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LOOKING FOR A MEDICARE SUPPLEMENT PLAN?

Choose BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina We’ve all seen companies offering Medicare Supplement plans come and go. However, we have been covering South Carolinians for 70 years.

Why Choose Blue®? • Trust and Stability – BlueCross has earned the trust of South Carolinians for 70 years. • Quality Coverage At Reasonable Prices – Even though Medicare increases the amount that comes out of your pocket each year, we strive to keep your premiums affordable. • Here for You – Award-winning customer service.

Our Plans Our Medicare Supplement plans help to fill coverage gaps that may leave you with costly medical bills. With several options to choose from, you could save up to 20 percent off the standard rate, as well as gain access to added features and benefits by being a member of BlueCross.

Get More With Your Plan! Not only do we offer the strength, stability and value of BlueCross – we also offer discounts on prescription drugs, vision services, hearing products and much more!

Find a plan that’s right for you. Visit www.EasyGuide65.com.

Get a free quote. Call us toll free at 855-823-0321.

BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association.

18970-7-2016


THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS Vol. 70 • No. 8 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240) Read in more than 559,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033 Tel:  (803) 926-3 1 75 Fax:  (803) 796-6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop EDITOR

Keith Phillips ASSISTANT EDITOR

Diane Veto Parham FIELD EDITOR

Walter Allread PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

Travis Ward

ART DIRECTOR

Sharri Harris Wolfgang DESIGNER

Susan Collins PRODUCTION

Andrew Chapman Van O’Cain COPY EDITOR

Susan Scott Soyars CONTRIBUTORS

Ron Aiken, Liz Carey, Mike Couick, Jan A. Igoe, Charles Joyner, Patrick Keegan, Kelly Rae Smith, Susan Hill Smith, Belinda Smith-Sullivan, S. Cory Tanner, Tom Tate, Paul Wesslund PUBLISHER

Lou Green ADVERTISING

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739-5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

National Country Market Tel:  (800) NCM-1181 Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor. ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send

Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices. © COPYRIGHT 201 6. The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor. SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING is brought to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network.

16 Hooked

on fishing South Carolina teens take to the water in search of trophy bass, college scholarships, school pride and outdoor fun. Olivia Neal and Christian Brackett of Chapman High School show off their prizewinning catch—a 7.24-pound bass caught during a 2016 tournament for schoolsponsored fishing clubs.

4 CO-OP CONNECTION Cooperative news

6 ON THE AGENDA

The Summerville Sweet Tea Festival says so long to summer with a celebration of our state’s favorite cold beverage. Plus: Electric cooperatives team up with researchers to reduce carbondioxide emissions from power plants.

POWER USER DIALOGUE

10 Game changers

Technology may change the way we power our homes, businesses, churches and farms, but your local electric cooperative is always looking out for you. ENERGY Q&A

12 Is your ductwork delivering?

Your heating-and-air system will work more efficiently when you show the ducts a little TLC.

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Member of the NCM network of publications, reaching more than 7 million homes and businesses

Lindsay Johnson enjoys a day on the water as part of the T.L. Hanna High School fishing team. Photo by Milton Morris.

STORIES

21 Memories etched in silver Learn how The Charleston Silver Lady got her start collecting shiny antiques.

22

SCENE

22 Worship on the water

Rain or shine, “boat church” spreads the Gospel from the shores of Lake Marion. TRAVELS

26 From grass to glass

Take a tour of Happy Cow Creamery and Trantham 12 Aprils Farms to learn how one Upstate farmer revolutionized sustainable dairy farming. GARDENER

28 Asian greens in the garden

Add a dash of color and texture to your garden with an array of edible Asian greens. RECIPE

30 Homemade fiesta

Enjoy all of your Mexicanrestaurant favorites without leaving home. HUMOR ME

38 Let them eat cake

When vegan vigilantes call the shots in the kitchen, one can never be sure what’s really on the menu.

34 MARKETPLACE 36 SC EVENTS

26 JEFF SMITH

E CI SC R

REELE TIM

SC LIFE

MIC SMITH

to your local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above.

FEATURE

MILTON MORRIS

WEB EDITOR

AUGUST 2016 • VOLUME 70, NUMBER 8


On the Agenda For a listing complete s, see of Event 6 page 3

Highlights AUGUST 26–27

TOP PICK FOR KIDS

Sandy Oaks Pro Rodeo

AUGUST 27

For details, visit sandyoaksprorodeo.org or call (803) 637-5369.

For details, visit yorksummerfest. com or call (803) 684-2590.

Give the kids a last hurrah before the new school year at this day full of fun in historic downtown York. Good luck getting them off the bungee jump once they start bouncing; you might try luring them to the monster water balls, petting zoo or BMX stunt demonstrations. There’s entertainment for grown-ups, too, with a huge car show, live music and handmade crafts. York Electric Cooperative is a sponsor.

MIC SMITH

Bucking broncs and rowdy ropers will fill Lazy J Arena near Edgefield with two nights of IPRA-sanctioned rodeo entertainment. Two favorites make return appearances this year: comical rodeo clown Mike Wentworth and trick rider Jessica Blair, famed for her Roman riding astride two horses.

Summerfest

SEPTEMBER 3

SEPTEMBER 15–18

Dragons have become familiar sights in Beaufort. If you’ve missed them, take a front-row seat as they cruise the Beaufort River this Labor Day weekend in front of Henry C. Chambers Waterfront Park. Dozens of 22-person dragonboat teams will paddle down river in a day of races sponsored by DragonBoat Beaufort to raise funds to assist cancer survivors and their families. Concerts and an arts-and-crafts market round out the fun.

The town that claims to be the birthplace of sweet tea notched another title in June, setting the Guinness record for world’s largest sweet tea by filling a giant Mason jar with 2,524 gallons of the state’s favorite beverage. You can celebrate sweet tea at this weekend of live music and events in Summerville’s charming downtown. Cast a ballot for your favorite in the sweet-tea contest, and snap a selfie with Mason, the giant tea jar, while you’re downtown.

DragonBoat Race Day

For details, visit dragonboat-raceday.com or call (843) 473-4477.

6

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   AUGUST 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

Summerville Sweet Tea Festival

For details, visit summervilledream.org/sweet-tea-festival or call (843) 821-7260.


EMAIL COMMENTS, QUESTIONS AND STORY SUGGESTIONS TO LETTERS@SCLIVING.COOP

ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT

Eyes on the prize

Electric co-ops team up with researchers to reduce carbon-dioxide emissions CALL IT THE $20 MILLION

­ uestion: What if the carbon q dioxide generated at coalfired power plants could be contained and turned into something useful? Electric cooperatives, working with the XPRIZE Foundation and other partners, recently broke ground on a research facility at the Dry Fork Station, a power plant in northeast Wyoming owned by Basin Electric Power Cooperative. The Integrated Test Center will allow researchers to experiment with new ways to grab carbon dioxide from a working power plant and turn it into beneficial products.

The XPRIZE Foundation is an organization that seeks “radical breakthroughs for the benefit of humanity.” In the past, it has offered cash prizes for space travel and health innovations. More recently, it announced two $10 million prizes for “transformational approaches to converting [carbon dioxide] emissions into valuable products.” The carbon XPRIZE will be awarded in 2020, and the competition has already produced several promising applicants, says Dr. Paul Bunje, principal scientist and senior director of energy and environment at XPRIZE.

BY THE NUMBERS

Investments in reducing carbon dioxide

$21 million

Cost to build the Integrated Test Center at Basin Electric Cooperative’s Dry Fork Station. The state of Wyoming, Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association are funding the project.

$20 million

Total prize money offered by XPRIZE Foundation to the research teams studying new ways to recycle or reuse carbon dioxide generated by power plants. Teams will begin work at the Integrated Test Center in 2018. The foundation will award two $10 million prizes in 2020.

$6 billion

Amount spent to date by the U.S. Department of Energy to research current carbon-capture and storage systems, which pump carbon dioxide into geologic formations instead of the atmosphere.

33.3 percent

Share of a power plant’s total electricity output required to operate existing carbon-capture and storage technology.

Dry Fork Station, a coal-fired power plant in northeast Wyoming, will serve as the test center for the carbon XPRIZE competition. Research teams will experiment with new ways to turn the carbon dioxide from the plant into useful products.

Planned research includes using carbon dioxide to make fuels, ingredients in chemical processes, or thin, extremely strong “supermaterials.” Contestants will begin moving equipment to the test center in the summer of 2018. Carbon capture is still a developing technology, with 15 test plants in the world and seven more coming online by 2017. One of the main problems with existing carbon-capture and storage technology—which pumps carbon dioxide into geologic formations instead of the atmosphere—is the expense to operate. Running carbon-capture equipment at a power plant uses about one-third of the electricity produced. If the carbon XPRIZE competitors are successful in creating more efficient ways to recycle or reuse carbon dioxide, the

benefits could extend to electricity consumers across the nation, says John Pulley, communications manager for the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA). Although Environmental Protection Agency regulations under the Clean Power Plan have forced many coalfired power plants to close, one-third of the nation’s electricity still comes from coal—an abundant domestic energy source. “Once you have a facility like this in place that will allow people to test their great ideas, the sky’s the limit,” Pulley says. “People might look at coal in an entirely new light.” —PAUL WESSLUND

GET MORE Visit

SCLiving.coop to watch the video “America’s Energy Sources,” and learn how different fuels provide the electricity that powers our homes and businesses.

