South Carolina Living August 2022

Page 1

Head of CHANGEOUT the class The finalists for South Carolina’s Teacher of the Year share their passion for teaching

SC RECIPE

Breakfast for dinner HUMOR ME

AUGUST 2022

If it tastes good, run


The Invention of the Year The world’s lightest and most portable mobility device

Once in a lifetime, a product comes along that truly moves people. Introducing the future of battery-powered personal transportation . . . The Zinger. Throughout the ages, there have been many important advances in mobility. Canes, walkers, rollators, and scooters were created to help people with mobility issues get around and retain their independence. Lately, however, there haven’t been any new improvements to these existing products or developments in this field. Until now. Recently, an innovative design engineer who’s developed one of the world’s most popular products created a completely new breakthrough . . . a personal electric vehicle. It’s called the Zinger, and there is nothing out there quite like it. “What my wife especially loves is it gives her back feelings of safety and independence which has given a real boost to her confidence and happiness! Thank You!” –Kent C., California Available in Green,

The first thing you’ll notice about the Zinger is its unique Black and Blue (shown) 10” look. It doesn’t look like a scooter. Its sleek, lightweight it can go up to 6 miles an yet durable frame is made with aircraft grade aluminum so hour and its rechargeable it weighs only 47.2 lbs. It features one-touch folding and battery can go up to 8 The Zinger folds to a mere 10 inches. unfolding – when folded it can be wheeled around like a miles on a single charge. With its low center of gravity and suitcase and fits easily into a backseat or trunk. Then, there inflatable tires it can handle rugged terrain and is virtually are the steering levers. They enable the Zinger to move tip-proof. Think about it, you can take your Zinger almost forward, backward, turn on a dime and even pull right up anywhere, so you don’t have to let mobility issues rule to a table or desk. With its compact yet powerful motor your life.

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THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS VOLUME 76 • NUMBER 8 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240)

Read in more than 600,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033 Tel: (803) 926‑3175 Fax: (803) 796‑6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop

2022 |aug 13 A passion

for teaching

Meet the five finalists for the 2023 South Carolina Teacher of the Year award and learn how they set high standards for classroom education.

EDITOR

Keith Phillips Tel: (803) 739‑3040 Email: Keith.Phillips@ecsc.org FIELD EDITOR

Josh Crotzer

PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

Raphael Ofendo Reyes ART DIRECTOR

Sharri Harris Wolfgang DESIGNER

Trevor Bauknight PRODUCTION

Andrew Chapman WEB EDITOR

4

CO-OP NEWS

6

AGENDA

8

DIALOGUE

Chase Toler

COPY EDITORS

Jennifer Jas, Jim Poindexter CONTRIBUTORS

Jared Bailey, Abby Berry, Mike Couick, Jan A. Igoe, L.A. Jackson, Kiley Kellermeyer, Belinda Smith-Sullivan Lou Green

ADVERTISING

NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

10

American MainStreet Publications Tel: (512) 441‑5200 Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor.

12

Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices.

by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network. $8 nonmembers

$5.94 members,

Breakfast. It’s what’s for dinner SC STORIES

Examining insects

18 19 20

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

10

MARKETPLACE SC GARDENER

Summer-blooming hostas

Dig into the facts of these pretty perennials that can survive and thrive during the hottest days of the year.

22

HUMOR ME

If it tastes good, run

Put down the french fries and sink your teeth into Jan A. Igoe’s thoughts on better living through nutrition.

Head of the class The finalists for South Carolina’s Teacher of the Year share their passion for teaching

Member of the AMP network reaching more than 9 million homes and businesses

SC RECIPE

Breakfast for dinner HUMOR ME

If it tastes good, run AUGUST 2022

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS:

RECIPE

Spend the day with John Morse, professor emeritus of entomology at Clemson University, for a better understanding of the 14,000 species of insects that call South Carolina home.

local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING is brought to you

Competing with TikTok

If breakfast is the most important meal of the day, why not enjoy it for dinner too?

ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send to your

© COPYRIGHT 2022. The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor.

Spending more time indoors this summer? Consider these tips to improve your home’s air quality. Even before Netflix, social media and video games came onto the scene, teachers like Ms. Ruth Funderburk knew how to keep their students on track.

PUBLISHER

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739‑5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop

Updates from your cooperative

Deion Jamison, South Carolina’s 2023 Teacher of the Year, is ready to roam the state as an advocate for education and a mentor to other classroom teachers. Photo by John Gillespie.

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FRO M TO P: COU RTESY O F WOO DRU FF M I DDLE SC H OO L; I U LI IA N E DRYGA I LOVA ; L . A . JAC KSO N


SC |agenda Stay fresh: Tips for better indoor air quality

ONLY ON

SCLiving.coop

G I N A M OO R E

DE POS ITPH OTOS

In fact, the Environmental Protection Agency estimates the average person spends 90% of their life inside a home or office. Additionally, our buildings are becoming more energy efficient—they’re better insulated and sealed with less ventilation—which is great for our energy bills but not so much for indoor air quality. The thought of breathing pollutants can be scary, but there are ways you can easily improve the air quality of your home.

WE SPEND A LOT OF TIME INDOORS.

