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Sporting Optics Catalog 2013 1.


Endeavor ED Spirit ED Spotting Scope Endeavor HD Endeavor XF Spirit XF Orros DM / MZ

16 - 17 22 - 23 38 - 39 74 75 76 77

TRIPODS

ABEO Plus & ABEO kits Alta+ kits

BAGS

80- 81 82-83

Kinray Lite

84- 85

Cleaning Kits & Accessories

86-87

Specifications & Compatibilities

88-91

Cover page picture © Danny Green - www.dannygreenphotography.com

Spring Summe r

Autum n Win ter

Optics | Other products

© Jon Sparks


Optics


Spring Birdwatching hiking biking nature

Late Winter/Early Spring Hill and Mountain Walking: The Lake District Mountain Biking Seasons...

Matthew Merritt Jon Sparks Morag Patterson Ross Hoddinott

• • • •

12 - 15 18 - 21 24 - 27 28 - 31

Summer Birdwatching hiking hiking nature sailing

Spring and Early Summer Country Walking: The Yorkshire Wolds Family Walking: The Isle of Purbeck Enjoy Nature Responsibly... Summer sailing races

Matthew Merritt Jon Sparks Jon Sparks Ross Hoddinott Andy Rice

• • • • •

34 - 37 40 - 43 44 - 47 48 - 51 52 - 57

34--37 Lord Garten

Fort William

SCOTLAND

24-27

64-67-

Autumn Birdwatching Downhill Racing

Late Summer and Autumn Scottish Downhill Racing

Matthew Merritt Morag Patterson

• •

Winter

Matthew Merritt

NORTHERN IRELAND

Lake District

40-43

60 - 63 64 - 67

Winter Birdwatching

18-21

Yorkshire Wolds

70-73

Titchwell

REPUBLIC OF IRELAND

WALES ENGLAND

70-73

12-15

44-47 Dungeness 28-31 Isle of Purbeck

Isle of Wight

Cornwall 60-63

6.

48-51 52-57

7.


The Vanguard Contributors Team

Jon Sparks

Matthew Merritt

Ross Hoddinott

Jon Sparks is more used to looking through a camera viewfinder than a pair of binoculars, but he says that either, used properly, can add enormously to your outdoor experiences.

Matt Merritt has been watching birds since he was eight years old, but he’s particularly excited at how recent advances in optical technology have brought them, and other wildlife, within easy reach of everyone with an interest in nature, whether they’re an expert or an absolute beginner. Matt is the acting editor of Bird Watching Magazine, the UK’s best-selling birdwatching magazine, based in Peterborough, UK, as well as an award-winning poet with a special focus on wildlife. He’s also a keen hill-walker, an interest that over the years has helped fuel and guide his passion for birdwatching, and an enthusiastic photographer who’s still learning to find his way around a camera. While he does most of his birding in the ancient woodlands and upland heaths of Charnwood Forest, close to his home in Leicester, he’s also travelled around the world in search of some of the most extraordinary birds on the planet, from the prehistoriclooking Hoatzins of the Amazon rainforest, to the ornate and colourful Birds-of-Paradise of Papua New Guinea, taking in outstanding birdwatching locations such as the USA, Ecuador, Iceland, Spain, Portugal, Hungary, Israel, South Africa, and Australia along the way.

Ross Hoddinott is one of the UK’s leading natural history and landscape photographers. He is the author of five photography books and a multi award winner. Ross has been working as a full time professional since 1997, supplying imagery and undertaking commissions for a wide range of publications and clients. Based in the South West of England, Ross is best known for his intimate close-up images of nature, and for evocative landscape photographs. He is a member of the 2020VISION photo team and co-runs Dawn 2 Dusk Photography.

Jon is an award-winning photographer (and writer) based in Lancashire, UK, and specialising in landscape, travel and outdoor pursuits. He’s particularly passionate about walking, climbing and all varieties of cycling. He’s authored guidebooks for all these pursuits as well as travel guides to Finland and the Baltic. He founded his career on photographing Lancashire and the Lake District, but has now travelled and photographed in more than 30 countries. He also writes extensively about photography, including a series of camera guides and a regular column for Outdoor Enthusiast magazine. Jon lives in Lancashire, between the flatlands of the Fylde and the high heather moors of the Forest of Bowland. Jon Sparks - Outdoor Photographer and Writer

www.jon-sparks.co.uk

Member of the Outdoor Writers and Photographers Guild

www.jonsparks.zenfolio.com/blog @jsparkphoto Jon Sparks

www.rosshoddinott.co.uk @ross_hoddinott Ross Hoddinott Photography

The Vanguard Contributors Team

Morag Paterson Morag is one half of UK photography partnership Leeming + Paterson. She’s lived in the south west of Scotland for 20 years and is keen cyclist and walker when not behind the camera, enjoying both epic cross country rides and adrenaline fuelled downhill racing - although very much an amateur at both. Leeming + Paterson are landscape photographers, with a style that varies from truly abstract impressionist images to more traditional landscapes. Living in the wilds of Dumfries and Galloway they need look no further than out of their window for inspiration with the beautiful Galloway Forest Park on their doorstep. They run several workshops throughout the year, both locally and on the western isles of Scotland. www.leemingpaterson.com @leemingpaterson Leeming+Paterson

Andy Rice Andy Rice travels the world reporting on international sailing events. He has reported at every major sailing event including the America’s Cup, Vendée Globe, Volvo Ocean Race and the Olympic Games. He is a radio commentator for the America’s Cup, a contributing writer for a number of sailing magazines and websites, and an occasional TV commentator for the BBC and the Discovery Channel. A former member of Britain’s Olympic Squad, he has won a number of European and National sailing championships in his own right. As well as his work in journalism, Andy edits a website called SailJuice.com, which asks the world’s best sailors for their hot sailing secrets, and passes these tips on to enthusiastic sailors of all levels of ability. www.sailjuice.com www.asymmetricsailing.com @sailjuice SailJuice

www.birdwatching.co.uk polyolbion.blogspot.co.uk @polyolbion Pictures © Mike Weedon weedworld.blogspot.co.uk

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9.


HIKING

BIRDWATCHING

NATURE

BIKING

SAILING

Jon’s Introduction

Matthew’s Introduction

Ross’ Introduction

Morag’s Introduction

Andy’s Introduction

I’ve walked in 30 countries on five continents, and loved it, but I do most of my walking here in Britain and I never get tired of it. There are lots of reasons why walking in Britain is great. Our landscape is incredibly varied; you never need to travel very far to enjoy a real change of scene.

Variety is the spice of life where birdwatching in Britain is concerned. While it doesn’t have the huge numbers of resident species that you’d find in a tropical birding hotspot such as Peru, or Costa Rica, it more than makes up for it with a situation that changes from day to day throughout the year.

In recent years Scotland has truly consolidated its position as one of the worlds cycling meccas. With the 7 Stanes in the south taking in all manner of spectacular scenery to the dramatic backdrops of the highlands and lift assisted riding at Fort William, Glencoe and the Lecht it’s a top destination for both domestic and international two wheelers.

Sailing is one of the most diverse of all sports. From racing 24,000 miles solo, non-stop around the world to shortcourse racing in the Olympic Games which last little more than 20 minutes, it is impossible to encapsulate the full breadth of the sport. But the thing that unifies all sailors is their deep understanding and respect for the elements. Unlike a motor racing driver who knows how far and how fast his fuel will drive his car, a sailor has to accept whatever the wind brings, and make the best of it. There’s a purity to the sport that makes it very addictive. For many sailors, it’s an addiction that will stay with them for the rest of their lives.

One reason for this is that Britain has the most diverse geology in the world; we have some of the oldest rocks in the world, as well as some of the youngest, and almost every period in between. Travel from south-east England to north-west Scotland and you can travel back in time a mindboggling three billion years. Though the timespan may be shorter, Britain’s human history is equally complex, with waves of migration and invasion bringing new influences to the landscape. One way this shows up is in the names you navigate by as you walk: villages, farms, rivers and hills. This might be most obvious in Wales and Scotland, but the sound of the names changes across England too. A stream might be a ‘brook’ in the south, a ‘beck’ in the north, where hills also become ‘fells’ and waterfalls become ‘forces’. In the south, the ‘Downs’ are actually ups and in the Peak District a ‘Low’ is a high place.

The fact that you can never be much more than 75 miles from the sea, its location on major migration routes, and of course the unpredictable British weather mean that all year-round, there’s something new to occupy the attention. Rarities are blown in from the far side of the Atlantic, or from the vast expanses of eastern Europe and central Asia, on a daily basis, but there’s just as much reward to be found in getting to know the movements and behaviour of commoner birds – even after more than 30 years, there’s something new to learn every time I step outside the front door. I’ve put together a guide to where to go, and when, and how to see some of Britain’s most iconic birds when you get there…

The UK is home to wide and wonderfully diverse range of wildlife. Quite simply, this is a great place to enjoy nature. Throughout the seasons, there is always something different and interesting to witness – bellowing rutting deer, chaotic nesting seabirds, great carpets of wild flowers and colourful flying insects. Every type of habitat – whether its woodland, moorland, farmland, heath, or urban parks – has something a little different and unique to offer wildlife watchers. Getting outdoors and exploring nature is good for your soul. You just never know what you might see or glimpse next? Maybe a raptor swooping down on its unsuspecting prey; a grass snake basking in the morning sunshine; or maybe a dragonfly taking its maiden flight. There is always something going in the British countryside, so try to keep quiet, always be observant, listen carefully and don’t forget your binoculars and camera – they will allow you to enjoy nature in intimate close-up from a distance where your subject never need be disturbed.

The landscape lends itself perfectly to all grades of cycling, mountainous road climbs, vertiginous off road descents and epic coast-to-coast routes with almost everything in between. There’s something for all ages and all abilities from the many trail centres with full facilities to true wilderness riding.

For this edition we’ve chosen three fabulous walking areas which illustrate just a little of this infinite variety. Purbeck has spring turf, sea views, and stories at every turn. The Yorkshire Wolds have intriguing dry valleys, slow-rolling skylines, and above all a sense of space. And the Lake District has real mountains, abrupt and rocky, but on a human scale; you can climb any of them (or several of them!) in a day.

© Mike Weedon

10.

© Ross Hoddinott

© Ieeming Paterson

© Andy Rice

11.


Spring 12.

13.


When to go Lord Garten

Fort William

NORTHERN IRELAND

SCOTLAND

Lake District

Yorkshire Wolds

Titchwell

REPUBLIC OF IRELAND

WALES ENGLAND

Dungeness

Isle of Purbeck

Isle of Wight

Cornwall

Birdwatching Crested Tit Š Mike Weedon 14.

15.


Birdwatching

Spring

in city and town centres as well as open countryside. Gardens and parks provide good habitat for their preferred style of hunting, which is the high-speed ambush of small birds. First they circle the area at height, spying out potential victims, before descending to low level and flying fast and straight towards a likely source of prey, such as bird feeders. When doing so they often ‘hedge-hop’, briefly rising above obstacles before ducking down again, and they are single-minded in their pursuit of prey, often following small birds into thick bushes or undergrowth. For the best chance to see them, listen out for a sudden flurry of activity and alarm calls from small birds – look up and you might well see that it’s a soaring Sparrowhawk that is causing their concern. Most garden birds will be alarmed by them, too, as while the smaller male takes prey up to the size of a Blackbird, the larger female is capable of tackling something as big as a Woodpigeon.

Late Winter/Early Spring Wheatears are among the first migrants to arrive in spring

B

irdwatching starts right outside your back door – even in the cold, frosty depths of January and February, you’ll be able to find a good variety and number of birds, starting in your own back garden and gradually moving further afield. The best way to attract small birds to your garden, of course, is to provide them with the necessities of life. If you put out bird feeders, and keep them regularly topped up with fresh supplies of nuts, seeds, fruit, fat-balls and even mealworms, you’ll ensure regular visits from many species. You can also put up nestboxes (this is best done in early winter, to give the birds a chance to check them out), to encourage them to stay and raise a family. Both feeders and nestboxes should be placed close enough to bushes and other vegetation to give birds somewhere to hide in case of danger, but not so close that cats and other predators can easily sneak up on them.

16.

You’ll probably be watching from inside the house, so for best results, turn off the lights, stand back from the window, and stay still (or at least avoid sudden movements). You’ll be viewing at close range, so a small to medium sized pair of binoculars (8x32 up to 8x42) should do the job well. For beginners, Goldfinches are among our most colourful garden visitors, with their distinctive gold-yellow wing flashes and red, white and black heads. They are seed-eaters, and are particularly attracted to teasels and thistles – if you have either of these in your garden, remember that what looks like a weed to you can be a great meal for a bird! At feeders, they like black nyger seeds – put some out and they’ll soon visit in small flocks. Blue Tits are another very common garden bird, and are easily recognisable thanks to their bright blue crowns and yellow breasts. They’re acrobatic feeders, often

© Mike Weedon

hanging upside down to get at a meal, and a good way to ensure that they’re not chased away by bigger birds is to put out the sort of feeders that only they can use. A string of monkey nuts works well, or even better half a coconut shell stuffed with fat and hung from a tree with a string. At this time of year, too, keep an eye on them, as their small flocks are often accompanied by related species such as Great Tits, Coal Tits and Long-tailed Tits, as well as the tiny Goldcrest or the Treecreeper, with its downcurved beak.

