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CHANGEOUT

Discover Daufuskie Experience the nature, history and friendly folks of this enchanting sea island

SC FE ATURE

MARCH 2019

Kids in the kitchen SC RECIPE

Veggie delights


WHERE DREAMS ARE BORN

YOUR SOURCE OF POWER. AND INFORMATION. We’re not your typical energy company, we’re a local, not-for-profit electric cooperative. We empower future generations, making sure they have power to grow and flourish, right here in your hometown. To learn more about the power of the cooperative difference, visit TouchstoneEnergy.com


THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS VOLUME 73 • NUMBER 3 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240) Read in more than 595,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033

2019 | march 16 Kids in the kitchen Four aspiring chefs from Greenville County Schools’ culinary arts program step up to the plate for the Healthy Lunchtime Throwdown— and the results are delicious.

Tel: (803) 926‑3175 Fax: (803) 796‑6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop EDITOR

Keith Phillips Tel: (803) 739‑3040 Email: Keith.Phillips@ecsc.org FIELD EDITOR

4 CO-OP NEWS

Updates from your cooperative

Walter Allread PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

Travis Ward

6 AGENDA

If you’ve ever wondered what it’s like to be a cooperative lineworker, don’t miss the 2019 S.C. Lineman’s Rodeo in Florence.

ART DIRECTOR

Sharri Harris Wolfgang DESIGNER

Susan Collins Andrew Chapman

In the aftermath of major weather events, South Carolina’s electric cooperatives join forces with federal, state and local agencies to restore power as quickly and safely as possible.

WEB EDITOR

Chase Toler COPY EDITORS

Jennifer Jas, L. Kim Welborn CONTRIBUTORS

April Coker Blake, Greta Burroughs, Mike Couick, Hastings Hensel, Jan A. Igoe, L.A. Jackson, Patrick Keegan, M. Linda Lee, David Novak, Sydney Patterson, Brian Sloboda, Belinda Smith-Sullivan, Brad Thiessen, Libby Swope Wiersema PUBLISHER

Lou Green

12 ENERGY Q&A Weighing your lawn care options Consider all the options when choosing between gas, electric and human-powered push lawn mowers.

14 SMART CHOICE Spring cleaning Take the drudgery out of house cleaning with these handy tools that power through the dirty work.

ADVERTISING

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739‑5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

American MainStreet Publications Tel: (800) 626‑1181 Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor.

21 STORIES The ship shaper Set sail with Bill Brady, one of the state’s top model shipwrights.

22

local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above. Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices.

Discovering Daufuskie Island

28

RECIPE

© COPYRIGHT 2019. The Electric Cooperatives

Quick and easy vegetarian

of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor.

Chef Belinda Smith-Sullivan offers up four healthy dishes that are so satisfying you won’t even miss the meat.

is brought to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

$5.72 members,

22

SCENE

Join us on a self-guided golf cart expedition in search of hidden treasures on South Carolina’s southernmost sea island.

ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send to your

30

OUTSIDE

What’s all the buzz about? Bee City USA gardens are popping up in public spaces across South Carolina. Learn how Lake City and Greenwood are leading the way in the fight to save pollinators.

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$8 nonmembers

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GARDENER

The possibilities of parsley More than a mere garnish on a plate, this tangy herb can also dress up your landscape.

Member of the AMP network reaching more than 9 million homes and businesses

34 36 38

MARKETPLACE CALENDAR HUMOR ME

Discover Daufuskie

Butter me up, Scottie Enjoy humor columnist Jan A. Igoe’s musings on the games people play. Pictionary, anyone? PHOTOS, FRO M TO P: M IC SM ITH; RUTA SM ITH; I U LI I A N EDRYGA I LOVA

Experience the nature, history and friendly folks of this enchanting sea island

SC FE ATURE

Kids in the kitchen MARCH 2019

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS:

16

10 DIALOGUE ‘Nobody relaxes until the job is done’

PRODUCTION

SC RECIPE

Veggie delights

Wick Scurry, owner of Freeport Marina, and his dog, River, welcome visitors who come to explore Daufuskie Island. Photo by Ruta Smith.


SC | agenda Top competition IF YOU’VE EVER WONDERED WHAT IT’S

like to be a cooperative lineworker, here’s your chance. The S.C. Lineman’s Rodeo will take place March 15–16 at the Pee Dee Touchstone Energy Commerce City Park in Florence. Electric cooperative ­employees from across the state will demon­strate their trade skills during this friendly competition that also includes fun activities for the family.

M IC SM ITH

York Electric Cooperative lineman Lucas Elston (above) demonstrates the Hurtman Rescue event, in which competitors must safely lower a 185-pound mannequin to the ground. Joe Wright (left), a lineman with Lynches River Electric Cooperative, gives his best effort in the challenging crossarm lift competition. M IC SM ITH

Competitive events for both new and veteran lineworkers will include the challenging “Hurtman Rescue” where climbers must scale a 40-foot pole to rescue a 185-pound mannequin simulating an injured worker. Like all rodeo events, this drill requires competitors to demonstrate the physical abilities, mental sharpness and safe working practices they use on a daily basis, says Nick Adams, senior safety and training instructor with The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. “If people come out to the rodeo, they’re going to get to see linemen doing work similar to their daily job,” he says. “Competition helps keep their skills fine-tuned.” A kids zone, complete with an inflat6

able “bounce house,” and electrical safety demonstrations will offer families a chance to learn what linemen do in a safe and fun environment. Spectators can also take tethered rides in the Touchstone Energy Cooperatives hot air balloon. The rodeo is a great way for young men and women to see what it takes to be a lineworker, Adams says. Working as part of a line crew for a local electric cooperative is a stable and rewarding career option for those with the physical ability to do the work and a desire to serve their neighbors. “People who are interested in teamwork, camaraderie and brotherhood, that’s who cooperatives want,” Adams says. “People who are hard-working, dedicated to their jobs and able to work well with other people.” “The money’s good but that’s not the

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MARCH 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

GET THERE The 2019 S.C. Lineman’s Rodeo, hosted by Pee Dee Electric Cooperative, takes place at the Pee Dee Touchstone Energy Commerce City Park at the intersection of Interstate 95 and S.C. Hwy 327 in Florence. For more information, visit ecsc.org/rodeo.

Schedule of events FRIDAY, MARCH 15

5:30 p.m. Touchstone Energy Cooperatives hot air balloon rides SATURDAY, MARCH 16

8 a.m. Opening ceremony and flag raising 8:30 a.m. Kids zone opens 8:30 a.m. Competitions begin 10:15 a.m. Electrical safety and 1:15 p.m. demonstration

reason to get into it,” he says. “You make a difference in the community when you go out there and get somebody’s power back on. When you see that expression on their face—they’re so thankful—that’s the ultimate reward.”


ONLY ON SCLiving.coop

GE

Light it up

M ICH A E L PH I LLI P S

Spice it up They may be small, but Chef Belinda’s cheesy jalapeno cornbread mini muffins pack a big, spicy punch of flavor into every bite. Get the recipe and see how they’re made in this month’s cooking video at SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda.

IN THE PAST, CONTROLLING LIGHTS IN A HOME

was a simple matter of flipping a wall switch, twisting a dimmer dial or plugging lamps into a timer. Today, a new option exists for complete home lighting control—connected LEDs. These clever and highly efficient lightbulbs can be controlled over your home Wi-Fi network using a smartphone or via voice commands issued to smart­hub devices like the Amazon Echo, Apple HomeKit or Google Home. Connected LEDs cost more than traditional bulbs, but can be installed without any rewiring. Starter kits with basic white-light bulbs cost anywhere from $35 to $120 from online retailers, hardware stores and home improvement centers. Consumers can choose from a variety of manufacturers when purchasing connected LEDs, but read all the fine print before buying. Not all bulbs are compatible with all hubs or home automation systems. —BRIAN SLOBODA EDITOR’S NOTE: Coverage of home electronics is not an endorsement by South Carolina Living or any S.C. electric cooperative.

Apply now for 2019 WIRE scholarships Women returning to school to earn college degrees may now apply for financial assistance from the 2019 Jenny Ballard Opportunity Scholarship program. Sponsored by Women Involved in Rural Electrification (WIRE), a service organization associated with South Carolina’s not-for-profit electric cooperatives, the scholarship is a one‑time award based on financial need and personal goals. Application forms for the 2019 WIRE scholarship are available at your local electric cooperative and as a PDF download at SCLiving.coop/scholarship. Applicants for the program must: u Be a member of a South Carolina electric cooperative. u Have graduated from high school or earned a GED at least

10 years ago. u Be accepted into an accredited S.C. college or university. u Demonstrate financial need and clear academic goals.

The deadline for applications is June 1, 2019. Winners will receive scholarships for the Fall 2019 or Spring 2020 semester.

Register to win $100 You could be saying hello to spring with a $100 Visa gift card in your pocket! Sign up today for your chance to win in our Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes. We’ll draw the name of one lucky reader from all eligible entries received by March 31. Turn to Page 27 for more details, or register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply.

Like us on Facebook If you love South Carolina, follow South Carolina Living on Facebook, where we celebrate all that’s great about the Palmetto State. Add your voice to the conversation and share your photos at facebook.com/SouthCarolinaLiving.

