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Prepare for Real-World Litigation Practice Vanderbilt Law School’s Branstetter Litigation and Dispute Resolution Program prepares students for the real world of litigation practice by acquainting them with the wide variety of ways that disputes are resolved, including arbitration, court-supervised settlement, mediation, negotiation and trial. The program offers students an advanced legal curriculum designed to enable them to step immediately into sophisticated litigation practice anywhere in the nation.

FAST FACTS

BRANSTETTER

Vanderbilt Law School | 131 21st Avenue South Nashville Tennessee 37203 (615) 322-6452 | (615) 322-1531 fax law.vanderbilt.edu

LITIGATION & DISPUTE RESOLUTION PROGRAM

The program’s name underscores a simple fact: The vast majority of litigation in the U.S. today results in settlements rather than trials. As a result, litigation practice today primarily involves the management and resolution of disputes. Students who complete Vanderbilt’s program are prepared to enter legal practice with both a practical and conceptual understanding of the different methods that our justice system employs to resolve disputes. The curriculum includes courses taught by accomplished Vanderbilt Law professors and by leading practitioners and judges from across the nation. In addition, nationally recognized practitioners teach short courses each year that integrate the academic study of the litigation process with an up-to-date sense of legal practice.

Learn more about the Branstetter Litigation & Dispute Resolution Program.

© 2015 Vanderbilt University Law School

The Richard A. Nagareda Memorial Award is given each year to the student who submits the best written work in the field of litigation and dispute resolution. Monique Hannam ’15 received the 2015 prize for her paper, “Highway Discrimination: The Controversial Routing of Interstate 40 through North Nashville,” which chronicled an unsuccessful lawsuit brought in 1967 by a group of North Nashvillians seeking to stop the construction of a highway link through the heart of their community.

Develop the Competencies Litigators Need Students in the Litigation and Dispute Resolution Program develop the core competencies essential to succeed as a litigator, including strong analytical, communication, negotiation and writing skills. By placing litigation in the context of its role in the U.S. justice system, the program also teaches students what litigators do, how they interact with clients and other involved parties, and how litigation really works. Students learn to deal effectively with litigation starting in the pretrial stage, when cases may involve complicated discovery disputes and pretrial motions as well as strategy, finance and ethics. A Curriculum That Integrates Theory and Practice The program’s carefully designed curriculum combines a thorough background in the legal doctrines and theories underlying modern litigation with courses approaching the various aspects of litigation from a variety of perspectives, including psychological and economic. Students learn all of the methods our justice system uses to resolve disputes, including conventional trials, private agreements, court-approved settlements, class actions, multidistrict litigation, mediation, negotiation, arbitration and other forms of alternative dispute resolution. They also gain a practical understanding of the structure of the court system, the theory and practice of settlement negotiation, and how conventional trials work.


Prepare for Real-World Litigation Practice Vanderbilt Law School’s Branstetter Litigation and Dispute Resolution Program prepares students for the real world of litigation practice by acquainting them with the wide variety of ways that disputes are resolved, including arbitration, court-supervised settlement, mediation, negotiation and trial. The program offers students an advanced legal curriculum designed to enable them to step immediately into sophisticated litigation practice anywhere in the nation.

FAST FACTS

BRANSTETTER

Vanderbilt Law School | 131 21st Avenue South Nashville Tennessee 37203 (615) 322-6452 | (615) 322-1531 fax law.vanderbilt.edu

LITIGATION & DISPUTE RESOLUTION PROGRAM

The program’s name underscores a simple fact: The vast majority of litigation in the U.S. today results in settlements rather than trials. As a result, litigation practice today primarily involves the management and resolution of disputes. Students who complete Vanderbilt’s program are prepared to enter legal practice with both a practical and conceptual understanding of the different methods that our justice system employs to resolve disputes. The curriculum includes courses taught by accomplished Vanderbilt Law professors and by leading practitioners and judges from across the nation. In addition, nationally recognized practitioners teach short courses each year that integrate the academic study of the litigation process with an up-to-date sense of legal practice.

Learn more about the Branstetter Litigation & Dispute Resolution Program.

© 2015 Vanderbilt University Law School

The Richard A. Nagareda Memorial Award is given each year to the student who submits the best written work in the field of litigation and dispute resolution. Monique Hannam ’15 received the 2015 prize for her paper, “Highway Discrimination: The Controversial Routing of Interstate 40 through North Nashville,” which chronicled an unsuccessful lawsuit brought in 1967 by a group of North Nashvillians seeking to stop the construction of a highway link through the heart of their community.