Change your air filter often. Clogged, dirty filters reduce the amount of airflow and the HVAC system’s efficiency. When a filter becomes too clogged, the excess dirt and dust are sent through your air ducts, adding unnecessary allergens and other unwanted particles into your living space. The Department of Energy recommends replacing your air filter every month or two during the summer. Regularly vacuum carpet and rugs. This tip is especially important if you have furry friends. The cleaner the home, the healthier the home. Vacuuming carpet and area rugs once a week can greatly reduce the accumulation of pet dander and dust inside your home.

Breakfast for dinner

Your house, your rules. So turn to Page 10 for Chef Belinda Smith-Sullivan’s recipes that make the most important meal of the day work at any time of the day. Then point your browser to SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda for Pancakes with Spicy Chicken and Sriracha Syrup, shown above, and even more delicious recipes and advice including: Get cracking—Easy egg recipes from Chef Belinda Smith-Sullivan’s popular cookbook, Let’s Brunch. Flipping over omelets—In this popular how-to video, Chef Belinda shows you how to turn an omelet, whether you prefer to fold or flip.

M A R K G I LLI L A N D

Use vents to remove cooking fumes. Those exhaust fans aren’t just for when you burn the bacon. Fans help remove fumes emitted while cooking and eliminate unwanted moisture and odors. They may be a bit noisy, but these handy tools can help you improve indoor air quality while you’re preparing that culinary masterpiece (or even a grilled cheese sandwich!). Get a handle on humidity. Moisture in the air can carry bacte-

ria and other unwanted particles that you eventually breathe in. Dehumidifiers work to remove that moisture from the air, reducing the amount of bacteria, mold and other allergens in your home.

Taking simple steps to purify indoor air can improve your health and overall quality of life. With a little effort, you can boost the indoor air quality of your home and breathe a bit easier. —ABBY BERRY 6

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING | AUGUST 2022 | SCLIVING.COOP

Surviving the dog days of summer

As we pass through another sweltering August in South Carolina, use these tips to keep your cool while also keeping power bills low. See the story at SCLiving.coop/energy.


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| dialogue Competing with TikTok QUITE FRANKLY, I DON’T KNOW HOW TEACHERS DO IT TODAY.

MIKE COUICK

President and CEO, The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina

These teachers make their classrooms just as exciting as any game that could be played.

8

There are so many things competing for our students’ time and attention that didn’t exist when I was a student at York County’s Bethel Elementary in the late 1960s. In fact, all that was competing with school then were farm chores. Once the cows were fed in the morning and you checked your shoes to make sure there was no cow hockey on them, you went to school and were all about school. My mother was a teacher at the school, so she drove my brother and me directly there. I knew everybody who was in our classroom, and half of them I was kin to. In fact, my fourth grade teacher, Ms. Ruth Funderburk, had gone to school with my grandmother and taught my mother, so she knew about me before I walked through the door. Throughout the school day, I interacted with people I would also see at church or in town, like the lady who ran the cafeteria or the couple who kept the school immaculate. If I did have a hard time finishing lessons, it was identified by the end of the day that I needed to do some extra work, and a handwritten note from the teacher was sent home. I knew that if I didn’t do it, she certainly knew how to reach out to my mom and let her know that “Michael” was having problems. I think about the teachers I had the privilege of interviewing as a final-round judge in the 2023 South Carolina Teacher of the Year ­competition​— what they’re competing with, both good and bad. It’s not just TV anymore, it’s Netflix and Prime, YouTube and TikTok, video games and social media. These distractions steal away the attention of bright students who are just looking for something exciting to do or see. Add to that the challenge of parents who may be working in a different city and have a long commute. Interactions and communications between teachers and parents have more complexities and channels than the note home or the occasional inperson conference. More diverse classrooms also require that teachers have the ability to connect with different students in different ways. Through my role as a judge, I was exposed to teachers doing amazing things to overcome these

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING | AUGUST 2022 | SCLIVING.COOP

challenges. They made their classrooms just as exciting as any game that could be played. They made their students feel important and engaged. I watched a math teacher create dance steps for her geometry lesson about angles. She paired the steps with hip-hop music, imprinting on her ­students the elements of the lesson through verbal ­repetition and physical motion. I talked to a teacher who said it was his goal to be a part of every extracurricular event in his rural community—every athletic contest, PTO meeting and service organization activity. He took it so far as to meet with all his state legislators to tell them, “Here’s what I’m doing in my classroom, and here are the things you could do to help support me.” Another teacher recognized that parts of her community were challenged by language barriers and parents working extended hours. So, she found ways to interact with them on the weekends to let them know she cared. And I guess that was the central message that came through from all five Teacher of the Year finalists. It was very discernible in my interviews with them, and it had to be obvious to their students— they care. That’s the one common denominator between Ruth Funderburk in 1968 and these award-winning teachers (and teachers like them) today. They care, they love and they are committed to education. Cooperatives have similar responsibilities and motivations. Emerging technologies, diverse communities and an increasing need for services require innovative approaches. These challenges are opportunities for us to show that we care and are committed to the people we serve. We are serving the same communities as these teachers, and I hope we can have the same impact.

Turn to Page 13 for more on the five finalists in the 2023 Teacher of the Year competition.