Another species to test your growing birdwatching skills while still in an urban area is the beautiful Waxwing. These breed in Siberia, and only come to Britain in winter, sometimes in huge flocks and sometimes in much smaller numbers, but they are always predictable in their behaviour, so a little planning should help you track them down. They’re berry-eaters, so if your garden has trees such as Rowan, or bushes and shrubs such as Cotoneaster or Pyracantha, you might be lucky enough to attract some. If not, don’t sorry, because they’re exactly the type of vegetation often planted in the flower beds and borders that

divide car-parks outside supermarkets, schools, council offices and the like. If you have any locations such as this close to home, or your workplace, get into the habit of watching the trees and bushes whenever you walk past – sooner or later you could be rewarded with close views of a flock of these colourful, ornate birds, feasting on the berries. It might sound stupid, but even experienced birdwatchers often forget one of the golden rules – don’t forget to look up. It’s easy to get so fixated on trees, bushes, buildings and other potential perches that you ignore birds’ most astonishing ability – flight. Keep and eye on the skies at all times, and you’ll be surprised just how many species fly over, even in an urban area. These days, they could include Red Kite. Just 40 years ago, it was the rarest breeding species in the UK, with maybe half a dozen pairs in the remote valleys of Wales, but thanks to conservation and reintroduction programmes, they’re now much more numerous and can even be seen over central London, as well as other cities. Although they’re large birds of prey, with a distinctive deeply-forked long tail, and long wings with white patches underneath, they feed on carrion, discarded food and other scraps, which they spot while soaring elegantly overhead. Finally, as you start to become a more expert birdwatcher, you’ll want to start looking for migrant birds, no matter where in the country you live. Remember that even species that live

in remote, wilderness habitats have to get to and from their breeding areas, and so in spring and autumn can turn up anywhere. There’s no better example than the Wheatear. A little larger and slimmer than a Robin, with a black eyestripe and orangey breast (on the male), and a bright white rump, they migrate from south of the Sahara in Africa to their northern breeding grounds in Greenland, Scandinavia, and upland parts of the UK. They’re usually one of the first migrants to arrive back in spring, with the first birds appearing in early March, and as they pass through other parts of Britain, they stop off to rest and feed. They like open ground with short grass and low vantage points (such as molehills), so find a suitable piece of habitat, and watch it regularly, especially just after sharp rain showers, which cause migrating birds to land and wait it out.

Matthew Merritt

To try for great urban birdwatching With regular family use, expect binoculars to get dirty. To maintain performance, clean optics regularly. While using a shirtsleeve or tissue might seem like the easiest solution, doing so can scratch the glass or lens coatings. Instead, use a soft brush or blower to remove tiny dust particles, before using a dedicated lens cleaning cloth to clean the lenses. Careful maintenance will maximize image clarity and ensure long-life..

Waxwings are attracted to berry trees

© Mike Weedon

From your garden, you’ll want to broaden your horizons a little, but don’t worry, because there’s a lot of good birdwatching to be done without ever leaving your city, town or village. If you’re seeing lots of small birds, then sooner or later you’re going to see a Sparrowhawk, too. Once rare, they’re now much more common, 17.


Features

Endeavor ED 8X42

Anti-reflection

P2

Phase coating

• Outstanding low light performance • ED glass technology for superior color reproduction • Advanced lens coatings for enhanced light transmission • Locking dioptor ring • Ergonomic open bridge design • Large precise focus wheel • 3-stage twist eyecups • Waterproof and fogproof • Lightweight body design • Bak4 phase-coated roof prisms • Includes padded carrying bag and neck strap Endeavor ED Light Waves STANDARD GLASS

PRISM

Ch

ro m

atic ab e r r

ati on

lo ha

DIS

PE

RS

IO

N

LIGHT

PRISM

DISPERSION MINIMIZED

ED glass effectively reduces color dispersion and enhances color resolution and contrast. Different light wavelengths do not come to the same point after passing the lens. ED glass helps to correct this problem. As a result, the image will be sharper.

Endeavor ED Series

E

xpect vivid viewing to the extreme, because there’s nothing typical about top-ofthe-line Endeavor ED binoculars. They deliver sharpness and clarity like never before with exceptional 92% light transmission and remarkable color resolution and contrast. Other features include an ergonomic, openbridge design for comfortable use, wide view angle, BaK4 phase-coated roof prisms, anti-reflection coating,

18.

large focus adjustment wheel and long eye relief. The magic behind its performance lies in the premium ED glass, which reduces color dispersion to provide highresolution colors and clarity. Endeavor ED has phase-coated BaK4 roof prisms and special lens coatings for unbelievable quality. Nitrogencharged and O-ring sealed, Endeavor ED is waterproof and fogproof to take on challenging weather conditions.

H

ailed by avid bird watchers and optics enthusiasts the world over, Endeavor ED 8420 is an excellent choice for serious birders who demand intricate detail and edge-to-edge clarity from their glass and rugged construction made to withstand the elements that come with spring and fall migration.

it easy to hold steady for clear viewing, and the light gathering capability and resolving power of the 42mm objective lenses make it ideal for high resolution viewing. This 8 x 42 configuration also offers one of the widest fields of views possible, making it easy to spot movement in brush or quickly follow fast moving birds in flight.

The 8 power magnification makes

Without coatings Optional Tripod Adapter

Open bridge design

Advanced coatings

Advanced Light Transmission and Advanced Coatings

Endeavor ED Series Specifications Endeavor ED 8420 Endeavor ED 8545 Endeavor ED 1042 Endeavor ED 1045

3 stage twist out eyecups with long eye relief and position locking diopter ring

Power Diameter of Objective Field of View View Angle Near Focus Eye Relief Dimension (L x W) Weight Adjustable Pupillary

8 42 mm 122 m/1000m | 367 ft/1000yds 7.0 ° 2.5m | 8.2 ft 19 mm 154 x 130 mm | 6 x 5.13 in 730 g | 25.8 oz 58-74 mm

8.5 45 mm 114 m/1000m | 340 ft/1000yds 6.5 ° 2.5m | 8.2 ft 19 mm 159 x 130 mm | 6.25 x 5.13 in 770 g | 27.2 oz 58.5-73 mm

10 42 mm 114 m/1000m | 340 ft/1000yds 6.5 ° 2.5m | 8.2 ft 16.5 mm 154 x 130 mm | 6 x 5.13 in 730 g | 25.8 oz 58-74 mm

10.5 45 mm 105 m/1000m | 314 ft/1000yds 6.0 ° 3 m | 9.8 ft 17 mm 156 x 130 mm | 6.13 x 5.13 in 760 g | 26.8 oz 58.5-73 mm

19.


HIKING

When to go There’s no real ‘off-season’ in today’s Lake District. Summer holidays can get very busy, and of course winter conditions can make the walking much more challenging – though extremely rewarding if you have the right gear and skills. For keen walkers, spring and autumn are prime time, with quieter trails, more varied colour in the landscape, and better chance of really clear views than the often hazy days of summer.

Lord Garten

Fort William

NORTHERN IRELAND

SCOTLAND

Lake District

Yorkshire Wolds

Titchwell

REPUBLIC OF IRELAND

WALES ENGLAND

Dungeness

Isle of Purbeck

Isle of Wight

Cornwall

The Lake District Beacon Knott, looking towards the Coniston Fells

©Jon Sparks 20.

21.


HIKING

Spring

Top tips Familiarise yourself with boat

and bus services. Some are seasonal but many run all year. Local Tourist Information Centres are friendly and really helpful.

Get a good guidebook GPS will get you from A to B but won’t tell you anything about the landscape. The Wainwright series are legendary, but a bit long in the tooth. The best current guides are the Fellranger series by Mark Richards. Car-Free Cumbria by Jon Sparks features linear walks using buses and boats: it’s now out of print

I spy... Wildlife Foxes, buzzards, stoats, dragonflies… the list goes on. Two star turns are the Red Kite and the Osprey. 90 spectacular Red Kites have been reintroduced in Grizedale Forest, not far from Ambleside. England’s first breeding Ospreys for 150 years arrived on Bassenthwaite Lake, just north of Keswick, in 2001.

Hill and Mountain Walking: The Lake District Beacon Tarn, with the Coniston Fells on the horizon

T

here’s a reason why the Lake District is Britain’s (if not the world’s) favourite hill-walking area. In fact there are probably as many reasons as there are hills – or ‘fells’, as they’re called here. The Lake District has something for just about everyone, from gentle lakeside strolls to all-day expeditions over a dozen rocky peaks. If you’re new to hill-walking, or just new to the Lakes, a real treat awaits you – but you may wonder where to start. With fabulous walks all over the district, any base is a good one, but it makes sense to begin in one of the main centres, Ambleside or Keswick. Apart from having a terrific range of accommodation, eatingplaces, and outdoor gear stores, they are also key hubs for an excellent transport network, with regular buses and lake cruises too. Keswick sits by Derwentwater and Ambleside is at the head of Windermere, England’s largest lake. 22.

© Jon Sparks

Outdoor pursuits The Lakeland fells are a prime arena for many activities. Check out the crags (like

Buses and boats give a stress-free and scenic way to get to the start of a walk, and they liberate you from the straitjacket of the circular walk. Walking from A to B means that, with no extra effort, you can range further, see more, and enjoy that very special sense of making a journey on foot. For an easy starter, the ferry across Windermere opens up a gentle lakeshore walk to Wray Castle, or the

higher trails over lovely Claife Heights, splashed with tarns where Beatrix Potter used to paddle a little dinghy and sketch the ducks. Moving into the higher fells, you can start from Ambleside, over Loughrigg Fell and Blea Rigg before making a rocky traverse of the famous Langdale Pikes. For extra adventure you could include the famous scramble of Jack’s Rake. After that you’ll definitely have earned a pint in one of Great Langdale’s pubs before catching the bus back to Ambleside. If you’re really ambitious, then the grandest ridge-walk in the Lakes is the traverse of the Helvellyn range. Helvellyn is only the third highest peak in the District but the walk along the range stays higher, for longer, than any other. It’s easily accessed thanks to the regular, year-round, Keswick– Ambleside bus service.

Low Parkamoor and Coniston Water, with a little late snow on the Coniston Fells

Jon Sparks

but try searching on Amazon.

Wear good boots Many of the

paths, even at low level, are very rocky. Boots can be light but need decent soles and ankle support.

Be flexible Rain (necessary to keep the Lakes topped up) needn’t spoil your day; just pull on a waterproof and pick an appropriate walk. Lower-level walks have more shelter and Lakeland woods can be at their loveliest in the rain, while the becks (streams) and forces (waterfalls) can be spectacular. Walkers on Wansfell; the most distant ridge is Black Combe

those on the Langdale Pikes) for rockclimbers, observe mountain-bikers (Claife Heights is a favourite), look for kayakers on the lakes and rivers.

Traditional life The Lakes are also a living, working landscape, with a long history. Sheep (especially the Herdwick breed) live high on the fells for most of the year, and dogs are still used to herd them. Dry-stone (no mortar) walls, sometimes hundreds of years old, snake across the fells to denote boundaries. Walkers on Wansfell, with Windermere behind

Spring evening near Grasmere

© Jon Sparks


Features Anti-reflection

P2

Phase coating

• Outstanding performance even in low-light conditions • ED glass technology for superior color reproduction • Advanced lens coatings for enhanced light transmission • Waterproof and fogproof • Large precise focus wheel • Lightweight body design • Bak4 phase-coated roof prisms • 2-stage twist eyecups • Includes padded carrying bag and neck strap

Optional Tripod Adapter

Endeavor ED Light Waves STANDARD GLASS

PRISM

Ch

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atic ab e r r

ati on

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DIS

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LIGHT

PRISM

Spirit ED Series S pirit ED’s 90% light transmission results in a near-perfect viewing experience. Its advanced lens and prism design with ED glass means you’ll get up-close and personal with nature, unveiling details in a way you never thought possible.

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Spirit ED boasts user-friendly features, too, with a lightweight, comfortableto-hold body design, 2-stage twist-out eyecups for long eye relief, large focus adjustment wheel and it’s 100 percent waterproof, so the weather will never slow you down.

DISPERSION MINIMIZED

ED glass effectively reduces color dispersion and enhances color resolution and contrast. Different light wavelengths do not come to the same point after passing the lens. ED glass helps to correct this problem. As a result, the image will be sharper.

Outstanding performance in low-light conditions

Twist eyecups with long eye relief

Spirit ED Series Specifications Power Diameter of Objective Field of View View Angle Near Focus Eye Relief Dimension (L x W) Weight Adjustable Pupillary

Spirit ED 8360 8 36 mm 122 m/1000m | 367 ft/1000yds 7.0 ° 2 m | 6.6 ft 17 mm 125 x 120 mm | 4.88 x 4.75 in 530 g | 18.7 oz 55-75 mm

Spirit ED 8420

Spirit ED 1042

Spirit ED 1050

8 42 mm 110 m/1000m | 330 ft/1000yds 6.3 ° 2.5m | 8.2 ft 19 mm 145 x 125 mm | 5.75 x 4.88 in 640 g | 22.6 oz 55-75 mm

10 42 mm 105 m/1000m | 314 ft/1000yds 6° 2.8 m | 9.2 ft 16 mm 145 x 125 mm | 5.75 x 4.88 in 640 g | 22.6 oz 55-75 mm

10 50 mm 98 m/1000m | 295 ft/1000yds 5.6 ° 3 m | 9.8 ft 19 mm 165 x 135 mm | 6.5 x 5.38 in 845 g | 29.8 oz 59.5-74 mm

25.