GONE FISHIN’ The Vektor Fish & Game Forecast provides feeding and ­migration times. Major periods can bracket the peak by an hour. Minor peaks, ½ hour before and after. Minor

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

MARCH 16 9:31 4:16 2:16 9:31 17 10:16 4:46 3:16 10:16 18 10:46 5:16 4:16 11:01 19 11:31 5:46 5:16 11:46 20 — 6:16 12:01 6:01 21 6:31 12:16 6:46 12:46 22 7:01 1:01 7:46 1:16 23 1:31 7:31 8:31 2:01 24 2:01 7:46 9:46 2:46 25 2:31 8:01 11:16 3:31 26 3:01 8:16 — 4:31 27 2:46 8:16 — 6:01 28 — 3:46 — 7:31 29 10:16 4:01 12:16 8:46 30 10:16 4:16 2:16 9:31 31 10:31 4:31 3:31 10:01

Minor

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

APRIL 1 10:46 2 11:01 3 11:31 4 — 5 12:01 6 12:31 7 1:01 8 1:31 9 2:01 10 2:46 11 12:01 12 9:16 13 8:46 14 9:31 15 10:01 16 10:31

5:01 4:16 10:46 5:16 4:46 11:16 5:31 5:31 11:31 5:46 6:01 12:01 6:01 6:46 12:16 6:16 7:31 12:46 6:46 8:16 1:31 7:01 9:01 2:01 7:16 10:16 2:46 7:46 — 3:46 8:16 — 5:01 2:01 — 6:46 3:01 12:31 8:01 3:31 2:16 9:01 4:01 3:31 10:01 4:31 4:31 10:46

SCLIVING.COOP  | MARCH 2019  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

7


|

SC   agenda HIGHLIGHTS MARCH 15–APRIL 15

GEORGETOWN BURNING OF THE SOCKS AND GUMBO COOKOFF MARCH 21

AIKEN’S BACON AND BREWS FESTIVAL MARCH 16

When a county’s name rhymes with bacon, it’d be a shame to not have a festival dedicated to the always-popular fried strips of pork. Attendees can feast on a variety of offerings—baconsmothered pork chops, bacon-wrapped hot dogs, maple bacon sundaes, bacon cotton candy, bacon cheeseburgers— and wash it all down with an equally diverse selection of beers. The festival, hosted by the Kiwanis Club to benefit children’s programs in Aiken County, runs from 6–10:30 p.m. and will feature live music by Tokyo Joe. Admission is free, but bring cash to purchase beverages and those tasty bacon treats. aikensbaconandbrews.com PALMETTO SPORTSMEN’S CLASSIC

Winter’s over—time to burn your socks! At least it would be, if your socks got as gross as Captain Bob Turner’s did back in the 1980s when he worked on his boats all winter, preparing for summer sailing adventures. On the first day of spring, he toasted the change of the seasons by burning those old winter socks to celebrate the return of warmer weather. The tradition lives on in Georgetown at the South Carolina Maritime Museum. Bring socks to burn—or not—but do stay for the gumbo cookoff, beer and wine, plus raffles, door prizes and live music. Tickets can be purchased by phone or online at the museum’s website. (843) 520-0111; scmaritimemuseum.org/scmm-calendar/ BEAUFORT TWILIGHT RUN MARCH 22–23

South Carolina runners know how sweltering it can be to run in our state’s famous heat, so why not run in the evening as the sun sets? The Beaufort Twilight Run celebrates the pleasure of running at dusk while benefiting Riverview Charter School. The race, set in the quaint Habersham community just a few miles from Beaufort, takes a scenic route whether you choose the 5K, 8K, 10K or the kids’ fun run course. Following the race is a huge after-party with live music and gourmet food trucks. (843) 321-8309; beauforttwilightrun.com

MARCH 22–24

The arrival of spring means it’s time to head outdoors, but not before a stop at the Palmetto Sportsmen’s Classic. Held yearly at the State Fairgrounds in Columbia, this event showcases the latest in sporting and outdoors equipment from more than 325 vendors. A 5,500-gallon tank full of native fish species and a catch-and-release fishing pond are just two of the kid-friendly displays that will inspire a love for the great outdoors and South Carolina wildlife. (803) 734-4008; psclassic.com

SOUTHERN SOUND SERIES: SIERRA HULL APRIL 13

GET MORE

For more happenings, turn to our Calendar on Page 36, and see expanded festivals and events coverage on SCLiving.coop.

8

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MARCH 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

Sierra Hull, two-time winner of the International Bluegrass Music Association’s Mandolin Player of the Year award, takes the McCelvey Center stage April 13 to close out the 2019 Southern Sound Series in York. Come early to ­celebrate spring during the free “Vittles & Fiddles” pre-show festival featuring live music on the lawn. Details and advance-purchase tickets are available online. (803) 909-7242; chmuseums.org/southernsoundseries


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SC   dialogue

‘Nobody relaxes until the job is done’ MAJOR WEATHER EVENTS, THE KIND THAT KNOCK OUT POWER

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MARCH 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

PHOTOS COU RTESY O F B ERKE LE Y E LEC TRIC COO PER ATI V E

to tens of thousands of homes and businesses across the state, can occur at any time and in any season. A fierce winter storm can be every bit as damaging to the power grid as a major hurricane, and that fact requires South Carolina’s not-for-profit electric cooperatives to stay prepared for anything on a daily basis. With the arrival of spring, we don’t have to worry about ice damage for a while, but we are approaching the start of the 2019 hurricane season (June 1 to Nov. 30). It seems like a good time to reflect on the restoration process co-ops follow in the aftermath of catastrophic weather. As a case study, let’s consider how co-op line crews responded to Hurricane Matthew when the Category 5 storm hit the Palmetto State in October 2016, knocking out power to more than 400,000 South Carolina National Guard troops had to clear a path through Hurricane homes and businesses. Matthew storm debris before Berkeley Electric Cooperative could use the Even before the winds died down, co-ops had crews, trucks “Marsh Master” tracked vehicle to replace or repair damaged power poles in flooded areas. and equipment ready to roll the moment it was safe to do so. Problem: Matthew turned city streets into rivers, washed out massive chunks of rural highways Department of Transportation to safely move it GET MORE and toppled bridges. Just getting to the damaged around,” Dantzler says. Get prepared for power poles, lines and transformers was a The Highway Patrol set up a rolling roadmajor weather events with the tips and resources at major hurdle, says Peggy Dantzler, vice presiblock on I-95 so Edisto Electric Cooperative SCLiving.coop/storm-center. linemen could safely raise a power line that had dent of loss control and training for The Electric fallen across both sides of the highway near mile Cooperatives of South Carolina. marker 71, just between Grover and Canadys. And in Beaufort During Matthew, it was her job to coordinate the cooperCounty, one of the hardest hit areas, law enforcement officers ative repair efforts with state and federal agencies, local first escorted Palmetto Electric Cooperative trucks through standresponders and private disaster relief services, an impressive community of helpers all focused on a common goal: getting still traffic as residents who had evacuated Hilton Head tried life back to normal. The complex coordination of all these to return in droves. Once the crews arrived on the island, agencies is “like a ballet to me,” says Dantzler. “It’s through National Guard troops and Department of Transportation the collective efforts during storms that we really shine.” ­officials helped them maneuver around the debris-strewn Job 1 after Matthew passed was activating the Emergency streets to make repairs. Support Functions (ESFs), including the National Guard, These are just some examples of how cooperative line crews Highway Patrol and local police escorts to get utility trucks work together with multiple agencies to serve our neighbors in where they needed to go. Before Tri-County Electric the worst of times. Every step of the storm-­recovery process inCooperative crews could begin their restoration work, the volves careful communication and coordi­nation to make sure National Guard and local law enforcement had to clear a path the teams restore power quickly and safely. through the fallen trees and traffic jams of returning storm “The importance of keeping the crews safe and moving evacuees that choked off Hwy. 176 for miles. forward is especially critical after a big storm,” Dantzler says. Berkeley Electric Cooperative relied on the National “Nobody relaxes until the job is done.” Guard’s tactical ability to roll over or remove almost any ­physical barrier to clear the way for a massive tracked vehicle called a “Marsh Master” that allowed lineworkers to repair or replace downed utility poles in flooded areas. “When you have a large piece of equipment like the Marsh Master, you have to coordinate traffic with law enforceMIKE COUICK President and CEO, ment and ensure the integrity of roads and bridges with the The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina


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SC   energy Q&A

Weighing your lawncare options Electric or gas? How to determine which mower is right for you BY PATRICK KEEGAN AND BRAD THIESSEN

Q

I’m seeing a lot of ads lately for electric lawn mowers, but from what I’ve heard, they can be underpowered, and the cordless ones lose their battery charge too quickly. Do you think it’s worth making the switch from a gas mower to an electric mower?

A

Unlike models from only a few years ago, many of today’s electric mowers have the power and battery life to keep up with gas mowers.

a less expensive fuel than gas. You’ll also save on repair costs, as electric motors generally require less maintenance than gas engines. Given all these considerations, our advice is to weigh your priorities. If you have a small- to mid-size lot, you prioritize environmental concerns and you don’t mind navigating a cord or recharging batteries, an electric mower could be the right choice for you. If you don’t mind the noise, maintenance and other hassles of a gas mower, or you have a large lot and need to keep your upfront investment low, a gas mower may be the way to go. There is a third option that you might want to consider. If you’re willing to keep your lawn mowed regularly and don’t mind breaking a sweat, consider a manual reel mower. Some models are more effective than you might think, they’re far less expensive than gas and electric models and they require little maintenance or storage space.

Until recently, corded and cordless electric mowers had a bad challenging. Consider the size of the lawn reputation for sub-par battery and access to outdoor outlets. life and for being underpowered, but Quality electric mowers, especially the best electric mowers on the market the cordless, rechargeable ones, aren’t today can be a smart solution. It all cheap. They tend to cost twice as much depends on the size of your lawn, how as a new equivalent gas model, but you often you mow and your lawncare can recover some of the expense with preferences. lower operating costs, since electricity is There are advantages to electric mowers. They are much quieter than gas-­powered models, they start instantly and they produce no noxious fumes. A cordless, electric mower with a large, 56-volt battery can run for about one hour before needing to be recharged. If your normal mowing tasks take less time, battery life is a non-issue. Plug-in electric mowers don’t have this limitation but using a Small yard? Maybe a rotary or reel push mower is your best option. It’s long electrical cord can be eco‑friendly, low-maintenance and easy to store—and offers great exercise, too! 12

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MARCH 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

Send questions to Energy Q&A, South Carolina Living, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033, or email energyqa@scliving.coop.


