Page 1

7 TIPgSthe

for viewin pse solar ecl2i2 PAGE

CHANGE OUT

MINI

GOLF

MASTERS

AUGUST 2017

S.C. hosts its own classic, complete with a green jacket SC R E C I PE

Italian specialties HUMOR ME

The fur is flying


HAVE 5 MINUTES?

TELL US ABOUT YOUR CAREER FOR A CHANCE TO

WIN $500

www.scpowerteam.com/individual-survey The SC Power Team, your statewide, nonprofit economic development organization representing Santee Cooper and the state’s 20 consumer-owned electric cooperatives, has commissioned an in-depth study of South Carolina’s labor market. This effort will help: • Identify new and enhanced training opportunities • Guide employers on the career goals of their community’s workforce

Scan here to access the survey

• Attract new businesses to increase quality job opportunities

The most important part of this project is hearing from you: South Carolina’s workforce. If you have just five minutes, we want to hear about your career interests, job satisfaction, and other factors that will help create better employment opportunities for you and your community far into the future.

South Carolina Power Team is the economic development organization of the state-owned electric utility, Santee Cooper, and the state’s 20 electric cooperatives. Together they provide power to more than 2 million South Carolinians.


THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS Vol. 71 • No. 8 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240) Read in more than 584,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033

AUGUST 2017 • VOLUME 71, NUMBER 8

Tel:  (803) 926-3 1 75 Fax:  (803) 796-6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop EDITOR

Keith Phillips ASSISTANT EDITOR

Diane Veto Parham

FEATURE

FIELD EDITOR

Walter Allread

16 Aces wild

PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

Travis Ward

ART DIRECTOR

Professional mini golf finds a home on the Grand Strand, where serious players compete for big money, a coveted green jacket and a little sporting respect, please.

Sharri Harris Wolfgang DESIGNER

Susan Collins PRODUCTION

Andrew Chapman

JON STELL

WEB EDITOR

Chase Toler COPY EDITOR

Susan Scott Soyars CONTRIBUTORS

Mike Couick, Jayne Cannon, Amy Dabbs, Tim Hanson, Hastings Hensel, Jan A. Igoe, Patrick Keegan, Sydney Patterson, Belinda Smith-Sullivan, Paul Wesslund PUBLISHER

Lou Green

4 CO-OP CONNECTION

SC LIFE

6 ON THE AGENDA

21 Life on two wheels

A new book tells the forgotten history of the role America’s electric cooperatives played overseas in the Vietnam War.

ADVERTISING

National Country Market Tel:  (800) NCM-1181 Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor. ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send

to your local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above.

Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices. © COPYRIGHT 201 7. The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor.

10 Bringing new life to food deserts Learn how community partnerships are the key to ensuring all South Carolina residents have access to healthy, nutritious food. ENERGY Q&A

12 Charging ahead

Shopping for a new set of wheels? Consider the pros and cons of an electric vehicle. SMART CHOICE

14 Electrical college

Plug into products designed to enhance your student’s enjoyment of campus life.

the solar eclipse

Here’s everything you need to know to enjoy the total solar eclipse when it sweeps across the state on Aug. 21. TRAVELS

26 Paddling Goodale State Park

Our intrepid reporter journeys into the heart of a dark cypress swamp in search of Elvis. RECIPE

30 Make mine Italian

No reservation required: Enjoy easy and delicious Italian dishes in the comfort of your own home. GARDENER

32 Catapult your garden

into shoulder season

Don’t put away the garden tools just yet. There’s still time to reap another crop of homegrown vegetables before autumn sets in.

7 TIPSthe

for viewing se solar eclip 22 PAGE

MINI

GOLF

MASTERS

HUMOR ME

AUGUST 2017

S.C. hosts its own classic, complete with a green jacket

38 When pigs fly SC R E C I PE

Italian specialties HUMOR ME

The fur is flying

Danny McCaslin, winner of the 2014 U.S. ProMiniGolf Masters tournament, wills his putt into the hole at the Hawaiian Rumble course in North Myrtle Beach. Photo illustration by Sharri Harris Wolfgang; images by Matt Silfer.

Please fasten your seatbelt and lock your tray table in its upright position as our humor columnist takes off on the topic of Emotional Support Animals.

34 MARKETPLACE 36 SC EVENTS

26 30

GWÉNAËL LE VOT

Member of the NCM network of publications, reaching more than 7 million homes and businesses

SCENE

22 Seven tips for viewing

TIM HANSON

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING is brought to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network.

DIALOGUE

ID CL A R K

NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

POWER USER

22

Joe Dawes brings a lifetime of riding experience to his work teaching Motorcycle Safety Foundation courses at Midlands Technical College.

DAV

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739-5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop

STORIES


On the Agenda For a listing p m co lete s, see of Event 6 page 3

SEPTEMBER 3 

Highlights

Bojangles Southern 500

In a hat tip to history, Darlington Raceway kicks off its Labor Day Weekend races with a tribute to NASCAR champion Dale Earnhardt Sr. on Saturday, Sept. 2, honoring the 30th anniversary of his Southern 500 victory. It’s all part of Darlington’s Throwback Campaign, this year celebrating the 1985–89 era in NASCAR racing. The weekend’s main event is set for Sunday, with gates opening at 1 p.m. and the race starting at 6 p.m.

SEPTEMBER 7–9

South Carolina Apple Festival

Dale Earnhardt Jr. fans may want to be at Westminster’s annual festival for a peek at a No. 88 show car and NASCAR driving simulator. Get a head start on apple season at this long-running festival with pageants, an apple-baking contest and barbecue supper on Thursday, but the bulk of the fun is planned for Friday and Saturday with a parade, car show, children’s activities and a two-night rodeo.

For details, visit darlingtonraceway.com or call (866) 459-7223.

SEPTEMBER 8–9

Aiken’s Makin’

This pedestrian-friendly arts and crafts festival is makin’ its 41st annual appearance in historic downtown Aiken, on Park Avenue between Chesterfield and Kershaw streets. Showcasing high-quality crafts by more than 170 Southeastern artisans, it’s a relaxed and friendly two days of shopping, good food, and demonstrations of crafters’ skills in clay, wood, glass, fibers, leather, metal, gems, photography and more.

TOP PICK FOR KIDS SEPTEMBER 9

By the Sweat of Our Brows

For details, visit aikensmakin.net or call (803) 641‑1111.

SEPTEMBER 9

For details, visit ascgreenway.org or call (803) 547‑4575.

6

MIKE WATTS

Fiddle ’n Pig Shindig

Settle in for a jam-packed day of bluegrass, barbecue and craft brews at Anne Springs Close Greenway. The annual gathering offers up some of the best bluegrass music and barbecue in the Carolinas, set in this beautiful nature preserve in Fort Mill. Musical acts take the stage at 11 a.m., with Grandpa’s Cough Medicine closing out festivities as the final band of the evening.

For details, visit scapplefestival.com or call (864) 647‑5316.

Kids get to know life on a Southern plantation, through the eyes of its slaves, while they play historical games, hear stories from African-American history and culture, and enjoy music from hymn choirs. This award-winning event honors the legacy of the “Seven Sacred Families,” the enslaved African-Americans of Historic Brattonsville in McConnells and their descendants. For details, visit Demonstrations of 18thchmuseums.org and 19th-century plantation or call skills include cooking, (803) 684‑2327. blacksmithing, brick making, cotton ginning, quilt making and agricultural practices.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   AUGUST 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP


EMAIL COMMENTS, QUESTIONS AND STORY SUGGESTIONS TO LETTERS@SCLIVING.COOP

Lighting up a war zone TED CASE, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR of the Oregon Rural Electric Cooperative Association, has spent the past several years researching electric co-op history. In his first book—Power Plays: The U.S. Presidency, Electric Cooperatives, and the Transformation of Rural America—he described how co-ops have affected national policy since the 1930s. In his just-released second work—Poles, Wires and War: The Remarkable Untold Story of Rural Electrification and the Vietnam War—he tells the riveting story of how America’s electric cooperatives volunteered to improve the lives of people in Southeast Asia. The fast-paced narrative begins with an audacious offer from Clyde Ellis, the head of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, to President Lyndon Johnson. Give the South Vietnamese electricity, said Ellis, and you’ll win their hearts and minds in the fight against communism. What followed was a classic battle of enormous personalities, foreign and domestic political and military maneuvering, and a determined band of people fighting the odds to bring light to a war zone halfway around the world.

Q: How did you end up writing about electric co-ops in the Vietnam War? CASE: It came out of my first book and the chapter on President Lyndon Johnson. In 1965, he received a letter from the general manager of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Clyde Ellis, saying that NRECA could help win the war by putting electric co-ops in Vietnam. I was intrigued by that bold claim.

Ted Case is a co-op historian, author and executive director of the Oregon Rural Electric Cooperative Association. His second book, Poles, Wires and War: The Remarkable Untold Story of Rural Electrification and the Vietnam War, tells a riveting story of how a determined band of people brought electricity to Vietnam during the war.

Since Johnson was such an early and strong supporter of rural electrification in Texas, he embraced Ellis’ proposal fully.

Q: Did NRECA start co-ops in Vietnam? GET MORE CASE: It was a really good effort. Just 20 Poles, Wires and men went over there in a five-year period. War: The Remarkable These were the most difficult co-ops to establish Untold Story of Rural in the history of the electric co-op program. The Electrification and the Viet Cong soldiers that were fighting against the Vietnam War is available South Vietnamese tried to cut down the co-op for purchase at lines and chop down their poles and blow up TedCaseAuthor.com. their dams. The people trying to start the co-ops faced rampant corruption and an inability to get poles and other materials. They got three co‑ops up and running and brought light to thousands of villagers. Q: What lessons did you learn from researching the book? CASE: The support the U.S. co-op workers got from the Vietnamese villagers was not unlike the support from the farmers who started electric co-ops in the United States in the 1930s. The Vietnamese villagers wanted a radio. They wanted an iron and lights to read. Toward the end of the war, when the communists were rolling through the country in 1975, they came to a town that was one of the co-ops’ headquarters. The militia in the town rose up and fought against the communists in one of the most heroic battles of the war. They were fighting for their electricity. They were fighting for what they had built. —PAUL WESSLUND

SEPTEMBER 17–23

National Farm Safety Week

If you must exit the machinery, hop at least 40 feet away.