“In recent years, a group of international designers and artists has rediscovered the innate modernity of Italian blown glass, turning to Murano as inspiration…” — New York Times, 2020

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Approaching Burano Island off of northern Venice was like being swept away in a dream. Known for its brightly-painted fisherman houses that line the canals, I was greeted with every color of the rainbow. Since before the Venetian Republic, Burano was home to fishermen and legend says that the houses were painted in bright hues so they could see their way home when fog blanketed the lagoon. Inspiration struck. I wanted to capture this historical beauty in the centuries old art form of Murano. Still regarded as being the finest form craftsmanship in the world, Murano has evolved into modern day fashion statements. So I hopped on a vaporetto for a forty minute ride to Venice and sought out the impeccable talents of one of Venice’s finest Murano artisans. They’ve captured the vibrant colors of the iconic fisherman houses in the perfect hand-formed beads of The Rainbow Murano Necklace. To own a piece of authentic Murano is to own a piece of fine art steeped in history. Each and every piece is a one-of-a-kind masterpiece. I want to make it easy for you to send her over the rainbow. That’s why for a limited time you can treat her to the The Murano Rainbow

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| recipe

If breakfast is the most important meal of the day, wh y not enjoy it for dinne r too? Instead of break ing the fast, break the rules!

Breakfast. It’s what’s for dinner

KAREN HERMANN

GWÉ N A Ë L LE VOT

BY BELINDA SMITH-SULLIVAN

HAM SPINACH CHEDDAR AND MUSHROOM STRATA 1 tablespoon butter, or cooking spray 2 cups cubed bread (leftover French, wheat, rolls, etc.) 8 ounces cooked ham, cubed 1 cup grated cheese, Gruyere or fontina 1 10-ounce package frozen spinach, thawed and drained well

1–2 cups mushrooms, chopped or sliced 4 large eggs, room temperature 1½ cups milk Kosher salt White pepper ¼ teaspoon nutmeg Pinch, cayenne pepper 1 tablespoon fresh chopped thyme

Butter an 8-by-8-inch baking dish. Into bottom of dish, spread cubed bread. Layer with ham, cheese, spinach and mushrooms. In a medium bowl, whisk together eggs, milk, salt, pepper, nutmeg, cayenne and thyme. Pour custard over bread. Wrap with plastic wrap and refrigerate for a few hours, up to 12 hours. Remove from refrigerator 30 minutes before baking. Heat oven to 350 F. Bake until cheese is melted and the custard is set in the center, about 45 minutes. Let cool slightly and serve warm. Wringing it. When using frozen spinach in your recipe, first thaw and then wrap in a clean kitchen towel and wring the excess water out of the spinach. Now it is ready to use in your recipe. CHEF’S TIP

I U LI IA N E DRYGA I LOVA

SERVES 4–6

SAUSAGE SHAKSHUKA SERVES 4–6

1 1 1 1 4

tablespoon olive oil pound bulk Italian sausage small onion, chopped garlic clove, minced cups marinara sauce, ­store‑bought or homemade Pinch, red pepper flakes 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil

½ cup grated mozzarella ¼ cup fresh grated Parmesan cheese 4 large eggs, room temperature Kosher salt Fresh ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 400 F. In a cast-iron or oven-proof skillet over medium heat, heat oil. Crumble sausage in skillet and cook, stirring, until brown. Make a well in center of skillet and add onion, saute until soft. Add garlic and cook an additional minute. Stir until meat mixture and onions/garlic are well combined. Stir in sauce, pepper flakes and half of basil and bring to a simmer. Top evenly with mozzarella and Parmesan cheeses. Make 4 dents in sauce and crack an egg in each dent, leaving space between each egg. Season eggs with salt and pepper. Transfer skillet to oven and bake 15 minutes or until eggs are desired consistency. Remove from oven and garnish with remaining basil and additional Parmesan. Serve with lots of crusty bread.

What’s cooking at

SCLiving.coop

G I N A M OO R E

Ready for an unusual taste treat? Discover Pancakes with Spicy Chicken and Sriracha Syrup, as well as recipes from Chef Belinda’s cookbook Let’s Brunch and her popular video on how to turn out a perfect omelet, exclusively at

SCLiving.coop/​food/​chefbelinda

10

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING | AUGUST 2022 | SCLIVING.COOP

STEAK AND MUSHROOM OMELET MAKES ONE

2 large eggs, room temperature 1 tablespoon heavy cream Kosher salt Fresh ground black pepper Dash of Tabasco or hot sauce 1 teaspoon fresh-chopped herbs such as oregano, basil or thyme, divided 1 tablespoon butter ½ cup sliced mushrooms Slices of leftover steak, from a previous meal Grated smoked Gouda or provolone cheese, to taste

In a small bowl, whisk together eggs, cream, salt, pepper, Tabasco and ½ teaspoon herbs until combined. In an 8-inch nonstick omelet pan over medium heat, melt butter. Saute mushrooms until most of liquid is evaporated. Add egg mixture and lower temperature to medium-low. Let eggs cook about 30 seconds until starting to set. With a heat-resistant spatula, lift sides of omelet and tilt skillet to let uncooked eggs run under the omelet—do this all the way around the omelet until it is set (no longer runny). Spread sliced steak and cheese over one half of the omelet. Using the spatula, fold the blank side of the omelet onto the cheesy-meat half. Carefully slide omelet onto a plate and serve. Garnish with remaining herbs.