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Guaranteed to grow new green shoots within 45-60 days or we’ll replace it FREE – for up to 1 year – just call us. We ONLY ship you living genuine Amazoy Zoysia grass harvested direct from our farms. Easy planting and watering instructions are included with each order. Every Reorder assumes success of previous orders (plantings), voiding any previous guarantees, but initiating a new one-year guarantee.

produce up to 150-1 in. plugs. Plant minimum 1 plug per sq. ft.

CHOKES OUT CRABGRASS AND WEEDS ALL SUMMER

7

NOW 3 WAYS TO START YOUR AMAZOY ZOYSIA LAWN!

Your established Amazoy Zoysia lawn grows so thick, it simply stops crabgrass and most summer weeds from germinating!

1) Freestyle plugs come in uncut sheets containing a maximum of 150 - 1” plugs that can be planted up to 1 ft. apart. Freestyle plugs allow you to make each plug bigger and plant further apart – less cutting and planting – you decide. 2) New Super Plugs come precut into individual 3”x3” plugs ready-to-plant (minimum 1 per 4 sq. ft.). They arrive in easy to handle trays of 15 Super Plugs. Save more time and get your new lawn even faster! 3) Amazoy Approved Seed-As The Zoysia Specialists for 60+years, we finally have a Zoysia seed available that meets our standards and homeowners expectations. Learn why at zoysiafarms.com/mag or by phone at 410-756-2311.

©2019 Zoysia Farm Nurseries, 3617 Old Taneytown Rd, Taneytown, MD 21787

Freestyle Plugs You decide how big to cut the plugs. Each grass sheet can

Plant it from plugs.

6

ORDER TODAY - GET UP TO

1000 FREESTYLE PLUGS – Dept. 5330

Plugs only shipped to Continental USA & not to WA or OR.

Super Plugs Precut plugs 3 inches by 3 inches. READY TO PLANT Packed in trays of 15 Super Plugs. Plant minimum 1 plug per 4 sq. ft.

Free Plugs

Grass Sheets*

Your PRICE

+ Shipping

SAVINGS

Super Plugs

Free Plugs

Trays

300

2

$29.95

$14.50

15

1

500

+100

4

$50.00

$16.00

60

+15

750

+150

6

$66.00

$19.50

95

1100

+400

10

$95.00

$30.00

2000

+1000

20

$165.00

$45.00

25% 36% 43% 52%

Max Plugs*

Your PRICE + Shipping $24.95

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+25

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120

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180

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All Available Exclusively at www.ZoysiaFarms.com/mag or 410-756-2311 ZOYSIA FARM NURSERIES, 3617 OLD TANEYTOWN ROAD TANEYTOWN MD 21787

AMAZOY IS THE TRADEMARK REGISTERED U.S. PATENT OFFICE for our Meyer Zoysia grass.

We ship all orders the same day the plugs are packed and at the earliest planting time in your state.


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SC   smart choice

Spring cleaning There are those who genuinely love to grab a vacuum, mop and scrub brush, and then there are the rest of us who just want to get the dirty work done quickly. Either way, spring cleaning is a breeze with these handy gadgets.  BY DAVID NOVAK

ENJOY THE VIEW

Why spend your free time scrubbing windows when you can assign the task to the Ecovacs Winbot X? This cordless cleaning robot features a four-stage cleaning system that never misses a spot, and a deep-clean mode for the real dirty work. The device runs up to 50 minutes on a single charge and comes with a handy remote. $450. (415) 947‑7630; ecovacs.com/us.

HANDS-FREE VACUUMING

Get intelligent about household hygiene with the Neato Botvac D7 Connected vacuum. It has a laser mapping and navigation system to cover more area in less time, moving around your house logically—not randomly. A zone-cleaning function pinpoints trouble areas, corners and walls. All you have to do is sit back, relax and enjoy cleaner carpets. $830. (877) 296-3286; neatorobotics.com.

BLOW OFF SOME STEAM

Steam and scrub germs, bacteria and grime away from almost any surface with the Sienna Luna Plus steam cleaning system. Three steam settings and a reusable microfiber cleaning pad that pulses at 90 vibrations per second make short work of even the dirtiest jobs. $150. (888) 574‑3662; siennadirect.com.

MONSTER GARAGE

Clean that filthy garage of yours with a Bissell Garage Pro Wet/Dry Vac. This bagless, four-gallon, wall-mountable machine eliminates the hassle of maneuvering a vacuum around, and comes equipped with a 32-foot hose. It’s also good for cleaning your auto interiors, vacuuming up messes or blowing leaves out of your space. $200. (800) 237‑7691; bissell.com. 14

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MARCH 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

MORE SWIM, LESS SKIM

Everybody loves to swim in the pool, but nobody ever wants to clean it. Ditch the net with the Solar-Breeze NX2, a solar-powered three-in-one robotic pool-cleaning machine. Like a hands-free vacuum for your pool, the NX2 smartly covers the entire surface, constantly scooping up leaves and dirt. $628. (623) 582‑2825; solar-breeze.com.

MOP IT UP

Forget sloshing around with a bucket of gross mop water. The Multi-Surface Cordless Mop from Sharper Image tackles the toughest mess with an 11-ounce, on-board cleaning solution sprayer and dual microfiber heads that rotate at 250 revolutions per minute. Safe for virtually any flooring surface, this cleaning machine runs up to 40 minutes on a single charge. $180. (877) 202‑9337; ­​ ­sharperimage.com.

Tech journalist David Novak is editor of GadgetGram.com. Prices and availability are subject to change. Inclusion in this column is not an endorsement by South Carolina Living or any S.C. electric cooperative.


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SCLIVING.COOP  | MARCH 2019  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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The competition heats up at Greenville Euphoria’s Healthy Lunchtime Throwdown

ith just minutes to go in the 2018 Healthy Lunchtime Throwdown, Sadie Hiltabidel is feeling the pressure. BY M. LINDA LEE | PHOTOS BY MIC SMITH A crowd of spectators looks on in anticipation, watching the clock tick down, urging the Wade Hampton High School senior to finish making her butternut squash and l­inguine with shrimp before time expires.

Behind her, loudspeakers roar with the ’80s rock anthem “Eye of the Tiger,” and the sous chef who helped her boil, bake, peel and sauté her way to this moment—Alex Jackson, former chef de cuisine at Sons & Daughters in San Francisco—is leading the crowd in an encouraging chant: “Sadie! Sadie!” Jackson tries to lighten the mood, cracking jokes while he tears basil to garnish Hiltabidel’s dish. When emcee Jamarcus Gaston asks the team how it’s going, Jackson responds, “It’s controlled chaos!” With the butternut squash in one pan, the shrimp in another, and the pasta in yet a third, Hiltabidel and Jackson hustle to combine all the elements on the plate. Jackson tosses the squash and pasta, doling out portions onto five plates. Hiltabidel places the shrimp on top, passing each dish back to Jackson, who cries, “Bam!” as he hits each mound with a finishing snowfall of freshly grated Parmesan cheese. Gaston calls that time is up and leads the audience in an enthusiastic round of applause for Hiltabidel and her onstage 16

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MARCH 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP


SADIE HILTABIDEL

competitor, William Stephenson, a senior at Mauldin High. Stephenson’s dish is a hoisin-glazed salmon with a brown rice and vegetable stir-fry, and he was assisted by Chef Brandon Jew, owner of Mr. Jiu’s in San Francisco—which ranks one Michelin star. Relief lights up both students’ faces as they step down from the stage and present their dishes to the judges at last. “This is going to be tough to judge,” says Joe Urban, ­director of food and nutrition services for Greenville County Schools, as he eyes the plates. “The dishes from the first round were amazing, so these chefs had better bring it!”

If you can’t stand the heat … The Healthy Lunchtime Throwdown, a cooking competition for Greenville County students, is a signature event during the annual Euphoria food, wine and music festival. The challenge offers kids the rare chance to cook with some of the world’s top chefs, earn recognition for their talents and have

A senior at Wade Hampton High School and aspiring chef, Sadie Hiltabidel made a butternut squash and linguine with shrimp dish with the assistance of San Francisco chef Alex Jackson. “Pairing pasta with a protein is a healthy option,” she says. “I was thinking in terms of a recipe that could easily be prepared in large quantities for school lunches.”

their recipes added to the county’s school lunch menu. We’re not talking about burgers and fries, pizza or PB&J sandwiches. All four of the competitors are enrolled in the culinary arts career programs offered by the Greenville County Schools, and their recipes—culled from more than 40 entries—display a sophisticated approach to cooking. Dressed in white chef jackets, the students are paired with their professional-chef partners and introduced to the crowd on a stage with twin cooking stations, each complete with a stovetop and oven, a refrigerator full of fresh ingredients, and every pot, pan and cooking tool a young chef could hope for. In two, 45-minute heats, the students and their wildly overqualified assistants must make a healthy, delicious and affordable recipe to wow the judges. Although the students call the shots during the competition, the celebrity chefs are quick to

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CHEF BRANDON JEW AND WILLIAM STEPHENSON

“The next generation of cooks is really important,” notes Chef Brandon Jew— owner of Mr. Jiu’s in San Francisco—which ranks one Michelin star. He assisted 2018 Healthy Lunchtime Throwdown winner William Stephenson as they prepared hoisin-glazed salmon with brown rice veggie stir-fry. “I wanted William to see how important it is to take time to plate a dish carefully, and to have a vision before we worked. We talked about our game plan, how we were going to set it up and what would look good on the plate.”

