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Criminal Justice Program

FAST FACTS

CRIMINAL JUSTICE PROGRAM Vanderbilt Law School | 131 21st Avenue South Nashville Tennessee 37203 (615) 322-6452 | (615) 322-1531 fax law.vanderbilt.edu

© 2015 Vanderbilt University Law School

Vanderbilt’s Criminal Justice Program offers students a thorough grounding in the theory and practice of criminal law and procedure. The United States has the biggest prison population in the world, the West’s longest sentences, more than 50 different criminal codes, and a complicated procedural regime. Criminal lawyers need to understand the principles underlying this complex system and how the rules work on the ground if they hope to achieve justice for criminal defendants, victims and society. Vanderbilt offers a comprehensive curriculum that combines cutting-edge theory with ample opportunities to gain practical skills in clinics and through externships in the offices of prosecutors and public defenders.

A complete list of electives is available on the law school’s website. Other elective courses offered each year include: International Criminal Law Juvenile Justice n National Security Law n Appellate Litigation Clinic n Criminal Practice Clinic n Family Law and Domestic Violence Clinic n n

Courses that focus entirely or significantly on criminal law that are offered at least every two years include: Actual Innocence Law and Neuroscience n Law and the Emotions Seminar n White-Collar Crime Seminar n Advanced Criminal Procedure Seminar n

An Integrated and Comprehensive Curriculum Every student takes Criminal Law in the first year. This course introduces students to the purposes of criminal punishment, the structure of criminal statutes, and basic liability and sentencing rules. In the second and third years, students may choose from an array of electives. The two basic criminal procedure courses, offered every year, cover regulation of the police, including search and seizure and interrogation rules, and “bail-to-jail” issues such as preliminary hearings, plea bargaining, the right to jury trial, double jeopardy, sentencing and habeas corpus.

Criminal Justice Program Director Chris Slobogin is the author of more than 100 articles, books and book chapters on topics relating to criminal procedure, mental health law, and evidence. In 2015, his work on surveillance was published in the Georgetown Law Journal, and he was appointed an associate reporter for the American Law Institute’s Principles of Policing.

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Visit the Criminal Justice Program page.


Criminal Justice Program

FAST FACTS

CRIMINAL JUSTICE PROGRAM Vanderbilt Law School | 131 21st Avenue South Nashville Tennessee 37203 (615) 322-6452 | (615) 322-1531 fax law.vanderbilt.edu

© 2015 Vanderbilt University Law School

Vanderbilt’s Criminal Justice Program offers students a thorough grounding in the theory and practice of criminal law and procedure. The United States has the biggest prison population in the world, the West’s longest sentences, more than 50 different criminal codes, and a complicated procedural regime. Criminal lawyers need to understand the principles underlying this complex system and how the rules work on the ground if they hope to achieve justice for criminal defendants, victims and society. Vanderbilt offers a comprehensive curriculum that combines cutting-edge theory with ample opportunities to gain practical skills in clinics and through externships in the offices of prosecutors and public defenders.

A complete list of electives is available on the law school’s website. Other elective courses offered each year include: International Criminal Law Juvenile Justice n National Security Law n Appellate Litigation Clinic n Criminal Practice Clinic n Family Law and Domestic Violence Clinic n n

Courses that focus entirely or significantly on criminal law that are offered at least every two years include: Actual Innocence Law and Neuroscience n Law and the Emotions Seminar n White-Collar Crime Seminar n Advanced Criminal Procedure Seminar n

An Integrated and Comprehensive Curriculum Every student takes Criminal Law in the first year. This course introduces students to the purposes of criminal punishment, the structure of criminal statutes, and basic liability and sentencing rules. In the second and third years, students may choose from an array of electives. The two basic criminal procedure courses, offered every year, cover regulation of the police, including search and seizure and interrogation rules, and “bail-to-jail” issues such as preliminary hearings, plea bargaining, the right to jury trial, double jeopardy, sentencing and habeas corpus.

Criminal Justice Program Director Chris Slobogin is the author of more than 100 articles, books and book chapters on topics relating to criminal procedure, mental health law, and evidence. In 2015, his work on surveillance was published in the Georgetown Law Journal, and he was appointed an associate reporter for the American Law Institute’s Principles of Policing.

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Visit the Criminal Justice Program page.


Criminal Justice Faculty The Criminal Justice Program’s faculty is ranked among the best in the nation. Christopher Slobogin, Milton

Owen Jones, New York Alumni

Michael Newton, Professor of the

R. Underwood Chair in Law and Professor of Psychiatry, is an authority on criminal procedure, mental health law, and evidence. He directs the program.

Chancellor’s Chair in Law and Professor of Biological Sciences, specializes in law and behavioral biology, and law and neuroscience.

Practice of Law, studies international humanitarian law and criminal law and is an expert on the International Criminal Court.

Susan Kay, Associate Dean for

Terry Maroney, Professor of Law

Yoli Rodero, Assistant Clinical

and Professor of Medicine, Health and Society, focuses on juvenile justice, the relevance of adolescent brain science, wrongful conviction, and law and emotion.

Professor of Law, created and directs the Family Law and Domestic Violence Clinic. She was assistant chief of the Misdemeanor Domestic Violence Unit in the Miami Dade County, Florida, State Attorney’s office.