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Celebrating the 100th Anniversary with Legal-Tender Morgans

Honoring the 100th anniversary of the last year they were minted, the U.S. Mint struck five different versions of the Morgan in 2021, paying tribute to each of the mints that struck the coin. The coins here honor the historic New Orleans Mint, a U.S. Mint branch from 1838–1861 and again from 1879–1909. These coins, featuring an “O” privy mark, a small differentiating mark, were struck in Philadelphia since the New Orleans Mint no longer exists. These beautiful

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SC

| stories Examining insects

Who really runs planet Earth? Here’s a hint: They’re all around you, but you can hardly see them. “Contrary to popular belief, insects rule the world,” says John Morse, professor emeritus of entomology at Clemson University. Fortunately for humanity, Morse knows a lot about our tiny overlords, and he is one of the world’s foremost experts in freshwater entomology with a specific interest in caddisflies. Although he spends most days in the narrow, unassuming office he’s occupied since 1976, his life story seems plucked from a National Geographic documentary. “I’ve taught in ten different countries,” Morse says, waving casually toward the maps and travel posters on his walls. He is the epitome of a Ph.D.-wielding professor while also warm and down-to-earth, despite the wealth of experience under his belt. Morse credits his 1990 expedition to southern China, which covered 82 locations in two and a half months, for altering his life course. Morse literally wrote the book on aquatic insects of continental Asia and taught courses on the topic to riveted Chinese students. “It was a life-changing, career-changing opportunity,” says Morse. After teaching in China, he was sought by universities worldwide that were eager for Morse’s knowledge on aquatic insects and how they could indicate water pollu‑ tion. He was asked to teach in Mongolia, Russia, Thailand and Indonesia, among others. But why all the hubbub about bugs? “They are our greatest enemies and our greatest benefactors,” Morse says. “If we learn their names and a little something about them, we can be much more comfortable. Look at them under a microscope. They are incredibly beautiful and extremely complex.” —KILEY KELLERMEYER | PHOTO BY MATTHEW FRANKLIN CARTER

John Morse

Pendleton. Professor emeritus of entomology at Clemson University. FATHERLY LOVE: Morse discovered the only caddisfly species known in North America that preys on freshwater snails. He named it Ceraclea joannae after his daughter, Joanna. FAMILY BUSINESS: Morse’s uncle, Henry K. Townes, was a famous entomologist who first introduced him to the possibility of a career studying insects. FOR PERSPECTIVE: Two-thirds of all species on earth are insects, and an estimated 14,000 species of insects live in South Carolina. LIVES IN:

CLAIM TO FAME:

12

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING | AUGUST 2022 | SCLIVING.COOP


THOMAS SLATER

LAURA MERK

DEION JAMISON

JAMI GUKER

ZACHARY ARMS

PH OTOS BY TR AV IS B E LL

The five finalists for 2023 S.C. Teacher of the Year set high standards in classroom education BY JARED BAILEY

WHEN THE 2023 SCHOOL YEAR BEGINS, Deion Jamison, an English teacher at Legacy Early College in Greenville, will have a challenging new mission—traveling the state as a roving ambassador for education. Named the 2023 Teacher of the Year during a gala celebration in May, Jamison received a $25,000 stipend and a new BMW X5 to use during his one-year sabbatical as an advocate and mentor for classroom teachers. “Deion exhibits the qualities and characteristics that we want to see in every current and future South Carolina educator,” says Molly Spearman, state superintendent of education. “He is so deserving of this tremendous honor, and I know he will do a fantastic job advocating and representing our over 55,000 teachers this next year.” In addition to naming a Teacher of the Year, the annual competition recognizes top teachers in each school district. When you review the profiles of the five finalists for the 2023 award, it becomes clear that while they may use different methods to reach their students, the common denominator is a passion for teaching.

DEION JAMISON AGE:

27.

Legacy Early College in Greenville, 9th–10th grade English. Earned a bachelor’s degree in sociology from Clemson in 2017 and a master’s degree in education from Johns Hopkins University in 2021. TEACHING PHILOSOPHY: “I want to give my students an education that will take them beyond.” TEACHES AT:

CREDENTIALS:

Even as a child, Deion Jamison knew he wanted to be a teacher. “I used to have this chalkboard that my fourth grade teacher purchased for me,” he says, “and I would play school with my ‘students.’” But by the time he went to college, Jamison had cooled to the idea of teaching and planned to pursue a computer science degree instead. That changed when he compared ACT scores with his friends in the dormitory. “I noticed that all uu A NIGHT OF SMILES Finalists, top, take a moment to pose for portraits during the 2023 South Carolina Teacher of the Year awards ceremony this past May. SCLIVING.COOP | AUGUST 2022 | SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

13


DEION JAMISON Fighting the inequities that exist in education

JO H N G I LLES PI E

of my peers who came from affluent districts had very high ACT scores, so I started to piece together that there was something wrong with the quality of education I was receiving in comparison to my peers.”