If you are inside farm machinery that makes contact with a downed power line, know what to do! If you can drive safely away from the power source without bringing down the utility pole and lines, travel at least 40 feet before exiting. If you are unable to drive the machinery due to injury or obstacles or if it is inoperable, do NOT exit. Call for help, and warn others NOT to approach.

If you can drive away safely, travel at least 40 feet before exiting.

If the vehicle is on fire or you must exit for other safety reasons, follow these steps: 1  Jump clear of the 2  Land with feet together, n 3  Keep going until you are n 4  Call for help. Make sure n n ­vehicle. Do not let any part and hop away in small steps at least 40 feet away. no one gets within 40 feet of your body or clothes of the downed line. to minimize the path of touch the ground and the electric current and avoid machinery at the same time. electric shock.

5  Do not re-enter the n area or vehicle until emergency responders and your ­electric co-op crews determine it is safe.

SCLIVING.COOP   | AUGUST 2017   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

7

AMERICA’S ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES

National Farm Safety Week is an excellent time for a reminder to exercise caution when operating farm machinery near overhead power lines. Stay safe around downed power lines. Consider all lines, equipment and conductors to be live and dangerous. Review this graphic for important tips on what to do in the event of an accident.

40 feet is the minimum safe distance from a downed power line.


13 10 ⁄8 103⁄4 10 ⁄16

101⁄2

On the Agenda O N LY O N

SCLiving.coop

BY THE NUMBERS

THE POWER TO SERVE YOU

Your local electric cooperative exists to serve your family and community with reliable, affordable power. Standing behind your local co-op is the state’s (and the nation’s) largest utility network.

20

Number of not-for-profit, member-owned electric cooperatives serving South Carolina

1.5 million

Approximate number of people who use power provided by S.C. electric cooperatives

75,000-plus

Secret sauce

No store-bought marinara in the house? Don’t panic. Let Chef Belinda show you a quick-and-easy homemade version at SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda.

Why do the lights go out?

Have you ever wondered what causes your power to fail or blink? Possibilities include storms, animals and accidents. Visit our Featured Videos section to watch this informative video from the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.

Miles of power line owned and operated by S.C. electric cooperatives

70 percent

South Carolina land mass served by electric co-ops

900-plus

Number of electric cooperatives in the U.S.

47

Number of states where electric cooperatives serve local communities

56 percent

Land mass of the United States served by electric co-ops GONE FISHIN’

Win a $100 gift card

What’s cooler than a total solar eclipse? Having an extra $100 spending money in your pocket. Enter our Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes this month for your chance to win a Visa gift card. One lucky reader’s name will be drawn at random from all eligible entries received by Aug. 31. Enter today at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply.

Like us on Facebook

Join us as we celebrate all that’s great about life in South Carolina. Add your voice to the conversation and share your photos at facebook.com/SouthCarolinaLiving.

8

The Vektor Fish & Game Forecast provides feeding and migration times. Major periods can bracket the peak by an hour. Minor peaks, ½ hour before and after. Minor

AM Major

AUGUST

Minor

PM Major

16 12:52 8:52 9:22 4:37 17 2:22 9:52 10:37 5:22 18 3:22 10:52 11:22 6:07 19 4:22 11:37 11:52 6:37 20 — 5:22 7:07 12:22 21 — 6:07 7:37 12:52 22 1:07 6:52 8:07 1:37 23 1:52 7:37 8:37 2:07 24 2:22 8:22 8:52 2:37 25 9:07 3:07 9:22 3:07 26 9:52 3:52 3:37 9:52 27 11:22 4:37 4:07 10:07 28 — 5:52 1:37 10:52 29 — 7:22 4:22 11:37 30 — 8:37 9:07 4:52 31 1:22 9:37 10:22 5:22

Minor

AM Major

SEPTEMBER

1 2:37 10:22 2 3:37 10:52 3 4:37 11:22 4 — 5:22 5 — 5:52 6 12:52 6:37 7 1:37 7:22 8 8:07 2:07 9 9:07 2:52 10 10:07 3:37 11 11:37 4:22 12 — 5:37 13 — 7:07 14 — 8:37 15 2:22 9:37 16 3:37 10:37

Minor

PM Major

10:52 5:37 11:22 6:07 11:52 6:22 6:52 12:07 7:07 12:37 7:37 1:07 7:52 1:37 2:07 8:22 2:52 8:52 3:22 9:07 4:07 9:52 1:37 10:37 12:37 3:37 9:52 4:22 10:37 5:07 11:07 5:37

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   AUGUST 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP 101⁄2 103⁄4

13


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Dialogue

Bringing new life to food deserts food desert. With a vision of bringing better food options to her neighborhood, Germaine Jenkins established the For many people, stopping by the store on the way Chicora Place Community Garden, yielding 200 to 300 home to pick up fresh ingredients for dinner is fairly pounds of fresh produce each year. This spot not only routine. But for some, just getting to a grocery store is expensive and time-consuming. In areas and neighborhoods serves as a thriving community garden, it also established the roots for Fresh Future Farm, a nonprofit organic farm that can’t support supermarkets, gas stations and convehalf a mile down the road. Serving as the first USDA nience stores have become the primary local option for grocery store in the community since 2005, Fresh Future food shopping, making it nearly impossible to put together offers basic grocery items along with fruits, vegetables, meals that include healthy, fresh ingredients. eggs, and herbs—as well as stamps, envelopes, and kitchen Referred to as “food deserts,” these rural and urban areas offer residents limited access to nutritious food. and toiletry items. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Finally, Seeds of Hope is a statewide partnership there are about 250,000 South Carolina residents living between churches and family farmers developed by visionin 21 food deserts located in 14 different counties. In our ary Donna Bryan in 1987 to help create regular markets state’s low-income rural areas where grocery stores have for fresh produce. Most of these community-based farmers shuttered their doors, many residents end up traveling at markets are located in church parking lots, serving their least 10 miles before they reach the nearest supermarket— local surrounding neighborhoods, and often the produce left over at the end of and usually far more the day is shared with a than that. GET MORE Learn more about North Charleston’s Fresh Future charitable group chosen For those without a Farm and its community-based solution to food deserts at by the congregation. reliable car, transportafreshfuturefarm.org. To find Seeds of Hope markets in your area, visit Over the past 30 years, tion is a major hurdle agriculture.sc.gov/where-to-buy-local/community-based-farmers-markets. these partnerships have when it comes to food expanded to all denomiaccess. Especially in rural areas, long stretches of road often mean asking friends for a nations of churches, as well as synagogues, health centers, lift or taking expensive taxi rides. And when shoppers have hospitals and community centers, creating opportunities to head out of town to buy groceries, their money leaves across the state for people to access fresh food. town with them. It’s estimated that South Carolinians in The ripple effect of these innovative approaches to food deserts spend approximately $311 million annually on addressing food deserts in our state is spreading, helping groceries outside of their local community. to bring deserts back to life, strengthening community But some communities are finding innovative ways to ties and making it easier for all South Carolinians to put bring back local fresh-food options. healthy meals on the table. The small town of Jackson in Aiken County (population If you know of other organizations working locally 1,700) has long been classified as a food desert. Recently, to solve problems and improve the lives of neighbors, however, the town council partnered with Aiken Electric please write to connections@ecsc.org, or Connections, Cooperative to bring a Fresh Market IGA supermarket to 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033. Jackson. By helping to facilitate a USDA zero-interest loan of up to $400,000 to the town, the cooperative enabled the town’s mayor to fulfill his 10-year mission to bring a quality grocery store to the community. The new store is scheduled to open this December in time for the holiday season. Down in the Lowcountry, where the Winn-Dixie in the Chicora-Cherokee community of North Charleston closed MIKE COUICK President and CEO, back in 2005, the USDA has defined the area as a certified The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina WHAT’S FOR SUPPER TONIGHT?

10

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   AUGUST 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP


EMPOWERING VISION By combining our low-cost, reliable energy and diverse property portfolio with South Carolina’s low cost of doing business, creative incentive packages and unparalleled quality of life, Santee Cooper, working with the South Carolina Power Team and the state’s electric cooperatives, continues to help new businesses picture a better future – and continues to power South Carolina toward Brighter Tomorrows, Today.

www.scpowerteam.com • www.santeecooper.com


EnergyQ&A

BY PATRICK KEEGAN

Charging ahead

Q

DAVE CHRISTENSEN/PLATTE-CLAY ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE

My son and his wife just bought a new electric vehicle. I was surprised that the cost was comparable to a gasoline-powered car. I’d like to learn more. What are the pros and cons of going electric?