EMILY EASLER

As one of the first two teams to cook in the 2018 competition, Emily Easler, a senior at Travelers Rest High School, worked with Vivien Durand, executive chef of the one-Michelinstar restaurant Le Prince Noir in Lormont, France, to make Peruvian lomo saltado ratatouille. “I wanted something out of the box,” says Easler, who has a parttime job as a line cook at Farmhouse Tacos in Travelers Rest.

mentor the young cooks, teaching them knife skills, presentation techniques and other tricks of the culinary trade. In the first round of the 2018 competition, Emily Easler, a senior at Travelers Rest High School, is paired with Vivien Durand, executive chef of the one-Michelin-star restaurant Le Prince Noir in Lormont, France. Easler, who has a part-time job as a line cook at Farmhouse Taco in Travelers Rest, is making Peruvian lomo saltado ­ratatouille. “I wanted something out of the box,” she says. Andrew Espittia, a 10th-grader at Berea High, is making Moroccan Spiced Chicken and Couscous with the help of Teague Moriarty, chef and owner of the one-Michelin-star restaurant Sons & Daughters in San Francisco. Espittia, who often cooks dinner at home, doesn’t seem intimidated by the crowd or the task before him, so much as awestruck by his cooking partner. “It’s a huge opportunity to work with a Michelin chef,” he says. With the last two dishes from Hiltabidel and Stephenson set before them, the judges dig in, making notes on their scorecards as they evaluate taste, texture, affordability and healthfulness. The panel includes Urban; Joannie Martin, chief administrative officer for Michelin North America; food writer Jenn Rice; Greenville Mayor Knox White and local ­restaurateur Carl Sobocinski. Choosing a winner is no easy task, says Sobocinski, who founded Euphoria with singer/songwriter Edwin McCain in 2006 as a way to raise funds for area charities. “I was very impressed with the thought that the kids put into each of their dishes—trying to be creative but also considering the type of dishes their peers would be excited to actually try,” he says. 18

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An idea takes root The idea for this competition sprang from Michelle Obama’s Healthy Lunchtime Challenge and Kids’ State Dinner in 2014, part of the Let’s Move! initiative that sought to make healthy eating a priority with American families. The challenge called on budding chefs ages 8–12 to create healthy and affordable recipes. Out of thousands of entries, judges chose 56 winners, one from each of the U.S. states and territories. Julia Pascoe, a rising third-grader at Sterling School in Greenville, won the challenge for South Carolina with her recipe for Carolina Chicken Chili. As part of the prize, Pascoe and her mother, Valerie, were flown to Washington, D.C., to attend the Kids’ State Dinner at the White House. Joe Urban took notice, impressed by the story of a Green­ ville County student going to the White House, all thanks to a family recipe. “We introduced Julia’s chicken chili recipe to her school, and it stayed on the menu for four years,” he says. That led Valerie Pascoe to wonder how they could get more kids involved. A PR consultant with ties to Michelin, she was working with Brianna Shaw, then the executive director of Euphoria, on setting up wine dinners with Michelin-starred chefs for the festival. Pascoe told Shaw about her daughter’s experience with the Healthy Lunchtime Challenge, and both women agreed that having a children’s event at Euphoria would be a great way to get kids involved in nutrition. The idea didn’t marinate long before a new event was born. “It was all about kids eating healthy and getting kids into the kitchen,” Shaw says. “And it planted that seed for kids who might be interested in a culinary career.” uu


WILLIAM STEPHENSON

In addition to culinary classes at Golden Strip Career Center, Stephenson works after school and on weekends at Rick Erwin’s West End Grille in downtown Greenville. After high school, he plans to attend the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York.

ANDREW ESPITTIA

“It’s a huge opportunity to work with a Michelin chef,” says Andrew Espittia, a 10th grader at Berea High, who made Moroccan spiced chicken and couscous with the help of Teague Moriarty, chef and owner of the oneMichelin-star restaurant Sons & Daughters in San Francisco. Espittia often cooks dinner at home and leans toward the spicy cuisine of Mexico and the American Southwest.

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Stirring up healthy lunches

WITH BROWN RICE VEGGIE STIR-FRY SERVES 4–6

STIR-FRY

1 ¼ cups parboiled brown rice 2½ cups red cabbage 2 heads of broccoli 1 bell pepper 2 zucchini 3 garlic cloves 2 green onions 1 pound snap peas 4 tablespoons soy sauce 3 tablespoons sesame seeds, toasted SALMON

6 pieces of salmon, skin on 10 tablespoons honey 5 tablespoons soy sauce 2½ tablespoons white vinegar 2 large garlic cloves 1 tablespoon hoisin sauce 2 tablespoons sesame seeds, toasted

“My favorite things to cook are Mexican and Asian dishes,” William Stephenson says of his winning recipe. “A veggie stir-fry is always a hit.”

Greenville’s Healthy Lunchtime Throw­ down begins in late April when Euphoria announces their lineup for the annual ­festival. The competition is now open to any child age 8 to 18 enrolled in Greenville County Schools. Students can submit recipes until the end of August, when Joe Urban and a few members of his culinary staff begin to narrow down the selections by looking for recipes that are healthy and affordable. “If someone sends in a fried Twinkie recipe, we’re not even considering that,” Urban says. “We look for lean beef, chicken, seafood or vegetarian entrees. If it looks to us like the kids will really enjoy it and we can be proud to put it in our program, that’s what we’re looking for.” As South Carolina’s largest school district, Greenville County School System provides more than 80,000 meals a day for its students, and Urban is determined to get kids excited about lunch. “The Healthy Lunchtime Throwdown is an opportunity to get kids engaged in our program, and it’s an opportunity for our community to see the level of our commitment to providing our kids tremendous food,” he says.

STIR-FRY

Put rice and a little vegetable oil in a wok or shallow pan. Toast the rice in the pan for a minute or so; after the rice starts to crisp, start pouring in water. Cover and cook about 10 minutes. Chop broccoli, thinly slice the cabbage and julienne the bell peppers and zucchini. Cut snap peas and green onions on the bias. Heat up a wok with oil. When hot, add rice to the wok. Then add the vegetables in the following order, cooking each a couple of minutes before adding the next: bell pepper, cabbage, broccoli, zucchini, snap peas and green onions. Sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds. SALMON

Mince garlic. Stir hoisin sauce, honey, soy sauce and white vinegar together in a pan and simmer the mixture down until it is syrupy (about 10 minutes). Add garlic and set aside. Season salmon with salt, pepper and garlic, and chill it in the refrigerator for 5 minutes. Cook sesame seeds in a small, dry skillet on low heat until lightly toasted. Heat a griddle to 400 F and sear the salmon skin-side-down for several minutes, until it no longer sticks to the bottom of the pan. Flip the salmon over, turn off the heat, and let it sit until you no longer hear cooking noises on the griddle. Flip the salmon skin-side down just before pulling off the griddle. Drizzle one-third of the pan sauce over the salmon—don’t do this until you’re ready to serve, or the sauce will burn and become bitter. Top salmon with toasted sesame seeds. To serve, put rice and vegetables in individual bowls and place salmon atop rice. RECIPE PROVIDED BY WILLIAM STEPHENSON

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Recipe for success When the judges are ready to announce a winner of the 2018 competition, the students take the stage to e­ nthusiastic audience applause and pose with the keepsake plates that each of the celebrity chefs has signed. In this competition, even the runners-up come away with the amazing experience of having worked with a Michelinstarred chef. But there can only be one winner, and in 2018 it’s William Stephenson for his hoisin-glazed salmon with brown rice veggie stir-fry. “William’s dish was a perfect blend of sophistication and simplicity,” says Sobocinski. “He allowed the ingredients to be the highlight of the dish and didn’t try to overcomplicate them with too much seasoning or sauces. The salmon was prepared to perfection and the dish was attractive to the eye.” For Stephenson, who plans to attend the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York, after graduation, working with Chef Brandon Jew was a dream come true. “It was fun learning from him,” Stephenson says. “It was my recipe, but I really felt like Brandon helped me elevate it to another level.” The chef even offered Stephenson an opportunity to cook at Mr. Jiu’s if he ever finds himself in San Francisco. “It’s exciting just knowing that a Michelin-starred chef knows who I am,” Stephenson says. “And having my food on the lunch menu—it’s just an awesome feeling!”


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SC   stories

The ship shaper

Bill Brady AGE:

79.

HOME TURF:

Litchfield Beach. Expert model

CLAIM TO FAME:

shipwright.

