguil­ ing spell. Normally starting in January and lasting into February, modest clus­ ters of small, white or pale-pink, bellshaped flowers brave the cold air and fill the hibernating garden with their unex­ pected perfume—just what chilled gar­ deners need to affirm that, yes, a new spring is coming. If you like scented and sassy, try one of winter daphne’s more popular culti­ vars, Aureomarginata, with variegated leaves edged in a head-turning butter-­ yellow. This unusual beauty is a common offering at many quality garden centers and not hard to find online, either. Well suited for plant-hardiness zones 7 through 9, winter daphne is a small, deer-resistant, Far East import that has been gracing Southern gardens for years, in spite of rumors that it is a fickle plant, luring gardeners to love it and then unexpectedly dying in their arms. True, winter daphne can have prob­ lems, especially with crown and root rot. But, much of this is a matter of location, location, location. First, it should be set

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

L . A . JACKSO N

During the coldest times of the year, winter daphne weaves its beguiling spell.

n While business is slow at your local small-engine repair shop, have your motorized garden tools serviced before the spring rush of customers.

Winter daphne is a treat for the senses in the coldest months, with pretty, little flowers and a sweet fragrance.

in an area that receives some morning sun but is shaded from the worst after­ noon rays in the summer. This—and a good layer of mulch—will lessen troubles associated with underwatering and, espe­ cially, overwatering. To the point, winter daphne needs excellent drainage. A raised bed, of course, is one remedy, but working in plenty of quality, commercial topsoil and mounding the planting will also help prevent a soggy-bottom death. And, winter daphne has a strong aver­ sion to being relocated. Basically, if you move it, you’ll lose it, so place it correctly the first time. Good choices include close to a doorway, gate or path, but also con­ sider a tucked-away corner where its strongly scented flowers can play hideand-seek with gardeners’ noses on crisp winter days. L.A. JACKSON is the former editor of Carolina Gardener magazine. Contact him at lajackson1@gmail.com.


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35


|

SC   calendar JAN 15 – FEB 15

Upstate JA NUA RY

15–17  Ice on Main, Main Street,

Greenville. (864) 467‑4355. 15–18  “Ink Travels,” Sikes Hall Showcase, Clemson University, Clemson. (864) 656‑3881. 16–18  Weekday Waterfall Tour, Oconee State Park, Mountain Rest. (864) 638‑5353. 18  Palmetto Poets: Speaking of the South, Peace Center, Greenville. (864) 467‑3000. 18  Violinist Kristin Lee, Brooks Center for the Performing Arts, Clemson. (864) 656‑7787. 19  The Aspen String Trio, Daniel Recital Hall, Converse College, Spartanburg. (864) 596‑9173. 19–20  SE Championship Bull Riding, T. Ed Garrison Livestock Arena, Pendleton. (864) 377‑1479. 19–21  Hands on a Hardbody, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. 20  Scott Seaton conducts Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 4, Twichell Auditorium, Converse College, Spartanburg. (864) 948‑9020. 20  Winter Bluegrass Jubilee, Pickens High School, Pickens. (864) 918‑5277. 24  Poetry reading by Distinguished Writer-in-Residence Jessica Jacobs, Bain Room, Converse College, Spartanburg. (864) 596‑9186. 25  Cabaret, Brooks Center for the Performing Arts, Clemson. (864) 656‑7787. 26–28  Summer and Smoke, Twichell Auditorium, Converse College, Spartanburg. (864) 596‑9724. 27–28  Greenville Symphony Orchestra presents: Love Stories, Peace Center, Greenville. (864) 467‑3000. 30  The Mountaintop, Brooks Center for the Performing Arts, Clemson. (864) 656‑7787. F EB R UA RY

1  Chautauqua History Alive:

George Washington, Spartanburg County Public Libraries Headquarters Library, Spartanburg. (864) 244‑1499. 1  The Birdland All-Stars featuring Tommy Igoe, Brooks Center for the Performing Arts, Clemson. (864) 656‑7787. 2  Bluegrass Spartanburg: Della Mae, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. 3  Chautauqua History Alive: George Washington, Wade Hampton High School, Greenville. (864) 244‑1499.