A

Charging with electricity is nearly always cheaper than fueling with gasoline. reduced or eliminated altogether. However, in lieu of gas refueling, EVs need to be recharged. At the lowest charging level, called Level 1, an hour of charging typically provides two to five miles of range per hour. Because the average light-duty car is parked for 12 hours per day at a residence, many EV drivers can use Level 1 for most of their charging needs. The fastest charging level, called DC FastCharging, can provide 60 to 80 miles of range in a 20-minute period. Charging with electricity is nearly always cheaper than fueling with 12

p Platte-Clay Electric Cooperative’s EV Charging Station provides a convenient location to recharge. u The Chevrolet Volt is a hybrid, switching between battery and gasoline as needed.

gasoline. An electric gallon—or “eGallon”—represents the cost of driving an EV the same distance a gasoline-powered vehicle could travel on one gallon of gasoline. On average, an eGallon is about one-third the cost of a gallon of gasoline. Also, in many places, electricity is a cleaner fuel source than gasoline. Although exact environmental benefits will vary, one recent study found that two-thirds of Americans live in regions where driving an EV is cleaner than driving a 50 mpg gas-powered car. Another reason for the rise in EV ownership is recent reductions in the upfront cost of the cars. The batteries used in EVs are the most expensive component of the cars, but, thanks to improving production methods, the cost of batteries has dropped by more than 35 percent since 2010 and is expected to keep dropping. Because of cost reductions and technology improvements, EVs are hitting major performance and affordability milestones. For example, in 2016, General Motors released the Chevrolet Bolt— an all-electric EV with an estimated

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   AUGUST 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP

CHEVROLET

The electric vehicle (EV) market is growing rapidly. There are good reasons why EVs are becoming more popular, but there are also potential drawbacks. Let’s start with the basics: EVs are vehicles that plug into the electric grid for some or all of their power. There are two primary types. All-electric EVs—such as the Nissan LEAF—are powered entirely with electricity. Plug-in hybrid EVs—such as the Chevrolet Volt—are dual-fuel cars, meaning both the electric motor and the internal-combustion engine can propel the car. A key benefit of EVs is that trips to the gas station are either vastly

range of 238 miles per charge, costing about $30,000 after rebates. Although longer-range and more affordable EVs are expected to hit the market soon, one drawback of EVs is that most current models have a range of less than 100 miles per charge. Public charging stations are increasingly available across the U.S., but “range anxiety” is still a concern for many potential buyers. Fortunately, the average American’s daily driving patterns are well-suited for EV use. More than half of all U.S. vehicle trips are between one and 10 miles. Even in rural areas, average daily drive distances for errands and commutes are well within the range of most currently available EVs. Send questions to Energy Q&A, South Carolina Living, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033, email energyqa@scliving.coop or fax (803) 739-3041.


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13


SmartChoice

BY JAYNE CANNON

Electrical college

DORM SWEET HOME JUST BREW IT Caffeinate through college, one cup at a time, with the Keurig K15 Coffee Maker in your favorite color. Its compact size fits nicely in cramped quarters. Brews three sizes, with a 10-ounce option to power you through sleepy mornings. $100. (866) 901‑2739; keurig.com.

Plug into products designed to enhance your students’ enjoyment of campus life

TAKE NOTE BIG MAC Though it weighs only 4 pounds and measures a bit over half an inch thick, the MacBook Pro is no lightweight. Touch ID requires your fingerprint to open, for extra security. The Touch Bar provides easy access to functions you use most. With improved speed and graphics capability, it’s ready for academic achievement. Starts at $2,249 for 15-inch model. (800) 692‑7753; apple.com. PACKING A CHARGE Your phone is worthless when it’s out of juice. Carry the BirkSun Festival backpack to keep your phone fully functional. With plenty of room for books and papers, the pack also features a solar panel to deliver the power you need. And when there’s no sun, you can recharge it via wall plug. $100. (424) 237‑8850; birksun.com.

OWN THE DOT When you’re away from home, who’s your source for answers and advice? Enter the Echo Dot. The Dot responds to voice commands and will announce the weather, read the news, play favorite songs and more. But it won’t do your laundry or make your bed. $50. (888) 280‑4331; amazon.com. CHILLIN’ Having a refrigerator stuffed with snacks may be what freshmen miss most about home (next to Mom and Dad, of course). The space-saving Igloo Mini Refrigerator comes in a rainbow of colors and keeps everything cold—a must for late-night study breaks. $89 and up. (800) 925‑6278; walmart.com.

WRITE SMART If you’ve ever looked back at notes and wondered what language you wrote them in, the Neo smartpen N2 may be your new best friend. Used with a special paper, the smartpen uses its invisibleto-the-eye technology to transfer your handwriting to the device you choose via Bluetooth. $169; neosmartpen.com. DIGITAL DICTATION What to do on days when your mind wanders, you’re too sleepy to pay attention or the professor is talking too fast to keep up? Let the Sony Digital Voice Recorder step up and record the lecture. No worries if chatterboxes are nearby—this recorder filters background noise. $60. (888) 237‑8289; bestbuy.com.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   AUGUST 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP


Boldly BoldlyShow ShowYour YourPride Pridefor forthe the

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Professional mini golf finds a home on the Grand Strand, where serious players compete for big money, a coveted green jacket and a little sporting respect, please  BY HASTINGS HENSEL | PHOTOS BY JON STELL On a cloudless October day in North Myrtle Beach, beneath a 40-foot volcano whose indigo waterfall sprays mist with each gust of wind, Bobby Ward lines up his first putt of the 20th annual U.S. ProMiniGolf Masters tournament. The winner of the inaugural event in 1997 and the first-ever U.S. MiniGolf Hall of Fame inductee, Ward has been referred to as “the Jack Nicklaus of Miniature Golf,”

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and today he certainly looks the part. In a striped golf shirt tucked neatly into white shorts, with his gray hair parted perfectly, he stoops in an L-shape, nearly horizontal over his tournament-custom gold Chromax golf ball. He chokes down, exhales and gives his Ping Anser putter a few short, swift practice strokes. Like all holes in the tournament, this is a par two. To make an ace, players must gently roll their shot between


SILVER AND GOLD Shiny, commemorative 20thanniversary balls were on the roll during the 2016 tournament. Bobby Ward, the first inductee into the U.S. MiniGolf Hall of Fame, waits to see if this putt is golden.

two miniature tiki totems. It’s a simple “front door” shot, which means he won’t need to bank the ball off one of the red bricks encircling the Astroturf. Still, Ward is locked in. He knows that the U.S. ProMiniGolf Masters is a test in concentration and stamina. The competitors will play a total of 216 holes over the course of three days—five rounds at Aloha Mini Golf and seven rounds, including the final two, at the Hawaiian Rumble Course. And he knows what every golfer knows—that one mistake can ruin your chances at victory. “I’ve always been calm,” he says later, between rounds. “If you get going too good and you’re not calm, you’ll lose it. Every hole, you should have concentration.” Finally, with his head still and his stance widened, he hits the ball and watches it roll between the totems

and into the cup. His tournament off to a good start, the 53-year-old from Beech Island gives a calm fist pump and moves on to the next hole.

Yes, it is a professional sport

Until you watch this tournament unfold, it can be hard to fathom that mini golf—a game played on outlandish courses, often by kids and families on beach vacations— has a professional circuit. Yet, every fall, competitors from around the world arrive in Myrtle Beach to play with an intensity that any athlete would recognize. Yes, the players are here to have fun; it’s still mini golf, after all, and this is still Myrtle Beach, “the Mini Golf Capital of the World.” But they take this not-so-serious sport quite seriously indeed—they are all here to win the crystal trophy,

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‘The thing I enjoy the most is the camaraderie. ... While we all take the tournament very seriously, it’s always secondary to hanging out.’ —BOBBY WARD

the green windbreaker (a nod to the PGA Masters’ green jacket) and the $5,000 first-place check. Presiding over it all is Bob Detwiler, founder of the U.S. ProMiniGolf Association and the owner of both Hawaiianthemed courses. A former physical education teacher and tennis coach, Detwiler is also the chief cheerleader seeking to legitimize the sport. “When I got into miniature golf, the first thing I said was that we needed tournaments. It’s a sport,” he says. “These people love it. Once they start playing, they realize it’s the best part of golf. When you watch PGA on TV, what do you see? They show them on the green, putting.” Miniature golf distills regular golf down to its most nerve-racking moments. At a mini-golf tournament, there’s lots of collective breath-holding. Many of the players, after hitting their shots, lean to the left or right, as if they can guide the ball into the cup. Aces produce fist pumps and the occasional Tiger-esque roar. After near misses and lip-outs, you’ll see frustrated winces and putters nearly slammed to the ground. And the most exciting part of the game, of course, makes it the most humbling. Ward finishes his morning round—before the catered chicken-bog lunch buffet—on hole 13, which contains a

MATT SILFER

MASTER OF CEREMONIES Bob Detwiler established the ProMiniGolf Masters, which celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2016.

kind of miniature volcano with the hole in the crater. On his first shot, the ball doesn’t roll up the plateau and falls back into a kind of valley. He hangs his head but tries again. He misses. And then misses a third time. And a fourth. Finally, he walks away with a three over for the hole and a frustrating round of 39. “You can make a one, so I’ll just call it challenging,” he says in his ever-humble and soft-spoken manner.

Living the dream

All the drama is partly a result of the serious money on the line. For the 2016 tournament, Detwiler landed Coca-Cola as a major sponsor, and the purse went up to $20,000. The money is certainly incentive enough, but these players are, in their own way, living out every kid’s dream on the miniature golf course—the chance to make the putt that wins it all. Ward, who grew up near Augusta, Georgia, traces his love of the game to his childhood. At 11 years old, he was able to get Arnold Palmer’s autograph at the 1969 PGA Masters. Below his signature, Palmer wrote the numbers 58, 60, 62, 64. “You know why?” asks Ward. “Those were the years he won the Masters. It meant that much to him.” And so, this tournament means so much to these players, many of whom have retired from regular golf altogether. Either injury hinders them from being able to hit the long ball, or they’ve simply found miniature golf to be a more fun and accessible sport. They can compete at the highest levels and still go back to their day jobs pulling

UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE From fist-pump success to head-in-hands agony, a full range of emotions is elicited by putts made and missed at the ProMiniGolf Masters.

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HOLE IN ONE Greg Newport of York peeks around the bend to confirm that his ball dropped in the cup.