Associate professor of aerospace studies at Auburn University; director of procurement at The Citadel. SECRET WEAPON: A 3D printer that he uses to make small objects for his ships—lifebuoys, fire extinguishers, anchors, winches, oyster traps, even a YETI cooler. “I love the details,” he says. DIVINE INSPIRATION: A stainedglass window depicting Jesus and the apostles on the Sea of Galilee prompted Brady to research first-century fishing vessels and build a model that he donated to St. Peter’s Lutheran Church. PREVIOUS GIGS:

Oyster sloops. Lobster smacks. Dinghies. Skiffs. Dories. Prams. Shrimp boats. Skipjacks. Kayaks. Spanish galleons. Bill Brady has built models of them all. “Most model shipwrights stick to a theme—tall ships, clipper ships. Well, I tried that,” he says. “Now, whatever I see that looks nice, I pursue it until I can build it.” Brady fell in love with building model ships in the late 1970s as a way to pass the time while stationed in Spain with the U.S. Air Force. “I didn’t know anything about boats. But it’s the challenge of taking some wood and building something that looks like that sitting over there,” he says, pointing to a Herreshoff sailing yacht, one of the dozens of models that adorn his Litchfield Beach home. “It’s looking at that and saying, ‘How do I build it?’ And then doing it.” Brady honed his skills throughout his life, making model ships for his private collection and as gifts for friends and family. Today he builds mostly from scratch in a workshop chock-full of tools, materials and intricate plans. Several of his boats are on display at the South Carolina Maritime Museum in Georgetown, including a stunning model of Henrietta, the 201‑foot, three-masted clipper ship that was the largest wooden boat ever built in South Carolina. Although Henrietta was a unique challenge, Brady says each model he builds requires careful attention to all the intricate details. “It takes a lot of patience,” he says of his hobby. “It takes a lot of time.” —HASTINGS HENSEL | PHOTO BY MILTON MORRIS

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Discovering Daufuskie  22

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MARCH 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP


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SC   scene

Buried treasure​—there’s lots of it

Island

Self-guided golf cart tours are the best way to explore this beautiful island BY LIBBY SWOPE WIERSEMA PHOTOS BY RUTA SMITH

on Daufuskie Island. Leave your shovels at home, though. The best way to dig up island gold is with a map and a golf cart. Woven throughout the riot of loblolly pines, palmetto thickets and live oaks is a network of rumbly lanes and roadways. Some are dirt, a few are paved and most all of them lead to bucolic shorelines and prized landmarks that reveal Daufuskie’s legendary past. As the last bastion of a Gullah culture that’s quickly disappearing, South Carolina’s southernmost sea island is esteemed by historians and those with an interest in preserving what remains of its natural landscape and folkways. While there are plenty of options for guided tours, the do-it-yourself method significantly ups the sense of adventure. But first things first. You’ve got to get to Daufuskie. The only things bridging the island to the mainland are water taxis and ferries that cross from Hilton Head. The trip across the Calibogue Sound to the island’s Freeport Marina takes approximately an hour. Most all transit services require a reservation and will get you and yours there and back for a modest fee. One such operation is Enjoy Daufuskie. It offers round-trip ferry service from Broad Creek Marina to Freeport Marina, where you’ll find the Freeport General Store. Should you forget sunscreen, bug spray, snacks or drinks, you can pick them up here. The store is also where you’ll secure a golf cart. Head to the counter and the staff will have you on your way in no time. Public restrooms are few and far between on the island, so use the facilities at the marina before you go. You’ll be supplied with a map of 13 suggested stops: a mix of historic sites, art studios and other points of interest. Freeport Marina proprietor and SCENERY TO DIE FOR The view from Bloody Point Cemetery is much nicer from above ground than below.

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p SANDS OF TIME

Bloody Point Beach earned its unfortunate name from a 1715 conflict between Yemassee Indians and settlers.

u PRAISE HOUSE

First Union African Baptist Church was established in 1881 on 12 acres purchased when the Mary Fields plantation was divided into lots. It closed in the 1950s when the island’s population dwindled, but reopened in 1968.

p LIGHT YEARS

Artifacts and a video production at the museum in Bloody Point Lighthouse relate the history of the property.

u DAUFUSKIE BLUES

An artisan at the Mary Fields School House demonstrates traditional indigo dying on a scarf that will soon become a souvenir for an appreciative visitor.

u CLOSER TO HOME

The Cooper River Cemetery follows the Gullah tradition of burying the dead near water so their souls can swim back to Africa.

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SC   scene

Daufuskie Island Tours operator, Wick Scurry, ­recommends a backward route. “Start from the furthermost point—the water,” he says. “The map outlines the shortest route to the beach, so go there first, then work your way back, stopping at the various sites before ending where you began—at the General Store. It will take you about four hours from start to finish if you stop and explore a little along the way.” Begin at the beach at Bloody Point, where you’ll park your cart and explore on foot. Soak in the serenity, but do take a few minutes to ponder its dark ­history. This is the site of a 1715 ­skirmish between the Yemassee Indians and settlers, the carnage of which literally turned the beach blood red. Other sites on the tour include: Bloody Point Lighthouse, a modest, two-story house where the dormer window once held the front light that guided those sailing the Savannah port. The house has been transformed into a museum where you can learn all about 1880s Daufuskie. You can also grab a cold drink and use the restroom. The grounds feature heirloom gardens, a bald eagle viewing station and its own resident alligator named “Papy.” Silver Dew Winery: One of two rustic buildings at the end of the museum drive, this tiny structure was used as storage for lighthouse supplies before becoming the first licensed winery in South Carolina in the 1950s. Iron Fish Gallery: This eclectic metal art studio is the home base of metal sculptor Chase Allen. If you’re looking for a special Daufuskie souvenir, this is your place. Mary Fields School House: The clapboard house is where the late author, Pat Conroy, taught island children in the 1960s—an experience that inspired his popular novel, The Water is Wide. Inside is a classroom, the School Grounds Coffee Shop, restrooms, and Daufuskie Blues, a studio where artisans create gorgeous scarves and other goods using indigo dye. First Union African Baptist Church: This historic church, established by former slaves on land bought for $82 in 1881, is still active. Notable is the replica of the original “praise house” from Mary Fields Plantation, where the enslaved once worshipped. Daufuskie Island Rum Company: For a modest fee, get a tasting and a tour of this small, but dynamic family-run rum distillery. Cooper River Cemetery: This graveyard was built on the river bank—a nod to the Gullah tradition of burying their dead near the water so their uu

p START AND FINISH Freeport Marina, where the ferries arrive from and depart to Hilton Head Island, is also the location of Freeport General Store, where golf carts can be rented, and Old Daufuskie Crab Company, where lunch can be enjoyed while overlooking the water.

t GRAPE EXPECTATIONS

A small outbuilding near the lighthouse housed Silver Dew Winery in the 1950s, where Arthur “Papy” Burn made grape, pear, and elderberry wine.

q SMOOTH SAILING

A lovely sunset provides a perfect ending to this Daufuskie Island excursion.

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SC   scene

GET THERE

A Festival Full of Fun! April 4th - 13th, 2019

Project assembled by City of Rock Hill and York County Accommodations Tax Advisory Committee.

ComeSeeMe.org

Enjoy Daufuskie offers river boat ferry service to the island, departing from Broad Creek Marina, 18 Simmons Road, Hilton Head. Cost is $33 for adults and $16.50 for children 10 and younger, and includes sightseeing narration during transit. For reservations, call (843) 342-8687 or visit enjoydaufuskie.com. You can also reserve transit through Daufuskie Island Ferry Service by calling (843) 940-7704 or visiting daufuskieislandferry.com/ make-reservations. Cost is $35 round trip; children 5 and younger are free. It departs from Buckingham Landing, located at 35 Fording Island Road Ext. in Hilton Head. To secure a golf cart for your self-guided tour, visit the Freeport General Store at Freeport Marina. Cost is $65 for four hours. Call (843) 342-8687 or visit daufuskiefreeport.com to learn more. Tour Daufuskie also offers self-guided golf cart tours. Cost is $75 for four hours for a four-seater. Six-seaters are sometimes available for an additional cost. Call (843) 842-9449 or visit tourdaufuskie.com to make arrangements. NOTE: You must have a valid driver’s license to rent and drive golf carts on Daufuskie Island.

souls could swim across the water back to Africa. Keep in mind that cell phone ­service is spotty on certain parts of the island. Once you’re off and running, though, you’ll likely forget all about modern technology. And if all that exploring works up a big appetite, there are two restaurants on Daufuskie: Old Daufuskie Crab Company at Freeport Marina, and Lucy Bell’s on Benjies Point Road. Both offer the local ­specialty, Gullah-style deviled crab as well as other fresh seafood, sandwiches and salads. Cold beverages, adult and otherwise, abound. To get to either—or just about any place on Daufuskie—just look to the trees. Handmade signs nailed to tree trunks point the way to wherever you want the roads to take you. 26

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REGISTER TO WIN $100

March 20 is the first f spring, official day o inter ew and after th na’s had, South Caroli e fast er it can’t get h enough!

CHANGEOUT

Celebrate the return of warm sunny days and pleasantly cool nights by entering our March Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes. Mail in this form or register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply for your chance to win a $100 Visa gift card. Use the extra money to get out and explore all South Carolina has to offer, because there’s no better time of year to enjoy the state we love. We’ll draw the winner’s name at random from all eligible entries received by March 31, so enter today!

By entering, you may receive information from these great travel and tourism sponsors: jj Alpharetta, Ga. CVB jj Alpine Helen/White County, Ga. jj Cheraw Visitors Bureau jj Come See Me Festival jj Edisto Chamber of Commerce

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27


|

SC   recipe

Quick and easy vegetarian ITH-SULLIVA BY BELINDA SM

N

Place a pizza stone in the oven and preheat oven to 425 F. If you do not have a pizza stone, place dough on a large, flat cookie sheet. Spread the pizza sauce over the dough to within ½ inch of the edges. Starting with the zucchini, evenly distribute the vegetables over the pizza. Drizzle the olive oil over the pizza and sprinkle with mozzarella.

LOADED VEGGIE PIZZA SERVES 2–4

1 12-inch pizza dough, homemade or store-bought 1 cup pizza sauce ½ zucchini, thinly sliced ½ red bell pepper, sliced ½ red onion, sliced 1 cup sliced mushrooms ½ cup sliced olives, black, green or combination

G I N A MOORE

Now you have somethi ng impressive to serve your vegetarian guests. But be ware, all of your non-vegetarian frie nds will want to go bble these down as we ll—these recipes are just that good! Includ e some cheesy jalapeno cornbrea d mini muffins and dinner is serve d.

1 tablespoon garlic-infused olive oil (or 1 clove minced garlic mixed with 1 tablespoon olive oil) 1 –2 cups grated mozzarella cheese ½ cup grated Parmesan cheese ¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

If using a pizza stone, carefully slide the pizza onto the stone, or bake on the cookie sheet, for 15–20 minutes until crust around the edges is golden brown and cheese is melted. Sprinkle with Parmesan and crushed red pepper. Serve warm with additional grated Parmesan and crushed pepper, if desired. CHEF’S TIP Feel free to use your favorite veggies and beans in this recipe. These ingredient measurements are for a 12-inch pizza. Adjust ingredients up or down depending on the size crust you have.