36

3  Sweetheart Charity Ball, Hyatt

Regency Greenville, Greenville. (864) 233‑6565. 5  Helsingborg Symphony Orchestra, Brooks Center for the Performing Arts, Clemson. (864) 656‑7787. 6–8  Weekday Waterfall Tour, Devils Fork State Park, Oconee. (864) 944‑2639. 8  Broadway Backwards 2: A Concert with a Twist, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 585‑8278. 8  Piano Battle, Founder’s Memorial Amphitorium, Bob Jones University, Greenville. (864) 770‑1372. 8–28  “Reconstructed Images and Nature Morte,” Milliken Art Gallery, Converse College, Spartanburg. (864) 596‑9181. 9  Eutaw Springs: The Final Battle of the American Revolution’s Southern Campaign book signing, Cowpens National Battlefield, Gaffney. (864) 461‑2828. 9–10  Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. 9–11  Lunatics at Large, Oconee Community Theatre, Seneca. (864) 882‑1910. 12  Attacca Quartet, Daniel Recital Hall, Converse College, Spartanburg. (864) 596‑9724. O NG O ING

Third Thursdays  ArtWalk,

downtown cultural district, Spartanburg. (864) 582‑7616. Fridays  Starry Nights, Roper Mountain Science Center, Greenville. (864) 355‑8900.

Midlands JANUARY

20  Aiken Camellia Society Show, Aiken First Presbyterian Church, Aiken. (803) 279‑9451. 20  Come Draw with Me! Culture & Heritage Museums, Rock Hill. (803) 329‑2121. 20  Night Sky and Telescope Viewing 101, South Carolina State Museum, Columbia. (803) 898‑4921. 20  Southern Sound Series: Nikki Lane, McCelvey Center, York. tickets@chmuseums.org. 22  Irving Berlin’s I Love a Piano, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑6264. 25  Dublin Irish Dance, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑6264. 27  Jimmy Fortune, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑6264.

SCLiving.coop/calendar Our mobile-friendly site lists even more festivals, shows and events. You’ll also find instructions on submitting your event. Please confirm information with the hosting event before attending. 27  Watercolor Textures with Marcia Kort Buike, Center for the Arts, Rock Hill. (803) 328‑2787. 28  Lexington County Chili CookOff, Icehouse Amphitheater, Lexington. (803) 254‑3474. 28  The Second City: Look Both Ways Before Talking, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑6264. 29  Terrance Simien & the Zydeco Experience, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑6264. FEBR UARY

2–4  Antiques in the Heart of Aiken Show & Sale, Aiken Center for the Arts, Aiken. (803) 641‑9094. 3  Battle of Rivers Bridge Anniversary Lectures, Rivers Bridge State Historic Site, Ehrhardt. (803) 267‑3675. 3  Clean Sweep Rummage Sale, Cantey Building, South Carolina State Fairgrounds, Columbia. (803) 252‑4552. 4  The World Famous Glenn Miller Orchestra, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑6264. 5  Arlo Guthrie Re:Generation Tour, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑6264. 7  A Tribute to Pavarotti, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑6264. 9  Pianist Michelle Cann, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑6264. 10  Time for You—Marbleized Dishes with Angie Clinton, Center for the Arts, Rock Hill. (803) 328‑2787. 11  Sense and Sensibility, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑6264. ONGOING

Daily, Jan. 18–March 4  Winter

Exhibit featuring Robert Lyon and Alicia Cully, Arts & Heritage Center, North Augusta. (803) 441‑4380.