BIKING

Where to go Lord Garten

Fort William

NORTHERN IRELAND

SCOTLAND

Lake District

Yorkshire Wolds

Titchwell

REPUBLIC OF IRELAND

WALES ENGLAND

Dungeness

Isle of Purbeck

Isle of Wight

Cornwall

Mountain Biking

SDA Scottish Champs 2012 Fort William

Š Keith Valentine 26.

27.


BIKING

Spring Top tips • Start the day early and head up to the top of the track - this way you will be back down at the finish pits come race runs. Take your camera to the to - the view really is fabulous. • Bring your binoculars – it’s possible to watch most of the course from the finish area and you’ll get the most out of your grandstand seat if you use them. • You’ve heard the expression “four seasons in a day” - well it really can do that here, bring sunscreen but be prepared for a deluge too.

Mountain Biking

A

for an exciting weekend event. Riders who manage to make the cut offs in Saturday qualifying head back up the hill on Sunday afternoon to launch themselves into an adrenaline packed race run where it’s everyone for them selves. Live timing in the arena adds to the drama, the crowd urging the riders on, giving them the last blast of energy to pedal like crazy and clear the huge arena jumps.

© Keith Valentine

Don’t miss out on the 4X action on the Saturday night when four riders at a time take on the shorter - but equally as tricky - track. Elbows are out - with everyone vying for the best line there’s guaranteed carnage and edge of your seat excitement all the way.

SDA Scottish Champs 2012 Fort William 28.

• Use the breaks in the action to take a wander round the plentiful stalls selling everything from clothes to the very latest bike gear. Pick up some souvenir bike parts off the riders. • Most of the riders are happy to pose for photographs and sign autographs, take a walk round the pits and catch them between runs. • There’s always a great food and drink provision at Fort William, but be prepared to queue.

• West of Scotland in summer means midges – bring some repellant and a midge net if you can.

• Try your hand in the skills area or for braver souls tackle the kicker jump onto the inflatable air bag.

• Make some noise!!! The riders really appreciated some encouragement to get them down the hill, cowbells being the instrument of choice at Fort William.

• Don’t miss the trials riders executing seemingly impossible tricks in various obstacle areas around the pits.

SDA Glencoe 2012

SDA Scottish Champs 2012 Fort William

visit to a downhill hill cycling race at Fort William in Scotland is a must for anyone who enjoys being a spectator at extreme sports events, with a spectacular location as an added bonus. Tackling a 555ft vertical drop over a 2.82km course riders reach speeds of over 50km/h hitting a multitude of jumps, drops and technical rocky sections. With crashes a plenty and a dramatic finish into the arena it certainly makes

• Stay safe, always obey the marshals and stay outside the taped area of the track. It’s not unheard of for a rider to come crashing out of the tape either so be aware at all times.

Morag Patterson

© Keith Valentine

© leemingpaterson


nature

Where to go Lord Garten

Fort William

NORTHERN IRELAND

SCOTLAND

Lake District

Yorkshire Wolds

Titchwell

REPUBLIC OF IRELAND

WALES ENGLAND

Dungeness

Isle of Purbeck

Isle of Wight

Cornwall

Seasons... Inspiring the next generation... Female hawker dragonfly laying eggs, Cornwall

Š Ross Hoddinott 30.

31.


nature

Spring

A Harvest house feeding among corn

Seasons...

t every opportunity, it’s important to encourage children to take an active interest in nature. You could argue we have a duty to nurture and develop our kids understanding and appreciation of nature – they are the next generation of conservations, after all. How do we do this? Obviously, reading and education are important, but there is only so much you can learn from a book or computer screen. The most important thing is to get them outdoors so that they can enjoy wildlife for themselves, first-hand. Visit local parks, woodland and wetlands and get your kids or grandchildren face-to-face with nature. Binoculars offer unrivalled, beautifully magnified views of wildlife. Kids will be amazed, excited and inspired by what they see as they peer through the eyecups, and the memories of these first, important

Common lizard basking in morning light Backlit ferns among bluebells

W

hatever the season, don’t leave home without binoculars safely slung around your neck – you just never know what encounters with nature you might have. Summer is a favourite time of year among many people and, at this time, the countryside is brimming with wildlife. Mammals like deer, foxes, hares and harvest mice are busily raising young. They rarely tolerate a close approach, though, which is why binoculars are a ‘must have’ – allowing you closeup views that otherwise wouldn’t be possible. They’ll will also allow you to view brightly coloured and beautifully patterned butterflies ‘up close and personal’ while they feed on nectar rich plants. The magnified view binoculars provide make them the perfect tool for enjoying summer flowers, like poppies and orchids, in intricate detail, as they bloom along field margins. When you intend carrying binoculars regularly or for

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long distances, size, weight and comfort are important considerations, which is why Vanguard’s Spirit ED range are designed to be compact and lightweight, while still offering outstanding performance. They’re also weatherproof – making them the perfect choice when venturing outdoors in the unpredictable British weather!

Ross Hoddinott Backlit cowslips

Top tips Binoculars aren’t just a superb way to ‘get close’ to nature in bright daylight – thanks to the Spirit ED’s light transmission of up to 90% they also perform superbly in low light. Therefore, even at dusk, keep them close to hand; they will help you get close-up views of nocturnal wildlife, and are also suitable for stargazing.

© Ross Hoddinott

Inspiring the next generation…

encounters with nature can last a lifetime. With Vanguard binoculars designed to be lightweight – with ergonomic grip and comfortable-tohold design – they are ideally suited to family use.

Ross Hoddinott

Top tips With regular family use, expect binoculars to get dirty. To maintain performance, clean optics regularly. While using a shirtsleeve or tissue might seem like the easiest solution, doing so can scratch the glass or lens coatings. Instead, use a soft brush or blower to remove tiny dust particles, before using a dedicated lens cleaning cloth to clean the lenses. Careful maintenance will maximize image clarity and ensure long-life..

© Ross Hoddinott


Summer 34.

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Where to go Loch Garten RSPB – the forests here will hold the likes of Crested Tit and the rare Scottish Crossbill, while the loch itself is home to breeding Ospreys, now common in the region. Nearby, Capercaillies and Black Grouse breed and display, while you’re close to the mountains to look for Golden Eagles, and the coast for seabirds such as Puffins.

Lord Garten

Fort William

NORTHERN IRELAND

SCOTLAND

Lake District

Yorkshire Wolds

Titchwell

REPUBLIC OF IRELAND

WALES ENGLAND

Dungeness

Isle of Purbeck

Isle of Wight

Cornwall

Birdwatching Puffins breed around the Scottish coast

© Mike Weedon 36.

37.


BIRDWATCHING

Summer distance, whether out to see or across wide-open mountainsides and moorland, you might find the extra magnification offered by 10x42 or 10x50 binoculars a great help. A second seabird to look for at this time is the Arctic Tern. As the name suggests, many of them breed within the Arctic Circle and merely pass through Britain on their way (so remember to check your local reservoir in late April and early May, wherever you area), but good numbers breed around the Scottish coast.

Spring and Early Summer Puffins breed in clifftop colonies

A

s spring really begins in all its glory, with the trees in full leaf and the flowers blooming, many more bird species, especially songbirds, start to arrive in Britain from the Mediterranean and Africa. Almost anywhere in the country will get its fair share of migrants passing through, with some staying for the summer to breed, but there are few better places to be in spring and early summer than Scotland, especially the Highlands and the east coasts. As well as those migrants, they boast a number of specialities of their own, found nowhere else in the UK. The first of these is the tiny Crested Tit, the rarest and most localised member of its family in the British Isles. It’s found only in the ancient Caledonian pine forests and in plantations of Scots Pines, where it can be seen clinging acrobatically to branches and trunks in search of insects and seeds.

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It actually feeds much lower down than you might imagine, so don’t forget to check bushes and undergrowth too, but perhaps the best way to locate them initially is by sound. In the Cairngorm valleys that are their stronghold, a “zee-zeezee” call, very similar to the much commoner Coal Tit, is likely to be a Crested Tit – once you’ve heard them, stay still and wait for them to show themselves. Although not as colourful as some tits, they have a strongly marked face, and an impossible to miss black-and-white crest, so you’re unlikely to confuse them with any other species. Another bird hard to mistake for anything else is the rather comicallooking Puffin, once known as the seaparrot. It spends much of its time at sea, but at this time of year returns to breeding colonies on cliffs around the UK coast. There are ‘seabird cities’ like this most of the way around Scotland,

© Mike Weedon

including Orkney and Shetland, and the birds sometimes disperse further afield in search of food. The colourful, tall, flattened bill is utterly distinctive, along with the black and white plumage and bright red-orange legs, and they will often let you approach relatively closely around their nests, which are burrows in the ground. Make sure you have permission to do so, though – reserves run by the RSPB or Wildlife Trust will bring the best results. While they appear awkward on land, bobbing and lurching from side to side, they can also be seen swimming on the sea, or flying low and fast over it on small, quickly whirring wings. Before looking for some slightly harder to find birds, it’s worth mentioning that the landscapes of Scotland might require a slightly different type of binocular. Because you’ll be looking at birds at a greater

Like all terns, they’re very elegant birds, with a buoyant flight style that, along with their long tail streamers and narrow, pointed wings, gives them their nickname “sea-swallow”, and although they are very similar to the more numerous and widespread Common Tern, they can be told apart by their blood-red bills (without a black tip), longer tail streamers, and shorter legs, plus a translucent patch near the wingtips. The typically feed by snatching small fish and insects from the surface or just below the surface of the water, but they also sometimes catch insects in mid-air. If you do see one, reflect on the fact that it will spend our winter as far south as the Antarctic, making it one of the world’s most widely travelled species.

Arctic Terns are among our most elegant bird

Inland, the forests of Scotland play host to one of our most beautiful songbirds, the Redstart. Males have orange-red breasts, black faces and wings, blue-grey upperparts, and a reddish-orange tail, which they frequently quiver, while females and young birds are a duller version of that. But, while they’re the same basic size and shape as the familiar Robin, their behaviour is quite different, as they spend most of their time within the tree canopy, looking for insects, spiders and berries. A good tip for finding them, though, is to look for scrubby hedges and thickets, especially Hawthorn and Elder, and around Crab Apple trees – such habitat often proves attractive to them. If you’re around the Scottish coast in April and May, a prized sighting is the Great Northern Diver, the largest and rarest of the divers seen in the UK. It’s seen here mainly as a wintering bird, but at this time of year they may be seen along the coasts, heading north to their Arctic breeding grounds, while small numbers remain off Scotland all summer. In their breeding plumage, they’re handsome birds, with a red eye, black head, white underparts, and an extraordinary black and white chequered mantle, and their heads

appear larger and heavier than the related Black-throated and Redthroated Divers, with a more squaredoff forehead. They need a long take-off run to get airborne, and you’re much more likely to see them swimming offshore, or on one of the larger inland lochs. Of course, Scotland has Britain’s highest and most rugged mountains, with snow remaining on the tops of some well into June most years. They’re home to a correspondingly unusual bird, the Snow Bunting. A little larger than a Chaffinch, with noticeably long wings for a bunting or finch, it breeds in small numbers on the highest peaks, and the mainly white (with black) plumage of the male is excellent camouflage among snowy boulders and rocks. Intriguingly, though, for a bird that lives in such remote places, it’s often attracted to the crumbs of food left behind by climbers, hikers, mountainbikers and even skiers on the summits of mountains such as Ben Nevis, or Cairn Gorm. If you’re willing to take the long walk to the top of one of these peaks, and sit still around the summit, you stand a good chance of being rewarded with close-range views of this engaging bird.

Matthew Merritt

© Mike Weedon


Features Anti-reflection

P2

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• Extra-low dispersion glass virtually elimi nates color fringing. • Improved coatings give high light trans mission rate • Fully water-proof submersible and fogproof • Magnesium housing • BaK4 prism • Large & comfortable detachable eye-piece is fully water-proof • Excellent near focus • Built in retractable shushade with peep sight INCLUDES SOFT BAG

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Extra-low Dispersion Glass

Spotting Scopes Endeavor HD T he Endeavor HD Spotting Scope is the most advanced piece of optical equipment that Vanguard has ever produced. Available in 65mm angled, 65 mm straight, and 82mm angled, it is sure to fulfill the needs of anyone serious about their optics. All models feature a rubber armored magnesium body, are waterproof submersible, nitrogen filled and fog proof. The optical system employs extra-low dispersion glass (ED) to ensure accurate color rendition and virtually eliminate

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color fringing. The lenses are all fully multi-coated to ensure optimum light transmission and feature a phasecoated BAK4 roof prism. The eyepiece zooms from 15-45x on the 65mm models and 20-60x on the 82mm. It features an extendable rubber covered eyecup and boasts impressive eye relief even at the highest zoom settings. It also provides a very impressive field of view. A built-in sunshield is included to eliminate glare in direct sunlight and it includes a padded raincoat

with sling for carry and protection. All models are equipped with fine and coarse focusing wheels for quick and precision fine tuning adjustments. The Endeavor HD mounts directly to Vanguard tripod heads (and others) that are equipped with the universal mounting plate without the use of a quick shoe. The tripod mount rotates on the angled scope to give optimum viewing angles in a variety of situations and use with a window mount.