Matthew cut her practice short, and she teeth, teaching classes, delivering mail, struggled to stay in contention. tending bar. “I’ve played bad,” she admits in broken Still, many mini golfers are on a quest English. “But everybody can play bad. I’ll to get people to take their sport more be back.” seriously. “From a public standpoint, we don’t have Good sports as much respect, because we’re not playing for a million dollars, and money always The most oft-cited reason for loving this adds a certain amount of legitimacy,” says sport is its fellowship. Although the players Rick Baird, a pro competitor who grew up differ in personality as much as they differ in Lake City. in the putting stances, at the masters level, He fell in love with mini golf as a kid on they all seem to root for one another. They summer vacations at the beach, and he still applaud a good shot. They offer a consoling loves to bring his friends to the course and pat on the back for a close miss. CZECH MATE International mini-golf show them it’s no joke. “The thing I enjoy the most is the camastar Olivia Prokopova has won the “At first, they kind of laugh a little bit,” raderie,” says Bobby Ward. “Like a family, ProMiniGolf Masters twice. he says. “Then they go out and shoot a 45 we all hang out together—eat together, or a 50, and they get a different perspective.” stay together, have a wonderful time together. While we all The first thing the casual player might notice is that take the tournament very seriously, it’s always secondary to professional miniature golfers don’t use the standard-issue hanging out.” rubber putters and monochrome golf balls the public does. “It feels like these people are all family. They look out They don’t look like they’ve just come off the beach; indeed, for each other,” says Becky Newport of York—a former most look like PGA golfers, complete with rags and scoreplayer herself who is here to cheer on her husband, Greg, one of the top contenders. They met at a miniature golf cards stuffed into their pockets. Many of them carry notetournament, and for the 2016 Masters, she wears a shirt books with information they’ve gathered about each hole. that reads, “Team Newport—The Better Halves of Mini One player who brings a high level of dedication to the sport is Olivia Prokopova from the Czech Republic. An Golf.” So, when she says family, she means it literally. international star and two-time winner of the ProMiniGolf And this year, she certainly has plenty to cheer about. Masters, she’s been playing the game since she was 3 years Heading into the final round, Greg Newport finds himself old, and she typically arrives in Myrtle Beach a month in second place, eight shots behind Randy Reeves. Newport before the tournament to prepare. In 2016, Hurricane arrives at the Hawaiian Rumble on the final day in the

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cool dawn hours, wearing a red victory golf shirt, like Tiger Woods. “One thing about this game is there’s no defense,” he says before the start of his round. “I can only control what I do on the course. If I start making aces and keep making aces and cut the lead in half after this round, I have a shot.” Ever the good sport, Ward, who is out of contention, volunteers to carry the leaderboard for the final round. Spectators and other players are climbing up hillsides, leaning on palm trees and crossing indigo creeks to get a view of the shots. It is a remarkably hushed atmosphere. This is, beyond a doubt, serious competition. The difference between third and fourth place, for instance, is $1,000, and perhaps a single mistake. And, almost tauntingly, Bob Detwiler has hung the green windbreaker over the crystal trophy, beside the final holes. Newport starts strong, trading a birdie for Reeves’ bogey. But, alas, that will be the end to the drama. Reeves, a postal worker from Montgomery, Alabama, is a top competitor who finished second in 2008 and 2009 and in or around

NINTH TIME’S THE CHARM Randy Reeves of Montgomery, Alabama, hoists the crystal trophy after decisively winning the 2016 ProMiniGolf Masters.

GET THERE Are you ready to test your putting skills in high-stakes competition? The 21st annual U.S. ProMiniGolf Masters tournament will be played Oct. 12–14 at Hawaiian Rumble, 3210 Hwy. 17 South, North Myrtle Beach. The tournament has several divisions and is open to any player, regardless of experience. Registration fees range from $130 for elite competitors to $55 for amateurs and $20 for juniors (age 12 and under). For more information or to register for the tournament, visit prominigolf.com or call Danielle Maloni at (843) 458‑2585. GET MORE What to do when arm

pain keeps you from playing the golf game you love? Be like Loris resident Niko Manou and invent a new sport. “Shloff” is a hybrid of “shoe” and “golf,” and, like the name implies, the sport requires you to kick the golf ball, rather than hit it with a traditional golf club. Read more at SCLiving.coop.

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‘When you’re playing with someone playing that well, it’s fun to watch. Randy really deserved it.’ —GREG NEWPORT

the top 10 for the past eight years. But this year, as if making up for all his near victories, he runs away with it. He shoots the best score in the history of the tournament and wins by 16 shots. After the round, Newport concedes with good sportsmanship: “When you’re playing with someone playing that well, it’s fun to watch. Randy really deserved it.” And it’s hard to imagine someone looking happier than Reeves himself. He slips into his green jacket, signs his scorecard and hoists the trophy to a roar of applause. “It feels great, man!” he says. “Been a long time coming.” Ward makes his way through the crowd and gives Reeves a congratulatory handshake. Together, they will wear their green windbreakers to the closing ceremony at Crocodile Rocks and sit with the other past champions as the good times roll. In the coming weeks, Reeves will have his winner’s plaque hung beside the past winners in lobby of the Hawaiian Rumble, and before long, it will be tourist season. The volcano will start erupting, Jimmy Buffett music will pour from the loudspeakers and the beach crowds will return. But the professionals will go home and play the course over and over in their minds before they return next October. The possibility of a victory is just too thrilling to let go. As Ward says with a smile, “I’ll be playing this game as long as I’m physically able.”


SC Life

Stories

Life on two wheels

Like a matador facing down a bull, rider coach Joe Dawes stands in a vacant parking lot at Midlands Technical College’s Beltline Campus and signals a nervous new motorcyclist to do the unthinkable—accelerate straight at him. As the gap between them closes, Dawes calmly signals the rider to veer right and (hopefully) avoid running over him. The rider cuts right, then left again—​ a little wobbly, but inside the assigned lane—and stops safely beside the instructor. With a patient smile that never wavers, Dawes gives the rider a few tips, a thumbs-up and a hearty “Good job!” On any given weekend, you’re likely to find Dawes teaching Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) courses for riders of all skill levels. On days off, he’s probably on his beloved Moto Guzzi 1100 Sport, cruising the back roads of the Midlands with the European Motorcycle Club, or happily tinkering in his garage, tending to a small fleet of English and Italian bikes. Riding has been a constant for Dawes since the age of 12 and his first throttle-twisting experience on a blue minibike powered by a lawnmower engine. From that moment, if he was going anywhere, he wanted to be on two wheels—whether it was across town or the epic rides he’s made across Greece, Turkey, Germany and the U.S. “Unless I’m down for maintenance, it’s a motorcycle all the time. I ride everywhere—probably 20,000 miles a year,” he says. “Motorcycling has been the central theme of my life for quite a while.” —KEITH PHILLIPS

Joe Dawes AGE:

60

Columbia Rider coach and defensive-driving instructor at Midlands Technical College; former state coordinator of the South Carolina Motorcycle Education Program (scridered.org) PREVIOUS GIGS: U.S. Air Force staff sergeant and electronics technician, emergency generator technician at the University of South Carolina and professional motorcycle mechanic IN HIS GARAGE: A 1974 Norton Commando, three Moto Guzzis and a 2007 Benelli OFF THE BIKE: Enjoys writing science fiction and growing hot peppers in his backyard garden HOMETOWN:

ANDREW HAWORTH

OCCUPATION:

GET MORE To learn more about Motorcycle Safety Foundation

classes offered at Midlands Tech, see midlandstech.edu/learn/ training-courses/motorcycle or call (803) 732-0432.

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SCScene

Seven tips for viewing the solar eclipse Pickens

Spartanburg

BY DIANE VETO PARHAM

Greenville Walhalla

ILLUSTRATIONS BY DAVID CLARK

Central

Anderson

Laurens Newberry

Florence

Greenwood Saluda

Lexington

Columbia

Edgefield

Sumter Myrtle Beach

St. Matthews Kingstree

Aiken

Orangeburg Bamberg

Georgetown Moncks Corner

McClellanville

Summerville

The buzz has been building for months;

Charleston

the big moment is nearly upon us. On Monday, Aug. 21, South Carolina will witness its first total solar eclipse in decades, and plenty

IN THE DARK The entire state of South Carolina will experience a solar eclipse on Aug. 21. The gray band indicates the path of totality, the only places where the total eclipse can be seen. The rest of the state will see a partial eclipse. Totality will be visible longer the closer you are to the blue center line. MAP BASED ON VERSION AT ECLIPSE2017.ORG

of activities are planned statewide to help us enjoy this rare celestial event right over our heads. For most of us, it’s a brand-new experience—easy to understand if you’re a little in the dark about how to watch it. So, here are a few helpful tips. 22

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WHAT TO EXPECT. 2. KNOW IN POSITION. 1. GET

Location is the most important detail for ensuring your ability to witness this total solar eclipse. Anyone in North America will be able to see the partial-eclipse phases in the minutes before and after the total eclipse (as long as they’re wearing eclipse glasses— see tip 4, Protect your eyes). But to see the shorter and much-rarer total eclipse of the sun, something that hasn’t happened in South Carolina since 1970 and won’t again until 2052, you must stake out a spot in the 70-mile-wide path of totality. Being even a smidgeon outside that path means you won’t experience the full effects of the total solar eclipse, and that’s the critical point. “If you want to see this once-ina-lifetime event, you need to drive somewhere in the path of totality,” says Greg Cornwell, planetarium specialist at Roper Mountain Science Center in Greenville. Not every part of South Carolina is in the eclipse’s path of totality. A general map showing the eclipse path is on the facing page. To get really specific, type in your address on the interactive map at xjubier.free.fr/en/site_pages/solar_ eclipses/TSE_2017_GoogleMapFull.html to see if you’re in the eclipse path. Also, eclipse2017.org lists every community in the path of totality and the precise times totality will start there.