Lowcountry JANUARY

17  Tech Talk, Drs. Bruce and

Lee Foundation Library, Florence. (843) 413‑7075. 17–18  S.C. AgriBiz & Farm Expo, Florence Civic Center, Florence. (864) 237‑3648. 18  Jon Conley Concert, FMU Performing Arts Center, Florence. (843) 661‑4444.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

18–21  Charleston Jazz Festival,

multiple venues, Charleston. (843) 641‑0011. 19–27  Driving Miss Daisy, Florence Little Theatre, Florence. (843) 662‑3731. 20  Daddy Daughter Dance Masquerade, Hilton Head Beach and Tennis, Hilton Head Island. (843) 681‑7273. 20  Hunting Tales with Archibald Rutledge, Hampton Plantation State Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 546‑9361. 20  The Affair with the Arts—Vegas Style, USC-Beaufort Center for the Arts, Beaufort. (843) 521‑4145. 24  International Holocaust Remembrance Program, Cauthen Education Center, Francis Marion University, Florence. (843) 661‑1188. 26  A Night in the Valley, The College Center, Trident Technical College Main Campus, North Charleston. (843) 574‑6580. 26  Let’s Hang On—Tribute to Frankie Valli, USC-Beaufort Center for the Arts, Beaufort. (843) 521‑4145. 26–28  Charleston Boat Show, Charleston Area Convention Center, North Charleston. (864) 250‑9713. 27  Gun and Knife Show, Florence Civic Center, Florence. (843) 679‑9417. 27  Hilton Head Snow Day, Shelter Cove Community Park, Hilton Head Island. (843) 681‑7273. 27  Met Opera Live in HD— Puccini’s Tosca, USC-Beaufort Center for the Arts, Beaufort. (843) 521‑4145. 28–31  Come Out and Paint S.C. Parks! with Michel McNinch, Givhans Ferry State Park, Ridgeville. (803) 360‑2994. 28  Lowcountry Oyster Festival, Boone Hall Plantation, Mount Pleasant. jpeppler@explorecharleston.com. 28  Stephanie Nakasian, Fripp Island Community Center, Fripp Island. (843) 940‑8964. FEBR UARY

1–28  Gullah Celebration, multiple venues, Hilton Head Island. (843) 255‑7304. 2–4  Low Country Winter Coin Show, Exchange Park Fairgrounds, Ladson. lowcountrycoinclub@att.net. 3  Charleston STEM Festival, Brittlebank Park, Charleston. chs.stemfest@gmail.com.

3  Paws and Pearls Oyster Roast,

Summerville Country Club, Summerville. (843) 871‑3820. 4  Golden Readers, Florence Little Theatre, Florence. (843) 662‑3731. 7–10  Moliere’s The Miser, Francis Marion University Performing Arts Center, Florence. (843) 661‑1385. 8  Author AJ Tata, Drs. Bruce and Lee Foundation Library, Florence. (843) 413‑7065. 9  Cirque Zuma Zuma, USC‑Beaufort Center for the Arts, Beaufort. (843) 521‑4145. 9–10  Florence Stampede and Pro Rodeo, Florence Civic Center, Florence. (843) 679‑9417. 10  Bacon and Bourbon, North Charleston Convention Center, North Charleston. (843) 819‑5947. 10  Met Opera Live in HD— Donizetti’s L’Elisir d’Amore, USC‑Beaufort Center for the Arts, Beaufort. (843) 521‑4145. 10  Whale of a Sale, Founders Hall, Charleston. whale@jlcharleston.org. 10–11  Lowcountry Irish Fest, Omar Shrine Convention Center, Mount Pleasant. (843) 754‑0155. 10–11  Myrtle Beach Stamp & Postcard Show, Clarion Hotel and Conference Center, Myrtle Beach. (843) 331‑0112. 11  Chefs’ Feast 2018, North Charleston Convention Center, North Charleston. (843) 747‑8146. 11  Craft Fair to benefit Low Country Food Bank, Base Recreation Center, Myrtle Beach. (843) 578‑1486. 12  Florence Symphony Orchestra presents the 3 Tenors of Florence, Francis Marion University Performing Arts Center, Florence. (843) 661‑2541. 14  Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad, Francis Marion University Performing Arts Center, Florence. (843) 661‑4444. 15  “Love the Arts” Education Fundraiser, The Stables at the Inn at the Crossroads, Lake City. (843) 374‑2482. 15  Pianist and composer Sonny Paladino, Francis Marion University Performing Arts Center, Florence. (843) 661‑4444. ONGOING