Jamison began researching disparities in education, and what he found reignited his passion to become a classroom teacher, he says. “I felt it was one of the ways I could fight the inequities that exist in education.” As a teacher, Jamison strives to impart skills his students can use for the rest of their lives. “I could teach my students Shakespeare all day, but it really wouldn’t matter if they remember who Romeo and Juliet are when they’re adults,” he says. “What will matter is that they are able to utilize skills such as critical thinking, collaboration and problem-solving.” When Jamison watched the Teacher of the Year Gala in 2021, he made a prediction: “I said to myself, ‘I will be there one day.’ I did not expect that day to be exactly one year later,” he says. Now that he has won the Teacher of the Year award—the first black male to do so—he feels encouraged to hear that he’s already inspiring others. “That’s the most rewarding part of it all.”

COU RTESY O F WOO DRU FF M I DDLE SC H OO L

JAMI GUKER AGE:

41.

Woodruff Middle School, 7th grade math. Earned a bachelor’s degree in teaching from the University of South Carolina Upstate in 2002, a master’s degree in education from Converse University in 2003 and a master’s degree in education administration from Converse University in 2009. TEACHING PHILOSOPHY: “Teaching is a calling, not just a job.’’ TEACHES AT:

CREDENTIALS:

JAMI GUKER Building relationships with students

14

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING | AUGUST 2022 | SCLIVING.COOP

Growing up in Reidville, Jami Guker developed an interest in teaching by observing her mother, who was a teacher’s assistant for 28 years. “I remember her coming home and telling me about all of her students every day,” she says. “That’s the biggest reason I


started teaching. I loved those relationships I saw my mom was able to form with her students.” As a seventh grade math teacher at Woodruff Middle School, Guker likes to keep students engaged by incorporating games and upbeat activities into her lessons. “I try to make my math class fun,” she says. “We sing in my class, we dance in my class, to try to help them remember some of the mathematical concepts.” Over summer breaks, Guker organizes weekly activities for her students in order to “continue that connection with them all year round,” and says it’s her faith in God that inspires her to go the extra mile. “Teaching is a calling, not just a job.”

T H O M A S S L AT E R AGE:

59.

Chestnut Oaks Middle School in Sumter, 6th–8th grade chorus and general music. CREDENTIALS: Earned a bachelor’s degree in secondary education and music from S.C. State University in 1986 and a master’s degree in education administration from Grand Canyon University in 2016. TEACHING PHILOSOPHY: “All students can learn.” TEACHES AT:

TR AV IS B E LL

Growing up in rural South Carolina in the late ’60s and ’70s, Slater saw teaching as “the gateway to the future.” Fortunately for him, teaching ran in the family. Both of his parents were teachers, as were his aunts and two of his siblings. “So it seemed logical that I would choose this road in life,” he says. THOMAS SLATER Spreading the joy of music In high school, Slater played trumpet and was inspired by his band director to seriously pursue music. “Her enthusiasm was contagious, and she made music so much fun for me,” he says. She challenged him to dig deeper into his musical abilities and even LAURA MERK compose his own music. AGE: 29. As a teacher, Slater uses a similar strategy—offering his TEACHES AT: Springfield Middle School in Fort Mill, 6th grade math. students lesson plans and classroom activities that challenge CREDENTIALS: Earned a bachelor’s degree in elementary education from Anderson University in 2015 and a master’s degree in learning and them in order to boost confidence and self-esteem, he says. “I technology from Western Governors University in 2020. think it’s my duty as a teacher to discover the best method in TEACHING PHILOSOPHY: “Teaching is my way of serving other people.” which students will learn.” The principal of Chestnut Oaks Middle School, Jenaii Growing up in Fort Mill, Laura Merk always had a love Edwards, describes Slater as someone with “a passion for for learning, and over the years, it evolved into a love for music and a passion for his students.” She recalls being teaching. deeply moved when she attended one of his student concerts. “Teaching is my way of serving other people,” she says. “I “Seeing the joy in his face and the joy he brought to his stuthink every student, every child, deserves the opportunity to have a high-quality education.” dents and how well they sung—it was magnificent.” Merk is adamant that teaching be student-oriented. She Even after nearly four decades of teaching, Slater still feels achieves this by employing a small-group, workshop model energized by watching his students develop their musical in her classroom. Where most teachers deliver lessons to the talent. entire class simultaneously, Merk works with five or six stu“I get the same euphoric feeling today as I did 35 years ago when I witness them perform,” he says. “It’s something I dents at a time so she can give everyone the attention they never get tired of.” need. uu SCLIVING.COOP | AUGUST 2022 | SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

15


ZACHARY ARMS AGE:

26.

LAURA MERK Serving others through teaching

Liberty High School, social studies. Earned a bachelor’s degree in history and secondary education from Clemson University in 2017. TEACHING PHILOSOPHY: “What can I do to make my students better than myself?” TEACHES AT:

CREDENTIALS:

Zachary Arms became a teacher because of his twin ­passions for social sciences and helping others succeed. “I figured teaching would be the best opportunity for me to wrap these two passions into one.”