S.C.RAMBLE! BY CHARLES JOYNER, SEE ANSWER ON PAGE 35

Noted architect Frank Lloyd Wright (1867–1959) designed two homes in South Carolina: Auldbrass Plantation in  _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ d n a u l l n n and Broad Margin in _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _. s b n n m e c r r n Use the capital letters in the code key below to fill in the blanks above.

A E G I L M N R S V Y means unscr a mbl ed

SCLIVING.COOP   | AUGUST 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

7


On the Agenda O N LY O N

SCLiving.coop

ENERGY ANSWERS

OVERHEAD OR UNDERGROUND?

Q A

BONUS VIDEO Super salsa. So much fresh flavor bursts from this easy homemade chip dip, you’ll wonder why you ever bought salsa in a jar.

BONUS ARTICLE Listen up. Tune in to some of the latest innovations in headphones, stereo speakers and home-­ entertainment sound systems.

Why are some power lines suspended overhead on utility poles while others are buried underground?

Determining whether to place lines overhead or underground boils down to what is best for the situation. Underground lines might be ideal in situations where there is a desire to keep the poles and wires out of sight, such as in a residential neighborhood, park or historical area, but overhead lines are still the most common configuration. When it comes to serving members with affordable, reliable electricity, many of South Carolina’s not-for-profit electric cooperatives maintain a network that uses both overhead and underground lines. Each method has pros and cons. —TOM TATE

I NTERACTIVE FEATURE

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK Join us as we celebrate all that’s great about life in South Carolina. Add your voice to the conversation and share your photos at facebook.com/SouthCarolinaLiving. GONE FISHIN’

ARTUR POKUSIN

Register to win a $100 gift card. Sign up for our free email newsletter, and you will automatically be eligible to win a $100 gift card in our Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes. One lucky reader’s name will be drawn at random from all eligible entries received by Aug. 31.

O V E R H E A D CO N ST R U C T I O N PROS:

CONS:

4 Lower cost 4 Quicker construction 4 Easier to spot damage and faults 4 Less expensive to repair and upgrade 4 Can be built anywhere 4 Any voltage can be placed overhead

The Vektor Fish & Game Forecast provides feeding and migration times. Major periods can bracket the peak by an hour. Minor peaks, ½ hour before and after. Minor

AM Major

AUGUST

Minor

8

12:37 1:07 1:37 2:22 2:52 9:52 10:37 11:22 3:37 4:37 5:22 5:52 6:22 6:52 12:37

Minor

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

SEPTEMBER

1 — 6:37 7:37 1:07 2 1:22 7:07 7:52 1:22 3 7:52 1:52 8:07 1:52 4 8:22 2:22 2:22 8:22 5 9:07 2:52 2:52 8:52 6 10:07 3:37 3:07 9:07 7 11:37 4:22 3:37 9:37 8 — 5:22 2:07 10:07 9 — 6:52 11:07 3:52 10 — 8:07 9:37 4:22 11 1:22 9:22 10:22 4:52 12 2:52 10:07 10:52 5:22 13 4:07 10:52 11:22 5:37 14 4:52 11:37 11:52 6:07 15 — 5:37 6:37 12:07 16 — 6:22 7:07 12:52

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   AUGUST 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

snow

7 More vulnerable to damage

from trees and vegetation, which require right-of-way trimming 7 Vulnerable to blinks when animals and branches contact lines 7 Susceptible to damage from vehicle collisions 7 Less attractive

U N D E RG RO U N D CO N ST R U C T I O N PROS:

4 Not vulnerable to damage from tree branches 4 No right-of-way trimming required 4 Less susceptible to damage from vehicle collisions 4 Not impacted by wind, ice and snow CONS:

7 More expensive to build 7 Susceptible to flooding 7 Difficult to locate faults 7 Expensive to repair 7 Limitations on voltages that can be buried underground

7 Vulnerable to dig-ins

PERRY BAIRD

17 — 5:37 7:22 18 12:52 6:22 7:52 19 1:22 7:07 8:22 20 2:07 7:52 8:52 21 8:52 2:52 9:22 22 9:52 3:37 3:37 23 11:07 4:37 4:22 24 — 5:52 1:07 25 — 7:22 7:37 26 12:52 8:52 9:22 27 2:22 9:52 10:22 28 3:22 10:37 11:07 29 4:22 11:22 11:52 30 5:07 11:52 12:22 31 — 5:52 7:07

PM Major

7 Susceptible to wind, ice and


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Dialogue

Game changers OVER THE NEXT FEW MONTHS, I’M GOING TO BE

MIKE COUICK

President and CEO, The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina

10

looking ahead and sharing with you what I believe are likely to be the biggest game changers in our industry, starting with how we think about the energy market in general. For more than 100 years, utilities have operated using a business model that was more or less static—they produced and purchased power generated from coal, nuclear and hydroelectric sources, then sold it to members at an affordable rate. Technology moved at a snail’s pace. Line crews sank poles, maintained lines and, over time, gradually expanded the grid. All that is changing—rapidly. Renewableenergy sources may one day be a practical option for generating some of the electricity we need to power our homes, schools, churches, ­factories and farms. Exciting new battery technologies may soon allow us to store exponentially larger amounts of electricity than we can today. The old meter at your home that merely records electricity use could be replaced by a “genius meter” that allows you to manage power consumption and maximize the value of your utility service. If all this sounds a bit radical, think about the transition from rotary telephones of the past to the smartphones of today. For decades, a phone was a hardwired device connected to the outside world by a network of wires suspended on poles (most often an electric utility or cooperative pole). In the earliest days, the phone was generally in a common room—a kitchen or living room—and its range was governed by the length of the cord between the base unit and the handset. Anyone living through the 1970s can remember when long phone cords were essential to have any degree of privacy, especially when teenagers were talking to boyfriends or girlfriends. The sight of a cord winding from the phone through a closed bathroom door was common, as were time limits for phone calls (often ignored). In the 1980s, lower costs for both hardware and additional lines made putting a phone in multiple rooms feasible and affordable. Then came the invention of cordless phones, which were a wonder at the time and a huge leap forward in technology.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   AUGUST 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

From there quickly followed the first portable telephones that you could take in your car, and satchel phones became a status symbol in the mid-1980s. Since the 1990s, cell phones have gotten smaller, smarter and less expensive, and landlines have gradually disappeared. Today’s smartphones allow us to communicate with anyone in the world almost anywhere in the world, and they give us unlimited access to information, weather, news, movies and games—all while letting us share pictures of our lunch with our Facebook friends. The explosion of technology also created new business opportunities. Every one of these new uses for a phone is part of an array of revenue sources for an industry that formerly charged a flat monthly fee for service and by the minute for long-distance calls. Just as a wave of innovation transformed the phone industry in the span of 30 years, new technologies are poised to revolutionize the electric industry. Such leaps often produce un­expected results, from the mundane (like everyone knowing what everyone else had for lunch, thanks to Snapchat and Facebook) to the profound (instant news anywhere worldwide) to the absurd (a generation consumed with selfies). In the utility sector, technological advances in renewable-energy sources, battery storage and the advent of a “genius” meter are likely to change the way we track and distribute electricity and propel a new business model where the local utility is, first and foremost, an energy-­ services provider. Whatever happens next in the utility sector, South Carolina’s not-for-profit electric cooperatives will be at the forefront of it all, making sure technology and innovation come together in a way that best serves you, our member-owners. It’s how we’ve done business for 75 years, and no amount of technological upheaval will ever cause us to waver from that commitment.


EmPowering new business

Before the first aircraft flew, and before people showed up to their new job, Santee Cooper helped power Executive HeliJet’s expansion to Myrtle Beach, creating a $1 million economic partnership for South Carolina.

Since 1988, we’ve been a driving force behind more than $11 billion in industrial investments that have produced over 67,000 new jobs. And we’re not slowing down. With our low-cost, reliable power, creative incentive packages and diverse property portfolio, Santee Cooper, working with the South Carolina Power Team and the state's electric cooperatives, continues to power South Carolina toward Brighter Tomorrows, Today.

POWERING SOUTH CAROLINA

www.santeecooper.com/SL • scpowerteam.com


EnergyQ&A

BY PATRICK KEEGAN

Is your ductwork delivering?

Q

I recently moved from a home with wall-mounted heaters into one that has central heat and air and a duct system. How can I ensure my ducts are working efficiently?

A

is something in the ductwork impeding airflow, like debris or an infestation. Major renovations or new construction can put construction debris into the duct system, so after construction is an ideal time to consider duct cleaning.

XXYour

heating registers are releasing dust into the air.

XXHome

residents have allergies or asthma problems that have not been alleviated by other changes.