VEGETARIAN CHILI SERVES 4–6

2 tablespoons olive oil 1 onion, coarsely chopped 2 red bell peppers, coarsely chopped 1 large poblano pepper, coarsely chopped 2 carrots, diced 1 jalapeno or serrano pepper, seeded and finely diced 4–5 garlic cloves, minced 2 tablespoons chili powder 1 tablespoon ground cumin

GWÉNAËL LE VOT

28

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MARCH 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

1 tablespoon dried oregano Kosher salt, to taste 1 28-ounce can diced tomatoes in juice 1 7-ounce can diced mild green chilies 1½ cups vegetable stock, unsalted 1 15-ounce can kidney beans, rinsed and drained 1 15-ounce can pinto beans, rinsed and drained ½ large zucchini (or 1 whole small), medium diced Grated cheddar cheese, for garnish

Heat oil in a large saucepan or Dutch oven over medium heat. Saute onion, bell peppers, poblano, carrots and jalapeno until soft, about 7 to 8 minutes. Add garlic and saute an additional minute. Add chili powder, cumin, oregano and salt. Stir thoroughly and cook 2 minutes. Pour in tomatoes, green chilies and stock and bring to a boil. Lower heat and simmer covered for 30 minutes. Add beans and zucchini, cover and cook an additional 30 minutes or until thickened. Serve with grated cheddar cheese.


VEGETABLE AND CHEESE FRITTATA SERVES 8–10

2 tablespoons olive oil 2 leeks, light green and white parts (bottoms), halved and sliced 2 scallions, diagonally sliced 1 cup mushrooms, thinly sliced 2 red bell peppers, sliced 1 large russet potato, cubed, boiled and drained

2½ cups grated extra-sharp cheddar cheese 10 large eggs 1 ½ cups milk Kosher salt Fresh ground black pepper ¼ teaspoon Tabasco

Preheat oven to 350 F. In a large, oven-proof skillet over mediumlow heat, heat oil. Cook leeks, scallions, mushrooms and bell peppers until softened and all liquid from mushrooms is evaporated. Add potatoes and grated cheddar and remove from heat. In a medium bowl, whisk eggs, milk, salt, pepper and Tabasco until combined. Pour over vegetable mixture. Bake for 30 minutes or until puffed and golden brown and set in the middle (does not move when skillet is shaken). Let rest for 15 minutes before cutting/serving. CHEF’S TIP Leeks are very sandy. After slicing, rinse, drain and dry before using.

I U LI I A N EDRYGA I LOVA

VEGETARIAN LENTIL POT PIE SERVES 3–4

1 cup brown or green lentils 2½ cups vegetable stock 2 tablespoons olive oil ½ large onion, chopped 1 stalk celery, halved and sliced 1 russet potato, diced small 1 cup sliced mushrooms 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 16-ounce bag frozen peas and carrots

M ICH A E L PH I LLI P S

What’s cooking at SCLiving.coop SPICE IT UP They may be small, but they pack a big, spicy punch of flavor into every bite. Try Chef Belinda’s recipe for cheesy jalapeno cornbread mini muffins in this month’s video recipe at

SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda

2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 2 cups vegetable stock Kosher salt Fresh ground black pepper 1 teaspoon dried basil 1 teaspoon dried thyme 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 sheet puff pastry, thawed (will cover 4 servings)

Preheat oven to 450 F. In a medium saucepan over medium heat, bring lentils and stock to a boil. Lower heat, cover and simmer until stock is absorbed and lentils are tender, about 20–25 minutes. In a large skillet over medium-low heat, heat olive oil. Cook onions, celery, potatoes and mushrooms until soft, about 6–7 minutes. Add garlic and cook an additional minute. Stir in frozen vegetables and cook for 4–5 minutes. Add flour and mix thoroughly. Pour in stock and stir. Add salt, pepper, basil, thyme and oregano; stir and bring to a simmer. Cook until sauce thickens, and stir in lentils. Unwrap thawed pastry. If using individual serving dishes, invert dish onto pastry and cut pieces slightly larger than the opening. Fill dishes with the lentil mixture and cover with a piece of the pastry. If using a single 8-by-8-inch casserole dish, fill the dish with the lentil mixture and drape the pastry over the dish. Trim as necessary. Cut slits in the top of the pastry to allow steam to escape. Bake for 10 minutes or until pastry starts to brown. Reduce oven temperature to 375 F and continue to bake until pastry is golden brown, about 20–25 minutes. Let rest for 10 minutes before serving.

SCLIVING.COOP  | MARCH 2019  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

29


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SC   outside

BEE MINE City of Greenwood volunteers pose with a newly installed mason bee and leafcutter bee nesting box.

at’s all the buzz about? h W PH OTOS COU RTESY O F A N N BA RK LOW

Bee City USA pollinator gardens take root in South Carolina BY GRETA BURROUGHS

IN THE SPRING OF 2018, ON A SUNNY

morning in downtown Lake City, 40 students from the Boys and Girls Club work diligently planting a barren stretch of public park ground with wildflowers that will soon blossom and attract a variety of bees, butterflies and other pollinating insects to their city. Across the state in Greenwood, adult volunteers are on a similar mission, spend­ ing their morning installing a wooden nesting box in one of their city’s pollinator gardens. The structure will provide a safe nesting habitat for two super pollinators, mason bees and leafcutter bees. Why do these people put forth so much effort to help insects? Katie Dickson, senior horticulturist with Moore Farms Botanical Garden in Lake City, explains: “Seventy-five percent of the world’s food, beverage and fiber crops are pollinated by insects. That equates to one in every three bites of food we eat being provided by pollinators. They are 30

critical to our food supply. Without them, we’ll no longer have certain foods.”

Plant it and they will come As part of the Bee City USA i­nitiative, communities and colleges across the country—including Lake City, Green­ wood and the Medical University of South Carolina—are transforming their public spaces into pollinator-friendly habitats for bees, butterflies, moths, beetles, hummingbirds and other beneficial creatures. The project is the brainchild of Phyllis Stiles, a beekeeper in Asheville, North Carolina, who decided to take action when she witnessed a massive die-off of honeybees. “We knew something had to be done. It wasn’t just the honeybees; other pollinators were under threat as well,” she says. The Bee City USA and Bee Campus USA programs began in 2012 to encourage cities and colleges to reintroduce pollinator-friendly native plants and habitat into their landscaping. The message is the same for both initiatives: Plant it and they will come. And it doesn’t take long for small changes in the urban landscape

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MARCH 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

to have big impacts on local bee populations, Stiles says. “It takes very little time for the pollinators to find their new homes along with plentiful sources of food and places to nest,” Stiles says. “Insects are tiny and only need nectar and pollen and a small space to live. Most of them have short lifespans, and they rarely travel farther than a few hundred yards from where they emerged as adults. Depending on the species, one pollinator garden may provide all they need.”

Bringing the community together Lake City became a Bee City in 2015 with enthusiastic support from city residents, including the Boys and Girls Club. On field days at public parks, students volunteered to plant native w ­ ildflowers and learned about the importance of pollinators. “The most important thing I told the kids was to come back with family and friends and be proud of your work,” Dickson says. “Take ownership of it, knowing you did something good for the pollinators.” The enthusiasm is not limited to


PH OTO COU RTESY O F K ATI E DICKSO N

planting pollinator gardens. During the 2018 ArtFields competition, painter Matt Wiley created a beautiful mural entitled “The Good of the Hive” across a storage building, and Lance Turner decorated a nearly block-long wall with a painting of native plants. Dickson says interest has not waned since the inception of the Bee City project, and curiosity about landscaping with native flora is spreading throughout the community. She receives many requests from garden clubs and other groups for talks and presentations about using natural pest-management strategies and making lawns more attractive to pollinators. “It’s a privilege to work with beautiful plants and insects every day,” she says. “There’s nothing else I’d rather be doing.”

LET IT BEE The “For the Good of the Hive” mural dresses up the front of a storage building in downtown Lake City. Artist Matt Wiley created the mural for ArtFields 2018.

The remaking of ‘Green’wood

GET MORE For more information on the national Bee City USA and Bee Campus USA initiative, visit beecityusa.org. To learn about the pollinator-friendly campaigns in South Carolina, see visitlakecitysc.com/bee-city-usa and cityofgreenwoodsc.com/living/green‑spaces/ bee-city-usa. For advice on pollinator-friendly home gardening, visit Clemson University’s Cooperative Extension Home and Garden Information Center at hgic.clemson.edu.

Ann Barklow and master gardener volunteer Ann Sealy propagate a new crop of native plants for pollinators to be used in and around Greenwood.

PH OTO COU RTESY O F A N N BA RK LOW

Horticulturist Ann Barklow moved to Greenwood five years ago when she was hired by the city to teach other city employees how to reduce pesticide use and work native plants into landscaping projects. The ‘Green’wood movement quickly gained momentum, and in 2017 the city council approved a plan to officially become a Bee City USA affiliate. City residents learned about the campaign from presentations, meetings and dinners hosted by Barklow and city leaders, who explained the importance of pollinators to the community. Volunteers flocked to the project, she says. “People loved it!” Barklow says. “They loved the notion of providing for pollinators, especially after finding out how

much trouble we are in with the loss of insects and pollinators.” Barklow is determined to keep the momentum going by encouraging more city residents to include native plants in their home gardens. As an incentive, people who volunteer with the city get free seeds and plants, she says. “I can’t tell you how many pictures are sent to me from volunteers showing off their garden and the pollinators visiting it.”