Detachable eyepiece

Excellent near focus

Endeavor HD Spotting Scopes Series Specifications Power Diameter of Objective Field of View View Angle Near Focus Eye Relief Dimension (L x W) Weight Viewing System

Endeavor HD 65A

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15-45 65 mm 48-23 m/1000m | 144-68 ft/1000yds 2.75-1.3 ° 4.5-5.5 m | 14.8-18 ft 19-20 mm 345 x 175 mm | 13.6 x 6.9 in 1450 g | 51.10 oz Angled

15-45 65 mm 48-23 m/1000m | 144-68 ft/1000yds 2.75-1.3 ° 4.5-5.5 m | 14.8-18 ft 19-20 mm 350 x 120 mm | 13.8 x 4.8 in 1450 g | 51.10 oz Straight

Endeavor HD 82A 20-60 82 mm 37-17 m/1000m | 110-52 ft/1000yds 2.1-1.0 ° 6-6.5 m | 19.7-21.33 ft 19-20 mm 375 x 180 mm | 14.8 x 7.1 in 1890 g | 66.70 oz Angled

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hiking

When to go This bare, open landscape can feel very exposed in winter, though on a good day its austerely expansive beauty really lifts the spirits. It’s not really a walkers’ honeypot, so trails are rarely crowded even in high summer.

Lord Garten

Fort William

NORTHERN IRELAND

SCOTLAND

Lake District

Yorkshire Wolds

Titchwell

REPUBLIC OF IRELAND

WALES ENGLAND

Dungeness

Isle of Purbeck

Isle of Wight

Cornwall

The Yorkshire Wolds The rolling, wide-open landscape of the Yorkshire Wolds

© Jon Sparks 42.

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hiking

Summer Top tips Information As the Yorkshire Wolds Way is a National Trail, there’s lots of information on http://www. nationaltrail.co.uk/yorkshirewoldsway/ – including a selection of day-walks. Most are circular but there’s also the Wolds Edge, an easy access linear walk – a mini-Wolds Way, in fact. The official National Trail guidebook is a great source of background information too.

Access Most of the Wolds is farmland: Open Access Land exists

I spy...

Country Walking: The Yorkshire Wolds An unusual crop – borage – colours the landscape at Etton

G

reat swathes of England’s green and pleasant land are overlooked by chalk hills; the Yorkshire Wolds are the most northerly of these uplands. This is a landscape mostly of smooth rolling hills seamed by steep-sided valleys, many of which have no permanent stream. They come to an abrupt and spectacular end at Flamborough Head.

Way, reckoned the quietest of Britain’s National Trails. Its 127km course is roughly an inverted ‘L’ running north from the Humber Bridge then turning east to meet the coast at Filey. If you don’t fancy a 5-day walk you can do it in sections, or just take it as a pointer to some of the best walking in the Wolds.

Much of what we say about walking here could apply equally to other chalk areas like the North and South Downs or the Chilterns, but the Wolds are quieter and emptier; many walkers and other visitors are drawn to the nearby North York Moors National Park (and the Yorkshire Dales and Peak District aren’t too far off either). For lovers of peace and solitude, big skies and wide open spaces, the Wolds are hard to beat. This is walking for the connoisseur. You can traverse the whole length of the Wolds on the Yorkshire Wolds 44.

Wildlife The wide Wolds are a great

© Jon Sparks

Some of the most classic Wolds walking is centred around Thixendale; there’s a fanciful theory that it’s so called because six dry valleys meet nearby (some say sixteen!). In summer, waving stands of wheat and barley can blur the outlines of the ancient earthworks, barrows and tumuli which pepper the landscape. An hour’s brisk walking along the Wolds Way would take you to the deserted village of Wharram Percy, one of the most important mediaeval archaeological sites in England. To the untutored eye it mostly appears as the usual ‘lumps and bumps’, but it just takes a little imagination; only the shell of St Martin’s Church still stands above ground, alongside a later farmhouse.

Jon Sparks

The shell of St Martin’s Church at Wharram Percy

place to spot hares, though they’re wary creatures and don’t usually let you get too close. March, when the hares ‘box’ in their famous courtship displays, is the best time. If you start a walk early or finish late, watch for the silent white flight of the barn owl. Farming practices here mean there are good populations of many other birds, such as the unmistakable yellowhammer. Where the Wolds meet the sea, especially at the RSPB reserve of Bempton Cliffs, you can see

mostly in small patches, often on the steep uncultivated slopes. For easier walking as well as to stay legal, stick to the rights of way.

Be prepared It’s a sparsely populated area, by English standards, and not overly touristy, so you can find yourself a fair way from a pub or teashop. Carry some refreshment.

Footwear The chalky soil drains well so few paths stay muddy for very long, but they can be slippery after recent rain. Big boots are hardly necessary but decent walking shoes will be more comfortable and safer than squashy ‘street’ trainers.

A classic dry valley near Wharram Percy

kittiwakes, puffins, and the spectacular ‘dive-bombing’ flight of gannets.

Ancient sites The ‘lumps and bumps’ of ancient earthworks, dykes and settlement sites (lie Wharram Percy) can often be easier to ‘read’ from a distance, especially when the sun’s low in the sky to cast good shadows.

Distant views With few obstructions, views from the ridges range far beyond the Wolds themselves. Look out for the White Horse of Kilburn on the first ride of the North York Moors, the towers of York Minster, or the mighty pylons of the Humber Bridge.

Cliffs near Filey Brigg, where the Wolds Way meets the coast. Spot the tiny figures to grasp the scale.

Looking over St Martin’s Church from the mediaeval village site at Wharram Percy

© Jon Sparks


hiking

When to go Of course Purbeck’s mild climate makes it a yearround destination, but summer is when it really comes alive. While Swanage and Corfe Castle may become crowded, it’s easy to escape into your own world on the vast heaths, down back lanes or on the breezy ridges.

Lord Garten

Fort William

NORTHERN IRELAND

SCOTLAND

Lake District

Yorkshire Wolds

Titchwell

REPUBLIC OF IRELAND

WALES ENGLAND

Dungeness

Isle of Purbeck

Isle of Wight

Cornwall

The Isle of Purbeck Rock formation on the clifftop near St Aldhelm’s Head

©Jon Sparks 46.

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hiking

Summer Top tips Check out timetables There are some handy bus services, but the Swanage Railway is the most exciting way to travel across Purbeck; services are very limited from November to mid-March. Prepare the ground Beware of

cliff and when you can get down to sea level the shore is rocky. (There is, however, a good beach at Swanage and a great one, with safe bathing, at Studland Heath.)

Take care on cliff-tops The paths themselves are safe enough but sometimes run close to sloping or crumbling ground above the cliffs; keep a close eye on kids and dogs. Mountain bikers climbing onto the Purbeck ridge with Corfe Castle guarding the gap in the ridge behind

telling the kids ‘we’re going to the seaside’ as much of the coast is sheer

I spy... All at sea The Jurassic Coast looks out over the English Channel, one of the great seaways of the world, while the Purbeck Hills overlook the quieter waters of Poole Bay and Poole Harbour. Swanage is a popular sailing centre and Studland Beach caters for everything from pedalos to windsurfers.

Family Walking: The Isle of Purbeck © Jon Sparks

The dramatic ruins of Corfe Castle

T

he Isle of Purbeck is not a true island; in fact it’s hardly even a peninsula, but it is a self-contained, strangely complete parcel of landscape – or should we say landscapes? In its small compass, Purbeck has heathland, downland, lush valleys, dramatic cliffs, dunes and beaches, so each day’s walk can be quite different. For families, there’s no better defence against potential cries of “I’m bored!”

of Famous Five renown. If the kids are too old, or too cool, for Blyton, it might easily morph into Isengard or Hogwarts; to complete the Hogwarts effect, you can even get there by steam train.

It’s also a landscape rich in stories. Younger kids might like Studland, said to be the inspiration for Toytown in Enid Blyton’s Noddy books. Purbeck really is Blyton country; anyone who loves the Famous Five will adore it. There’s even a Ginger Pop shop at Corfe Castle, selling a huge range of Blyton books and, of course, lashings of ginger beer.

To the north of the Purbeck ridge are swathes of sandy heathland, while to

The Castle itself – one of the most striking ruins in Britain – is at least partly the inspiration for Kirrin Castle

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Corfe Castle commands a deep gap in the elegant ridge of the Purbeck hills; a few minutes’ steep walking gets you up there. In summer the downland is vivid with flowers and butterflies.

the south, the ridge drops to a green vale; then the land rises again before being chopped off above the sea in a ragged line of cliffs. This is the eastern extremity of the world-famous Jurassic Coast. If your youngsters are excited by fossils it’s certainly worth walking to the old quarry above Dancing Ledge; with care you an also scramble down to the Ledge itself, where the rough outlines of massive ammonites can still be seen. The whole of this coast offers terrific views, and glimpses into much more recent history, from the mediaeval strip lynchets near Winspit to the striking memorial to the pioneers of radar at St Aldhelm’s Head, Purbeck’s southernmost point. Near Dancing Ledge there are also the last remaining naval mile posts, formerly used to enable ships to test their true speed over a measured nautical mile.

A classic pub. The Square and Compass at Worth Matravers

Jon Sparks

Wildlife The diverse landscape is a mosaic of different habitats. The heathlands are great for spotting deer as well as snakes and lizards, while pools such as Studland’s Little Sea are home to many species of dragonfly. Summer is the time to spot butterflies, too, while the rest of the year brings a real chance of spotting dolphins out at sea: keep those binoculars at the ready.

Memorial to the pioneers of radar at St Aldhelm’s Head

Cliffs near St Aldhelm’s Head ©Jon Sparks


NATURE

When to go Set your alarm early. Nature is often at its most active around dawn, so rise early and venture out into the great outdoors. Roads and traffic are quiet at this time of day, so you can escape the hustle-bustle of ordinary life. After clear nights, insect’s wings will be dew covered – look for them glistening in the morning light as you carefully scan vegetation using binoculars.

Lord Garten

Fort William

NORTHERN IRELAND

SCOTLAND

Lake District

Yorkshire Wolds

Titchwell

REPUBLIC OF IRELAND

WALES ENGLAND

Dungeness

Isle of Purbeck

Isle of Wight

Cornwall

Enjoy The Nature Responsibly... By Water’s Edge... Colourful field of poppies, Pentire, Cornwall

© Ross Hoddinott 50.

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NATURE

Summer

M Green winged orchids

ost outdoor enthusiasts love being by the water’s edge. Not only is water tranquil and calming, but it is also home to a wide variety of wildlife. Rivers, lakes, lochs, canals and ponds provide a great environment to discover, view and enjoy nature – and not just bird life. Find a quiet spot close to the water’s edge and simply wait, listen and observe. Wetland wildlife is at its most active during springtime. Otters and water voles are preparing to breed, while you might hear a chorus of frogs or even spot a grass snake swimming on the water’s surface. On fine spring mornings, the larvae of colourful insects – like dragonflies, damselflies and mayflies – emerge from the water in order to hatch into adult insects. To

Beautiful demoiselle

W

hen you have a passion for nature, you crave getting close-up to wildlife in order to enjoy unique or intimate moments of animal behavior or action. However, as we know, the subject’s wellbeing must always come first – never do anything to knowingly disturb or damage a wild animal, plant or the habitat on which it depends. Using high quality binoculars is the perfect solution. They provide the most convenient, lightweight and quickly maneuverable way to observe wildlife – allowing nature lovers to enjoy their chosen subjects in stunning close-up from afar. You might think binoculars are only suited to observing timid subjects like mammals, birds and insects, but in practice, they are equally useful for enjoying the intricacy and design of plants and wild flowers – particularly during springtime, when there is fresh, vibrant growth all around us. Using binoculars, like Vanguard’s popular

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Ross Hoddinott Water vole

Top tips Most nature lovers enjoy taking photos, and binoculars prove a great aid for budding wildlife photographers. Using them, it is possible to search your surroundings. Once you’ve located a potential subject, swap binoculars for camera and capture ‘the shot’. Binoculars will help guarantee you never miss a good photo opportunity again…

© Ross Hoddinott

By the water’s edge...

Spirit range – with lightweight design, superb ergonomics and twist-out eyecups for long eye relief – allows keen botanists to view and identify subjects without the need to trample or disturb surrounding habitat. Binoculars are an essential aid for any nature watcher, helping ensure that they are able to enjoy nature responsibly.

Thankfully, using binoculars, you can witness nature in close-up without having to get too near. Vanguard binoculars offer a near-perfect viewing experience. Their advanced lens and prism design, boasting ED (Extra lowDispersion) glass, helps reveal natural detail and behavior in outstanding magnification and clarity. Using them offers an unrivalled viewing experience.

Ross Hoddinott

Orange tip butterfly resting on bluebell

Enjoy nature responsibly... Small pearl bordered fritillary butterfly

fully appreciate such natural wonders, you need to view them close-up – but we all know that if you get too close physically, you risk disturbing the creature and spoiling that ‘magic’ moment.

© Ross Hoddinott


SAILING

Where to go Lord Garten

Fort William

SCOTLAND

NORTHERN IRELAND

Lake District

Yorkshire Wolds

Titchwell

REPUBLIC OF IRELAND

WALES ENGLAND

Dungeness

Isle of Purbeck

Isle of Wight

Cornwall

Binoculars for Sailing Enthusiasts 54.

Š Andy Rice 55.


Can they cross?

The Aussie 49er has just gybed on to port tack. That makes them vulnerable to starboard boats behind them. Can they cross? Let’s take a closer look through the binoculars to find out...