Before the big day, start with the big picture. You can get a complete overview of the total solar eclipse from South Carolina’s perspective at SCLiving.coop/eclipse. For a nationwide scope, check out eclipse2017.nasa.gov and GreatAmericanEclipse.com. Here it is in short: South Carolina is one of only 12 states in the path of totality, where all light from the sun will be temporarily blocked. The first glimpse of a partial phase of the eclipse—when the moon begins to move between sun and Earth—will reach the uppermost parts of South Carolina shortly after 1 p.m. Starting around 2:36 p.m., the Upstate will be in total darkness. In the Midlands, the partial eclipse will start around 1:13 p.m., with the full darkness of totality around 2:41 p.m. In Charleston, the partial phase begins around 1:16 p.m.; totality around 2:46 p.m. On the back side of totality, expect another partial phase as the moon finishes its path across the sun. Totality will last anywhere from 22 seconds to 2 minutes, 38 seconds, in South Carolina, depending on how close you are to the center line of the shadow—

shorter times on the edges, longer times toward the middle. Some parts of the state are completely outside the path of totality. If that’s you, the most you’ll see is a partial eclipse—not the main show. Everyone watching the partial phases of the eclipse, no matter where they are, must wear protective eclipse glasses to avoid permanently damaging their eyes. If you’re in the path to witness totality, here are some cool things to watch for, besides total darkness midafternoon: l the temperature drops a few degrees l birds stop chirping l nocturnal animals become active l Baily’s beads, small points of sunlight, shine through valleys around the edge of the moon in just the few seconds before and after totality l a “360-degree sunset” makes the entire sky appear as if the sun were setting along the horizon, in the final moments before totality l the sun’s corona, not normally visible to the naked eye, can be seen l planets near the sun will be visible in the darkened sky

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SC SCENE • SEVEN TIPS FOR VIEWING THE SOLAR ECLIPSE

YOUR PREFERRED VIEWING SPOT. 3. FIND

Maybe you’ve heard claims from various locales about being “eclipse central” or “eclipse headquarters” or “the best” place to watch the eclipse. The truth is, there’s no one place that owns that title. All you really need is a clear view of the sun, be it an open field or parking lot, out on the lake, or in your own backyard. The sun should be high in the sky for the eclipse’s earlyafternoon arrival; you just don’t want any trees or tall buildings (or, fingers crossed, clouds) in your line of sight. “You choose where you want to see this,” says Merritt McNeely, marketing director for the S.C. State Museum and member of the steering committee for Total Eclipse Weekend Columbia, S.C. “Are you an outdoor adventurer? If so, Congaree National Swamp might be an excellent place for you. Are you an astronomy enthusiast? If so, the State Museum might be best for you. Are you a family of four who has the day off and you want to watch this awesome experience during a baseball game? Go to the Fireflies game.” As totality time approaches, be settled in position—no last-minute dashes to your chosen spot, because traffic may be snarled with thousands of visitors to the state, looking for good viewing spots.

IT A PARTY. 5. MAKE

YOUR EYES. 4. PROTECT

Still don’t have your eclipse glasses? Act quickly. You may be able to score some free glasses at eclipse-related events in your community. Or, you can buy your own. Safe eclipse glasses meet the ISO 12312-2 international standard for products made for direct observation of the sun. Online retailers like Amazon.com and eclipse-related websites are selling eclipse glasses certified to this standard, including: l rainbowsymphonystore.com l eclipseglasses.com l thousandoaksoptical.com l tse17.com Certified eclipse-viewing glasses have language on the back indicating that they meet the appropriate safety. If you don’t see that certification, don’t use the glasses. If the solar filters on your glasses are scratched or damaged, discard them and do not use them. Sunglasses, cameras, binoculars or telescopes without appropriate filters are not safe for viewing the eclipse. Find more eye-safety tips from American Astronomical Society at eclipse.aas.org/eye-safety/safe-viewing.

Wherever you are for the eclipse, make plans to see it with friends—it’s a once-in-a-lifetime experience for most people, and you’re going to want to talk about it. Maybe you want to host your own gathering with an eclipse-themed menu—Sun Chips? Moon Pies? Ice-cold Corona or Blue Moon beers, or Capri Sun juices for the kids? NASA’s got some tips for hosting an eclipse party. You’ll find ideas for party locations and publicity at eclipse2017.nasa.gov/host-eclipse-party, including fliers you can download and customize for your special event, as well as crafts and activities for your guests. Don’t forget to take care of yourself and your guests. It’ll be an August afternoon in South Carolina, so have water, sunscreen and air conditioning at the ready. Also, it’s a Monday, so you may need to ask off from work or find out if the boss is planning to close up shop so everyone can watch. Many schools have rearranged their schedules to make sure students get to witness the eclipse; check with your student’s school to get details.

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PIGGYBACK ON SOMEONE ELSE’S PARTY. 6. OR,

Creativity abounds when it comes to activities being planned statewide to observe the eclipse. Want to combine the eclipse with some baseball? The Columbia Fireflies, the Charleston RiverDogs and the Greenville Drive have home games that afternoon, with special events planned to celebrate the eclipse. Columbia has gathered a lengthy list of pre-eclipse weekend events under the banner of Total Eclipse Weekend Columbia, S.C., including a visit to the State Museum by Apollo 16 astronaut Gen. Charles Duke. The weekend gets a high-tech start Aug. 19 with the inaugural lighting of a laser-artwork installation over the Congaree River between the Gervais and Blossom Street bridges. Designed by artist Chris Robinson in collaboration with EngenuitySC, “Southern Lights” is, like the eclipse, a rarity—one of only two such permanent laser installations worldwide, with laser power unlike most people have ever seen, Robinson says. Check the Calendar of Events at SCLiving.coop/calendar for some of the places around South Carolina that have special events planned. Visit these sites to find the eclipse experience that’s right for you: l GoDarkCharleston.com (Charleston area) l TotalEclipseColumbiaSC.com; scmuseum.org/eclipse (Columbia area and the S.C. State Museum) l ropermountain.org (Greenville area and Roper Mountain Science Center) l bju.edu/eclipse (Bob Jones University, Greenville) l ultimatespf.com (Hammock Coast area) l santeecoopercountry.org (Lake Marion/Lake Moultrie area) l rpsec.usca.edu/Events/Eclipse/SolarEclipse2017.html (Aiken area and Ruth Patrick Science Education Center) l clemson.edu/eclipse (Clemson University) l discoversouthcarolina.com/articles/come-to-south-carolina-for-the-great-eclipse-of-2017 (statewide) l swu.edu/eclipse (Eclipse over Pickens County event at Southern Wesleyan University in Central)

7. ASLASTA RESORT ...

If the closest you can get to the total solar eclipse is in front of a computer screen, check out nasa.gov/eclipselive, which will show live video streams of the eclipse from locations across the country, including images captured by high-altitude balloons from the College of Charleston. Still, the real deal is preferable. “Lots of things will occur as the moon moves across the sun,” says Steve Rodney, assistant professor at the University of South Carolina’s Department of Physics and Astronomy. “No photo or video of the sun will ever capture what that moment is like.”

GET MORE Visit SCLiving.coop/eclipse for more stories on the coming event, including: Total blackout Get ready for the oncein-a-lifetime total solar eclipse sweeping across South Carolina this summer on Aug. 21.

How to protect your eyes Proper eye protection is critical for safely viewing partial and total solar eclipses. Use these tips to protect your vision.

The geometry of an eclipse See how the positions of the sun, moon and Earth create shadows that give us a partial or total solar eclipse.

By the numbers: The Great Solar Eclipse A total solar eclipse is, for most people, a once-in-a-lifetime experi‑ ence. Take a look at the numbers that make the 2017 eclipse special.

How long will I be in the dark? Find out what time the eclipse starts in your community and how to position yourself for the longest viewing times.

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SCTravels

BY TIM HANSON

WITH EVERY STROKE OF THE PADDLE,

I am hoping to catch a glimpse of Elvis—an American alligator of some repute who is said to live among a forest of bald cypress trees that populate the lake on which I am kayaking with two state park rangers. Elvis is supposed to be an imposing fellow of unusual size who makes only the rarest of appearances and whose massive, armored body leaves those few lucky witnesses slack-jawed and awash in unadorned admiration. But I’m having a little trouble getting Paul McCormack—the affable

GetThere Goodale State Park is located at 650 Park Road in Camden. Besides paddling and fishing, the park has picnic shelters, a children’s playground and a mile-long nature trail. A South Carolina fishing license is required for anglers. HOURS: The park is open daily from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Office hours are from 11 a.m. to noon daily. BOAT RENTALS: Canoes, kayaks and fishing boats are available Thursday through Monday and rent for $7 for a half day and $12 for a full day. Rental season runs from March 1 to Nov. 30. The lake is open to private, non-motorized boats, canoes and kayaks year-round. FEES: Admission to the park is free. DETAILS: Visit southcarolinaparks.com/goodale or call (803) 432-2772.

26

Sandhills regional chief for the South Carolina State Parks Service—to come clean about the reliability of the Elvis sightings. “The Parks Service makes no claims that Elvis exists,” he says with a laugh. “We neither confirm nor deny …” Still, hope springs eternal. I remain vigilant. We paddle on. The lake we are exploring is called Adams Grist Mill Lake. It covers about 140 acres of Goodale State Park in Kershaw County, not far from Camden. McCormack, park manager John Wells and I launch our kayaks on a muggy, overcast morning in June and make our way across the relatively open water of the lake to a canoe trail that leads into a dense thicket of trees and underbrush. McCormack calls this trail one of South Carolina’s “hidden gems” for paddlers, birders and outdoor enthusiasts, and it’s easy to see why. Once inside the forest, the sounds of the outside world fade away and are replaced with the buzzing of insects and the sounds of our paddles breaking the surface of the water. At one point, a dragonfly lands on the bow of my kayak and hitches a ride for a minute or so. McCormack and Wells watch a mourning dove land in a pine tree, and we hear it begin cooing. And later, we spot a great egret, its white feathers and

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   AUGUST 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP

TIM HANSON

Paddling Goodale State Park ANOTHER DAY AT THE OFFICE John Wells, manager of Goodale State Park (left), and Paul McCormack, Sandhills regional chief of the S.C. State Parks Service, survey the paddling trail on Adams Grist Mill Lake.

yellow bill contrasting sharply with the overwhelming green of the forest. Pretty soon, I’m starting to forget about Elvis as the overall serenity of this place starts to take hold. “This is a spot where you can escape from everyday life,” says Wells. “You can leave everything back in town and come out here and, for a little while, just forget everything.” The canoe trail twists and turns through the forest, the occasional diamond-shaped arrow signs on trees pointing the way. The path gradually becomes narrower and narrower until what appears to be a metal pie tin tacked to tree marks the turnaround point. Another hour or so of paddling brings us back to the entrance, and we once again break out into open water, slipping between cypress trees and plowing through lake vegetation on our way back to shore. “Hey, Paul,” I say. “I reckon we’re not going to see Elvis after all, eh?” The ranger rests his paddle across the kayak’s cockpit and turns back toward me. “Elvis …” he says, breaking into a smile. “Elvis has left the building.”