ZACHARY ARMS Working

to better students and community

JO H N G I LLES PI E

16

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING | AUGUST 2022 | SCLIVING.COOP

As a teacher, he wants to give his high school students the leg up he never got. “My teaching philosophy is ‘What can I do to make my students better than myself?’” he says. One way he does this is by making students aware of scholarships and other programs that can help them go to college without taking on debt. The principal of Liberty High School, Josh Oxendine, has been impressed by Arms since he first student-taught at the school before becoming a full-time teacher. “He’s a go-getter,” Oxendine says. “He’s very attuned to the needs of a school or a student or the community and is always looking for a way to address those needs.” Arms stays motivated by the perennial challenge of connecting student interests to their learning outcomes. One way he’s successfully met this challenge is by developing a “Psychology of Superheroes” curriculum that teaches students about complex psychological concepts using familiar comic book narratives. Arms says he was surprised to be named a finalist for the Teacher of the Year award. “To be considered a top five teacher blows my mind because there are so many good things happening in our schools in South Carolina and so much excellence in our state.” This fall, he will be starting a master’s degree in educational leadership at Clemson University. In the coming years, he hopes to get involved in state education policy “to better the working conditions and learning conditions in South Carolina.” GET MORE For additional information on the annual Teacher of the Year award, visit ed.sc.gov/educators/recruitment-and-recognition/ teacher-of-the-year.

COU RTESY O F S PR I N G FI E LD M I DDLE SC H OO L

This allows her to build relationships and “meet students where they are in their math level,” she says. “Math isn’t as scary when you’re in a small group.” Keith Griffin, principal of Springfield Middle School, describes Merk as “a student magnet” because of the genuine interest she shows in each individual child. “She’s just a great person and a great teacher.” Merk credits her colleagues for molding her into the teacher she is today. “I truly believe iron sharpens iron,” she says. “When you work with great teachers, you become a great teacher.”


SC

| calendar

Upstate AU G U ST

18 Summer Food Truck Rollout,

Greer City Park, Greer. (864) 968‑7008 or cityofgreer.org. 20 Abbeville Holistic Expo, The Livery Stable, Abbeville. abbevillemassage.co. 20 Frontier Encampment, Oconee Station State Historic Site, Walhalla. (864) 638‑0079. 20 Summer’s End Cruise In, Market at the Mill, Pickens. (864) 506‑2982. 26–27 Williamston Spring Water Festival, Mineral Spring Park, Williamston. springwaterfestival.com. SE PT E M BE R

1–11 Upper SC State Fair,

Greenville-Pickens Speedway, Easley. (864) 269‑0852 or uppersouthcarolinastatefair.com. 3 Olde South Timeline Ball, Embassy Suites & Golf Resort, Greenville. oldesouthball.blogspot.com. 8–12 A Public Reading of an Unproduced Screenplay about the Death of Walt Disney, Market Theatre, Anderson. (864) 729‑2999 or markettheatre.org.

AUG 15–SEPT 15

9–10 Indie Craft Parade, Timmons Arena at Furman University, Greenville. makerscollective.org. 9–10 South Carolina Apple Festival, Historic Main Street, Westminster. scapplefestival.com. 9–10 SpartOberfest, Jesus Our Risen Savior Catholic Church, Spartanburg. (864) 576‑1164 or spartoberfest.com. 15–18 euphoria, multiple venues, Greenville. (864) 617‑0231 or euphoriagreenville.com.

Midlands AUG UST

19 Aiken Master Gardener Association Lunch Box Series: “Keeping the Girls … Bees,” Millbrook Baptist Church, Aiken. (803) 508‑7739 or aikenmastergardeners.com. 19 “Making the Hampton Massacre: Native Resistance, Settler Memory and White Solidarity in South Carolina,” USC‑Lancaster Native American Studies Center, (803) 313‑7172.

SCLiving.coop/calendar

Lowcountry

Our mobile-friendly site lists even more festivals, shows and events. You’ll also find instructions on submitting your event. Please confirm information with the hosting event before attending. 20 Arts Alive Open House,

Aiken Center for the Arts, Aiken. (803) 641‑9094 or aikencenterforthearts.org. 20 Battle of Musgrove Mill Commemoration, Battle of Musgrove Mill State Historic Site, Clinton. (864) 938‑0100. 26–27 York Summerfest, downtown, York. (803) 684‑2341 or yorkscsummerfest.com. 27 Main Street Latin Festival, Main Street, Columbia. mainstreetlatinfestivalsc.com. 27–28 Repticon, Jamil Shrine Temple, Columbia. (803) 772‑9380 or repticon.com. SEPTEMBER

9–10 Aiken’s Makin’, downtown, Aiken. (803) 641‑1111 or aikenchamber.net.

AUGUST

9–17 Roald Dahl’s Matilda, Aiken Community Theatre, Aiken. (803) 648‑1438 or aikencommunitytheatre.org. 10 3rd Annual Catawba River Ramble for Recovery, Catawba Longhouse, Rock Hill. (803) 984‑0970. 10 Springdale 5K at Sunrise, Historic Springdale Race Course, Camden. runsignup.com. 15 “The Hunt is On” Southern Decoy Carvers, Aiken Center for the Arts. (803) 641‑9094 or aikencenterforthearts.org. 15–18 Columbia’s Greek Festival, Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Cathedral, Columbia. (803) 461‑0248 or columbiasgreekfestival.com. 15–18 2022 Humanities Festival, various locations, Allendale. (803) 771‑2477 or schumanities.org.