You can help your heating and cooling system work more efficiently by regularly changing your air filters. How often you change them depends 12

KET555

XXThere

JANWIKIFOTO

Homes with central forced-air heating and cooling systems— furnaces, central air conditioners and heat pumps—use air ducts to deliver heated or cooled air through the home. Ducts are often concealed in walls or in areas of your home you don’t go to often, like a crawlspace, so many people don’t think about them as a way to save energy. You may have seen ads with offers for air-duct cleaning, saying it will improve your home’s air quality and efficiency. But duct cleaning may not always be necessary for air quality, and there is no indication that just cleaning your air ducts will improve your system’s efficiency. Duct cleaning may be necessary if: XXThere is visible mold in your duct system or there was a recent flood that caused mold or mildew in your home.

on how much your system runs, whether you have pets and whether you periodically vacuum your air filters. For the average home, air filters should be changed four to six times a year. While cleaning ducts may not do much for your system’s efficiency, sealing

them is important for saving energy and lowering utility costs, particularly if your ducts are in unconditioned spaces, like a crawlspace or an uninsulated attic. In a typical home, 20 to 30 percent of heated or cooled air escapes through unsealed gaps and holes in the duct system, which can cost you money and make your home less comfortable. You wouldn’t put up with a leaking water pipe, so why put up with a leaking air duct? The best way to assess the overall condition of your home’s ductwork is to have it tested by a professional home-energy auditor, who can conduct a duct-leakage test. If you can easily access your ducts, you might get by with doing your own visual inspection, which can identify larger holes and disconnections. Places where ducts meet or where they connect to a heating register are common places to find leaks. A professional trained in duct work can help identify and fix

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   AUGUST 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

p A duct-leakage test can help identify gaps or leaks in your ductwork. t Regularly vacuuming your air filters can extend their life and help your heating system work more efficiently.

any gaps and leaks you may not be able to see. Once gaps and leaks have been identified, you can work to seal your ducts. Small duct leaks can be sealed with mastic, a type of caulk. Larger duct leaks and disconnections may require additional lengths of duct, mechanical fasteners or special heatresistant tape. Do not use duct tape— ironically, it is not designed to adhere well to ducts. If you have ducts in unconditioned areas, like an attic or crawlspace, your ducts could be wasting energy by heating or cooling the surrounding air, even if there are no leaks in the duct­ work. Adding insulation around the ducts in these areas can help reduce energy loss and increase the efficiency and comfort of your home. Send questions to Energy Q&A, South Carolina Living, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033, email energyqa@scliving.coop or fax (803) 739-3041.


HURRY, 55% TAX CREDIT EXPIRES SOON!

Find your buried treasure PAWLEYS ISLAND, S.C.

Both of these devices create hot air but which uses less power?

GENE & CHERYL FOUND TREASURE IN THEIR YARD How did you hear about WaterFurnace? We are firm believers in hiring the right contractor for the job and relying on their expertise. Our contractor, Rhett Prosser, owner of Waccamaw Heating & Cooling, recommended WaterFurnace. That was good enough for us.

7 Series

Hair Dryer 1,500 watts

Geothermal Heat Pump

900 watts1

WaterFurnace—The smartest way to heat and cool your home. You may not realize it, but your home is sitting on a free and renewable supply of energy. A WaterFurnace geothermal heat pump taps into the stored solar energy in your yard to provide savings up to 70% on heating, cooling, and hot water… using less power than a typical hair dryer. It’s a smart investment in your family’s comfort—and it won’t cause split ends. Contact your local WaterFurnace dealer today and find out how much you can save by switching to geothermal.

Why did you choose a geothermal system over a conventional unit? Our air-to-air system was failing. A friend who installed a geothermal system in his home years ago explained how it functions and the advantages over air-to-air systems. After more research, we believed geothermal would be the right choice for us. Three years later, we are convinced we made the right decision.

Are you enjoying a lower power bill? We have family and friends here at various times, so it’s hard to compare year to year. What we do know is that our overall electric bills are less than they used to be.

What are your favorite features? visit us at waterfurnace.com YOUR LOCAL WATERFURNACE DEALERS

Myrtle Beach/Georgetown

WACCAMAW HEATING & COOLING GeoPro Master Dealer (843) 235-1158 • waccamawgeo.com

Would you recommend a WaterFurnace geothermal system to friends and family?

Columbia

CASSELL BROTHERS HEATING & COOLING (803) 932-6003 • cassellbros.com

We would emphatically recommend this system to anyone who is building a new home or is considering replacing their existing HVAC system. For us, the incremental dollars spent were well worth the home comfort.

Rock Hill/Charlotte

How did you select your contractor?

PANTHER HEATING & COOLING, INC. GeoPro Master Dealer (803) 792-0788 • pantherhvac.com

Upstate

CAROLINA HEATING SERVICE INC. GeoPro Master Dealer (864) 412-2651 • carolinaheating.com

Charleston

BERKELEY HEATING & AIR GeoPro Master Dealer (843) 779-3551 • berkeleyheating.com WaterFurnace is a registered trademark of WaterFurnace International, Inc. ©2016 WaterFurnace International Inc. 1. 7 Series unit uses approximately 900 watts while running in speeds 1-2.

Our favorite thing is how well it moderates the air temperature throughout our house, which is approximately 5,000 heated square feet. The house temperature always feels right, and we rarely hear the system running.

We selected Waccamaw Heating & Cooling based on recommendations and online research. They clearly had the experience, both in years and the number of geothermal systems they had installed in our region.

Contact your local WaterFurnace dealer today to learn how you can discover treasure in your backyard.

visit waterfurnace.com

SCLIVING.COOP   | AUGUST 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

13


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LOT 67514

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79

99

$189.99

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LOT 90018 shown 69595/60334

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8 Functions: Sanding, Flooring, Remove Grout, Cut Metal, Cut Cut Plastic, Plunge Cut, g Scrape Concrete, Scrape Floorin

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4599

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3-POINT QUICK HITCH

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2199

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WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF WELDING WIRE AND ACCESSORIES

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AS THE SUN CREEPS OVER THE HORIZON OF LAKE HARTWELL

in Anderson, the low rumble of outboard motors drifts over the dark, still water. It’s just a little past 7:30 on a Saturday morning in January; the temperature hovers around 45 degrees. Kami Carr and Lindsay Johnson bundle up in coats and gloves and step off the dock and into a boat. The 17-year-old girls take their seats as Johnson’s dad, Jeff, powers up the engine and eases away from the dock. Light filters through the clouds as the purple sky starts to open up. Dad hits the throttle, and the bow of the boat rises out of the lake. Both girls duck their heads to avoid the rush of wind and spray hitting them as they fly across the water. As members of the T.L. Hanna High School fishing team, the two girls will be at fishing practice for the better part of the next eight hours—picking a spot, casting out, reeling in—trying to hook a bass large enough to beat the dozen or so other teens in boats on the water today.

BY LIZ CAREY | PHOTOS BY MILTON MORRIS

16

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   AUGUST 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP


It’s a chilly way to spend a Saturday. But, as part of one of the fastest-growing high-school competitive sports in the country, the girls know practice helps them hone their skills, their strategy and their knowledge, so when competition time comes around, they’re ready to compete. Coaches say the team members are learning skills that will help them after high school. Parents say the fishing teams build their kids’ sense of responsibility and sacrifice. State officials say the teams help turn these kids into lifelong lovers of outdoor sports. But the kids say it’s simply a sport they love.

Lifelong anglers

The boat slows as they come closer to their first fishing spot of the morning, and Johnson reaches for her gear. As the boat floats to a stop, she takes up a position in a chair—no more than a tall stool, really—near the bow. She casts out into the deep, greenish water, her figure silhouetted against the pinkening sky.

South Carolina teens take to the water in search of trophy bass, college scholarships and old‑fashioned fun “Top water is my specialty,” she says. “The lure sits on top of the water and mimics a wounded fish, only a lot louder. I’ve literally caught fish when they’ve come up to knock the ‘wounded fish’ to get it to be quiet.” Both girls have been angling with their dads as long as they can remember, and their love of fishing lured them to join the fishing team their freshman year at Hanna. In a sport dominated by boys, they were pleasantly surprised to be welcomed and supported by their male teammates. “There’s a lot of pressure, if not to do as well as the boys, to do better,” Carr says. “But once Lindsay won a tournament, all of that changed. They saw us differently. They kind of saw us as anglers.” Devotion to fishing also drew Jackson Salley, an angler with

CATCH OF THE DAY Anglers gather for a day of fishing in a high school tournament sponsored by the S.C. Department of Natural Resources. Inset: Lindsay Johnson, bundled up against the chill of a January morning, ties on a lure during a practice day.

SCLIVING.COOP   | AUGUST 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

17


‘What I like is that he’s learning skills that he can carry with him for the rest of his life.’ — FRED SALLEY, FATHER OF SOUTHSIDE MIDDLE SCHOOL ANGLER JACKSON SALLEY

Southside Middle School in Florence, to his school’s team. “I just love the sport and the chance to get out on the water,” says Salley, 13. “It’s the wildlife and being out on the lake and having the possibility of catching a fish. It just makes your heart start pumping.” Salley’s dad says his son has always wanted to be a fisherman. “What I like is that he’s learning skills that he can carry with him for the rest of his life,” Fred Salley says. “He’s learning responsibility. It teaches him about teamwork and communication. Those are things that he will be able to use later on in life.” Research shows that fishing helps students focus better and succeed in school, says Sarah Chabaane, aquatic education coordinator for the S.C. Department of Natural Resources. But DNR hopes these anglers’ experiences will also help the state. “One of the things we want to achieve is to help these kids gain an appreciation for our natural resources in South Carolina,” Chabaane says. “We’re getting them outside and getting them out on the water. We know that if we catch kids in middle school, they’re more likely to be a lifelong outdoorsman, and that’s what we want to create.”