Summer

Binoculars for Sailing Enthusiasts in the UK

What’s Zach up to?

So, Zach Railey, an Olympic silver medallist. He must know what he’s doing. How’s he trimming his sail? Let’s use the binoculars and look at that leech profile.

470 sail trim. As you watch a fleet of Olympic 470s charging towards you, binoculars offer you a chance to pick out differences in sail trim and technique - eg. where the spinnaker pole is set, how low the crew is trapezing, and so on.

49ers running downwind. Use your binoculars to get

closer to the action and work out what the sailors are doing in greater detail. Here these 49ers are racing in the final ‘Medal Race’ of the Olympic Games. Critical times! What differences can we see in sailing technique, the way they’re moving around the boat, trimming the sails? Could be the difference between a medal - or nothing!

So how are we doing? The opposition looks a long way behind, but how we are doing on handicap? No way of knowing unless we can read their sail numbers. Where did those binoculars go? Who won the start? OK, so a good start for New Zealand, but how are the Spanish doing on the far side? What can we see through the binoculars?

Who’s over early? Wow, not much space on

that start line. Looks like someone might have gone over early. Who is it? Let’s take a closer look through the binoculars...

Star gazing.

Who’s that in the distance, sailing a Finn? Hard to tell, until you look through your binos. Oh yeah, heard of him. He’s only Ben Ainslie, the greatest Olympic sailor of all time!

What do they really do in light airs?

Not everyone likes saying what they really do to make the boat go fast. Maybe we need to do a bit of spying and see what they really get up to!

Andy Rice

Who’s in the lead? From a distance, a fleet looks like a blur of colour. With binoculars you can pick out sail numbers and see who’s doing well - and who’s not! These are the Finns battling it out for medals at London 2012.

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SAILING

Top Tips Pack for all weathers - always take your foul weather gear, even on a sunny day. You never know how the weather might turn out an hour from now.

Recommended Events JP Morgan Round the Island Race in late June

Always wear sun screen - even when you can’t see the sun! The glare from the water means you get double the impact of any UV rays, so it’s much easier to get burned even on a cold and cloudy day.

If you’re racing, use your binoculars to see who’s managing to scrape through The Needles, or who has run aground! If you’re watching, go to any of the four corners of the Isle of Wight and enjoy the spectacle of more than a thousand yachts racing around the island. With your binoculars you’ll be able to pick out which boats are in the lead - or which have run aground on those dreaded Needles!

Make sure you’ve got a fully waterproof bag for storing your binoculars, camera, and any other valuables.

Aberdeen Asset Management Cowes Week in August

Take plenty of cloths to wipe clean the lens of your binoculars if any spray hits them. If you’re watching a race, take the sailing instructions with you, a list of competitors so you can tell who’s who, and ideally a VHF radio so you can tune into any communications from the race committee. Pack plenty of water and food for the day, and more than you think you’ll need. Chances are, someone else on the boat has forgotten, so you can come to their rescue! If you feel seasick, keep your eyes on the horizon. Even better if you can convince the captain of the boat to let you drive/ steer for a while, as this helps tune your body into the motion of the boat.

There is so much traffic in every direction on the Solent during Cowes Week, a pair of binoculars offers clues about who’s doing what, useful information to feed back into your own strategy. Or if you watching from The Green in Cowes, or any other vantage point, you can see how your friends are getting on in the racing.

www.aamcowesweek.co.uk

Rolex Fastnet Race The 600-mile classic race from Cowes, via the Fastnet Lighthouse and back to Plymouth is always full of adventure. Navigators on the race yachts will be using their binoculars to help inform their strategy for the race, using any distant telltale signs as indicators of the next move. Watching the race depart Cowes on the Sunday is always a spectacle, well worth visiting early in the morning to get the sense of anticipation at the dockside before departure.

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www.roundtheisland.org.uk

www.fastnet.rorc.org

© Andy Rice 59.


Autumn 60.

61.


Where to go Dungeness – this is one of the iconic locations of British birding, situated on a shingle spit sticking out into the English Channel. That means that migrants are funnelled into it as they head south, while behind the shingle banks there are pools, scrapes, saltmarsh and mudflats, perfect habitat for wildfowl and waders. There’s a large RSPB reserve, and a bird observatory.

Lord Garten

Fort William

NORTHERN IRELAND

SCOTLAND

Lake District

Yorkshire Wolds

Titchwell

REPUBLIC OF IRELAND

WALES ENGLAND

Dungeness

Isle of Purbeck

Isle of Wight

Cornwall

Dungeness Avocets in Dungeness

© Mike Weedon 62.

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BIRDWATCHING

Autumn symbol of the RSPB, but it has steadily been recolonising the country since gaining a foothold during World War Two, when coastal marshes flooded as invasion defences proved perfect habitat for the birds. Now up to 1,000 pairs breed each year, while many more spend the winter here, again concentrated on the rivermouths and marshes of the south and east. To look at, they’re unique among British waders, with long legs, a white and black plumage, and an upcurved bill, but beware, because they’re not always as easy to spot as you might expect from that. That’s because, at a distance, they can look very gull-like, so take care to scan carefully through any gull flocks for hidden Avocets. A spotting scope could be a big help in such a situation, or binoculars with high magnification, such as 10x42.

Late Summer and Autumn Redstarts can be seen as they migrate south

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y the end of the summer, many of the birds that visit Britain in order to raise a family are already thinking about returning south, to the Continent and beyond. At the same time, other birds pass through Britain on their way south from the Arctic, Scandinavia and central Europe, while autumn gales can blow all sorts of stray migrants to our shores. At such a time, the south coast is the place to be, although the south-west also has its attractions (vagrant birds from America can appear). Seabirds such as skuas, shearwaters and petrels move along the English Channel itself, often in large numbers, while small birds preparing to depart for the south may spend a few days at the coast fattening themselves up for the journey, especially if there’s a late period of good weather, so it’s often possible to catch up with species that nest in all sorts of locations around Britain, outside their usual habitat.

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© Mike Weedon

Ospreys can be among the most conspicuous of our departing migrants, and not just because of their distinctively long, angled wings and sharply contrasting white and brown plumage. While the majority of the UK’s population breeds in Scotland, they make their way south, sometimes at a fairly leisurely pace, before their flight to Africa. As the only bird of prey feeding exclusively on fish, they’re easier to look for than other migrant raptors. Any lake or reservoir, especially close to the coast, is a potential stopping-off point for them – look for them on prominent perches such as dead trees, or soaring then hovering over the lakes themselves, before plunging into the water to take fish. Estuaries, harbours and coastal saltmarshes are also good places to look.

breed in Britain, but well over 40,000, mainly from Iceland, spend the winter here, with others passing through to continental Europe. At this time of year they’ll be losing the reddishbrown breeding plumage, being grey on top and white underneath, with a black tail, but their long legs and very long, straight bills are hard to miss. You’ll find flocks of large wading birds matching that description on many of the estuaries, marshes and mudflats of the south and east coasts, and the only possible confusion is with their close relative, the Bar-tailed Godwit. The latter, though, has shorter legs, a shorter, slightly upturned bill, and no black tail, while Black-tailed Godwits become unmistakeable when they take flight – from anonymous greybrown birds, they become a mass of black and white wing stripes.

Autumn’s also a good time to look for wading birds on the move, and Black-tailed Godwits are among the most photogenic. Only small numbers

Another wader, the Avocet, holds a special place in the hearts of British birdwatchers. By the late 1930s, it was extremely rare, and was chosen as the

The Hobby is another species that has increased greatly in numbers and range in recent decades, probably mainly because the British climate is getting warmer.

© Mike Weedon

This Kestrel-sized falcon is a summer visitor, and fast and agile enough to be able to catch Swallows, martins and even Swifts on the wing, and in fact they even like a huge Swift in silhouette, with long pointed wings held in a curved, sickle shape. At closer range, you might be able to pick out the red ‘trousers’, too. As well as birds, though, Hobbies feed on dragonflies, and in late summer and autumn a good way to find them is to look for a pond or small lake with good numbers of these insects. Hobbies will often circle above, picking off the dragonflies as they rise, and eating them in mid-flight, having first stripped off the inedible parts with a distinctive cycling motion. Among smaller migrant birds, the rarer and more localised UK breeders are much sought-after by birdwatchers. Pied Flycatchers have become sadly difficult to find in many parts of Britain, being concentrated in the north and west, but in autumn you stand a good chance of catching one or two at the south coast as

they prepare to migrate. The male is a handsome black and white bird, the female more brown and white, but both have a habit of cocking the tail nervously and flicking one wing upwards, and like all flycatchers feed by darting out and snatching flying insects in mid-air. They prefer mature oak trees, so look carefully for this type of habitat. Another much looked-for migrant is the Ring Ouzel. This handsome thrush breeds in upland areas, but during migration periods often stops off on any hills with shortish grass and a ‘hogsback’ appearance – sheepgrazed areas on the South Downs are good places to look. Superficially similar to Blackbirds, a closer look reveals greater size, a halfmoon shaped white ‘collar’, and long wings with pale, silvery tips. A good tip, as with most small migrant birds, is to look for them just after a sudden downpour – the birds may well be grounded, riding the storm out.

Matthew Merritt

Small birds such as Blue Tits will visit feeders as autumn arrives


BIKING

Where to see The World Cup at Fort William is the must see event of the year, upwards of 17000 people gather for the gravity spectacular including trials championships and the 4x pro tour. Held 8th/9th June. The Scottish Championships will be held at a venue to be confirmed and the series races will be held at venues

around the country including Innerleithen, Killin, and Glencoe. To keep abreast of all events across the UK the best place to go is the British Cycling events calendar, with most of the 2013 dates and venues being confirmed by late September.

Lord Garten

Fort William

NORTHERN IRELAND

SCOTLAND

Lake District

Yorkshire Wolds

Titchwell

REPUBLIC OF IRELAND

WALES ENGLAND

Dungeness

Isle of Purbeck

Isle of Wight

Cornwall

Scottish Downhill Racing Rock formation on the clifftop near St Aldhelm’s Head

© Paul Cram 66.

67.


BIKING

Autumn

C

ycling is pretty hard to ignore in Great Britain right now, with Bradley Wiggins and the rest of the team’s historic success in this year’s Tour de France and the impressive number of GB medalists at the London Olympics.

world cup venues. Riders and their bikes are ferried up to an altitude of 655 meters on Aonach Mor by way of a gondola, before flinging themselves as fast as possible down a track that’s 2.82 kilometers long with a vertical drop of 555 meters.

We take a look here at the more extreme side of cycling. Whilst not yet an Olympic sport, the downhill discipline warrants a global world cup series every year and an annual World Championships. As with the track and road events, you’ll find a healthy spattering of Brits in the top 10 at events these days.

The top of the track sees some flowing berms with a couple of jumps, moving swiftly into a run of steep rocky sections. Drop follows rocky

Most of these riders come up through the ranks of two race series – the Scottish Downhill Association events or the British Downhill Series, working their way up through the ranks from stabilizers to big air. Scotland has one of the gnarliest courses on the tour and Fort William has become one of the best -loved

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in the arena adds to the drama, the crowd urging the riders on, giving them the last blast of energy to pedal like crazy and clear the huge arena jumps.

Top tips

seasons in a day” - well it really can do that here, bring sunscreen but be prepared for a deluge too.

Start the day early and head up to the top of the track - this way you will be back down at the finish pits come race runs.

•West of Scotland in summer means midges – bring some repellant and a midge net if you can.

Bring your binoculars – it’s possible to watch most of the course from the finish area.

Scottish Downhill Racing 4X Fort William 2012

The crowds start arriving from Thursday onwards to see the riders practicing, many stopping to check out sections of the course and watch what lines the best guys hit. There are crashes galore but in most cases the riders immediately grab their bikes and carry on. On a course this tough there are always going to be a few injuries and it’s no surprise to see the course shut for an hour or so to bring casualties off the hill. Live timing

You’ve heard the expression “four

© Paul Cram

drop until the woods to negotiate the tangled roots after which the riders hit the new motorway section, rebuilt before the 2012 world cup. A series of gargantuan jumps lead the competitors into the final drops and arena jumps where they will arrive exhausted and panting and with adrenaline coursing through their veins. With its well-organized shop, café and gondola, Aonach Mor is an ideal place for spectators to come and watch the sport. Intrepid visitors can take the gondola up the hill and either come back the same way or walk the length of the course, taking in the action as they go. The Snowgoose restaurant at the top of the gondola serves hot meals and refreshments throughout the day. For the more sedate, you can see most of the course from the car park, although you’ll need a set of binoculars to get a good view of the high sections.

Links

Don’t miss out on the 4X action on the Saturday night when four riders at a time take on the shorter - but equally as tricky - track. Elbows are out - with everyone vying for the best line there’s guaranteed carnage

and edge of your seat excitement all the way. There are areas for the trials competitions spread throughout the event too, a different discipline but no less fascinating to watch. Anyone who saw the You Tube video of Danny MacGaskill will know what I’m talking about here, riders tackling seemingly impossible maneuvers on customized bikes.

Morag Paterson

Make some noise!!! The riders really appreciated some encouragement to get them down the hill, cowbells being the instrument of choice at Fort William.

Nevis Range www.nevisrange.co.uk British Cycling Calendar www.britishcycling.org.uk/events Fort William World Cup www.fortwilliamworldcup.co.uk SDA-races www.sda-races.com/sda/

4X Fort William 2012

With thanks to Paul Cram Photography and Keith Valentine.