Clinical Affairs, an expert on criminal procedure and evidence, teaches the Criminal Practice Clinic.

Nancy King, Lee S. and Charles A. Speir Professor of Law, works in the areas of habeas corpus, trials, sentencing, appeals and plea bargaining.

Nancy King, Lee S. and Charles A. Speir Professor of Law, coauthored Habeas for the 21st Century: Uses, Abuses, and the Future of the Great Writ (University of Chicago Press, 2011), which offers important recommendations for habeas reform.

Robert Mikos, Professor of Law, studies federalism and criminal law issues, including drug law and policy.

Alistair Newbern, Associate Clinical Professor of Law, teaches the Appellate Litigation Clinic and focuses on access to the courts for underrepresented litigants.

Edward Rubin, University Professor of Law and Political Science, studies and writes about constitutional law, administrative law and legal theory.

Externships in Criminal Justice Vanderbilt Law students are encouraged to serve in externships during the semester or over a summer, through which they receive course credit while gaining valuable legal experience. Students interested in criminal justice often take advantage of opportunities to engage in faculty-supervised summer or semester externships in judicial chambers or in the offices of federal and state prosecutors and public defenders. Cutting-Edge Topics in Criminal Law The Criminal Justice Program sponsors highprofile speakers, roundtables on current criminal law scholarship, and other events each year. Recent events have included a talk on capital punishment by jurisprudence expert Austin Sarat and a roundtable on Drug Law and Policy. The annual Victor S. Johnson Lecture, endowed by retired Nashville District Attorney Victor S. (Torry) Johnson III ‘74, features a distinguished speaker addressing criminal law topics.

WILL HOWELL AND LEO COSTALES, BOTH CLASS OF 2014, BECAME VANDERBILT’S FIRST GIDEON’S PROMISE FELLOWS. Vanderbilt supported Howell’s work at the Shelby County Public Defender’s Office in Memphis, Tennessee, and Costales’ work at the Office of the Public Defender in Lafayette, Louisiana. Vanderbilt’s 2015 Gideon’s Promise Fellows, Clarke Agre and Nakeisha Jackson, are working as assistant public defenders in St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana, and Knox County, Tennessee, respectively. In addition to support from Vanderbilt, fellows gain access to the Gideon’s Promise signature Core 101 three-year training program.

Zach Fardon ’92, U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois, discussed his department’s investigation and prosecution of criminal gangs in the 2014 Victor S. Johnson Lecture.

CRIMINAL LAW ASSOCIATION The Criminal Law Association, a student organization, organizes programs on jobs in the criminal justice system, field trips to local institutions and panel discussions. Association members work closely with Criminal Justice Program faculty and recently started the Riverbend Insider Support and Education (RISE) program, which provides law classes for inmates of the maximum security prison near Nashville.

“Through my Vanderbilt courses like Actual Innocence and Juvenile Justice, I discovered the right career path for me. I hope to be a passionate and effective voice for people who have effectively been silenced by society.” NAKEISHA JACKSON |

2015 Gideon’s Promise Fellow


Criminal Justice Program

FAST FACTS

CRIMINAL JUSTICE PROGRAM Vanderbilt Law School | 131 21st Avenue South Nashville Tennessee 37203 (615) 322-6452 | (615) 322-1531 fax law.vanderbilt.edu

© 2015 Vanderbilt University Law School

Vanderbilt’s Criminal Justice Program offers students a thorough grounding in the theory and practice of criminal law and procedure. The United States has the biggest prison population in the world, the West’s longest sentences, more than 50 different criminal codes, and a complicated procedural regime. Criminal lawyers need to understand the principles underlying this complex system and how the rules work on the ground if they hope to achieve justice for criminal defendants, victims and society. Vanderbilt offers a comprehensive curriculum that combines cutting-edge theory with ample opportunities to gain practical skills in clinics and through externships in the offices of prosecutors and public defenders.

A complete list of electives is available on the law school’s website. Other elective courses offered each year include: International Criminal Law Juvenile Justice n National Security Law n Appellate Litigation Clinic n Criminal Practice Clinic n Family Law and Domestic Violence Clinic n n

Courses that focus entirely or significantly on criminal law that are offered at least every two years include: Actual Innocence Law and Neuroscience n Law and the Emotions Seminar n White-Collar Crime Seminar n Advanced Criminal Procedure Seminar n

An Integrated and Comprehensive Curriculum Every student takes Criminal Law in the first year. This course introduces students to the purposes of criminal punishment, the structure of criminal statutes, and basic liability and sentencing rules. In the second and third years, students may choose from an array of electives. The two basic criminal procedure courses, offered every year, cover regulation of the police, including search and seizure and interrogation rules, and “bail-to-jail” issues such as preliminary hearings, plea bargaining, the right to jury trial, double jeopardy, sentencing and habeas corpus.

Criminal Justice Program Director Chris Slobogin is the author of more than 100 articles, books and book chapters on topics relating to criminal procedure, mental health law, and evidence. In 2015, his work on surveillance was published in the Georgetown Law Journal, and he was appointed an associate reporter for the American Law Institute’s Principles of Policing.

n

Visit the Criminal Justice Program page.

Vanderbilt law school 2015 criminal justice program  
Vanderbilt law school 2015 criminal justice program