Reeling them in TEAMWORK ON THE WATER Matthew Trussell (left) and Jackson Salley show off their catch after its weigh-in and before its release during the T.L. Hanna Invitational Fishing Tournament. FISHY BUSINESS (Below, left to right): Electronic fish finders are allowed in tournaments and help teams find the best spots for a winning catch. At weigh-ins, judges measure and weigh each fish before releasing them back to the lake. Schools and two-person teams receive trophies based on the total weight of their catch, but only one team takes home the award for the biggest fish of the day.

18

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   AUGUST 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

From September through May, students on teams across the state compete in high school fishing tournaments sponsored by DNR, culminating in the Youth Bass Fishing State Championship. On the line are prizes, trophies, bragging rights and college scholarships. Andrew Ray, a former math teacher who started T.L. Hanna’s fishing team in 2011 and coached it through the 2016 Youth Bass Fishing season, says the number of teams competing is increasing, as are the rewards. “When I first started this, we’d get probably 45 boats at


PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT T.L. Hanna anglers Kami Carr (left) and Lindsay Johnson hone their casting skills while coach Drew Ray keeps the boat in position. As with any sport, student anglers must make sacrifices to compete. “During freshman year, our cotillion was scheduled on the same day as a fishing tournament,” Carr says. “I chose the fishing tournament.”

a tournament,” Ray says. “Now, we’ll have 120 to 160 boats show up.” More than 40 schools in South Carolina have active Youth Bass Fishing teams—a number that has exploded in the past few years. In 2012, when DNR started its state championship, there were 11 fishing teams across the state. Now there are 50. Technically, the teams are more like clubs in most schools. Each high school team is composed of smaller, twoperson fishing teams who, with their coach, go out on the

lake to fish. Practice days are spent angling, trying honey holes here and there, hoping for the big one, but aiming for their five best fish. At tournaments, winners are determined by the weight of their catch. Competitors reel in as many fish as they can, keeping the five largest. The fish are stored in onboard freshwater tanks to keep them alive. When each boat’s weigh-in time comes up, they pull into dock, gather up their fish in large, breathable catch bags and take their fish up for weighing. After weighing, the fish are released back

TO P ST U D E N T A N G L E R S

2016 Youth Bass Fishing State Championship

2016 TBF/FLW High School Fishing State Championship

HIGH SCHOOL OVERALL

MIDDLE SCHOOL OVERALL

Dixie High School (36.77 pounds) Broome High School (31.92 pounds) Mid-Carolina High School (31.65 pounds)

Dixie Middle School (26.25 pounds) Southside Middle School (18.64 pounds) Conway Middle School (16.87 pounds)

HIGH SCHOOL TWO-MAN PAIRS

MIDDLE SCHOOL TWO-MAN PAIRS

Bailey Cobb and Alex Maddox Ninety Six High School (21.2 pounds) Bryson Glenn and Laython McLean Dixie High School (21.03 pounds) Hunter Weber and Jacob Dover Broome High School (18.06 pounds)

Noah Jones and Manning Felder Conway Middle School (16.87 pounds) Hudson Dix and Thomas Stanton Greer Middle School (16.15 pounds) Jacob Butts and Torry Kelley Crescent Middle School (13.69 pounds)

Oakley Connor and Gantt Connor Travelers Rest High School (25 pounds, 6 ounces) Nate Burkett and Brandon Jones Stratford High School (16 pounds, 5 ounces) Jacob Forrester and Wilson Rickenbaker Travelers Rest High School (15 pounds, 13 ounces) Cole Drummond and Piercen Lynch South Florence High School (15 pounds, 5 ounces) All four teams will advance to the TBF/FLW High School Fishing Southeastern Conference championship on Lake Cumberland in Somerset, Kentucky, in September.

SCLIVING.COOP   | AUGUST 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

19


‘On a good day, you maybe win a trophy. On a bad day, you still get to go fishing. Where’s the downside to that?’ —TROY BROWN, T.L. HANNA HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR into the lake. The team with the heaviest catch wins. Prizes are also given for biggest individual fish and largest catch per individual fisherman. Everything that goes along with competitive fishing is much more active than people think, Ray says. “A lot of people think it’s easy, but it’s not,” he says. “These kids are out on a boat, standing up, all day. And they’re not on solid ground—they’re always moving. They’re constantly casting and reeling in. It wears you out.” On tournament days, students get up hours before dawn to get themselves and their gear ready and packed, before driving two or three hours to a lake. They’ll put in their boats in the dark and head out at the first safe light. They’re responsible for not only fishing, but also keeping track of their team numbers and weigh-in time. Rewards are waiting for top performers. The ­popularity of the sport has led to colleges starting fishing teams and ­offering fishing scholarships. Even at the state championship level, DNR gives out two $500 scholarships to the winning angler GET MORE In addition to team, but money for college isn’t the Youth Bass League what draws Troy Brown, a senior tournaments sponsored by DNR, high-school and junior-high on T.L. Hanna’s club, to the sport. fishing teams may compete in The “I just like the adrenaline rush Bass Federation/Fishing League you get from catching a fish,” Worldwide (TBF/FLW) or the B.A.S.S. Brown says. “It’s a lot of hard Junior Bassmaster programs. Both work, and when you feel the fish series include team and individual on your hook, it’s just exciting.” tournaments that give students opportunities to compete nationTournament time ally and earn scholarships up to The culmination of a year of $5,000. For more information on practices and club-level tournatournaments and starting a bassments is DNR’s state tournament fishing team at your school, visit dnr.sc.gov/aquaticed/youthbass in Columbia each spring, where or contact Sarah Chabaane at teams that have scored well at (803) 737-8483, chabaanes@dnr.sc.gov. tournaments through the year compete for the championship. Held at the South Carolina State Fairgrounds, the DNR’s tournament looks like a professional fishing tournament. The weigh-in attracts a stadium-filling crowd at the Palmetto Sportsmen’s Classic, and trucks hauling boats line up to bring in their catch. Teams jump off their boats and put their catch bags into holding tanks, then wait their turn in line. One at a time, each team walks up to watch their catch get weighed. Competitors tell stories about what lures they used, where they found their fish and when the fish started 20

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   AUGUST 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

TEAMWORK In tournaments and practice sessions, student anglers fish as a twoperson team, trying for the highest combined weight total. Addison Webb (left) reels in his catch while T.L. Hanna teammate Houston Kelley readies the net.

biting. For Cody Christiansen of Crescent High School, his moment was also a chance to explain his damp appearance. “I was pulling one in, and the rod broke,” he says a little sheepishly. “When it jumped out of the boat, I just jumped in to get it.” Crowds in the stands cheer for their school’s teams as they walk across the stage to hold up their fish. Moms and friends in team jerseys stand up to clap, while dads lean against the fence between the stands and stage. One dad watches as a team hauls its catch bag on stage. The judges pull out the fish, one at a time, to show the crowd, then weigh them on a digital scale. “Did you see the haul in that bag?” one dad asks two high-school anglers as they walk past him. “Do you know where they grabbed that?” “Yeah,” the young fisherman replies, smiling from behind his cowboy hat and sunglasses. “Where we wasn’t.” Sometimes, it all comes down to just that. Despite hours of practice and miles of traveling to tournaments, none of the T.L. Hanna anglers placed during the 2016 state tournament. The fish were just where they weren’t. But, even when they don’t win, it’s a sport they love. “On a good day, you get to go fishing and maybe win a trophy,” Brown says. “On a bad day, you still get to go fishing. Where’s the downside to that?”


SC Life

Stories

Dawn Corley AGE:

54

Charleston CLAIM TO FAME: She’s The Charleston Silver Lady, an appraiser, collector and popular speaker specializing in antique silver items made before the Industrial Revolution MISSION IN LIFE: Curate and share the stories of the Americans who made and used the pieces in her extensive collection LITTLE-KNOWN FACT: Corley is close to publishing her first book, 30 years in the making, Memories of Charleston HOMETOWN:

GET MORE For informa-

ANDREW HAWORTH

tion on Dawn Corley’s speaking engagements, contact her at dawn@charlestonsilverlady.com.

Memories etched in silver When Dawn Corley speaks of Southern coin silver—its silky feel, antimicrobial properties, durability, timeless beauty and the soothing way it warms to the human touch—the metal sounds almost magical. But, for the woman dubbed The Charleston Silver Lady, the real value of her 5,000-piece ­collection isn’t in the raw material, but rather the stories of the people who made and used each item. “Everything in this house has a South Carolina story,” she says, surrounded by one-of-a-kind items, all handcrafted from before the American Revolution to shortly after the Civil War. “There isn’t anything in here that you can point to that I don’t know exactly who it came from.” She began collecting in the 1970s as a young girl, often scouring the Charleston City Market with her great-aunt, Rae Meyer, who taught her how to find and evaluate the best historical pieces. “Even as a little kid, I thought this was really cool, because I realized that someone 200 years ago had held these things,” Corley says, but she never imagined it would become her career. “I didn’t really choose to do what I’m doing. It’s like it chose me.” While parts of her collection travel with her to speaking engagements across the nation, and others are on loan to museums, Corley likes to keep some sentimental items close at hand, including the unadorned silver coffeepot made in the mid-1700s by a relative, Charleston silversmith Alexander Petrie. Still as beautiful and functional as it was in the 18th century, the coffeepot was used by generations of her family—though not always as intended. “When I got this from my great-grandmother, it had her hairpins in it and a receipt from Piggly Wiggly,” Corley says with a laugh. “It was too familiar. She didn’t recognize the value; she just wanted me to have it. Unbeknownst to her, there are two in the world, and she had one.” —KEITH PHILLIPS SCLIVING.COOP   | AUGUST 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

21


SCScene

BY SUSAN HILL SMITH | PHOTOS BY MIC SMITH

WORSHIP on the water Rain or shine, ‘boat church’ spreads the Gospel from the shores of Lake Marion THEY CALL THIS “BOAT CHURCH.”