Winter 70.

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Where to see Titchwell RSPB – this is one of the RSPB’s most family-friendly reserves, but as well as commoner birds, you’ll be able to see plenty of waders and wildfowl, birds of prey such as Marsh Harriers, rare Bearded Tits, and hard-to-find species such as Bittern. Recent improvements, including new hides, make it the sort of place you can spend a whole day, and see a huge variety of birds.

Lord Garten

Fort William

NORTHERN IRELAND

SCOTLAND

Lake District

Yorkshire Wolds

Titchwell

REPUBLIC OF IRELAND

WALES ENGLAND

Dungeness

Isle of Purbeck

Isle of Wight

Cornwall

Titchwell RSPB Snow Buntings are regular visitors in autumn and winter.

© Mike Weedon 72.

73.


BIRDWATCHING

Winter the short days, and the same applies to owls. Little Owls and Short-eared Owls are both day-hunters anyway, but Barn Owls are more normally nocturnal. At this time of year, however, they can often be seen out hunting in the middle of the day, because as well as the brief hours of daylight, they have to cope with a lack of waterproofing that makes it impossible for them to hunt in the rain. So, if a night of heavy rain is followed by a fine day, get out there and watch saltmarshes, sheep pastures and even parkland, and you stand a very good chance of seeing the ghost-like presence of a Barn Owl, floating low over the landscape in search of prey. They can appear almost all-white at some angles, although in fact the upperparts are grey and ochre, but they’re hard to miss, and Norfolk has the highest concentration of them in the UK.

Winter Goldfinches are attracted to gardens in winter

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ou might expect winter to be the deadest time of year for birdwatching, but in Britain at least, nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, some of our most memorable bird spectacles take place in winter. That’s because, however much we moan about our weather, we actually enjoy far warmer winters that might be expected so far north, thanks to the influence of the Gulf Stream. That makes Britain extremely attractive to all those birds that breed even further north, with wildfowl and waders in particular heading here in large numbers to spend the winter on our ice-free coasts. The East Anglian coast – from Snettisham on The Wash right round to the estuaries of Suffolk and Essex – is particularly good for both, and Pink-footed Geese are among the highlights. Pinkish-grey, with dark heads and necks and pink legs and

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feet, of course, they’re medium-sized geese, and form large, noisy flocks, flying in V-shaped skeins. While they roost on coastal marshes and pools, they spend the day feeding on agricultural land, often some way inland, with a particular liking for sugar beet fields (although other crops are also used). They can be very nervous birds, though, so need large, open fields from which they can see threats approaching a long way off, which means that you’ll need to view them from a distance, preferably from cover. Alternatively, you could visit one of their roosting sites, such as Snettisham RSPB, or Holkham Nature Reserve, and watch them flying in and out of the roost. Get there a good hour ahead of dawn or dusk for best results, and try to avoid periods with a full or nearly full moon, when the geese will sometimes stay inland feeding by its light all night.

© Mike Weedon

Snettisham is also a good place to see some of the smaller waders that spend their winters in these islands. These can include Oystercatchers, Knots, Redshanks, Golden Plovers, Grey Plovers, Lapwings and Dunlin. The latter form huge flocks which, after being displaced from their mudflat roosts by the incoming tide, swirl and swarm like insects or shoals of fish, thousands of birds moving as if with one thought. Low tide is the time to avoid – you’ll find yourself viewing the birds at very long distances, over miles of mudflats. In January, when high tide more or less coincides with dawn, you can be lucky enough to see both incoming skeins of Pink-footed Geese, and huge flocks of small waders including Dunlin and Knots, on their way to settle on the small pools just inland. Winter is an excellent time to look out for birds of prey, which have to hunt intensively to find enough food during

It’s also the time to look for a greater variety of ducks than are usually present. As well as the familiar species such as Mallard and Tufted Duck, larger lakes in particular will get visitors from the far north such as Wigeon (listen for their whistling calls), the tiny Teal, Shoveler (with their oversized bills), Pochard, Goldeneye and the very handsome Pintail. The name tells you what to look out for with that last one. The male has a very long tail, although the sharply contrasting chocolate-brown head

© Mike Weedon

and pure white breast are also striking, as is the blackish-green speculum on the trailing edge of the wing. Even the female – like most ducks a lot dowdier than the male – has a hint of that pintail, and both sexes have a slim neck and rather small head. Unlike a lot of the wildfowl that arrive here in winter, Pintails are usually present in small numbers rather than big flocks, so they’re a great test of your growing ID skills – scan flocks of other wildfowl, or even loafing gulls, and see if you can pick them out. They prefer marshes and estuaries, or reservoirs with grassy banks or farm fields nearby, so this is a case of getting the habitat right and the rest will follow. While Mute Swans are a common sight throughout Britain, many are semi-tame, so winter is a wonderful opportunity to connect with genuinely wild swans. Two species visit Britain – the small Bewick’s Swan, and the larger Whooper Swan (although it’s still smaller than a Mute). Their long yellow and black bills set them apart from their more common and familiar relatives, but what’s really distinctive is the loud, bugling call that gives them their name – when gathered together in large numbers, they can create an incredible noise. The best place to see lots is at the WWT reserve at Welney, on the fens of Norfolk – good numbers are present throughout the winter, and there are regular opportunities to watch the

elegant bird feeding by moonlight, close to the visitor centre. Finally, winter in East Anglia is a fine time and place to test your growing birdwatching skills to the limits, and search out one of Britain’s rarest, most mysterious and most extraordinary birds – the Bittern. This member of the heron family only breeds in Britain in small numbers, although some birds also arrive here from the Continent in winter. It’s a real specialist, needing reedbeds to live in, and its streaky brown plumage is the perfect camouflage in such a habitat – when it feels under threat, it points its bill skywards, making itself look even more reed-like. It can be incredibly secretive, too – it’s quite capable of remaining concealed in a very small patch of reeds all day. But, with a bit of careful preparation, you should be able to see one. Cold spells are good times to go looking, because when the water around the edges of reed-fringed pools is frozen, the Bitterns have to feed more out in the open, or even fly away in search of alternative feeding and roosting sites. This gives you a good opportunity to get good views of these wonderful birds, and if you do you’ll probably be struck by the gingery tinge to their plumage, and their almost owl-like flight silhouette and style.

Matthew Merritt

Whooper Swans arrive from the Arctic in large numbers


Endeavor XF Series T

he Endeavor XF spotting scope boasts excellent optical viewing. Available in 60mm angled, 60mm straight, and 80mm angled. All models feature a rubber armored magnesium body, are waterproof submersible, nitrogen filled and fog proof. The lenses are all fully multi-coated to ensure optimum light transmission and feature a phase-coated BAK4 roof prism. The eyepiece zooms from 15-45x on the

60mm models and 20-60x on the 80mm. It features an extendable rubber covered eyecup and boasts impressive eye relief even at the highest zoom settings. It also provides a very impressive field of view. A built-in sunshield is included to eliminate glare in direct sunlight and it includes a padded raincoat with sling for carry and protection. All models are equipped with a large smooth focusing wheel for

Spirit XF Series S

quick focusing adjustments. The Endeavor XF mounts directly to Vanguard tripod heads (and others) that are equipped with the universal mounting plate without the use of a quick shoe. The tripod mount on the angled scope rotates to give optimum viewing angles in a variety of situations or use with a window mount.

pirit XF binoculars outshine other optics in its price class. Spirit XF offers outstanding image quality, weather resistance and user-friendly features! Expect edge-to-edge clarity, high-contrast images and brilliant color reproduction thanks to its phasedcoated BaK4 roof prisms and fully multi-coated lenses. 100% waterproof

and fogproof, Spirit XF is made to take on the outdoors and challenging weather with textured rubber armor for a secure grip and shock resistance. Compact and lightweight, Spirit XF has a unique open bridge body design so it’s lightweight, compact and comfortable to hold without tire.

Long eye relief: twisted eyecups and smooth motion diopter ring

High light transmission rate

Features Anti-reflection

P2

Phase coating

• Improved coating give high light transmission rate • Fully water-proof submersible and fog-proof • Magnesium housing • BaK4 prism • Large & comfortable eye-piece with up to 20mm of eye relief • Excellent Near Focus • Built in retractable sunshade with peep sight on sunshade • Available digi-scoping adapter 76.

Low light transmission

High light transmission

Brand-new optical design and fully multi-coated optics give an outstanding high transmission light rate and superior lowlight performance.

Endeavor XF Series Specifications Endeavor XF 60A Power Diameter of Objective Field of View View Angle Near Focus Eye Relief Dimension (L x W) Weight Viewing System

15-45 60 mm 47-23 m/1000m | 141-168 ft/1000yds 2.7-1.3 ° 5-6 m | 16.4-19.7 ft 19-20 mm 350 x 180 mm | 13.8 x 7.1 in 1280 g | 45.2 oz Angled

Endeavor XF 60S

Endeavor XF 80A

15-45 60 mm 47-23 m/1000m | 141-168 ft/1000yds 2.7-1.3 ° 5-6 m | 16.4-19.7 ft 19-20 mm 355 x 125 mm | 14 x 4.8 in 1310 g | 46.2 oz Straight

20-60 80 mm 37-17 m/1000m | 110-52 ft/1000yds 2.1-1.0 ° 6-6..5 m | 19.7-21.33 ft 19-20 mm 380 x 180 mm | 15 x 7.1 in 1680 g | 59.3 oz Angled

Edge-to-edge clarity, high-contrast images and brilliant color reproduction

Features P2

Nitrogen-charged and o-ring sealed - 100% waterproof and fogproof

Lightweight, open-bridge body design

Spirit XF Series Specifications

Phase coating

• Lightweight open-bridge body design • Multiple-position eyecups • Long eye-relief • 100% waterproof & fogproof

Power Diameter of Objective Field of View View Angle Near Focus Eye Relief Dimension (L x W) Weight Adjustable Pupillary

Spirit XF 8420

Spirit XF 1042

8 42 mm 136 m/1000m | 409 ft/1000yds 7.8 ° 2.1m | 6.9 ft 20 mm 150 x 130 mm | 5.88 x 5.13 in 700 g | 24.69 oz 57-74 mm

10 42 mm 111 m/1000m | 332 ft/1000yds 6.35 ° 2.1m | 6.9 ft 16 mm 150 x 130 mm | 5.88 x 5.13 in 665 g | 23.46 oz 57-74 mm

• Non-slip extreme rubber armor 77.


Orros Series I

t doesn’t matter if you are watching a soccer game from afar or sitting across the stadium at your favorite band’s world tour…the Orros binoculars have the ticket. Compact enough to fit snuggly in your pocket,

yet powerful enough to see crisp detail from a staggering distance. Add the fact that their 100% waterproof, so you don’t have to worry about spilling a drink, makes these the perfect binocular for any event.

Versatile, multi-use binoculars for general outdoor use

DM Series

MZ Series

G

H

reat for on-the-go observation, DM monoculars are lightweight and small enough to fit in a jacket or purse pocket. Don’t let the small size fool you, DMs have great power for long distance viewing and a durable metal body with rubber armor.

andy MZ monoculars are compact and lightweight, fitting nicely in a side pocket. Its great near focus and zoom power earn high marks on quality, making it comparable to traditional binoculars. Its metal body and soft folding eyecup provide years of great performance.

Compact and lightweight

Features • BaK4 roof prisms and multi-coated lenses • Ultra lightweight and compact design • 100% waterproof and fogproof

• Non-slip rubber armor • Unique offset hinge for easy onehanded use (Compact models 8250 & 1025 only)

• Optional binocular-tripod adaptor for full size models (BA-185) available (see page 14) Include carrying pouch

DM/MZ Series Specifications

Orros Series Specifications Orros 8250 Power Diameter of Objective Field of View View Angle Near Focus Eye Relief Dimension (L x W) Weight Adjustable Pupillary

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8 25 mm 114 m/1000m | 340 ft/1000yds 6.5 ° 2.5m | 8.2 ft 12.5 mm 110 x 120 mm | 4.38 x 4.75 in 280 g | 9.9 oz 58-72 mm

Orros 1025 10 25 mm 110 m/1000m | 330 ft/1000yds 6.3 ° 2.5m | 8.2 ft 10 mm 115 x 120 mm | 4.5 x 4.75 in 280 g | 9.9 oz 58-72 mm

Orros 8320 8 32 mm 122 m/1000m | 367 ft/1000yds 7.0 ° 2.1m | 6.9 ft 16.5 mm 130 x 125 mm | 5.13 x 4.88 in 510 g | 18 oz 58-74 mm

Orros 8420 8 42 mm 109 m/1000m | 327 ft/1000yds 6.25 ° 2.1m | 6.9 ft 21 mm 145 x 130 mm | 5.75 x 5.13 in 600 g | 21.2 oz 58-74 mm

Include carrying pouch

DM-6250

Orros 1042 10 42 mm 100 m/1000m | 298 ft/1000yds 5.7 ° 2.1m | 6.9 ft 18 mm 145 x 130 mm | 5.75 x 5.13 in 600 g | 21.2 oz 58-74 mm

Power Diameter of Objective Field of View View Angle Near Focus Eye Relief Dimension (L x W) Weight Adjustable Pupillary

6 25 mm 140 m/1000m | 419 ft/1000yds 8° 0.35 m | 1.1 ft 13.5 mm 95 x 30 mm | 3.75 x 1.13 in 110 g | 3.9 oz NA

DM-8250 8 25 mm 122 m/1000m | 367 ft/1000yds 7° 0.35 m | 1.1 ft 8.6 mm 95 x 30 mm | 3.75 x 1.13 in 110 g | 3.9 oz NA

MZ-61125C 6-12 25 mm 70-42 m/1000m | 209-126 ft/1000yds 4-2.4 ° 0.35 m | 1.1 ft 8 mm 115 x 35 mm | 4.5 x 1.38 in 125 g | 4.4 oz NA

MZ-82425C 8-24 25 mm 66-35 m/1000m | 199-105 ft/1000yds 3.8-2 ° 0.35 m | 1.1 ft 8 mm 115 x 35 mm | 4.5 x 1.38 in 125 g | 4.4 oz NA

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Other products

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© Pete Webb - www.petewebb.com

Features • Thick foam on legs enable a secure grip even in slippery weather • Anti-spin central column stays in position • Large bubble level on canopy • 1/4 and 3/8” camera screw interface • Includes carrying bag • Rubber feet

80o 25o

ABEO Plus & ABEO Kit Series S olid. Secure. Sleek. It’s no wonder Abeo Series is one of our most anticipated professional tripods. Whether you’re shooting still or video or both, Abeo is built to support with unwavering reliability and stability thanks to premium magnesium diecast construction.