Develop the Competencies Litigators Need Students in the Litigation and Dispute Resolution Program develop the core competencies essential to succeed as a litigator, including strong analytical, communication, negotiation and writing skills. By placing litigation in the context of its role in the U.S. justice system, the program also teaches students what litigators do, how they interact with clients and other involved parties, and how litigation really works. Students learn to deal effectively with litigation starting in the pretrial stage, when cases may involve complicated discovery disputes and pretrial motions as well as strategy, finance and ethics. A Curriculum That Integrates Theory and Practice The program’s carefully designed curriculum combines a thorough background in the legal doctrines and theories underlying modern litigation with courses approaching the various aspects of litigation from a variety of perspectives, including psychological and economic. Students learn all of the methods our justice system uses to resolve disputes, including conventional trials, private agreements, court-approved settlements, class actions, multidistrict litigation, mediation, negotiation, arbitration and other forms of alternative dispute resolution. They also gain a practical understanding of the structure of the court system, the theory and practice of settlement negotiation, and how conventional trials work.


Faculty

LDR PROGRAM FACULTY REGULARLY WIN THE LAW SCHOOL’S HALL-HARTMAN AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING TEACHING. Tracey George, who directs the program, brings a social science perspective to law and courts, examining how institutional design influences actions and outcomes in federal courts. She teaches Evidence.

Terry Maroney’s recent research

Edward Cheng’s research explores evidence law from an empirical and statistical perspective. He teaches Evidence.

legal services attorney who began her career as a Skadden Fellow with Southern Migrant Legal Services. She teaches the Immigrant Advocacy Practicum.

Paul Edelman studies judicial decision

Alistair Newbern’s work focuses on

making and public choice. He teaches Introduction to Law and Economics.

underrepresented litigants. She teaches Appellate Practice and Procedure and the Appellate Litigation Clinic, in which third-year law students practice before appellate courts on behalf of clients who otherwise could not afford representation.

Brian Fitzpatrick’s research focuses on class action litigation, federal courts and judicial selection. He teaches Civil Procedure, the Advanced Litigation Seminar, Complex Litigation, the Litigation Finance Seminar, and Federal Courts and the Federal System.

Chris Guthrie, who has served as Dean of Vanderbilt Law School since 2009, is a leading expert on behavioral law and economics, dispute resolution, negotiation and judicial decision making. He teaches Negotiation.

Alex Hurder has written extensively on problem-solving legal negotiation and disability law. He teaches the Civil Practice Clinic, in which he and his students represent clients in special education cases and Social Security disability appeals.

Susan Kay, who heads the law school’s clinics and experiential education programs, focuses on criminal procedure and professional responsibility. She teaches the Criminal Practice Clinic.

Nancy King is an expert in criminal procedure whose most recent book, Habeas for the Twenty-First Century, coauthored with Joseph Hoffmann, offers important recommendations for habeas reform. She teaches Criminal Procedure and the White-Collar Crime Seminar.

explores the impact of emotion on judicial decision making. She teaches Actual Innocence and the Law and the Emotions Seminar.

Spring Miller is a former farmworker

Erin O’Hara O’Connor’s research includes empirical explorations of party preferences for arbitration and conceptual approaches to the influence of trust and apology in dispute resolution. She teaches Arbitration Law and Conflict of Laws.

Amanda Rose focuses on complex corporate and securities litigation and the institutional design of enforcement regimes. She teaches Corporations and Business Entities and Securities Regulation.

Suzanna Sherry writes extensively on federal courts and federal court procedures. She teaches Civil Procedure, Federal Courts and the Federal System, and the Judicial Activism Seminar.

Kevin Stack’s recent work has examined how courts interpret regulations. He teaches Civil Procedure, Regulatory State and Administrative Law.

Ingrid Wuerth studies international law in domestic courts. She teaches Civil Procedure, Public International Law and The Protection of Human Rights in Europe.

Prominent judges visit Vanderbilt and meet with students each year through the Branstetter Judicial Speaker Series. In 2015, Judge Andre Davis of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit (shown above with LDR Program director Tracey George), Chief Judge Diane Wood of the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals (bottom left), and Justice Goodwin Liu of the California Supreme Court (top left) discussed their work and careers in conversations moderated by faculty. Three federal appellate judges, Raymond Lohier Jr. of the Second Circuit, Stephanie Thacker of the Fourth Circuit and John Rogers of the Sixth Circuit, presided over Vanderbilt’s final 2015 Moot Court round and participated in a panel discussion about federal clerkships. While on campus, judges teach classes and meet informally with small groups of students for coffee and meals.