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SATURDAY, SEPT 16, 2017

Historic Main St., Westminster, SC

Aug. 26 – Apple Festival Pageant Sept. 5 – Rotary Golf Tournament Sept. 6 – Chattooga River Float Sept. 7 – Apple Baking Contest Sept. 8 – Arts & Craft Show Live Entertainment Quilt Show Rotary Club Luncheon Apple Festival Parade 27th Annual IPRA Rodeo Sept. 9 – Arts & Craft Show 27th Annual IPRA Rodeo

• Music • Food • Arts and Crafts • Kiddie Rides • Fun Run Race • Parade • Children’s Activities • Rodeo • Quilt Show • Classic Car Show

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27


WIN A $100 GIFT CARD

What’s cooler than a total eclipse? An extra $100 in your pocket. Two great things are happening in South Carolina this month: the Aug. 21 total solar eclipse and South Carolina Living’s Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes. Sign up today for your chance to win a $100 Visa gift card. One lucky winner’s name will be drawn at random from entries received by Aug. 31. Register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply or mail in the coupon.

READER REPLY TRAVEL SWEEPSTAKES Register below, or online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply YES! Enter me in the drawing for a $100 gift card. Name Address 

 City/State/ZIP  Email*  Phone

SEND COUPON TO: South Carolina Living, RRTS, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033 or travel@SCLiving.coop. Entries must be received by Aug. 31, 2017, to be eligible. *Winner will be notified by email.

BY ENTERING, YOU MAY RECEIVE INFORMATION FROM THESE GREAT SPONSORS:

jj Aiken’s Makin’ Festival jj Alpine Helen-White County Regional Visitors Center, Ga. jj City of Camden jj City of Darlington jj City of Pickens jj Daniel Stowe Botanical Garden, Belmont, N.C. jj Italian Heritage Festival, Hilton Head Island jj S.C. Apple Festival, Westminster jj York Summerfest, Greater York Chamber of Commerce jj South Carolina Living magazine

Register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply 28

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   AUGUST 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP


Calling Young Authors & Illustrators

5th Grade Students

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Recipe

BY BELINDA SMITH-SULLIVAN

Make mine Italian There’s mo re to Italia food than just spaghe n tti and meatballs. Be no need to tter yet, there’s wait for an table at a nearby rest open aurant to enjoy a ll variety. Ad that delicious d th delicious It ese easy and alia your repert n dishes to oire, and w them up in hip the comfo rt of your own kitchen.

STEAK PIZZAIOLA

SHRIMP FETTUCCINE ALFREDO

SERVES 4

SERVES 4

4 tablespoons olive oil, divided 1 onion, sliced ½ red bell pepper, seeds removed, sliced ½ yellow bell pepper, seeds removed, sliced 3 garlic cloves, minced 1 28-ounce can San Marzano-style plum tomatoes, crushed 2 tablespoons chopped fresh oregano Kosher salt ¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes ¼ cup sliced black olives (optional) 2 tablespoons capers (optional) 1 ½ to 2 pounds sirloin steak, 2 inches thick; or, 4 smaller steaks, 1 to 1 ½ inch thick Freshly ground black pepper Chopped oregano for garnish

1 pound fettuccine pasta 1 pound jumbo shrimp, shelled and deveined ½ teaspoon kosher salt ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 garlic cloves, minced 2 cups heavy cream 8 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese White pepper Grated Parmesan for garnish Chopped green onions for garnish

30

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   AUGUST 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP

Cook pasta according to instructions, and drain. In a medium bowl, combine shrimp with salt, cayenne, olive oil and garlic. Marinate 10 minutes. In a medium saucepan over medium-low heat, heat cream. Add butter, and whisk to melt. Gradually add 1 cup Parmesan cheese, and whisk to combine and thicken. Season with pepper, and remove from heat. Toss pasta with sauce; transfer to a serving dish, and keep warm. In a large skillet over medium-high heat, saute shrimp until browned, about 3 minutes on each side. Toss shrimp gently with pasta, and garnish with additional Parmesan and green onions.

GWÉNAËL LE VOT

In a large saute pan over medium heat, heat 2 table­ spoons oil. Add onion and peppers, and saute until onion slices are translucent. Add garlic, and cook an additional minute. Add tomatoes, oregano, salt and crushed red pepper flakes. Reduce heat, and simmer, partially covered, until sauce thickens, about 10 minutes. Add olives and capers, and stir. Remove from heat, cover and keep warm. Heat a large skillet or grill pan over medium-high heat. Season steak with salt, black pepper and remaining oil. Cook steak 5 minutes. Turn over, and cook about 5 minutes longer for medium-rare. (Cooking time will vary, depending on cut and thickness of meat.) Remove steak to a platter, and let rest 10 minutes. Cut steak, across the grain, into thin slices, and top with warm sauce and chopped fresh oregano.

KAREN HERMANN


SERVES 8

1 pound ziti pasta 1 –2 tablespoons olive oil 1 ½ pounds ground beef 1 large onion, chopped 2 large garlic cloves, minced 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil 1 tablespoon Italian seasoning

¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper 4 cups marinara sauce (about 32 ounces), store-bought or homemade Cooking spray 2 cups grated mozzarella cheese ½ cup Parmesan cheese Chopped fresh basil for garnish

Preheat oven to 350 F. Cook pasta according to instructions, and drain. In a large Dutch oven or saucepan over medium-high heat, heat oil. Add ground beef, breaking into smaller pieces, and cook until brown. Push meat to sides of pan, creating a well, and add onion. Saute until onion is translucent, about 4 minutes. Add garlic, basil, Italian seasoning and red pepper, and stir to combine. Add marinara, and bring to a simmer. Remove from heat. Add pasta to sauce, and stir to combine. Spray bottom and sides of a 9-inch-by-13-inch baking dish with cooking spray. Pour half of pasta-sauce mixture into prepared dish, and cover with half the mozzarella; repeat layers. Top with Parmesan cheese. Bake in preheated oven until cheese is melted and edges are bubbly, about 25 minutes. Let rest 15 minutes before serving. Garnish with basil.

GINA MOORE 

IULIIA NEDRYGAILOVA

BAKED ZITI BOLOGNESE

EASIEST CHICKEN PARMESAN SERVES 4

4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts (if very large, use 2, cut in half horizontally) Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper ½ cup all-purpose flour ½ cup Italian-seasoned bread crumbs Pinch of cayenne pepper

2 tablespoons olive or vegetable oil (more if needed) 2 cups marinara sauce, homemade or store-bought 1 cup grated mozzarella cheese Grated Parmesan cheese for garnish Chopped basil for garnish Cooked pasta

Using a mallet or the bottom of a cast-iron skillet, flatten chicken breasts, being careful not to tear meat, and season with salt and pepper. In a flat dish, mix flour, bread crumbs and cayenne. Coat both sides of chicken breast with flour mixture, and set aside on a parchmentlined platter or sheet pan. In a large skillet over medium-high heat, heat oil. Saute breasts until well browned on both sides, about 3 minutes per side. Remove from skillet, and keep warm. Pour marinara into skillet, and bring to a boil, scraping the brown bits from bottom of pan. Return chicken to skillet, and reduce heat to low. Cover and simmer about 3 minutes, until chicken is cooked to 165 degrees. Scoop some sauce over breasts, and top each with mozzarella cheese. Cover pan again, and cook just until cheese is melted. Serve with your favorite pasta. Garnish with Parmesan and basil.