From Memorial Day weekend to Labor Day weekend, the faithful arrive in a variety of watercraft each Sunday morning along the banks of Lake Marion at Wyboo Creek to hear the word of the Lord, continuing a summer ritual that dates back nearly half a century. The formal name for this congregation is the Edwin Boyle Santee Summer Ministry, in honor of the man who first provided this grassy point as a Christian gathering place. But not much about boat church is formal, and that’s part of the reason for its popularity. The Rev. Dr. Reginald Thackston, or Regi, as he’s known to many here, is another reason why crowds turn out. Even before the interdenominational service starts, the semiretired minister is easy to spot, since he’s the only one wearing a tie. “I have to set myself apart in some way other than wearing a T-shirt that says, ‘I’m the preacher.’ ” He walks alongside the seawall, stopping at each boat that’s tied up, greeting folks on board. They are welcome to come ashore to sit in the foldout chairs, and many of 22

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   AUGUST 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

THE MAN IN THE TIE “I have to set myself apart in some way other than wearing a T-shirt that says, ‘I’m the preacher,’ ” says the Rev. Dr. Reginald Thackston, aka Regi.

the kids will rush onto the lawn for lollipops during the children’s lesson, but most adults will listen to the amplified service from the comfort of their boat cushions. Those anchored within a quarter mile can tune into 90.1 FM on the radio to make sure they hear the message and electric piano. Those who live nearby may walk, bike or golf cart over. Those who drive here are in the minority.

Sharing in God’s beauty

During the school year, Genie Hodge stays busy as a principal at Laurence Manning Academy in Manning. During summer, she stays on the lake every weekend and is a boat-church regular. This Sunday, she and her husband pontooned with neighbors. She usually finds several of her students and their


families here, though there are also vacation‘I’m closer to announced on the ministry’s Facebook page, “We had 629 people and 100 boats!” ers from farther away in the mix. “It’s just the Lord here so inspirational to see people here from so Reaching people on vacation many denominations,” says Hodge, who also than I am in appreciates the natural setting. “You see God’s The ministry’s roots are organic, having a building.’ beauty here.” started in the late 1960s with a small group — ARCHIE STUKES, Year-round resident Zanne Morris likes to of families who came together for front-porch BOAT-CHURCH REGULAR AND bring guests to boat church along with her worship. “It was always anyone who could MINISTRY BOARD MEMBER family. This weekend’s crew of eight adults, come was welcome,” says Sandy Noonan, 71. five children and two dogs required a second boat and Her parents hosted the first official gathering at their lake included her friend Debi Mooney, an extended visitor. house several lots down. She still recalls picking up pine Mooney hails from Michigan, a state with an abundance of cones beforehand. lakes but, as far as she knows, nothing like boat church. “I As the group attracted people from other parts of the love this,” she says. lake, more and more came by water. The service eventually Her host likes the fact that the service is just a 10-minute migrated to Boyle’s Point, where Noonan now brings her boat ride from her home, though she would go further to growing family. “I have four children and 16 grandchildren, listen to Thackston. “I would follow him all over.” and when we come, we’ll fill up the lawn,” she laughs. On a recent Sunday, 57 boats bobbed on the water’s For a while, the ministry was affiliated with Aldersgate edge bearing 283 souls—a light turnout compared to the United Methodist Church in Sumter, but boat church has since evolved into a self-supported effort, run by a ninebig holiday weekends. After the July 4 service, Thackston

SCLIVING.COOP   | AUGUST 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

23


SC SCENE

Quick and simple, rain or shine

‘The agreement is that I’m going to be there every Sunday, and if anyone shows up, I’m going to lead them in worship.’ — REV. REGINALD THACKSTON

member board from different Christian denominations. When the board asked Thackston to lead boat church in 1998, the request felt familiar. He had just retired from a lengthy career serving United Methodist churches in several South Carolina locations—Hemingway, Conway, Marion, Charleston and Columbia. Yet, he started out across the state line in Gainesville, Georgia, where he led a service at a Lake Lanier picnic shelter during his summers as an Emory University seminary student in the late 1950s. “My first pulpit was a charcoal grill with the Sunday comics spread on it,” he says. On Lake Marion, he saw a similar opportunity to engage people who might otherwise miss worship during vacation.

GetThere EDWIN BOYLE SANTEE MINISTRY Services take place from

9:30 to 10:05 a.m. each Sunday during summer (Memorial Day weekend to Labor Day weekend) at Boyle’s Point on Lake Marion at Wyboo Creek. For those arriving by car, the address is 1092 Lemon Ave., Manning. For updates and the order of worship, visit the Edwin Boyle Santee Ministry Facebook page.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   AUGUST 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

Knowing his audience, he keeps the 9:30 a.m. service at Boyle’s Point to a breezy 35 minutes. “I preach from 15 to 17 minutes. If it’s over 17 minutes, I quit,” says Thackston. It’s a discipline he developed during his days doing a televised church service in Columbia. “Regi delivers what I call a Reader’s Digest sermon,” says Joe Davis Jr., who lives near Boyle’s Point and serves on the ministry’s board. Not only is the sermon short, it’s easy to understand, Davis says. ENGAGING A FLOATING FLOCK Fellow board member Boat church lures children to dry Archie Stukes says he land for a pint-sized Bible lesson. would attend boat church On the water, Tripp Boykin and his assistant, Wells Coffey, hand out year-round if he could. programs and collect offerings. He’s a fan of Thackston’s, as well as the casual dress and the outdoor location. “I’m closer to the Lord here than I am in a building,” says Stukes, a farmer. But the leaders of boat church want to make it clear that they are not trying to grow at the expense of other churches. “We are trying to supplement what they do,” Davis says. They also strive to support mission work. Volunteers take up offerings in plastic milk jugs by jon boat each week. After expenses, the remainder goes to charitable causes. Favorites include Crosswell Home for Children in Sumter and Salkehatchie Service, a Methodist ministry of young volunteers founded by the Rev. John Wesley Culp, who led boat church many years ago. Crowds fluctuate with weather and nautical conditions, but boat church is a rain-or-shine thing. “As long as it’s not lightning, we don’t have a problem,” says pianist Elaine Budden. The only time Thackston has canceled during the past 18 years was when Hurricane Gaston pushed inland in 2004. This year, tropical weather threatened to wash out Memorial Day weekend’s Sunday service, but Thackston still drove over from his home in Sumter and wound up delivering an emergency, plastic-wrapped sermon while someone held an umbrella over him. Six boats and 94 people turned out, though some, including his wife, wound up staying in cars and listening on the radio. “The agreement is that I’m going to be there every Sunday,” he says, “and if anyone shows up, I’m going to lead them in worship.”


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SCTravels

BY KELLY RAE SMITH | PHOTOS BY JEFF SMITH

From grass to glass AT THE END OF A DIRT ROAD,

alongside an Irish-green pasture full of Holstein cattle, Tom Trantham welcomes us to Happy Cow Creamery and Trantham 12 Aprils Farm, ­introducing himself simply as Farmer Tom. A spring breeze rushes past and wind chimes seem to ring in the new season as he begins the tour of the 100-acre property by pointing out that he’s really not the owner—not quite yet. “I started making payments to the bank in 1978,” he says. “And I’m trying to make it to 103 when the farm is all mine.” Trantham runs the place with the help of his daughter, Tammy, and son, Tom III. From the start, the Anderson County farm was one of the state’s top milk producers, but the late 1980s brought drought and a series of

Tom Trantham (left), a Laurens Electric Cooperative member, discovered quite by accident that providing a mix of natural forage for his cows led to higher yields and better-tasting milk. Visitors to the farm and the Happy Cow Creamery store (below left) can sample the results for themselves and pick up a gallon or two to go.

Trantham’s ‘12 Aprils’ concept of growing green, grazeable pastures year‑round revolutionized sustainable dairy farming. economic hardships that nearly caused the operation to go bankrupt. By April 1989, with the cost of feed alone costing him 65 cents of every dollar he earned, Trantham faced the loss of his life’s work—until he heard a crash. His cows had broken out of the fence and wandered off to greener pastures to graze on wild clover and oats, but the cattle’s mischief ­ultimately saved the farm. “They came back in the barn that evening and had a different smell to them,” he says. “They had the sweetest smell, because they’d been grazing on wild clover and laying out in that beautiful sunshine.”