Weekdays, Jan. 26–March 30 

Pee Dee Regional Arts Competition Exhibit, Florence County Museum Waters Building, Florence. (843) 676‑1200.


|

SC   humor me

Just call me Joe BY JAN A. IGOE

IT WAS SUNDAY, WHICH

is not a day of rest if you’re self-employed. But it was a good day. I was on track to meet every deadline, only taking an occa­ sional break to release the hounds, as they say. That’s when it happened. One of my beloved mutts broke loose and was nowhere to be found. I scoured the neighborhood shout­ ing her name. “Molly, come. Molly, Come. Molly, COME.” Finally, the ungrateful mutt hurtled through a hedge to tackle me the way Lawrence Taylor sacked Joe Theismann in 1985, except Lawrence didn’t lick his face. I never heard her coming until my nose hit the pavement. Splat. Game over. When the stars and rings of Saturn finally faded, I lifted my loopy head to take inventory. Arms? Still attached. Nose? Bloody and smooshed. Glasses? Totally mangled. Teeth, present and pro­ truding through lower lip. So far, so good. Considering. When I tried to get up, the drama unfolded. Between skiing, taming feisty dogs and an uncanny ability to find holes awaiting someone to trip, I’ve shown my knees little mercy. But, until today, they both could bend. Now, not so much. The emergency-room crew was delightful, especially the doctor who shot me so full of numbing juice that a broken kneecap sounded like a problem any Band-Aid could fix. But, I hadn’t met Lucy-the-Crutch-Nurse yet. Nurse Lucy was wearing a surgical

38

mask and having a coughing fit. Green germs were flying out the sides of her mask, where she schmeared her gloved hand every few seconds before wiping it on my crutch. Lucy had the demeanor of a vulture at a car wreck. The woman wanted to kill something. “On a scale of one to 10, what’s your pain level?” she hacked. I’d answered this question a half-dozen times, but every hospital person is supposed to repeat stuff so they don’t amputate your foot when you come in with an earache. “Two, if I stay still,” I said. “Twelve, if I move.” She picked up my limp leg and dropped it in an ankle-to-thigh splint, battened down the Velcro and asked how I felt. She and her germs were about three inches from my face, so I felt like I could hop to Ohio if it meant getting away from her. “Um, crooked,” I ventured meekly,

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

noting that my kneecap was poking out at a 45-degree angle. “Well, you obviously moved,” she coughed, rearranging my disobedi­ ent leg and strapping the brace tighter. “Have you used crutches before?” She then proceeded to tell me how. In theory, you place the crutches at hip width. Lift your bad leg in front. Balance on your good leg. Move the crutches 12 inches forward. Shift your weight to your arms. Don’t lean on your armpits. Look where you’re going. Stop looking down. Do a cart­ wheel. Dance a jig. Fly to the moon … Easy, right? Nurse Lucy barked displeasure at my progress, while I contemplated beating her with my crutch for extra points. She was called away to infect some other patient in the nick of time. This whole adventure has made me even madder at healthy people who park in handicap spaces. Like the cham­ pion singles player I met while walking my dogs, for instance. He parks his Benz in those spots during his private tennis lesson. What he really needs is a lesson in empathy. I could teach him with two words: “Molly. Come.” JAN IGOE has raised an exciting new breed of dog: offensive tackle. Listen up, Bulldogs, Gamecocks, Chanticleers, Tigers and Buccaneers. This is your chance to court true talent. She won’t last long. Send your best offers to HumorMe@SCLiving.coop.


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South Carolina Living January 2018  

Learn how a Pickens County charity is using a village of tiny houses to give homeless clients a chance at a better life.

South Carolina Living January 2018  

Learn how a Pickens County charity is using a village of tiny houses to give homeless clients a chance at a better life.

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