No store-bought marinara in the house? Don’t panic. Let Chef Belinda show you a quick-and-easy home­made version that starts with canned tomatoes at

SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda SCLIVING.COOP   | AUGUST 2017   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

31


SCGardener

BY AMY L. DABBS

PHOTOS: LEFT AND CENTER: BARBARA SMITH; RIGHT: AMY DABBS

Catapult your garden into shoulder season EVEN WITH AUGUST TEMPERATURES still sizzling, the time is right to plant late-summer and early-fall vegetables, taking advantage of shortening days and ever-so-slightly cooler nighttime temperatures. Horticulturists call the transitions between peak growing seasons “shoulder seasons.” August through October offers a short window to squeeze in fast-growing warm-season crops before a killing frost and to jumpstart cool-season veggies while the soil is still warm. Shoulder seasons help catapult your garden into year-round production. By August, much of the vegetable garden has been harvested or has succumbed to heat, insects and diseases. Revive heat-weary summer gardens and protect against future pest problems by first completely removing dead and diseased plants that may harbor overwintering insects and diseases. Rake and remove plant parts that have fallen to the ground, and clean debris from trellises and supports. Tall summer weeds can be mowed down; shorter weeds can be

GET MORE For step-by-step instructions on how to take a soil sample, see scliving.coop/home--garden/ digging-up-answers-with-soil-samples. To find helpful information about mid-season fertilizer rates for your garden plants, visit clemson.edu/extension/hgic. 32

smothered with thick layers of wet newspaper. Don’t till again; overworking the soil disrupts soil organisms and causes compaction. Instead, amend the soil with a thin layer of compost, and apply a few inches of an organic mulch, such as straw or leaves, between the rows to keep weeds at bay and retain moisture. A soil test is always a good idea. But without one, fertilize using the general recommendation of three to six pounds of 5-10-10, broadcasting this complete fertilizer before planting. Each type of vegetable has its own fertilizer needs; refer to the Clemson Home and Garden Information Center to research mid-season fertilizer rates for what you’ll be growing. Finally, be sure to rotate plant families in your garden to outwit diseases and pests. For example, if you grew squash in the summer months, plant your fall crop in a location other than where you last planted. Here’s a partial list of what you can start growing this month: Snap beans are warm-season crops that grow fast and are prolific producers. Bush and half-runner types do best this time of year; they’re easy to start from seed and mature quickly, producing pods within 50 to 60 days of planting. Recommended varieties of bush beans include Bush Blue Lake 274, Contender, Provider and Red Swan. Half-runner beans are typically grown like bush beans, but,

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   AUGUST 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP

KEEP THE VEGGIES COMING! Snap beans, summer squash and leafy greens are crops that can be planted from seed in August, providing an additional harvest well into autumn.

with runners up to 3 feet long, a short trellis can make harvesting easier. Try the heirloom variety Mountaineer White, which produces beans in 57 days. Bean flowers can sometimes drop off plants when temperatures soar over 90 degrees, but as the temperatures cool, you’ll find more pods developing. Didn’t get enough squash this summer? Plant a second crop now. Yellow squash and zucchini mature so fast, they’re perfect for shoulderseason planting. Just be sure to have a few flowering plants nearby to attract pollinating insects. Our mild winters are a perfect time for a wide variety of easy-to-grow root vegetables and leafy greens. While the soil is still warm from summer, sow seeds of beets, carrots, collards, lettuce, kale, spinach and mustard. To extend production, try the succession-planting method. Simply sow a new batch of seeds every one to two weeks, so when one crop is ready to harvest, the next one is up and growing, keeping you stocked for months to come. is an area horticulture agent for Clemson Extension based in Charleston County. Contact her at adabbs@clemson.edu.

AMY L. DABBS


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35


Calendar  of Events

UPSTATE AUGUST

17 • ArtWalk, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. 18–19 • A Celebration of Quilts, Anderson Sports and Entertainment Center, Anderson. (864) 224‑6440. 18–19 • Rolling Waterwheel Gospel Revue, Hagood Mill Historic Site and Folklife Center, Pickens. (864) 898‑2936. 18–19 • SHE Weekend (formerly the Upstate Women’s Show), TD Convention Center, Greenville. (864) 235‑1073. 19 • Flight of the Dove, Presbyterian College Bailey Memorial Stadium, Clinton. (864) 833‑6287. 19 • Laura Story in concert, Buncombe Street United Methodist Church, Greenville. (864) 293‑0663. 19–21 • Eclipse Extravaganza, Roper Mountain Science Center, Greenville. (864) 355‑8900. 21 • All-American Solar Eclipse, Calhoun Falls State Park, Calhoun Falls. (864) 447‑8267. 21 • Anderson County Eclipse Viewing Party, Green Pond Landing and Event Center, Anderson. (877) 282‑4650. 21 • BJU Eclipse Experience, Bob Jones University, Greenville. (864) 242‑5100. 21 • Eclipse @ Furman, Furman University Paladin Stadium, Greenville. (864) 294‑2000. 21 • Eclipse Fest, Chattooga Belle Farm, Long Creek. (864) 647‑9768. 21 • Eclipse over NOMA, NOMA Square, Greenville. (864) 248‑1568. 21 • Eclipse over Southern Wesleyan University, SWU Welcome Center, Central. (864) 644‑5382. 21 • Great American Total Solar Eclipse, Duke Energy’s World of Energy, Seneca. (864) 873‑4600. 21 • Solar Eclipse Programs, Table Rock Visitors Center and Nature Center, Pickens. (864) 878‑9813. 25 • PNC Bank ZooTunes Concert: The Revivalists, Greenville Zoo, Greenville. (864) 627‑4200. 25–26 • Williamston Spring Water Festival, Mineral Spring Park, Williamston. (864) 847‑5743. 26 • Cowpens National Battlefield Living History Day, Cowpens National Battlefield, Gaffney. (864) 461‑2828.

36

MIDLANDS

21 • Eclipse Activities and Viewing, Rivers Bridge State Historic AUGUST Site, Ehrhardt. (803) 267-3675. 17 • Eclipses in Blythewood 21 • Historic Eclipse in the History, Blythewood Historical Gardens, Robert Mills House & Society, Blythewood. (803) 333‑8133. Gardens, Columbia. (803) 252‑1770, 26 • Hub City Empty Bowls 17 • The Jasper Project presents ext. 23. Bowl-Making Session, Chapman “Syzygy: The Solar Eclipse Plays,” 21 • Total Eclipse of the Park STEM Cultural Center, Spartanburg. Tapp’s Arts Center, Columbia. Festival and Baseball Game, Spirit (864) 706‑3739. (803) 988‑0013. Communications Park, Columbia. 26 • Movies in the Park: Beauty 18 • AGAware Financial Training (803) 351‑0929. and the Beast, Trailblazer Park, Workshop, S.C. State Farmers 21 • Shadows and Science in the Travelers Rest. (864) 834‑8740. Market, Phillips Market Center, Wilderness of Congaree National Columbia. rjernigan@agsouthfc.com. Park, Congaree National Park, 26 • The Olde South Ball, Spartanburg Marriott, Spartanburg. 18 • Arts and Draughts, Columbia Hopkins. (803) 776‑4396. (864) 244‑2732. Museum of Art, Columbia. 21 • Soda City Eclipse Viewing (803) 799‑2810. 28–30 • Outdoor Adventures, Festival, Historic Columbia Hickory Knob State Park, 18 • Ben Kronberg Live, Tapp’s Arts Speedway, Cayce. (803) 665‑7620. McCormick. (864) 391‑2450. Center, Columbia. (901) 304‑6634. 21 • Solar Fest West, 31 • Fountain Inn Chamber Annual 18 • Find a Furever Friend Friday, West Columbia Riverwalk and Golf Tournament, Fox Run Country Aiken County Visitors Center, Aiken. Amphitheater, West Columbia. Club, Simpsonville. (864) 862‑2586. (803) 642‑7557. (803) 939‑8623. 18 • Historic Happy Hour Water 21 • Total Eclipse Tailgate, SEPTEMBER Balloon Battle, Robert Mills House South Carolina State Fairgrounds, 2–3 • American Truck Historical & Gardens, Columbia. (803) 252‑1700, Columbia. (803) 851‑4618. Society Palmetto Upstate ext. 23. Chapter Fall Show, Dacusville 25–26 • Sandy Oaks Pro Rodeo, Heritage Association Field, Easley. 18 • Pre-Eclipse Weekend at the Lazy J Arena, Edgefield. (864) 677‑3453. South Carolina State Museum, (803) 637‑5369. S.C. State Museum, Columbia. 2 • Angela Easterling & the 26 • Summer Celebration of Beguilers, Trailblazer Park, Travelers (803) 898‑4921. Water, Columbia Water Treatment Rest. (864) 834‑8740. 19 • Dress Rehearsal for the Plant, Columbia. (803) 545‑3227. Solar Eclipse, Cayce Tennis 2 • Fountain Inn Chamber’s 26 • Summerfest, North Congress Annual Horse Show, Berry Woods and Fitness Center, Cayce. Street, York. (803) 684‑2590. jhjameson@yahoo.com. Farm, Fountain Inn. (864) 862‑2586. SEPTEMBER 19 • Eclipsefest 2017, Music Farm 3 • Spiritfest 2017, Bon Secours 2 • Aiken Horsepower Car Show, Columbia, Columbia. (803) 252‑9392. Wellness Arena, Greenville. Home Depot, Aiken. (803) 270‑3505. (864) 241‑3800. 19 • The Final Journey of 2 • Aiken Music Fest, Highfields Christopher Columbia: Another 6–9 • South Carolina Apple Eclipseploitation Event, Tapp’s Arts Event Center, Aiken. (803) 649‑3505. Festival, various venues, Center, Columbia. (803) 988‑0013. 2 • September Monthly Gospel Westminster. (864) 647‑5316. Singing, Midland Gospel Singing 9 • Shag Doctorz, Trailblazer Park, 19 • Jailbreak Escape Urban Challenge Run, Lexington County Center, Gilbert. (803) 719‑1289. Travelers Rest. (864) 834‑8740. Sheriff’s Department, Lexington. 2–4 • Labor Day Festival and 9–10 • Palmetto Backcountry (803) 799‑4786. Parade, downtown, Chapin. Campout, Jones Gap Park, Marietta. (803) 345‑2444. 19 • Springdale at Sunrise 5K, (864) 836‑6115. Springdale Race Course, Camden. 6 • Stable View Jumper 14–16 • SpartOberfest, Jesus info@eggplantevents.com. Night, Stable View Farm, Aiken. Our Risen Savior Catholic Church, (484) 356‑3173. 19–20 • Historic Main Street Spartanburg. (864) 576‑1164. Walking Tour, Main Street, 7 • First Thursday on Main, 15 • Storyteller/Comedian Andy Columbia. (803) 252‑1700, ext. 23. Main Street, Columbia. Offutt Irwin, Walhalla Civic info@firstthursdayonmain.com. Auditorium, Walhalla. (864) 638‑5277. 19–20 • Historic Vista Walking Tour, Congaree Vista, Columbia. 8–9 • Aiken’s Makin’, downtown, 15–16 • Enchanted Chalice (803) 252‑1700, ext. 23. Aiken. (803) 641‑1111. Renaissance Faire—Viking 19–20 • Summer Stamp and 8–9 • The Big Grab 85-Mile Edition, Greenville Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, Greenville. Postcard Show, Spring Valley High Yard Sale, multiple highways, School, Columbia. (803) 309‑2563. Blythewood, Ridgeway and (864) 271‑4883. Winnsboro. (803) 635‑4242. 20 • Eclipse Eve Drive-In Movie, ONGOING Historic Columbia Speedway, Cayce. 9 • “By the Sweat of Our Brows,” Daily through Sept. 10 • (803) 665‑7620. Historic Brattonsville, McConnells. “Wyeth Dynasty,” Greenville 20 • Star Wars Musiclipse, Koger (803) 684‑2327. County Museum of Art, Greenville. Center for the Arts, Columbia. 9 • Fiddle ’n Pig Shindig, (864) 271‑7570. (803) 254‑7445. Anne Springs Close Greenway Every other Wednesday • Comporium Amphitheater, Fort Mill. 20 • Summer’s End Solar Run, Music Sandwiched In, Spartanburg Saluda (803) 547‑1041. Shoals Park, Columbia. County Public Library, Spartanburg. (803) 213‑2062. 9 • SPCA Dog Wash, SPCA Albrecht (864) 948‑9020. Center for Animal Welfare, Aiken. 20 • Total Eclipse: A Space Sundays through October • (803) 648‑6863. Nickelodeon Theatre, Woodburn and Ashtabula Historic Odyssey, Columbia. (803) 254‑8234. 9–10 • Columbia Home and Home Tours, house locations, Garden Show, Columbia 20 • Total Eclipse of the Art, Pendleton. (864) 646‑7249. Columbia Museum of Art, Columbia. Metropolitan Convention Center, Columbia. (631) 603‑2512. (803) 799‑2810.