19 Paddle with a Ranger, Givhans Ferry State Park, Ridgeville. (843) 873‑0692. 19 Sounds of Summer Concert Series: Tribute to Van Morrison and James Taylor, Paul Grimshaw Band, North Myrtle Beach Park and Sports Complex Amphitheater, North Myrtle Beach. (843) 280‑5570. 20 Eye of the Beholder: The Music of Chick Corea, Charleston Music Hall, Charleston. (843) 641‑0011 or charlestonjazz.com. 24 Art of Jazz: Jamie Slater Trio, Gibbes Museum of Art, Charleston. (843) 641‑0011 or charlestonjazz.com. 27 23rd Annual McElveen Race for The ARK, Saint Luke’s Lutheran Church, Summerville. (843) 471‑1360 or bit.ly/arkrace22. 27 Awendaw Blue Crab Festival, Municipal Park, Awendaw. (843) 928‑3100 or townofawendawsc.org. 27 The Food We Celebrate Exhibition Opening, Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage, Ridgeland. (843) 284‑9227 or morrisheritagecenter.org.

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PALMETTO STATE

| marketplace

To advertise, please go to SCLiving.coop or email ads@scliving.coop

28 Hilton Head BIG Fish 5K Run/Walk, South Beach Marina Village, Hilton Head Island. (843) 815‑1718. 29 Paul Reiser, Arts Center of Coastal Carolina, Hilton Head Island. (843) 842‑2787 or artshhi.com. SE PT EM B E R

2 Edisto Beach Music & Shag Fest, Bay Creek Park, Edisto

Island. (843) 869‑3867 or chamber@edistochamber.com.

3–4 Lowcountry Jazz Festival, The Charleston Gaillard

Center, Charleston. lowcountryjazzfest.com. 4 Cook Out Southern 500, Darlington Raceway, Darlington. (866) 459‑7223 or darlingtonraceway.com. 10 A Month and Some Days/Un Mes y Dias Screening, Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage, Ridgeland. (843) 284‑9227 or morrisheritagecenter.org. 10 Art in Common, The Market Common, Myrtle Beach. (631) 434‑5884. 10 Move Your Mind 5K/10K Walk and Run, May River High School, Bluffton. joy@mymemorymatters.org. 10 South Carolina’s Largest Garage Sale, Myrtle Beach Convention Center, Myrtle Beach. (843) 918‑1240 or cityofmyrtlebeach.com. 10 Tobacco Festival, downtown, Lake City. (843) 374‑8611 or lakecitysc.org. 13 World Affairs Council presents James Borton: Dispatches from the South China Sea, Hilton Head Library, Hilton Head Island. (843) 384‑6758 or wachh.org. 15–25 Society of Stranders Fall Migration, multiple venues, Myrtle Beach. shagdance.com.

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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6th • Music • Rotary Golf Tournament • Food WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7th • Arts and Crafts • Chattooga River Float • Kiddie Rides THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8th • Parade • Apple Baking Contest • Children’s Activities • Ms. South Carolina • Rodeo Apple Festival Pageant • Quilt Show • Little Apple Dumplin’ Pageant • Classic Car Show FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9th • Arts & Crafts For more information • Live Entertainment visit.SCAppleFestival.com • Quilt Show Or email: southcarolina • Rotary Luncheon applefestival@gmail.com • Apple Festival Parade • Rodeo • Street Dance Featuring Funk Factory SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10th • Arts & Crafts • Children’s Activities • Live Entertainment • Rodeo

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SC

| gardener Summerblooming hostas

AUGUST IN THE GARDEN n The days of summer might be on the wane, but the veggie patch certainly isn’t past its prime. This month is a good time to plant spinach, radishes, mustard greens, kale, cucumbers, collards, cauliflower and cabbage.

BY L.A. JACKSON

L . A . JAC KSO N

COUNT THE SUNNY HOURS Fine-tune your sundial’s accuracy to make it more functional.

TIP OF THE MONTH A sundial is an eye-pleasing garden addition, but to make it more functional, align the gnomon—the angled shadow maker—to true north on Sept. 1 at high noon when the shadow should point directly to the 12 o’clock Standard Time mark. To fine-tune your sundial’s accuracy, do this adjustment again on Dec. 24, April 15 and June 15. Also, the gnomon’s angle should be the same as your latitude, so if it is movable, adjust using a level and protractor or put a shim under the sundial for the proper angle. During Daylight Savings Time, mentally add an hour for the correct time. 20

