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O C T O B E R

N E W S L E T T E R

HIP to be HEALTHY BY: VANESSA CAMPBELL, B.SC., RHN

CERTIFIED NUTRITIONAL CONSULTANT

What is a Nutritional Consultant? A   Nutritionist   is   a   health   practitioner   who   recognizes   that   the   body   is   influenced   by   many   different   aspects   such   as   food,   drink,   exercise,   emotions,   environment,  stress  and  so  on.     We   work   together   with   the   client   to   bring   awareness   and   understanding   of   the   benefits   and   health   impact   of   optimal   nutrition.   “True   healing   begins   with   awareness:  awareness  of  self,  first   of  all,  to  discover  how  we  function.   With   awareness   comes   responsibility.  We  are  the  cause  of   our   illness   and   can   therefore   be   actively   responsible   for   our   own   healing.   True   healing   is   not   just   getting  rid  of  a  headache,  it  means   discovering   why   we   have   a   headache  in  the  first  place.”    

-­‐Annemarie  Colbin  

Do  you  ever  wonder  how  we  have  become  a  society  obsessed  with   fat?  Sure,  not  all  fats  are  created  equal  when  it  comes  to  our  diet   but   that   doesn’t   mean   we   should   eliminate   fat   altogether.   Educating   ourselves   on   the   different   types   of   fat   available   and   choosing   more   foods   which   contain   beneficial   fats,   will   help   us   not   only   improve   our   personal   health   but   also   help   dissolve   the   negative  connotation  that  often  accompanies  the  word  “fat.”  Read   more  to  find  out  why  F-­‐A-­‐T-­‐S  aren’t  really  as  scary  as  they  seem…  

e: info@hiptobehealthy.com

t: 705-770-4143

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Getting  the  skinny  on  essential  fats   Escaping the “Fat Phobia” We have all been subjected to the “fat phobia” that continues to get attention, despite research which clearly shows that fat is a necessary part of a balanced diet. Products which boast labels that read low fat and fat-free bombard us daily. Did you know that a diet that is deficient in healthy fats could seriously affect your health status? Fats can be classified into three main categories: saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated. One should not eliminate any of these fats from their diet, but rather balance and moderate the consumption of each. Polyunsaturated fats are of utmost importance as they include the essential fatty acids. They are termed essential because they cannot be produced by the body and therefore must be obtained from the foods we eat. These essential fatty acids are also known as omega-3 and omega-6. Why are the omegas so essential? Firstly, your body is made up of many cells. Each cell has an outer membrane that surrounds the cell. These membranes are made up of fats, particularly the essential fatty acids.

Are you deficient?

Having strong cell membranes composed of these healthy fats increases the cells’ ability to communicate with other cells and helps the cell respond appropriately to regulating hormones such as insulin. Also, if the cell membrane is strong, this decreases the chance of bacteria and viruses entering the cell and doing damage.

Sure signs of a lack of essential fatty acids in the diet include: dry skin and hair, psoriasis, eczema, impaired mental ability, decreased memory, constipation, anxiety, inflammation and depression. The typical North American diet obtains sufficient levels of omega-6. It is often the omega-3’s that are lacking. It is important to keep these two omegas within a proper ratio, which is still up for debate, but most experts recommend somewhere between a 2:1- 4:1 ratio in favor of omega-6.

HIP TO BE HEALTHY OCTOBER 2010 NEWSLETTER


Incorporating healthy fats into your daily routine A decreased amount of omega-3 relative to omega-6 can increase the risk of degenerative disease.   A great way to start including more healthy fats into your diet is by consuming more raw nuts and seeds as well as their organic and unrefined oil counterparts. Making a weekly dinner reservation with wild and fresh fish such as salmon, mackerel, and herring is another great way to incorporate more omega-3 into your diet. If your palate does not prefer fish, nuts, or seeds, a fish oil supplement is an alternative means of obtaining adequate levels of omega-3. In this case, be sure to find a source that is pharmaceutical grade as well as independently tested for quality and purity.  

One should limit their overall fat intake to 20% to 25% of their total caloric intake. For example, based on a 2,000 calorie per day diet, you should aim to consume between 400-500 calories from fats. That being said, it is important that your fat intake is composed of all types of fat. To start, begin reducing the amount of saturated fat in your diet by reducing the number of animal products you consume and begin replacing them with more plant based foods. Also, eliminating margarine and foods containing trans-fatty acids and partially hydrogenated oils from the diet is also advantageous. Hydrogenation creates fats, which interfere with the utilization of essential fatty acids. Fats are nothing to be afraid of as long as you are eating the right type of fats and in the right proportions. So if optimal nutrition is your goal, then it is essential that you start including these healthy fats in your diet today.

Healthy Hummus A great way to increase your protein intake and decrease saturated fat!

1 can drained chickpeas ¾ Tbsp. finely chopped garlic 2 Tbsp. lemon juice 4 Tbsp. Olive or Flax oil ¼ cup Tahini (sesame seed paste, check your natural value section of your local grocery store) Freshly chopped parsley for garnish

1. Place all ingredients in a food processor or blender and puree until smooth. Sprinkle parsley on top. 2. Enjoy with your favorite crunchy vegetables.

SOURCE: My mom!

Optional: add diced jalepenos for a spicier version.

HIP TO BE HEALTHY OCTOBER 2010 NEWSLETTER


October newsletter