Go to SCLiving.coop for more information and for guidelines on submitting your event. Please confirm information before attending events.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   AUGUST 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP

12 • “A Geologist Visits Turkey” Lecture, Birds and Butterflies, Aiken. (803) 649‑7999. 13 • Stable View Schooling Dressage Show, Stable View Farm, Aiken. (484) 356‑3173.

1–3 • Edisto Beach Music and Shag Fest, Bay Creek Park, Edisto Beach. (843) 869‑3867. 1–3 • Greater Charleston Lowcountry Jazz Festival, North Charleston Performing Arts Center, Charleston. (843) 529‑5000. ONGOING 1–4 • Muscadine Festival, Williams Daily through Sept. 17 • Muscadine Vineyard and Farm, “Home Sweet Home” exhibit, Museum of York County, Rock Hill. Nesmith. (843) 354‑2169. 6–17 • Charleston Restaurant (803) 684‑3948. various locations, Charleston. Daily in September • Gretchen Week, Hash-Heffner exhibit, Aiken County (843) 958‑3636. Visitors Center, Aiken. (803) 642‑7557. 7 • Yappy Hour, James Island County Park, Charleston. (843) 406‑6990. LOWCOUNTRY 7–10 • South Carolina Tobacco AUGUST Festival, downtown, Lake City. 16 • Movies on the Beach: Jaws, (843) 374‑8611. Beachfront at Tides Folly Beach, 9 • Dog Day Afternoon, Splash Folly Beach. (843) 588‑6464. Island Waterpark at Palmetto 18 • Special Needs Prom, Arthur Islands County Park, Charleston. W. Christopher Community Center, (843) 795‑4386. Charleston. (843) 795‑4386. 9 • Sea Island Cultural Arts 19 • Dramatic reading of “Total Festival, Sea Island Comprehensive Eclipse” by Annie Dillard, Hurd/ Health Care Corporation, Johns St. Andrews Regional Library, Island. (843) 559-4137. Charleston. (732) 961‑3319. 9 • Shaggin’ on the Cooper, Mount 19 • The Great American Eclipse, Pleasant Pier, Mount Pleasant. The Charleston Museum, Charleston. (843) 406‑6990. (843) 722‑2996. 10 • Dog Day Afternoon, Whirlin’ 19, 21 • All-American Solar Waters Adventure Waterpark at Eclipse events, Colonial Dorchester North Charleston Wannamaker State Historic Site, Summerville. County Park, Charleston. (843) 873‑1740. (843) 795‑4386. 19–21 • Solar Eclipse 2017, Hunting 13 • Wine Down Wednesday, Island State Park, Hunting Island. Old Towne Creek County Park, (843) 838‑2011. Charleston. (843) 795‑4386. 20 • Summer of Bill Film Series: 14 • A Night for the Children Gala, The Life Aquatic, Charleston Music Memminger Auditorium, Charleston. Hall, Charleston. (843) 853‑2252. (843) 266‑5200. 21 • Eclipse on a Warship, USS 14–17 • Charleston Scottish Yorktown Patriots Point Naval and Games & Highland Gathering, Maritime Museum, Charleston. various venues, Charleston. (843) 881‑5984. charlestonscots@gmail.com. 21 • Solar Eclipse Party, 15 • Moonlight Mixer, Edwin Kaminski Museum, Georgetown. S. Taylor Folly Beach Fishing Pier, (843) 546‑7706. Folly Beach. (843) 762‑9516. 23 • Movies on the Beach: Surf’s ONGOING Up, Beachfront at Tides Folly Beach, Daily through Sept. 10 • “Artists Folly Beach. (843) 588‑6658. Painting Artists,” Gibbes Museum 26 • Cornhole Challenge, of Art, Charleston. (843) 722‑2706. Little Pee Dee State Park, Dillon. Daily through Sept. 10 • (843) 774‑8872. Southern Living Custom Builder 26 • Myrtle Beach High School Program Showcase Home, Kickoff Banquet, Pine Lakes Litchfield Plantation, Pawleys Island. Country Club, Myrtle Beach. (843) 839‑0537. (843) 340‑9798. Daily through Sept. 24 • “Artist, 26 • Race for the ARK, St. Luke’s Scientist, Explorer: Mark Catesby Lutheran Church, Summerville. in the Carolinas,” Gibbes Museum (843) 832‑2357. of Art, Charleston. (843) 722‑2706. Thursdays through Oct. 6 • SEPTEMBER Music on Main Concert Series, 1–2 • Beach, Boogie and BBQ Main Street, North Myrtle Beach. Festival, Horry-Georgetown Technical College Conference Center, (843) 280‑5570. Myrtle Beach. (843) 855‑0527. Saturdays and Sundays 1–3 • Coastal Uncorked Food and through Oct. 7 • “Places and Spaces: Plantation Lives,” Charles Wine Festival, Broadway at the Beach, Myrtle Beach. (843) 626‑9668. Pinckney National Historic Site, Mount Pleasant. (843) 883‑3123, ext. 213.


SCHumorMe

BY JAN A. IGOE

When pigs fly finally ready to take the trip of a lifetime. You pried one eye open at 3 a.m. to drag yourself to the airport before dawn, arriving two hours early to check your bags, trek past checkpoints, surrender your Skechers and hope the orangutans groping your laptop are gentler than they look. Finally, you make it to the gate, and your plane is waiting. That’s good, because some airlines can misplace a $50 million plane long before they get around to your luggage. But not today. Your prayers were answered, and you’re ready to board. You can breathe a sigh of relief as your migraine subsides. One more aisle to trudge before you plop into your designated seat and buckle up. With luck, that bodybuilder chomping the bean burrito and the mom with her screaming twins will keep walking past your row—pretty please, keep walking. They do. Life is good until you meet the turkey that booked the seat next to you. Yes, turkey—and not the human kind. For the next six hours, you’ll be sharing the friendly skies with the star of Thanksgiving dinner. Your new feathered friend is a registered Emotional Support Animal. And, unlike us, it flies free. The rules for Emotional Support Animals, or ESAs, are pretty simple. Just get a letter from your mentalhealth professional—or fork over $190 to get one online—that says you might implode if friendly feathers, scales or fur aren’t within petting distance. Some folks truly need them, while others just don’t trust their pets to cargo. (Who does?) Here’s the problem. We’re not SO, THERE YOU ARE,

38

talking about superbly trained service dogs that can relieve post-traumatic stress, pull wheelchairs or detect seizures for disabled handlers. ESAs require an entirely different kind of training: None. That’s right. None. Astute bureaucrats devised regulations that allow untrained beasts—with beaks, teeth, hooves and/or claws intact—to sit inches away from total strangers in an airborne sardine can that’s subject to turbulence. The poor, frazzled pets could use their own support animals. Last year, hundreds of thousands of ESAs boarded airplanes. They came in all flavors, including iguana, potbellied pig, tortoise, parrot and miniature horse. If the pet fits in your lap, it can probably fly. (Don’t ask me how a horse did that.) Over the years, my pet menagerie has included some amazing parrots, but they wouldn’t make good passengers. For one thing, parrots like to clear their pipes every 10 minutes or so. According to my calculations: six potty breaks an hour, multiplied by a

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   AUGUST 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP

six-hour flight time, plus 45 minutes at baggage claim, 30 minutes leaving the airport and two hours in a rental car—wait, I’m doing the math—oh, yeah, that’s a lot of parrot goop. Parrots are also fond of sparkly things. They can dismantle an earring faster than any jeweler alive and aren’t fussy about whose ear it’s on. As a rule, I never argue with a bird that can crack walnuts with its beak, so leave the bling home, just in case you’ll be sitting next to a cockatoo. The worst thing for me would be getting stuck next to an emotional-­ support cat. Just drop the oxygen masks now, because I’ll be a hivecovered mucus factory before the plane leaves the gate. Give me turkey—or twins—any day. JAN A. IGOE is an avid animal addict who would love to meet your Rottweiler, pig, possum, llama, goat or other ESA at sea level. Don’t be shy. Drop your muzzle, and join the fun at HumorMe@SCLiving.coop.


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