FINDING HOSTA FANCIERS in South Carolina is not hard, as most gardeners know these pretty perennials can be pretty tough when it comes to dealing with everchanging conditions in the garden. But some hostas can be HOT-TO-TROT MAJESTY The fragrant Royal Standard hosta was introduced by Wayside Gardens in 1965. pretty weird, too. Typical blooming hostas swept by broad strokes of muted yellow. flaunt their flowers in the spring, but Have a small garden? Try a space-saver there is a renegade group that waits such as the popular Sugar Babe with instead for the full heat of summer its variegated leaves and nose-pleasing, to set in before showing off their purple-streaked flowers. blooms—and many are even fragrant! Getting August lilies off to a good These oddities are informally known as August lilies and botanically come from start is the key to whether they surthe Hosta plantaginea clan. vive or thrive in the garden. If possible, Interestingly, these hot-to-trot hostas plant them where they bask in early aren’t the result of some forward-­ morning sun but are lightly shaded in thinking 21st century genetic modithe afternoon. While August lilies tolerfication to counter global warming. ate many soil conditions, they will perNo, August lilies are old stuff. Brought form better in heavily tilled, organically over from China in the early 1800s, enriched sites. Also, since hostas prefer they proved to be quite heat-tolerant, well-draining soil, potting up a few is making them the darlings of many a certainly an option. landscape gardener in the sunny South. Applying a light amount of balanced, Since it was introduced by Wayside slow-release fertilizer in the early spring Gardens way back in 1965, the poster will satisfy August lilies’ nutrient needs child cultivar of August lilies, Royal for the growing season. Standard (easy to find, by the way), has Finally, slugs are the bane of hosta been putting a spell on gardeners with growers everywhere, but their garden flower towers rising from large, elegant party can be spoiled with due vigilance green leaves in late summer to beguile and timely applications of an iron phospassersby with ghostly white, sweetly phate-based slug killer. And when your scented blooms. hostas die back in the fall, cut the spent Fancier H. plantaginea cultivars have leaves off and toss them in the trash to been introduced since Royal Standard, prevent slugs from overwintering in the including such dandies as the aptly debris. named Guacamole, a widely available selection with snappy avocado-hued L.A. JACKSON is the former editor of foliage, and Stained Glass, another easy- Carolina Gardener magazine. Contact to-find August lily with green leaves him at lajackson1@gmail.com.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING | AUGUST 2022 | SCLIVING.COOP

L . A . JAC KSO N

n Lovers of fall-planted, spring-blooming bulbs will still have to wait a few months to add them to the garden, but in the meantime, plant bulbs now. No, not tulips, daffodils, hyacinths and the like, but rather unusual fall-flowering beauties such as colchicum, autumn-blooming crocus and sternbergia that mature rapidly and blossom in the heat of the late growing season.


SC

| humor me

If it tastes good, run BY JAN A. IGOE

RECENTLY, I’VE BEEN ADVISED

to rethink my diet. The french fries I fearlessly gobbled as a child would massacre my gallbladder today. And fudge-iced cupcakes, the ultimate reward for kids who made vegetables vanish from their dinner plates, would launch my blood sugar to Mars (even before I got the broccoli out of my pockets). I’ve already given up soda, red meat and Oreos. I rarely drink alcohol, but let’s face it: ordering nachos without a cold beer would be sacrilege. Mostly, I live on nuts, berries, fish, dark chocolate and pizza. Lots of pizza. “You’re not diabetic, but your blood sugar is creeping up,” my persnickety doctor likes to scold. “Just stop eating sugar.” Wait, we live in America. Is that even possible? Should I move to Tibet? My doc tells patients to stick to the perimeter of their grocery store, where the meat and vegetables hang out. Everything else is loaded with preservatives, chemicals, trans-fats and metric tons of sugar. That’s all the stuff that tastes good, but plots to kill you. Forget cereal, snacks and cookies. Forget ice cream and cheese. Even dairy is out “unless you’re a baby cow,” someone will nag. (Everybody you meet these days is a freelance nutrition expert.) My friend Angie took the Keto meatand-veggies route to robust health. It made her a diehard carbo-phobic. You can eat a pound of bacon in her presence, but show her a Cocoa Puff and you’ll get a two-hour lecture on killer carbs. Once in a blue moon, Angie will take a pizza and beer break from Keto. Afterward, she’ll beg her liver’s forgiveness by drinking 12 ounces of virgin olive 22

Take cauliflower, for instance. It is so bland that it has to pretend to be rice, pasta, pretzels or pizza crust to get anyone to eat it. oil with Epsom salts. As much as I love pizza—it’s the base of my food pyramid​ —I’ll give it up the moment the food police make olive oil chasers mandatory. Then there’s my daughter, who thinks Keto people are nuts. Her creed is simple: Never eat anything that has a face or a mother. As a crusading vegan, she’s on a mission to save the planet and convert everyone in her path. Naturally, her diet has no meat, fish or poultry, but

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING | AUGUST 2022 | SCLIVING.COOP

you never see her eat a bona fide vegetable either. Mostly, she lives on lentils and microwaved tofu with some kind of orange coating to mimic chicken tenders. (It’s not very convincing.) I always assumed vegans avoided synthetic ingredients with 10-syllable names, but some of them want their plant burgers to “bleed” like the animals they’re sparing. (Go figure.) The magic ingredient that makes that happen is soy leghemoglobin, which comes from genetically engineered yeast. Sounds yummy, right? To be honest, I don’t have a close personal relationship with many vegetables either. They are the plain Janes of the plant world. Take cauliflower, for instance. It is so bland that it has to pretend to be rice, pasta, pretzels or pizza crust to get anyone to eat it. You can’t trust a vegetable living under an assumed identity. If Julia Child were around today, the French cuisine queen would never make it past the carb counters. Eating diet food only made sense to her while waiting for a steak to cook. Julia had no future as a vegan. “If you’re afraid of butter, use cream,” was her motto. My ideal diet is somewhere between Julia and vegan, or anything I can order by phone. Until they start ­delivering Brussels sprouts, I can order pizza guilt-free. And my clot­hes won’t need ­pockets. has given up eating almost everything except organic carrot juice and olives. If your diet is more creative or you own a pizzeria, write to her at HumorMe@SCLiving.coop.

JAN A. IGOE


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