Its legs adjust to 25, 50 and 80-degree

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Quick & easy to use leg angle button

angles with an ergonomic release button – ultra fast and securely. Quickflip leg locks enable fast setup and are tension adjustable. Abeo enables unique shots, too, with an easy-to-set-up low-angle adaptor. With the video panhead Abeo supports cameras with large zoom lenses and camcorders with attached gear.

50o

Legs individually adjust to 25, 50 and 80-degree angles with an ergonomic button

80-degree low angle position

ABEO Plus & ABEO Kit Series Specifications ABEO Plus 323AV ABEO Plus 363AV Folded Height Extended Height Min. Extended Height Diameter of Leg Number of Sections Head Front Tilt Quick Shoe Rotation Max. Loading Weight

805 mm | 313/4 in 1905 mm | 75 in 1545 mm | 60 7/8 in 32 mm 3 PH-123V +60°~ -90° QS-67 360° 6 kg | 13.2 lbs 3.74 kg | 8.2 lbs

840 mm | 33 1/8 in 2015 mm | 79 1/4 in 1700 mm | 66 7/8 in 36 mm 3 PH-124V +60°~ -90° QS-67 360° 8 kg | 17.6 lbs 4.62 kg | 10.19 lbs

ABEO 203AV 635 mm | 25 in 1565 mm | 61 5/8 in 1275 mm | 50 1/4 in 20 mm 3 PH-111V +60°~ -90° QS-36 360° 2 kg | 4.4 lbs 1.56 kg | 3.43 lbs

ABEO 243AV

ABEO 283AV

ABEO 243CV

ABEO 283CV

675 mm | 26 5/8 in 1570 mm | 61 3/4 in 1350 mm | 53 1/8 in 24 mm 3 PH-113V +45°~ -90° QS-66 360° 6 kg | 13.2 lbs 2.05 kg | 4.51 lbs

720 mm | 28 3/8 in 1690 mm | 66 1/2 in 1470 mm | 57 5/8 in 28 mm 3 PH-114V +60°~ -90° QS-66 360° 8 kg | 17.6 lbs 2.50 kg | 5.51 lbs

675 mm | 26 5/8 in 1570 mm | 61 3/4 in 1350 mm | 53 1/8 in 24 mm 3 PH-113V +45°~ -90° QS-66 360° 6 kg | 13.2 lbs 1.77 kg | 3.89 lbs

720 mm | 28 3/8 in 1690 mm | 66 1/2 in 1470 mm | 57 5/8 in 28 mm 3 PH-114V +60°~ -90° QS-66 360° 8 kg | 17.6 lbs 2.1 kg | 4.62 lbs

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© Pete Webb - www.petewebb.com

Features • Ultra compact and lightweight • Enables low-angle photography • Legs adjust to 25, 50 and 80-degree angles • Advanced camera vibration control • Convertible spiked rubber feet

SBH Ball Head •Lightweight magnesium alloy • Precision-cut ball head • Two bubble levels • Fine-tuning function

GH-100 •360 degree 8 position handle • Friction control switch

Alta+ tripod kits with

• 72-click point panorama • Anodized center ball

Pan Head

Alta+ Kit Series H ailed as the world’s most lightweight and compact highquality tripods, VANGUARD Alta+ tripods were designed by professional photographers to meet the most demanding requirements - all in a sleek, modern design. Alta+ is perfect for air travel and backpacking. Alta+ combines ultra stability, durability, easy of use and reliability every photographer or spotting scope user

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needs. Its legs adjust to 25, 50 and 80-degree angles with a simple push of easy-release buttons for easy terrain changes and low angle-shooting. Other features include advanced camera vibration and shock control, all-weather foam grip legs, patented premium magnesium die-cast canopy and head, non-slip, spiked rubber feet for changing terrains, and a removable hook for hanging camera accessories.

Anti-shock rings helps protect your camera safe if center column accidentally drops

OR

OR

Ball Head

Quick & easy to use leg angle button

Grip Head

Includes a Tripod Bag

Alta+ Kit Series Specifications Folded Height Extended Height Min. Extended Height Diameter of Leg Number of Sections Head Rotation Quick Shoe Max. Loading Weight

Alta+ 233AO

Alta+ 264AO

Alta+ 263AGH

Alta+ 234AB

610 mm | 24 in 1450 mm | 57 1/8 in 1185 mm | 46 5/8 in 23mm 3 PH-21 360° QS-52 3.0 kg | 6.6 lbs 1.60 kg | 3.53 lbs

640 mm | 25 3/8 in 1780 mm | 70 1/8 in 1515 mm | 59 5/8 in 26 mm 4 PH-31 360° QS-52 5.0 kg | 11.0 lbs 2.1 kg | 4.63 lbs

670 mm | 26 3/8 in 1640 mm | 64 5/8 in 1310 mm | 51 1/2 in 26 mm 3 GH-100 360° QS-65GH 5.0 kg | 11.0 lbs 2.16 kg | 4.75 lbs

535 mm | 21 1/8 in 1450 mm | 57 1/8 in 1240 mm | 48 7/8 in 23 mm 4 SBH-50 360° QS-39 3.0 kg | 6.6 lbs 1.50 kg | 3.31 lbs

Alta+ 235AB 50 475 mm | 18 3/4 in 1245 mm | 49 in 1140 mm | 44 7/8 in 23 mm 5 SBH-50 360° QS-39 3.0 kg | 6.6 lbs 1.45 kg | 3.20 lbs

Alta+ 263AB 100 660 mm | 26 in 1650 mm | 65 in 1330 mm | 52 3/8 in 26 mm 3 SBH-100 360° QS-39 5.0 kg | 11.0 lbs 1.95 kg | 4.30 lbs

Alta+ 264AB 100 570 mm | 22 1/2 in 1540 mm | 60 5/8 in 1305 mm | 51 3/8 in 26 mm 4 SBH-100 360° QS-39 5.0 kg | 11.0 lbs 1.94 kg | 4.28 lbs

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Kinray Lite 32/45/48

© Pete Webb - www.petewebb.com

Features

C

reated to meet the needs of active photographers and nature enthusiasts, Kinray Lite sling bag and daypacks provide a streamlined, lightweight carrying solution for nearly any outdoors application.

Kinray Lite 15B/22B • 2-in-1 beltpack with removable inner box

Modeled after our acclaimed Kinray series outdoor bags, Kinray Lite daypacks and slings can be easily arranged for use as a daypack with side camera access and space for accessories or a top-loading backpack to carry a spotting scope, binoculars, and other observation needs. Or

• Versatile beltpack can be carried in multiple ways • Size 22B with tuck-away belt and shoulder strap • Front and side accessory pockets • Rain cover included

remove the soft inner compartment for use as an everyday backpack. Kinray Lite offers plenty of space for outdoors essentials, including an upper compartment for personal items, zippered front pocket, and side mesh pocket for carrying a water bottle. Kinray Lite also features a monopod/ walking stick holder, ergonomic harness system with chest and waist strap, and rain cover for protection from the elements.

Kinray Lite 32/45/48 • One bag for any occasion: can be used as photo-video daypack or backpack or everyday backpack • Quick Side Access • Holding system for monopod, walking stick or travel-size tripod • Multiple accessory pockets • Ergonomic harness system • Rain cover included

Kinray Lite series

One bag for all: Size 32/45/48 with removable inner box can be used as photo-video daypack, backpack & everyday backpack.

ersatile Kinray Lite belt packs provide multiple carrying solutions for active photographers and outdoor enthusiasts who want their gear on hand in a compact, convenient package. Wear Kinray Lite belt pack around your waist or sling-style over one shoulder for quick, unencumbered access to equipment. A soft inner compartment

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with adjustable dividers safely houses your camera and accessories or binoculars and can easily be removed, transforming Kinray Lite into an everyday bag. Size 22 also includes a tuck-away waist belt and detachable shoulder strap for even more carrying options. Kinray Lite belt packs also feature pockets and pouches for accessories and include a rain cover.

Monopod/ walking stick holding system (for size 32/45/48)

Kinray Lite Series Specifications

Kinray Lite 15B/22B

V

Versatile beltpack: Beltpack models can be carried in the way you want.

Inside Dimensions (L x W x D) Outside Dimensions (L x W x D) Max. Loading Weight

Kinray Lite 15B

Kinray Lite 22B

150 × 105 × 145 mm | 5 7/8 × 4 1/8 × 5 3/4 in 220 × 140 × 170 mm | 8 5/8 × 5 1/2 × 6 3/4 in 1.7 kg | 3.75 lbs 0.23 kg | 0.51 lbs

220 × 110 × 180 mm | 8 5/8 × 4 3/8 × 7 1/8 in 260 × 170 × 190 mm | 10 1/4 × 6 3/4 × 7 1/2 in 2.8 kg | 6.17 lbs 0.38 kg | 0.84 lbs

Main compartment Color BK GR

Kinray Lite 32 Inside Dimensions (L x W x D) Outside Dimensions (L x W x D) Max. Loading Weight

190 × 130 × 180 mm | 7 1/2 × 5 1/8 × 7 1/8 in 240 × 170 × 340 mm | 9 1/2 × 6 3/4 × 13 3/8 in 3 kg | 6.61 lbs 0.51 kg | 1.12 lbs

Kinray Lite 45 200 × 130 × 230 mm | 7 7/8 × 5 1/8 × 9 in 260 × 205 × 460 mm | 10 1/4 × 8 1/8 × 18 1/8 in 4.50 kg | 9.92 lbs 0.81 kg | 1.79 lbs

BK GR

Kinray Lite 48 240 × 130 × 240 mm | 9 1/2 × 5 1/8 × 9 1/2 in 280 × 205 × 490 mm | 11 × 8 1/8 × 19 1/4 in 6.50 kg | 14.33 lbs 0.89 kg | 1.96 lbs

Main compartment Color BK GR

BK GR

BK GR

87.


Accessories

6-in-1 Cleaning Kit (CK6N1) Great for cameras, computer screens, TVs, cell phones, and other electronics devices.

2-in-1 Cleaning Kit (CK2N1)

Power lens cleaner 45 mm rubber bulb diameter 165 mm long

Compact lens cleaner with soft microfiber cleaning cloth. Compact size is great for travel.

Microfiber cleaning cloth 300 x300 mm (11 3/4 x 11 3/4 inches)

Lens cleaner - 17 mm diameter - 95 mm long

Cleaning liquid - Cleaning liquid spray bottle: 60 ml

Microfiber cleaning cloth -300 x 300 mm (11 3/4 x 11 3/4 inches)

Pre-moistened and dry lens combo - 6 pcs/set Cleaning sticks - 10 pcs/set Cleaning tissue - 30 pcs/set - Cleaning kit carrying bag

Travel Pack Alcohol-free, all-natural cleaning liquid and cleaning cloth

1

Brush

2

Flexible polishing tip

Rub tissue. Then apply to lens

Cotton-tipped sticks for cleaning crevices and edges

BA-185 Binocular/Tripod Adaptor

Cleaning Cloth

• Provides stable viewing • Works with VANGUARD roof prism binoculars

3-in-1 Cleaning Kit (CK3N1) Triple-function power lens cleaner with soft microfiber cleaning cloth with cleaning solution. Great for camera lenses and other electronics.

PA Series Camera Adaptor

Power lens cleaner - 45 mm rubber bulb diameter - 165 mm long Microfiber cleaning cloth -300 x 300 mm (11 3/4 x 11 3/4 inches) Cleaning liquid - Cleaning liquid spray bottle: 30 ml

• PA-202 Digiscoping Adaptor for Endeavor HD ( 65A/65S/82A) & Endeavor XF (60A/60S/82A) Spotting Scopes

Bonus 58-52 mm Step-Down Ring included

Optic Guard Adjustable binocular harness for even weight distribution and comfortable extended use.

1 88.

Air blower

2

Brush

3

Flexible polishing tip

Alcohol-free, all-natural cleaning solution

Ultra-soft microfiber, non-linting cleaning cloth

89.