A plan for all seasons There is more to maintaining a Bee City than just planting wildflowers in spring. In the fall of 2018, Greenwood city employees gathered seeds and cuttings from the hardiest pollinator plants, and Barklow visited master gardeners in search of cuttings from their gardens.

Volunteers shifted to a new task— growing plants in the greenhouse over the winter for planting this spring. The same process took place in Lake City, where Dickson and her crew worked with propagation specialists at Moore Farms Botanical Garden. Now that spring has arrived, new pollinator gardens will soon transform the landscapes around Lake City and Greenwood into beautiful vistas of color. This year, Barklow plans to expand Greenwood’s seven existing pollinator gardens and involve more volunteers in landscaping and maintenance. A favorite project among the volunteers is the city’s edible landscape which grows produce for a local food bank. “Visitors to the garden can see how to put edibles in their landscape instead of the more traditional backyard vegetable garden,” she says. “Many of the flowers provide nectar for beneficial insects, and their larvae stage will then feed on the pests. This garden also provides for many pollinators which in turn give us more produce. Less pests and more produce! What’s not to love?”

SCLIVING.COOP  | MARCH 2019  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

31


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SC   gardener

The possibilities of parsley

MARCH IN THE GARDEN

BY L.A. JACKSON

n Now is a good time to divide and transplant perennials such as astilbes, bleeding hearts, ajuga, oxalis, heuchera, phlox, hostas, liriope, daylilies and shasta daisies.

TO THE UNINITIATED, PARSLEY IS

n If you are preparing garden trellises for annual ornamental and vegetable vine plants this summer, why not add more color and interest to the structures? Sure, regular white string will work as supports for vines, but so will colorful yarns that can be found at craft stores.

L . A . JACKSO N

TIP OF THE MONTH Whether species or cultivar, or annual, biennial or perennial, black-eyed Susans (Rudbeckia sp.) have similar needs. First, they do best if provided with a moderate amount of low-nitrogen fertilizer over the growing season—too much nitrogen encourages excessive foliage production at the expense of flowers. Second, most selections love the sun, but providing a little bit of shade late in the afternoon will prolong the fresh look of their flowers. Also, powdery mildew is a possible problem, so, for better air circulation to help minimize this disease, locate your Suzies in an open area and don’t overcrowd the plants. Finally, watch for slug and snail damage, especially on young plants.

32

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MARCH 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

L . A . JACKSO N

n Planning on putting up new birdhouses this spring? Just remember to buy or build birdhouses made of wood. Compared to metal or plastic, wood is a better insulator, which helps prevent the feathered occupants from overheating during the sizzling days of summer.

just a bit of foo-foo foliage that gets in the way of a good steak at an upscale restaurant. But to g­ ardeners and home cooks in the know, parsley is much more. Granted, parsley sprigs are often served on fancy dinners as frilly sideshows, but they have other purposes besides being eye candy. For instance, the next time a garlic-laced entree gives you a case of the ol’ dragon’s breath, instead of scrambling for breath mints, chew on a stem of this tangy herb to freshen your mouth. Folks who pass on including parsley in pesto, salsas, salads, soups, casseroles and other such dishes are also missing out on the nutritional punch of this plant. This herb packs twice the iron of spinach and has more protein than corn, while additionally being rich in other essentials such as calcium, potassium and vitamins A and C. Now is a good time to start a parsley bed. This hardy herb can take any leftover winter cold and continue producing delectable sprigs into the early summer. One negative knock you might hear about this herb is that it can be a real bear to grow from seed, but as an easy alternative, simply buy starter plants to create a homegrown parsley patch. They are readily available at local garden centers this time of year. Parsley is a biennial, but in our state, it is best grown as an annual. Planting instructions are simple: Any sunny, well-draining site with organic-rich soil is the place for parsley. For optimum growth, space the plants at least 6 inches apart and, in the late spring, add a light, 1- to 2-inch-deep mulch to keep the roots cool. To prevent rot, don’t push organic ground cover up against the base of the plants. Vegetable and herb gardens are

A green sea of curly (sometimes called French) parsley spilling out of a mixed planter adds just the right touch of ooh-la-la!. The flat leaves of Italian parsley (top of page) are a better choice for kitchen creations.

typical spots for parsley, of course, but there are other possibilities. This handsome, deer-resistant plant will also do nicely as an elegant, flowing, low-­growing pretty on the front of a border bed or in a planter as an interesting edible ornamental. In addition, the deep green of parsley as a backdrop can really help the colors of bright flowers pop in early spring hanging baskets. Curly (or French) parsley looks ­particularly pretty and is perhaps the best to use for ornamental purposes, while the flat (or Italian) parsley tends to be tastier and more heat-resistant. However, the type, location, purpose, and, more importantly, possibilities of parsley are up to you, and only limited by your imagination. L.A. JACKSON is the former editor of Carolina Gardener magazine. Contact him at lajackson1@gmail.com.


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SC   calendar MAR 11 – APR 15

Upstate MARCH

14–17  Anderson Senior Follies:

A Class Act, Henderson Auditorium at Anderson University, Anderson. (864) 231‑2080. 15–17  Peter and the Starcatcher, Spartanburg Little Theatre, Spartanburg. (864) 585‑8278. 16  Upstate South Carolina National College Fair, Timmons Arena at Furman University, Greenville. (703) 836‑2222, ext. 14. 19  Intro to Indigo, Devils Fork State Park, Salem. (864) 944‑2639. 22  Dancing with the Spartanburg Stars, Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium, Spartanburg. (864) 582‑0771. 22–23  #CollectiveWorks, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. 24  Spring Concert: Spartanburg Community Band, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. 25–28  Hejaz Shrine Circus, Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium, Spartanburg. (864) 277‑4386. 27  Peter Fletcher, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. 28  A Summer Night in Santorini: Spartanburg Little Theatre Gala and Season Reveal, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. 29  Music She Wrote, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. 29  The Temptations and The Four Tops, Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium, Spartanburg. (864) 582‑8107. 29–31  Disney’s Aladdin, Jr., Mauldin Cultural Center, Mauldin. (864) 335‑4862. 30  Healthy Laughter, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. APRIL

5  An Evening with Pianist Calvin

Jones, Newton Hobson Chapel and Fine Arts Center at Southern Wesleyan University, Central. (864) 944‑1390. 5–6  Hub City Hog Fest, downtown, Spartanburg. (864) 921‑1587. 5–7  Disney’s Aladdin, Jr., Mauldin Cultural Center, Mauldin. (864) 335‑4862. 6  Family Fishing Clinic, Table Rock State Park, Pickens. (864) 878‑9813. 6  Imagine Upstate STEAM Festival, downtown, Greenville. (864) 283‑7117. 6  Issaqueena’s Flight for the Fight 10K/5K, Ponderosa Park, Six Mile. admin@flightforthefight.com. 7  Family Fundays: DIY Kites, Spartanburg Art Museum, Spartanburg. (864) 582‑7616.