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   AUGUST 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

The next day, Trantham realized they were up 200 pounds of milk, and it was their most delicious and nutritious milk yet. Since then, he’s ensured that his cows regularly graze on fresh, April-like pastures every month of the year by systematically planting the paddocks with seasonal forage crops including rye, ryegrass, alfalfa, oats, sorghum and clover. Trantham’s “12 Aprils” concept of growing green, grazeable pastures year-round revolutionized sustainable dairy farming. Now, 30 years later, Happy Cow—the on-site bottling plant and creamery—continues to thrive, its award-­winning milk filling the shelves of area stores, like Whole Foods, Earth Fare, Fresh Market and, of course, the creamery’s own shop. And, by the way, should you decide to purchase milk at the farm store, know that the product has traveled no more than 48 feet from the udder to bottle, a claim few others can make. What else is in store on the farm


tour? You’ll board a trolley that whisks you around the property, past its 6,000 strawberry plants, 14 beehives and adorable baby calves. You may even learn a name or two while you’re there. “We have 160 cows here, and every one of ’em’s named,” Trantham explains. “Tammy can tell you every calf born and every cow on this farm​ —tell you their name and their mother and their father.” At the end of the tour, Trantham treats his guests to a free milk sample​ —served ice cold—and a ­single-serve ice cream, then invites them to shop the farm store to purchase their own Happy Cow ice cream, whole milk, strawberry milk, chocolate milk, butter­milk and butter. “I bet we sell more butter here than any store in

GetThere The Happy Cow Creamery and Trantham 12 Aprils Farm are located at 332 McKelvey Road in Pelzer, just off S.C. Highway 418. HOURS: Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed Sundays. ADMISSION: Farm tours, which must be booked in advance, are $8 per person (ages 3 and older) and run from March until November, weather permitting. Group tours are available. DETAILS: Call (864) 243-9699 or visit happycowcreamery.com. Visitors can book tours by emailing hcctours@yahoo.com.

the state of South Carolina,” Trantham says proudly. The store also sells chemical-free, ethically produced products, ­including meat, jam, sorghum syrup and a

s­ morgasbord of Wisconsin cheese. So, you can bring home not only food that’s great for your health but a feelgood story of heartache and triumph that’s great for your soul.

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• Music • Food • Arts and Crafts Sept. 7 – Chattooga River Float Apple • Kiddie Rides Growers Celebration • Fun Run Race Sept. 8 – Apple Baking Contest • Parade Elvis Show & • Children’s Activities WAHPS Fish Fry • Rodeo Sept. 9 – Arts & Craft Show • Quilt Show Live Entertainment Quilt Show • Classic Car Show Aug. 27 – Apple Festival Pageant

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6/30/16 9:57 AM


SCGardener

BY S. CORY TANNER

Asian greens in the garden Asian greens are fastgrowing crops and benefit from even soil moisture and collard, turnip and m ­ ustard adequate fertility. Have your greens were all I knew for soil tested for these crops, years. When kale hit the and fertilize according to scene in a major way, my the results. Under­fertilized ­horizons expanded a bit. greens will yellow and are Lately, I’ve become a more likely to bolt. big fan of a whole treaGreens are poor comsure trove of greens from the Far East. Generally petitors with weeds, so keep lumped together as “Asian your patch well weeded. greens,” these vegetables Pests common to cabbage offer incredible diverand collards will also attack Asian greens. These include sity in flavors, colors and Asian crops add diversity to a garden patch of greens, with different varieties cabbageworms and cabbage leaf shapes, and they rival providing both color and texture. Pictured are (left to right) Red Streaked loopers. Both are caterpilboth kale and traditional mizuna, Joi Choi pac choi, Red Komatsuna and Red Giant mustard. Southern greens in nutrilar pests and are susceptition. Some, like Red Giant ble to organic-approved Bt As a bonus, they are mustard greens, were first sold as insecticides like Dipel and Thuricide. ornamental plants. Now, we see them Harlequin bugs may become a problem attractive cool-season showing up increasingly in restauin warmer weather and are best manrant salads and at farmers markets— annuals in landscape beds. aged by hand removal. Some cutleaf mustards, such as because they’re tasty! Scarlet Frills, Golden Frills, and Ruby garden at the recommended spacing is The Asian greens section of seed a good option for me. Sow one to three Streaks, have naturally lacy leaves catalogs keeps expanding with unique that more than one gardener has misseeds per cell in a good-quality germinew options. Most, such as pac choi, tatsoi and mizuna, are staples in Asian nation soil mix; keep soil moist until taken for insect-eaten foliage. Don’t be cuisines like Vietnamese, Thai and germination. Transplant greens when alarmed; these frilly-foliaged greens Chinese. All of them belong to the they are 2 to 3 inches tall. add a fine texture to both the garden mustard (or brassica) family, with varyLike most brassica greens, Asian bed and the salad plate. greens grow best in the gradually coolWhen small, the leaves of Asian ing degrees of pleasantly spicy flavors. greens are excellent eaten raw and Seeds of these crops are very small ing weather of fall. As a bonus, they are and should be planted shallow (about attractive cool-season annuals that fill a lend a mild spice to salads. They can be harvested individually by taking a half-inch deep). Sow them thickly niche in landscape beds. Sow seeds or a few tender leaves from each plant, in the garden, and thin them out later set transplants in the garden between to the recommended spacing for each mid-August and early October. You can or you can cut the whole plant just above the growing point and allow the plant. Soil crusting can be a challenge also grow these greens in spring, but plant to sprout new leaves. Mature to germination, so keep the soil surface bolting (premature flowering) can be plants are generally best eaten cooked evenly moist until seedlings emerge. A a problem if a spurt of warm weather because of their increased pungency thin layer of straw scattered over the shows up. Try using bolt-resistant vaand are great sauteed or stir-fried. planting can help decrease crusting. rieties for spring plantings, and transThe tender thinnings of greens are plant seedlings instead of seeding completely edible and make great addirectly into the garden. Spring plantS. CORY TANNER is an area horticulture ditions to salads. Because I often fail ing dates are January through February agent for Clemson Extension based in Greenville County. Contact him at to thin crops on time, sowing seeds in on the coast and in the Midlands, midshannt@clemson.edu. cell packs and then transplanting to the March in the Upstate. AS A SOUTHERN BOY WHO LOVES HIS GREENS, stewed

S. CORY TANNER

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   AUGUST 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP


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29


Recipe

BY BELINDA SMITH-SULLIVAN

HOMeMaDE FieStA

Craving your favorite Mexican fo ods, but in the comfort of yo ur own home? Enjoy a night in with a Mexican meal featu popular restaurant ring items like these, rec reated in your own kitchen. An d if your south-of-th e-border preferences run to extra jalapenos or a do llop of sour cream, twea k to make your own taste buds happ y.

SPICY STEAK-AND-SHRIMP QUESADILLAS SERVES 4–6

1 pound flat iron or skirt steak 2 tablespoons spicy chipotle spice rub 1 pound medium shrimp, peeled, deveined and tails off 2–3 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon butter 1 red onion, sliced thinly 8 large flour tortillas 1 pound shredded Mexican cheeses 1 poblano pepper, roasted, peeled, seeded and cut into ¼-inch strips 1 pound shredded Monterey Jack cheese

WILLIAM P. EDWARDS

W H AT Õ S C O O K I N G AT

SCLiving.coop

For a fresh-made salsa good enough to eat with a spoon, see Chef Belinda’s oh-so-simple recipe at

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   AUGUST 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

Sprinkle steak on both sides with half of the chipotle rub. In a bowl, mix shrimp with the remaining half of the chipotle rub and ½ tablespoon of the olive oil; stir to coat. Let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes. In a skillet over medium heat, melt butter and add onion. Cook slowly, stirring occasionally, about 20 minutes, until onion slices are caramelized with a golden-brown color. Set aside. In a grill pan over medium-high heat, cook the steak, turning once, about 4 minutes per side for medium-rare. Transfer to a cutting board, and let rest for 10 minutes. Cut steak across the grain into ¼-inch strips. In the same hot grill pan, cook shrimp, turning once, until opaque throughout, 1–2 minutes per side. Transfer to cutting board, and let cool, then cut the shrimp in half lengthwise. Brush one side of a tortilla with olive oil and place, oiled side down, on a baking sheet. Sprinkle some of the Mexican cheese over one half of the tortilla, then top with pepper strips, caramelized onion, steak slices and shrimp. Sprinkle with Monterey Jack cheese, and fold empty side of tortilla over the filled side. Repeat to make 7 more quesadillas. Place quesadillas on grill pan and cook, turning once, until the cheese is melted and tortillas are golden brown, about 2 minutes per side. Transfer to a cutting board, and let cool for 2 minutes. Grill the remaining quesadillas, and let cool. Cut each quesadilla into 3 wedges.


KAREN HERMANN

EASY BEEF TOSTADAS

MAKE-YOUR-OWN FISH TACOS SERVES 6

¼ head of red or green cabbage 1 tablespoon cider vinegar 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1 ripe avocado 1 medium tomato 1 pound fish fillets (firm fish, such as cod or halibut) Salt and pepper Olive oil 12 corn tortillas Salsa, store-bought or homemade Lime wedges

Slice cabbage thinly, and put into a medium bowl. Sprinkle with cider vinegar and salt. Toss to combine, and set aside. Peel avocado, remove seed, and slice or chop avocado; set aside in a bowl. Chop tomato; set aside in a bowl. Cut fish fillets into 12 portions, and season each piece with salt and pepper. In a large, nonstick skillet over medium-high heat, add and heat two teaspoons olive oil. Place fish in skillet. Cook until fish is opaque in color, about 1–2 minutes on each side. Do not overcook the fish. Transfer to a paper-towel-lined platter. While fish is cooking, heat tortillas two at a time, in the microwave, for 40 seconds on top of a paper towel. Continue until all tortillas are heated. Cover; set on serving platter. Set out tortillas, fish, tomato, avocado, cabbage and salsa so everyone can assemble their own tacos with their favorite toppings. Squeeze juice from lime wedges over tacos.