Specifications & Compatibilities

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Specifications

Orros Series Orros 8250

Endeavor ED Series Endeavor ED 8420 Power Diameter of Objective Field of View View Angle Near Focus Eye Relief Dimension (L x W) Weight Adjustable Pupillary

Endeavor ED 8545

Endeavor ED 1042

8.5 45 mm 114 m/1000m | 340 ft/1000yds 6.5 ° 2.5m | 8.2 ft 19 mm 159 x 130 mm | 6.25 x 5.13 in 770 g | 27.2 oz 58.5-73 mm

10 42 mm 114 m/1000m | 340 ft/1000yds 6.5 ° 2.5m | 8.2 ft 16.5 mm 154 x 130 mm | 6 x 5.13 in 730 g | 25.8 oz 58-74 mm

8 42 mm 122 m/1000m | 367 ft/1000yds 7.0 ° 2.5m | 8.2 ft 19 mm 154 x 130 mm | 6 x 5.13 in 730 g | 25.8 oz 58-74 mm

Endeavor ED 1045 10.5 45 mm 105 m/1000m | 314 ft/1000yds 6.0 ° 3 m | 9.8 ft 17 mm 156 x 130 mm | 6.13 x 5.13 in 760 g | 26.8 oz 58.5-73 mm

Spirit ED Series Power Diameter of Objective Field of View View Angle Near Focus Eye Relief Dimension (L x W) Weight Adjustable Pupillary

Spirit ED 8360 8 36 mm 122 m/1000m | 367 ft/1000yds 7.0 ° 2 m | 6.6 ft 17 mm 125 x 120 mm | 4.88 x 4.75 in 530 g | 18.7 oz 55-75 mm

Spirit ED 8420

Spirit ED 1042

Spirit ED 1050

8 42 mm 110 m/1000m | 330 ft/1000yds 6.3 ° 2.5m | 8.2 ft 19 mm 145 x 125 mm | 5.75 x 4.88 in 640 g | 22.6 oz 55-75 mm

10 42 mm 105 m/1000m | 314 ft/1000yds 6° 2.8 m | 9.2 ft 16 mm 145 x 125 mm | 5.75 x 4.88 in 640 g | 22.6 oz 55-75 mm

10 50 mm 98 m/1000m | 295 ft/1000yds 5.6 ° 3 m | 9.8 ft 19 mm 165 x 135 mm | 6.5 x 5.38 in 845 g | 29.8 oz 59.5-74 mm

Power Diameter of Objective Field of View View Angle Near Focus Eye Relief Dimension (L x W) Weight Adjustable Pupillary

Orros 1025

Endeavor HD 65A Power Diameter of Objective Field of View View Angle Near Focus Eye Relief Dimension (L x W) Weight Viewing System

15-45 65 mm 48-23 m/1000m | 144-68 ft/1000yds 2.75-1.3 ° 4.5-5.5 m | 14.8-18 ft 19-20 mm 345 x 175 mm | 13.6 x 6.9 in 1450 g | 51.10 oz Angled

Endeavor HD 65S

Endeavor HD 82A 20-60 82 mm 37-17 m/1000m | 110-52 ft/1000yds 2.1-1.0 ° 6-6.5 m | 19.7-21.33 ft 19-20 mm 375 x 180 mm | 14.8 x 7.1 in 1890 g | 66.70 oz Angled

15-45 65 mm 48-23 m/1000m | 144-68 ft/1000yds 2.75-1.3 ° 4.5-5.5 m | 14.8-18 ft 19-20 mm 350 x 120 mm | 13.8 x 4.8 in 1450 g | 51.10 oz Straight

Endeavor XF Series Power Diameter of Objective Field of View View Angle Near Focus Eye Relief Dimension (L x W) Weight Viewing System

Endeavor XF 60A

Endeavor XF 60S

Endeavor XF 80A

15-45 60 mm 47-23 m/1000m | 141-168 ft/1000yds 2.7-1.3 ° 5-6 m | 16.4-19.7 ft 19-20 mm 350 x 180 mm | 13.8 x 7.1 in 1280 g | 45.2 oz Angled

15-45 60 mm 47-23 m/1000m | 141-168 ft/1000yds 2.7-1.3 ° 5-6 m | 16.4-19.7 ft 19-20 mm 355 x 125 mm | 14 x 4.8 in 1310 g | 46.2 oz Straight

20-60 80 mm 37-17 m/1000m | 110-52 ft/1000yds 2.1-1.0 ° 6-6..5 m | 19.7-21.33 ft 19-20 mm 380 x 180 mm | 15 x 7.1 in 1680 g | 59.3 oz Angled

DM-6250

DM-8250

Orros 1042 10 42 mm 100 m/1000m | 298 ft/1000yds 5.7 ° 2.1m | 6.9 ft 18 mm 145 x 130 mm | 5.75 x 5.13 in 600 g | 21.2 oz 58-74 mm

8 42 mm 109 m/1000m | 327 ft/1000yds 6.25 ° 2.1m | 6.9 ft 21 mm 145 x 130 mm | 5.75 x 5.13 in 600 g | 21.2 oz 58-74 mm

MZ-61125C

MZ-82425C 8-24 25 mm 66-35 m/1000m | 199-105 ft/1000yds 3.8-2 ° 0.35 m | 1.1 ft 8 mm 115 x 35 mm | 4.5 x 1.38 in 125 g | 4.4 oz NA

6-12 25 mm 70-42 m/1000m | 209-126 ft/1000yds 4-2.4 ° 0.35 m | 1.1 ft 8 mm 115 x 35 mm | 4.5 x 1.38 in 125 g | 4.4 oz NA

8 25 mm 122 m/1000m | 367 ft/1000yds 7° 0.35 m | 1.1 ft 8.6 mm 95 x 30 mm | 3.75 x 1.13 in 110 g | 3.9 oz NA

6 25 mm 140 m/1000m | 419 ft/1000yds 8° 0.35 m | 1.1 ft 13.5 mm 95 x 30 mm | 3.75 x 1.13 in 110 g | 3.9 oz NA

Power Diameter of Objective Field of View View Angle Near Focus Eye Relief Dimension (L x W) Weight Adjustable Pupillary

ABEO Plus & ABEO kit Series Folded Height Extended Height Min. Extended Height Diameter of Leg Number of Sections Head Front Tilt Quick Shoe Rotation Max. Loading Weight

805 mm | 313/4 in 1905 mm | 75 in 1545 mm | 60 7/8 in 32 mm 3 PH-123V +60°~ -90° QS-67 360° 6 kg | 13.2 lbs 3.74 kg | 8.2 lbs

ABEO 203AV

840 mm | 33 1/8 in 2015 mm | 79 1/4 in 1700 mm | 66 7/8 in 36 mm 3 PH-124V +60°~ -90° QS-67 360° 8 kg | 17.6 lbs 4.62 kg | 10.19 lbs

635 mm | 25 in 1565 mm | 61 5/8 in 1275 mm | 50 1/4 in 20 mm 3 PH-111V +60°~ -90° QS-36 360° 2 kg | 4.4 lbs 1.56 kg | 3.43 lbs

ABEO 243AV

ABEO 283AV

ABEO 243CV

ABEO 283CV

675 mm | 26 5/8 in 1570 mm | 61 3/4 in 1350 mm | 53 1/8 in 24 mm 3 PH-113V +45°~ -90° QS-66 360° 6 kg | 13.2 lbs 2.05 kg | 4.51 lbs

720 mm | 28 3/8 in 1690 mm | 66 1/2 in 1470 mm | 57 5/8 in 28 mm 3 PH-114V +60°~ -90° QS-66 360° 8 kg | 17.6 lbs 2.50 kg | 5.51 lbs

675 mm | 26 5/8 in 1570 mm | 61 3/4 in 1350 mm | 53 1/8 in 24 mm 3 PH-113V +45°~ -90° QS-66 360° 6 kg | 13.2 lbs 1.77 kg | 3.89 lbs

720 mm | 28 3/8 in 1690 mm | 66 1/2 in 1470 mm | 57 5/8 in 28 mm 3 PH-114V +60°~ -90° QS-66 360° 8 kg | 17.6 lbs 2.1 kg | 4.62 lbs

Alta+ kit Series Folded Height Extended Height Min. Extended Height Diameter of Leg Number of Sections Head Rotation Quick Shoe Max. Loading Weight

Alta+ 233AO

Alta+ 264AO

Alta+ 263AGH

Alta+ 234AB

610 mm | 24 in 1450 mm | 57 1/8 in 1185 mm | 46 5/8 in 23mm 3 PH-21 360° QS-52 3.0 kg | 6.6 lbs 1.60 kg | 3.53 lbs

640 mm | 25 3/8 in 1780 mm | 70 1/8 in 1515 mm | 59 5/8 in 26 mm 4 PH-31 360° QS-52 5.0 kg | 11.0 lbs 2.1 kg | 4.63 lbs

670 mm | 26 3/8 in 1640 mm | 64 5/8 in 1310 mm | 51 1/2 in 26 mm 3 GH-100 360° QS-65GH 5.0 kg | 11.0 lbs 2.16 kg | 4.75 lbs

535 mm | 21 1/8 in 1450 mm | 57 1/8 in 1240 mm | 48 7/8 in 23 mm 4 SBH-50 360° QS-39 3.0 kg | 6.6 lbs 1.50 kg | 3.31 lbs

Alta+ 235AB 50 475 mm | 18 3/4 in 1245 mm | 49 in 1140 mm | 44 7/8 in 23 mm 5 SBH-50 360° QS-39 3.0 kg | 6.6 lbs 1.45 kg | 3.20 lbs

Alta+ 263AB 100

Alta+ 264AB 100

660 mm | 26 in 1650 mm | 65 in 1330 mm | 52 3/8 in 26 mm 3 SBH-100 360° QS-39 5.0 kg | 11.0 lbs 1.95 kg | 4.30 lbs

570 mm | 22 1/2 in 1540 mm | 60 5/8 in 1305 mm | 51 3/8 in 26 mm 4 SBH-100 360° QS-39 5.0 kg | 11.0 lbs 1.94 kg | 4.28 lbs

Kinray Lite Series Inside Dimensions (L x W x D) Outside Dimensions (L x W x D) Max. Loading Weight

Spirit XF Series

Orros 8420

8 32 mm 122 m/1000m | 367 ft/1000yds 7.0 ° 2.1m | 6.9 ft 16.5 mm 130 x 125 mm | 5.13 x 4.88 in 510 g | 18 oz 58-74 mm

DM/MZ Series

ABEO Plus 323AV ABEO Plus 363AV

Endeavor HD Series

Orros 8320

10 25 mm 110 m/1000m | 330 ft/1000yds 6.3 ° 2.5m | 8.2 ft 10 mm 115 x 120 mm | 4.5 x 4.75 in 280 g | 9.9 oz 58-72 mm

8 25 mm 114 m/1000m | 340 ft/1000yds 6.5 ° 2.5m | 8.2 ft 12.5 mm 110 x 120 mm | 4.38 x 4.75 in 280 g | 9.9 oz 58-72 mm

Kinray Lite 15B

Kinray Lite 22B

150 × 105 × 145 mm | 5 7/8 × 4 1/8 × 5 3/4 in 220 × 140 × 170 mm | 8 5/8 × 5 1/2 × 6 3/4 in 1.7 kg | 3.75 lbs 0.23 kg | 0.51 lbs

220 × 110 × 180 mm | 8 5/8 × 4 3/8 × 7 1/8 in 260 × 170 × 190 mm | 10 1/4 × 6 3/4 × 7 1/2 in 2.8 kg | 6.17 lbs 0.38 kg | 0.84 lbs

Main compartment

Power Diameter of Objective Field of View View Angle Near Focus Eye Relief Dimension (L x W) Weight Adjustable Pupillary

Spirit XF 8420

Spirit XF 1042

8 42 mm 136 m/1000m | 409 ft/1000yds 7.8 ° 2.1m | 6.9 ft 20 mm 150 x 130 mm | 5.88 x 5.13 in 700 g | 24.69 oz 57-74 mm

10 42 mm 111 m/1000m | 332 ft/1000yds 6.35 ° 2.1m | 6.9 ft 16 mm 150 x 130 mm | 5.88 x 5.13 in 665 g | 23.46 oz 57-74 mm

Color BK GR

Kinray Lite 32 Inside Dimensions (L x W x D) Outside Dimensions (L x W x D) Max. Loading Weight

190 × 130 × 180 mm | 7 1/2 × 5 1/8 × 7 1/8 in 240 × 170 × 340 mm | 9 1/2 × 6 3/4 × 13 3/8 in 3 kg | 6.61 lbs 0.51 kg | 1.12 lbs

Kinray Lite 45 200 × 130 × 230 mm | 7 7/8 × 5 1/8 × 9 in 260 × 205 × 460 mm | 10 1/4 × 8 1/8 × 18 1/8 in 4.50 kg | 9.92 lbs 0.81 kg | 1.79 lbs

Kinray Lite 48 240 × 130 × 240 mm | 9 1/2 × 5 1/8 × 9 1/2 in 280 × 205 × 490 mm | 11 × 8 1/8 × 19 1/4 in 6.50 kg | 14.33 lbs 0.89 kg | 1.96 lbs

Main compartment Color BK GR

92.

BK GR

BK GR

BK GR

93.


www.vanguardworld.com


2013 VANGUARD SPORTING OPTICS CATALOGUE  

BINOCULARS SPOTTING SCOPES TRIPODS BAGS ACCESORIES

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