36

SCLiving.coop/calendar

23  Doughnut Dash 5K, South Windermere Shopping Center, Charleston. (843) 580‑8564. Our mobile-friendly site lists even more festivals, shows and 28–30  Springtime in Charleston events. You’ll also find instructions on submitting your event. House and Garden Tour, Please confirm information with the hosting event before attending. various locations, Charleston. charlestonhousegardentours@gmail.com. 29–30  72nd Annual Prince George 7  Taste of the Upstate, Zen, 28  Color Drawing II with Marge 13  Free Beekeeping Workshop, Greenville. (864) 232‑3595. Moody, Center for the Arts, Rock Hill. The Big Red Barn Retreat, Blythewood. Plantation and Town House Tours, Prince George Winyah Church and other (803) 328‑2787. (803) 754‑7577. 10  The Reel Sisters, Spartanburg locations, Georgetown. (843) 545‑8291. County Public Library, Spartanburg. 28–31  Indie Grits, various locations, 13  Grace Episcopal Church’s Spring 30  New Orleans Meets Charleston: (864) 948‑9020. Columbia. (803) 814‑3874. Dog Show, Rectory Square Park, Delfeayo Marsalis, Charleston Music Camden. (803) 432‑7621. 11–13  SpringSkunk Music 29  History at the McCelvey, Hall, Charleston. (843) 641‑0011. Fest, Skunk Farm, Greer. McCelvey Center’s Lowry Family 13  Healing Lens Photography dixie@albinoskunk.com. Theater, York. (803) 818‑6767. Workshop: Evening at the Cemetery, 30  Pet Fest, Palmetto Islands County Park, Mount Pleasant. (843) 795‑4386. 12–13  Spring Plant Festival, 29–31  Aiken Horse Show, Hitchcock Elmwood Cemetery, Columbia. 30  Step Back in Time: Artisan (704) 840‑9008. Greenwood County Farmers Market, Woods, Aiken. (803) 640‑9184. Edition, Hampton Plantation Greenwood. (864) 223‑6503. 14–15  Watercolor Painting with 30  Children’s Day on the Farm, State Historic Site, McClellanville. Amelia, Santee State Park, Santee. Historic Brattonsville, McConnells. 13  South Carolina State Chili (843) 546‑9361. (803) 854‑2408. (803) 684‑2327. Cook-Off, Main Street, Belton. 30  Three Little Kittens, Florence Little (864) 940‑3111. 30  Columbia City Ballet’s Sleeping Theatre, Florence. (843) 662‑3731. Beauty, Koger Center for the Arts, 13  Spartanburg Soaring! APR IL Columbia. (803) 799‑7605. International Kite Festival, Barnet MAR CH Park, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. 5  Kiawah Island Art & House Tour, 30  Henry Shelor Barbecue various locations, Kiawah Island. 11–17  Hilton Head Island Wine & Cook-Off, American Legion Post at Food Festival, Sea Pines Resort, Hilton info@kiawahartsetc.org. Sumter County Fairgrounds, Sumter. Head Island. (843) 686‑4944. (803) 983‑9934. 6  Chickenman Memorial Golf 13–April 18  Festival of Houses and Tournament, The Plantation Course at 30  Pat Veasey Book Signing and M ARC H Gardens, various locations, Charleston. Edisto, Edisto Beach. (843) 869‑3867. Reception, Historic Brattonsville, 15  Find a Furever Friend Friday, (843) 722‑3405. McConnells. (803) 818‑6767. 6  Gator Gauntlet 5K, Huntington Aiken County Visitors Center, Aiken. Beach State Park, Murrells Inlet. 30  Pine Needle Basket Workshop, 14–17  Crimes of the Heart, (803) 642‑7557. (843) 237‑4440. Flowertown Players Theater, Lee State Park, Bishopville. 15  Joye in Aiken, various venues, Summerville. (843) 875‑9251. (803) 428‑4988. 6  Pat Conroy’s Reverence for Aiken. director@joyeinaiken.com. Teaching, McClellanville Town Hall, 15–17  Charleston Antiques Show, 30  She Festival, Tapp’s Art Center, 15  Gilbert and Sullivan Favorites, McClellanville. (843) 546‑9361. The Gaillard Center, Charleston. Columbia. (803) 816‑0496. Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (843) 722‑3405. 6  To Settle a Town, Colonial 30  Sumter Boy Scouts Barbecue, (803) 276‑5179. Dorchester State Historic Site, 15–17  Dixie Swim Club, Florence Sumter County Fairgrounds, Sumter. 15  The Gibson Brothers, McCelvey Little Theatre, Florence. (843) 662‑3731. Summerville. (843) 873‑1740. (803) 983‑9934. Center, York. (803) 818‑6767. 7  Chamber Music Charleston – 16  Ducks Unlimited Annual 30  Teddy Bear Trot, York Electric 16  Aiken’s Bacon and Brews, Edisto Concert, Presbyterian Church on Dinner, Bay Creek Park, Edisto Island. Cooperative, York. (803) 684‑4248. downtown, Aiken. (803) 617‑7776. Edisto, Edisto Island. (843) 869‑3867. (843) 869‑3867. 16  Aiken Trials, Aiken Training Track, APR IL 7  Lowcountry Cajun Festival, 16  Edisto Road Race, Wyndham Aiken. (803) 648‑4631. 4–7  Camden Spring Classic, James Island County Park, Charleston. Ocean Ridge Recreation Center, Edisto South Carolina Equine Park, Camden. 16  Chesterfield Pigskin BBQ (843) 795‑4386. Beach. (843) 869‑3867. psjshows87@gmail.com. Cook-Off, Chesterfield High School, 8  Edisto Art Guild Program: Bonnie 16  Swamp Fox Adventure Race, Chesterfield. (803) 319‑1863. 5–6  Barnwell Barbecue Fest, Francis Marion National Forest, Huger. Lee, Edisto Beach Civic Center, Edisto downtown, Barnwell. (803) 249‑7446. (803) 292‑1900. 16–17  Progressive Show Jumping Island. (843) 869‑3867. Ashley Hall Horse Show, Mullet 6  April Monthly Gospel Singing, 17  Race & Roast, Oakland Plantation, 11  The Midtown Men, Francis Marion Hall Equestrian Center, Johns Island. Midland Gospel Singing Center, Gilbert. Mount Pleasant. (803) 754‑7577. University Performing Arts Center, psjshows87@gmail.com. (803) 719‑1289. Florence. (843) 661‑4444. 19–24  Dixie Swim Club, Florence 22–24  Palmetto Sportsmen’s 6  Barbecue Dinner Train, SC 11–12  Powerful Tools for Caregivers Little Theatre, Florence. (843) 662‑3731. Classic, State Fairgrounds, Columbia. Railroad Museum, Winnsboro. Leader Training, The ARK of SC, 21  Burning of the Socks, (803) 734‑4008. (803) 635‑9893. Summerville. (503) 719‑6980. South Carolina Maritime Museum, 23  Andrew Jackson Birthday 6  Groove ’N Brew, downtown, 12–13  Youth Mentors of the Pee Georgetown. (843) 520‑0111. Celebration, Andrew Jackson State Newberry. (803) 276‑4001. Dee Barbecue Cook-Off, downtown, 21–24  Edisto Art Guild presents Park, Lancaster. (803) 285‑3344. Florence. (843) 662‑7081. 7–9  Yoga in the Park with Cheryl Mama Won’t Fly, Edisto Beach Civic 23  Barbecue Dinner Train, SC Mason, Santee State Park, Santee. 13  Founders Day Festival, Charles Center, Edisto Beach. (843) 869‑3867. Railroad Museum, Winnsboro. (803) 854‑2408. Towne Landing State Historic Site, 22–23  Smoke in the ’Boro, (803) 635‑9893. Charleston. (843) 852‑4200. 12–13  Come-See-Me Festival Coastal Electric Co-op, Walterboro. 23  Highfields Just for Fun Show, and Barbecue Cook-Off, Winthrop 13–14  Charleston Outdoor Fest, (800) 328‑9425. Highfields Event Center, Aiken. Coliseum, Rock Hill. (803) 329‑7625. James Island County Park, Charleston. 23  Beaufort Twilight Run, (803) 649‑3505. (843) 795‑4386. 12–14  Progressive Show Habersham Marketplace, Beaufort. 23  Laps for Lancers 5K and 10K, Jumping Camden Spring Classic, 13–14  Seacoast Artists Guild (843) 321‑8309. University of South Carolina–Lancaster, South Carolina Equine Park. 23  Columbia City Ballet’s Sleeping Art in Common Spring Festival, Lancaster. (803) 313‑7000. psjshows87@gmail.com. Valor Memorial Park, Myrtle Beach. Beauty, Francis Marion University 23  Painting Skies (mixed media) (843) 748‑0133. 13  2019 Southern Sound Series: Performing Arts Center, Florence. with Marcia Kort Buike, Center for Sierra Hull, McCelvey Center’s Lowry (803) 799‑7605. the Arts, Rock Hill. (803) 328‑2787. Family Theater, York. (803) 818‑6767.

Lowcountry

Midlands

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MARCH 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP


|

SC   humor me

Butter me up, Scottie BY JAN A. IGOE

AS A KID, IT SEEMS LIKE

you’re always being sent to your room unless that’s the only place you want to be. Then you’re stuck in the dining room with all your prehistoric relatives. All my dad’s third cousins and great-somethings loved to play gin rummy. Whenever they visited, participation was mandatory. The moment we cleared the dinner table, the card deck appeared, closely pursued by amaretto cordials, Lucky Strikes and ashtrays the size of soup pots from an Army kitchen. Then the thrills would begin: Great Aunt Gerry: Puff. Sip. Draw card. Third Cousin Ann: Puff. Sip. Shuffle cards. Great Uncle Hal: Puff. Sip. “Yippee! Gin.” Ugh. Since children aren’t supposed to question sacred family rituals, it probably took a decade of playing cards with chain-smoking relatives before it dawned on me that it wasn’t fun. Nor is any activity that requires hours of waiting in vain (and smog) for something momentous to happen. It’s like waiting for a car chase during a curling match. Unless Vin Diesel is playing, don’t hold your breath. Games are particularly hard on rightbrain (OK, artsy-fartsy) types. Some say we’re blessed with insatiable curiosity, but what they mean is we have the attention span of a cabbage. Like preschoolers deprived of recess, we can’t stop fidgeting or feigning interest in anything for more than 30 seconds at a clip. Not without an Adderall prescription, anyway. Since becoming an adult (in theory) 38

Now that my peers and a few hundred strangers have heard my rendition of “Y.M.C.A,” I’m safe from future karaoke nights. no longer held captive by family rituals, my friends have provided new ones. That means weekly participation in popular activities like karaoke and team trivia. Both usually take place in bars where dozens of self-styled paparazzi hover with cell phones, ready to pounce on your most humiliating moments before you can change your identity and move to Peru. Now that my peers and a few hundred strangers (courtesy of YouTube) have heard my rendition of The Village People’s “Y.M.C.A,” I’m safe from future karaoke nights, but there’s still trivia. The prevailing belief is the older you are, the more obscure facts will be floating around your brain like space junk. If anyone should know where you could

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MARCH 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

be arrested for riding in a taxi with an unchaperoned sheep or plowing your field with an elephant, they’re betting it’s me. I tried playing with them because I like having friends and I might be a rising star. The best trivia players have an insatiable thirst for obscure facts, like I do. At least, that’s what Scott said when he was buttering me up to join his team. Unfortunately, remembering where I left those facts is another story. During my first month of team play, I contributed approximately two correct answers. After yet another defeat, dejected team members still helped me scour the parking lot for my missing car. We’d been searching for about 45 minutes when it occurred to me I’d taken an Uber there. My last shot at social vindication was Pictionary. In a game where you draw clues to help your team guess the answer, you’d think artists would be the starting quarterbacks, right? Not so much. Friend Scott: “What’s taking her so long?” Friend Linda: “She seems to be shading a rhino.” My defense: “It’s a unicorn. You have no appreciation of fine art.” So now that all invitations have been revoked, I have weekday nights free again. But it’s a good thing. Babar and I needed some extra time to plow the yard before we move to Peru. JAN A. IGOE is starting a Pictionary team for artists with Prismacolor pencils, Copic markers and Rembrandt oil paint. Everybody is invited, but it’s BYO Adderall.


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Profile for South Carolina Living

South Carolina Living March 2019  

Discover Daufuskie - Experience the nature, history and friendly folks of this enchanting sea island.

South Carolina Living March 2019  

Discover Daufuskie - Experience the nature, history and friendly folks of this enchanting sea island.

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