OPPORTUNITIES TO GAIN PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE Vanderbilt’s clinics offer students opportunities to handle actual cases and learn about specific types of litigation cases.

Four members of the Class of 2013— (l-r) James Danly, Hunter Branstetter, Seamus Kelly and Tracey Hancock (not pictured), shown here with Professor Alistair Newbern— established an important Sixth Circuit precedent through the Appellate Legal Clinic’s representation of a Michigan prisoner in LaFountain v. Harry: That people too poor to pay the $400 filing fee in federal court have the same procedural rights as those who can pay.

Ten Branstetter Summer Fellows receive stipends each year to support their work in unpaid externships where they will gain meaningful litigation experience.

2015 Branstetter Fellows included (l to r) Daniel Gross ’17 (U.S. District CourtEastern District of Pennsylvania), Kellie Travis ‘16 (U.S. District Court-Central District of California and U.S. Court of Appeals-Fifth District); Rebecka Manis ’17 (Michigan Supreme Court and U.S. District Court-Eastern District of Michigan), John Treat ’17 (U.S. Attorney’s Office-Northern District of California), Tara Melillo ’17 (Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office), Richard Fink ’17 (U.S. District Court-District of Nevada), James Alexander ’16 (U.S. Attorney’s Office-Northern District of Ohio), Hannah Wigger ’17 (U.S. Court of Appeals-Eighth Circuit), Matthew Doster ’16 (Tennessee Attorney General’s Office) and Nicolas Abbatista ’16 (U.S. District Court-Southern District of Florida).


Prepare for Real-World Litigation Practice Vanderbilt Law School’s Branstetter Litigation and Dispute Resolution Program prepares students for the real world of litigation practice by acquainting them with the wide variety of ways that disputes are resolved, including arbitration, court-supervised settlement, mediation, negotiation and trial. The program offers students an advanced legal curriculum designed to enable them to step immediately into sophisticated litigation practice anywhere in the nation.

FAST FACTS

BRANSTETTER

Vanderbilt Law School | 131 21st Avenue South Nashville Tennessee 37203 (615) 322-6452 | (615) 322-1531 fax law.vanderbilt.edu

LITIGATION & DISPUTE RESOLUTION PROGRAM

The program’s name underscores a simple fact: The vast majority of litigation in the U.S. today results in settlements rather than trials. As a result, litigation practice today primarily involves the management and resolution of disputes. Students who complete Vanderbilt’s program are prepared to enter legal practice with both a practical and conceptual understanding of the different methods that our justice system employs to resolve disputes. The curriculum includes courses taught by accomplished Vanderbilt Law professors and by leading practitioners and judges from across the nation. In addition, nationally recognized practitioners teach short courses each year that integrate the academic study of the litigation process with an up-to-date sense of legal practice.

Learn more about the Branstetter Litigation & Dispute Resolution Program.

© 2015 Vanderbilt University Law School

The Richard A. Nagareda Memorial Award is given each year to the student who submits the best written work in the field of litigation and dispute resolution. Monique Hannam ’15 received the 2015 prize for her paper, “Highway Discrimination: The Controversial Routing of Interstate 40 through North Nashville,” which chronicled an unsuccessful lawsuit brought in 1967 by a group of North Nashvillians seeking to stop the construction of a highway link through the heart of their community.

Develop the Competencies Litigators Need Students in the Litigation and Dispute Resolution Program develop the core competencies essential to succeed as a litigator, including strong analytical, communication, negotiation and writing skills. By placing litigation in the context of its role in the U.S. justice system, the program also teaches students what litigators do, how they interact with clients and other involved parties, and how litigation really works. Students learn to deal effectively with litigation starting in the pretrial stage, when cases may involve complicated discovery disputes and pretrial motions as well as strategy, finance and ethics. A Curriculum That Integrates Theory and Practice The program’s carefully designed curriculum combines a thorough background in the legal doctrines and theories underlying modern litigation with courses approaching the various aspects of litigation from a variety of perspectives, including psychological and economic. Students learn all of the methods our justice system uses to resolve disputes, including conventional trials, private agreements, court-approved settlements, class actions, multidistrict litigation, mediation, negotiation, arbitration and other forms of alternative dispute resolution. They also gain a practical understanding of the structure of the court system, the theory and practice of settlement negotiation, and how conventional trials work.

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