1 pound ground beef 1 cup chopped red bell pepper ½ cup chili sauce 1 teaspoon taco seasoning Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper 6 tostada shells 3 cups shredded lettuce

1 cup guacamole 1½ cups shredded Mexican cheeses Salsa Sliced pickled jalapenos Black olives Chopped green onion (optional) Chopped cilantro (optional)

In a large skillet over medium heat, cook beef and red pepper until meat is no longer pink. Drain, and stir in chili sauce, taco seasoning, salt and pepper; heat thoroughly. Layer each tostada with lettuce, meat mixture, guacamole, cheese, salsa, jalapenos and black olives. Top with chopped green onion and cilantro, if desired.

CHICKEN AND BLACK BEAN ENCHILADAS SERVES 4–6

Cooking spray 2½ cups enchilada sauce 2 cups shredded rotisserie chicken 1 4.5-ounce can diced green chilies 1 15-ounce can black beans, drained 10 flour tortillas 2 cups shredded Mexican cheeses Chopped green onions

Heat oven to 350 F. Spray a 13-by-9-inch baking dish with cooking spray. Spread ½ cup of enchilada sauce in bottom of baking dish. In a medium bowl, stir together chicken, ¾ cup of sauce, green chilies and beans. Place tortillas on work surface. Divide chicken mixture evenly among the tortillas; sprinkle each with cheese. Roll up tortillas; place, seam side down, in baking dish. Top enchiladas with remaining enchilada sauce and cheese. Bake 25–30 minutes or until enchiladas are hot and cheese is melted. Let stand 5 minutes before serving. Garnish with green onions.

GWÉNAËL LE VOT

GWÉNAËL LE VOT

SERVES 6

SCLIVING.COOP   | AUGUST 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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35


Calendar of Events UPSTATE AUGUST

15 • Edouard Michelin Memorial 5K, Michelin Conference Center, Greenville. (864) 458-4374. 18–20 • Spittoono XXXVI, 1569 Eighteen Mile Road, Central. facebook.com/spittoono. 19 • Movie Night in Wren Park: “Zootopia,” Wren Park, Anderson. (864) 231-2232. 20 • Celebrate the ’50s and ’60s, Laurens County Museum, Laurens. (864) 350-1365. 20 • Sunrise Battlefield Tour, Musgrove Mill State Historic Site, Clinton. (864) 938-0100. 21 • Earth Market Greenville, Swamp Rabbit Cafe and Grocery, Greenville. (864) 255-3385. 22 • Farm to Fork Dinner and Fundraiser, Arts Center of Greenwood, Greenwood. (864) 388-7800. 25 • Samsara Summer Art Movies, Spartanburg Art Museum, Spartanburg. (864) 582-7616. 25–Sept. 5 • Upper South Carolina State Fair, Upper South Carolina State Fairgrounds/ Greenville Pickens Speedway, Greenville. (864) 269-0852. 26 • Rock the River Concert Series, Peace Center Amphitheatre, Greenville. (864) 679-9214. 26–27 • Williamston Spring Water Festival, Mineral Spring Park, Williamston. (864) 847-7361. 27 • Flight of the Dove Cycling Event, Bailey Memorial Stadium at Presbyterian College, Clinton. (864) 833-6287. 27 • Mutt Strut Two-Mile Walk/ Run, Greenville Tech’s Barton Campus, Greenville. (864) 242-3626. 27 • Olde South Ball, Spartanburg Marriott, Spartanburg. (864) 244-2732. 27 • Pasta for Pups, Roberts Presbyterian Church, West Anderson. (864) 225-9950. 27 • Pendleton Place 5K, Falls Park, Greenville. (864) 467-3650. 27 • Tavernier & Anthony: Teenage Pianists, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542-2787.

SEPTEMBER

3 • 1Spark! Festival, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542-2787. 3 • Butts and Bluegrass BBQ Festival, Clover Community Park, Clover. (704) 214-2892. 3 • Musgrove Mill Battlefield Guided Hike, Musgrove Mill State Historic Site, Clinton. (864) 938-0100. 4 • Bacon Labor Day, Simpsonville City Park, Simpsonville. (864) 423-8074. 4 • Swine and Dine Summer Pig Pull for Charity, Roost Restaurant, Greenville. (864) 298-2424. 9 • Sippin’ Safari, Greenville Zoo, Greenville. (864) 467-4300. 9–10 • Enchanted Chalice Renaissance Faire, Greenville Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, Greenville. (864) 271-4883. 9–10 • South Carolina Apple Festival, Historic Westminster Depot, Westminster. (864) 647-3200. 9–17 • Trains, Trains and More Trains, Mauldin Cultural Center, Mauldin. (864) 335-4862. 10 • Homesteading Festival, Mineral Spring Park, Williamston. (864) 847-7473. 15 • Greenville Women of Distinction, Clemson University International Center for Automotive Research TD Gallery. Clemson. (864) 770-1415. ONGOING

Thursdays through September • Fountain Inn Farmers Market, Farmers Market Pavilion, Fountain Inn. (864) 409-1392. Third Thursdays • Art Walk, downtown, Spartanburg. (864) 542-2787. Second Saturdays • Heartstrings, Hagood Mill Historic Site, Pickens. (864) 898-2936. Third Saturdays • Milling Day, Hagood Mill Historic Site, Pickens. (864) 898-2936. Sundays • Sundays Unplugged, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542-2787.

MIDLANDS AUGUST

Go to SCLiving.coop for more information and for guidelines on submitting your event. Please confirm information before attending events.

36

15 • Schuetzenfest, downtown, Ehrhardt. (803) 267-5335. 19 • Arts & Draughts, Columbia Museum of Art, Columbia. (803) 799-2810. 19 • Water Balloon Battle, Robert Mills House & Gardens, Columbia. (803) 252-1770, ext. 36.

19 • Food Truck Friday in Old Town, Fountain Park, Rock Hill. (803) 329-8756. 20 • Jailbreak Escape Urban Challenge, Lexington County Sheriff’s Department, Lexington. (803) 785-8230. 20 • Springdale 5K at Sunrise, Springdale Race Course, Camden. (800) 780-8117. 22 • August Harvest Dinner and a Show, Music Farm Columbia, Columbia. (803) 252-9392. 26 • Friday Night Laser Lights, S.C. State Museum, Columbia. (803) 898-4921. 26–27 • Sandy Oaks Pro Rodeo, Lazy J Arena, Edgefield. (803) 480-0045. 27 • The Big Float, North Augusta Boat Ramp, North Augusta. (803) 706-8991. 27 • Children’s Trust Benefit Gala and Auction, USC Alumni Center, Columbia. (803) 744-4025. 27 • Sugarloaf Mountain Boys, Haynes Auditorium, Leesville. (803) 582-8479. 27 • Summerfest, downtown, York. (803) 684-2590. 27 • Wine on the River, Stone River Event Hall, West Columbia. (803) 727-8047. SEPTEMBER

1 • Anne Rauton Smith Exhibit, Aiken County Visitors Center, Aiken. (803) 642-7557. 3 • Butts & Bluegrass BBQ Festival, Clover Community Park, Clover. (704) 214-2892. 3 • Monthly Gospel Singing, Midlands Gospel Singing Center, Columbia. (803) 719-1289. 3–5 • Chapin Labor Day Festival, downtown, Chapin. (803) 345-2444. 4 • Southern 500 NASCAR Race, Darlington Raceway, Darlington. (866) 459-7223. 7 • Under the Stars Jumper Night, Stable View, Aiken. (484) 356-3173. 9–10 • 85-Mile Big Grab Yard Sale, Winnsboro. (803) 635-4242. 9–10 • Aiken’s Makin’, Paradise Farm, Aiken. (803) 641-1111. 10 • 2016 Open Horse Show, Gaston Farm Equestrian Center, Chester. (803) 789-3990. 10 • Martha’s Market, Union United Methodist Church, Irmo. (803) 781-3013. 10 • Rosewood Art & Music Festival, Rosewood Drive, Columbia. (803) 608-3057. 14 • Fall into Dressage, Stable View, Aiken. (484) 356-3173.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   AUGUST 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

15 • Sumter Green Fall Feast, USC-Sumter Nettles Building, Sumter. (803) 436-2500. 15–18 • Columbia’s Greek Festival, Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church, Columbia. (803) 252-6758. ONGOING

August–July 2017 • “A Compass to Guide: S.C. Cabinetmakers Today,” McKissick Museum, Columbia. (803) 777-7251. Daily through Sept. 11 • “Race: Are We So Different?” South Carolina State Museum, Columbia. (803) 898-4921. Mondays through August • Hopelands Summer Concert Series, Hopelands Gardens, Aiken. (803) 642-7654. Tuesdays • Second Shift Twosdays, S.C. State Museum, Columbia. (803) 898-4921. Tuesdays through Saturdays, through Sept. 10 • Dinosaur Revolution Maze, Museum of York County, Rock Hill. (803) 329-2121. Wednesdays through Sept. 28 • South Sumter Farmers Market, South Sumter Resource Center Pavilion, Sumter. (803) 436-2277. Saturdays through Nov. 24 • Downtown Market, downtown, Sumter. (803) 436-2500. Saturdays, weather permitting • Aiken Trolley Tours, Aiken Visitors Center and Train Museum, Aiken. (803) 644-1907. Fourth Saturdays • Mountain Dulcimers of Aiken, Aiken Visitors Center and Train Museum, Aiken. (803) 293-7846.

LOWCOUNTRY AUGUST

18 • Music on Main: Blackwater Rhythm and Blues Band, Horseshoe, North Myrtle Beach. (843) 280-5570. 19 • Bluffton Sunset Party, Bluffton Oyster Factory Park, Bluffton. (843) 757-8520. 19 • Moonlight Mixer, Folly Beach Pier, Folly Beach. (843) 795-4386. 19 • Sounds of Summer Concert Series, North Myrtle Beach Sports Complex, North Myrtle Beach. (843) 280-5570. 19 • Special Needs Prom, Bees Landing Recreation Center, Charleston. (843) 795-4386. 20 • Cast Off Fishing Tournament, Folly Beach Pier, Folly Beach. (843) 762-9516. 22 • South Carolina’s Largest Garage Sale, Myrtle Beach Convention Center, Myrtle Beach. (800) 537-1690.

25 • Music on Main: Special Blend, Main Street, North Myrtle Beach. (843) 280-5570. 26 • “Teen Beach Movie,” Island Rec Center, Hilton Head Island. (843) 681-7273. 27 • Close Encounters of the Bird Kind, Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 852-4200. 27 • Hot Nights and Holy City, Middleton Place, Charleston. (843) 556-6020. 27 • Race for the ARK, St. Luke’s Lutheran Church, Summerville. (843) 832-2357. 27–Sept. 11 • Moncks Corner Juried Art Show, Old Santee Canal State Park, Moncks Corner. (843) 899-5200. SEPTEMBER

1 • Music on Main with Carolina Soul Band, Horseshoe, North Myrtle Beach. (843) 280-5570. 2–3 • Lands End Woodland River Festival, 100 Lands End Road, St. Helena. (843) 263-5261. 2–5 • Star Spangled Labor Day, Swamp Fox Entertainment Complex, Marion. (843) 206-0862. 3 • DragonBoat Race Day, Waterfront Park, Beaufort. (843) 473-4477. 3 • Pocotaligo Point South Festival, Frampton Plantation Visitors Center, Yemassee. (843) 812-9230. 5–7 • Lowcountry Coin Club Winter Coin Show, Exchange Park, Ladson. (843) 367-0141. 8 • Music on Main with Six Stylez, Main Street, North Myrtle Beach. (843) 280-5570. 9 • Home Improvement & Outdoor Living Show, Myrtle Beach Convention Center, Myrtle Beach. (843) 438-4124. 9 • Marlboro County Summerfest, Bennettsville Community Center, Bennettsville. (843) 479-6982. 9 • Movies at McLean: “Shaun the Sheep,” McLean Park, North Myrtle Beach. (843) 280-5584. 9 • Roots: A Taste of the Lowcountry, Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage, Ridgeland. (843) 284-9227. 10 • Artisan Market, Field of Charleston Elks’ Lodge No. 242, Charleston. islandcraftersguild.com. 10 • BHS Stags 5K Stampede, Old Santee Canal State Park, Moncks Corner. (843) 830-5881. 10 • Bluffton Boiled Peanut Festival, Historic Downtown Bluffton, Bluffton. (843) 757-1010.

10 • Cast Off Fishing Tournament, Folly Beach Pier, Folly Beach. (843) 762-9516. 10 • Lowcountry Red Ribbon 5K Run/Walk, Wannamaker County Park, Charleston. (843) 747-2273. 10 • Shaggin’ on the Cooper, Mount Pleasant Pier, Mount Pleasant. (843) 795-4386. 10 • South Carolina Aquarium Turtle Trek 5K, Isle of Palms County Park, Charleston. (843) 720-1990. 10–11 • Land of the Sky Gun and Knife Show, Exchange Park, Ladson. (770) 630-7296. 11 • Dog Day Afternoon, Whirlin’ Waters Adventure Waterpark, Wannamaker County Park, North Charleston. (843) 795-4386. 13 • Field Day, Pee Dee Research and Education Center, Florence. (843) 519-0487. 15 • Archaeology of the Pre‑Drayton Era, South Carolina Society Hall, Charleston. (843) 769-2627. 15 • Music on Main: Midnight Allie, Horseshoe, North Myrtle Beach. (843) 280-5570. 15 • Yappy Hour, James Island County Park, Charleston. (843) 795-4386. 15–18 • Charleston Scottish Games and Highland Gathering, Boone Hall Plantation, Charleston. (843) 884-4371. 15–18 • Sweet Tea Festival Weekend, downtown, Summerville. (843) 821-7260. ONGOING

Daily • History Tours, Old Exchange & Provost Dungeon, Charleston. (888) 763-0448. Daily through Sept. 5 • “Nature Connects: LEGOS Bricks Sculpture Exhibit,” Brookgreen Gardens, Murrells Inlet. (843) 235-6000. Mondays through Aug. 29 • Freshfields Farmers Market, Village Green, Kiawah Island. (843) 763-7491. Mondays through Saturdays, through Oct. 1 • “The History of Fishing,” South Carolina Maritime Museum, Georgetown. (843) 520-0111. Saturdays through Aug. 20 • Moonlight Canoe Floats, Cheraw State Park, Cheraw. (843) 537-9656. Saturdays through Nov. 30 • Charleston Farmers Market, Marion Square, Charleston. (843) 724-7309. Saturdays • Snakes and Reptiles, Huntington Beach State Park, Murrells Inlet. (843) 237-4440.


SCHumorMe

BY JAN A. IGOE

Let them eat cake WHEN I THINK OF THOSE GENTLE FOLK

who dine exclusively on plants, I picture delicate woodland nymphs whispering to the ferns and spreading peace to all living creatures. What I don’t picture is Chuck’s sister: Mollie, the vegan vigilante. As a r­ ecovering omnivore born into a family of bacon addicts, Mollie somehow survived 50 cheeseburgerfilled years before realizing the error of her ways. Now, she’s on a mission to tofu-tize everyone she knows, starting with her big brother. My neighbor is a fairly adventurous guy. Chuck has been on safari, fished for sharks from a kayak, fought a war and tried pole dancing in his wife’s yoga pants. The more likely something is to maim him, the more likely he is to participate. But all that went out the window when Mollie came over to cook his birthday dinner. While it’s customary to serve the birthday boy’s favorite dish, Mollie whipped up her meatless rendition. She didn’t think Chuck would notice. First, she offered a gift to distract him. It was a lovely, illustrated ­children’s book: Santa’s First Vegan Christmas. (I guess Santa didn’t get that hefty on lentils.) We all wondered where Santa went wrong, since he never ate a reindeer and you can’t pull a sled with broccoli. But Chuck knew better than to ask and seemed grateful he didn’t get socks. For appetizers, Mollie served a 38

cauliflower-ginger-peanut concoction that was supposed to look like spicy chicken wings. But, trust me, Danny DeVito could pass for George Clooney before this stuff would pass as wings. Chuck didn’t object, but his hand kept

disappearing under the table, where the dog was choking. The next course was chickpeas masquerading as turkey. I like chickpeas, aka garbanzo beans, but it’s important to accept them for what they are, which is not poultry. Vegans must get confused by the “chick” part and totally ignore the “pea.” Chuck was nibbling every forkful in slow motion, like he was hoping the world would be merciful enough to end before dessert hit the table. But it wasn’t. A black-bean, faux-chocolate cake with avocado frosting was coming for him. That’s when Mollie proudly popped the question: “Did you know this dinner was meatless? Nothing on your

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   AUGUST 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

plates had a face or a mother.” Everybody managed a rigid smile and nod, because we feared the truth might incite a sermon. It’s funny. All of us like salads. We’ve all cut way back on meat and have nothing against garbanzos or any vegetable that died for our dinner. But why do they have to wear disguises and have secret identities, like they’re in witness protection? You don’t see Chuck dressing a pork chop up as an asparagus spear. Let’s stick those naked veggies on a plate and admit what they are. If you like tofu, eat tofu. Just stop telling me it’s turkey. As much as I admire the vegan quest to make this a kinder, gentler planet, dessert should be off limits. Chocolate is a deal breaker. It’s sacred and stands alone among guilty pleasures. Chocolate has the natural power to make you lick your fingers and sneak them in the frosting when nobody’s looking. It would be wrong to mess with that. Assuming we can agree to keep the avocados in the salad, vegans and omnivores can peacefully coexist, even on birthdays. Just let us have our cake. And let Santa eat it, too. JAN A. IGOE is as close to vegan as pizza allows. Enlightened daily by her vegan daughter, she’s inching closer every day. Only butter and cheese stand in the way. Write her at HumorMe@SCLiving.coop.


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