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JUDICIAL CLERKSHIP PROGRAM FAST FACTS

FAST FACTS

Start your legal career with a judicial clerkship. A judicial clerkship is one of the most prestigious and valuable employment experiences available to a graduating student or recent law graduate. Judicial clerks gain inside knowledge of how parties pursue actual cases and how judges resolve legal issues, which is valued highly by legal employers and clients. Clerks are exposed to substantive law and procedure while developing their research and writing skills. They also have the opportunity to develop a mentoring relationship with an experienced judge and a professional network of fellow and former clerks. Clerkships are available at all levels of the federal and state court systems and with specialized courts such as bankruptcy and tax courts. The process for obtaining a clerkship is extremely competitive. Vanderbilt’s Judicial Clerkship Program provides support throughout the hiring process and has enjoyed great success in helping students and graduates secure clerkships at all levels of the judicial system. Guidance Throughout Law School and Beyond Starting in their 1L year, students are invited to general information sessions about clerkship

Vanderbilt Law School 131 21st Avenue South Nashville Tennessee 37203 (615) 322-6452 (615) 322-1531 fax law.vanderbilt.edu

© 2019 Vanderbilt University Law School

opportunities, which cover the courses and extracurricular activities during law school that help prepare a candidate for a judicial clerkship after graduation. Clerkship Program Director Michael Bressman holds informational meetings detailing the application and interviewing process and then meets with each interested student individually. Students and graduates receive guidance throughout the application process, including assistance completing and submitting application packages and preparing for interviews. Some judges prefer to hire clerks with one or more years of work experience, and Vanderbilt’s Clerkship Program supports graduates seeking a clerkship as well as current students. Success in Clerkship Placements Each year, Vanderbilt students and graduates secure clerkships with federal appellate and trial court judges, federal bankruptcy judges, and judges in state supreme, appellate and trial courts. In recent years, Vanderbilt Law graduates have also clerked with the U.S. Supreme Court, the Delaware Court of Chancery, and various specialty courts.

“Clerkships are a one-stop shop for new lawyer training. As a clerk, you’re uniquely positioned at the right hand of the judge, managing cases, researching disputed legal issues, and drafting opinions. Perhaps most importantly, you get an insider’s look at what makes a good lawyer, which will prepare you for a law job of any type, whether you’re headed to a firm, a nonprofit organization, or the government. When you start your next job, you’ll already know what a judge is looking for.” SAMIYYAH ALI | Class of 2016 Associate, Wilkinson Walsh & Eskovitz, Washington, D.C. 2018–19 Clerk, Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, U.S. Supreme Court 2017–18 Clerk, Judge Srikanth Srinivasan, U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit 2016–17 Clerk, Judge Amul R. Thapar, U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Kentucky


JUDICIAL CLERKSHIP PROGRAM FAST FACTS

FAST FACTS

Start your legal career with a judicial clerkship. A judicial clerkship is one of the most prestigious and valuable employment experiences available to a graduating student or recent law graduate. Judicial clerks gain inside knowledge of how parties pursue actual cases and how judges resolve legal issues, which is valued highly by legal employers and clients. Clerks are exposed to substantive law and procedure while developing their research and writing skills. They also have the opportunity to develop a mentoring relationship with an experienced judge and a professional network of fellow and former clerks. Clerkships are available at all levels of the federal and state court systems and with specialized courts such as bankruptcy and tax courts. The process for obtaining a clerkship is extremely competitive. Vanderbilt’s Judicial Clerkship Program provides support throughout the hiring process and has enjoyed great success in helping students and graduates secure clerkships at all levels of the judicial system. Guidance Throughout Law School and Beyond Starting in their 1L year, students are invited to general information sessions about clerkship

Vanderbilt Law School 131 21st Avenue South Nashville Tennessee 37203 (615) 322-6452 (615) 322-1531 fax law.vanderbilt.edu

© 2019 Vanderbilt University Law School

opportunities, which cover the courses and extracurricular activities during law school that help prepare a candidate for a judicial clerkship after graduation. Clerkship Program Director Michael Bressman holds informational meetings detailing the application and interviewing process and then meets with each interested student individually. Students and graduates receive guidance throughout the application process, including assistance completing and submitting application packages and preparing for interviews. Some judges prefer to hire clerks with one or more years of work experience, and Vanderbilt’s Clerkship Program supports graduates seeking a clerkship as well as current students. Success in Clerkship Placements Each year, Vanderbilt students and graduates secure clerkships with federal appellate and trial court judges, federal bankruptcy judges, and judges in state supreme, appellate and trial courts. In recent years, Vanderbilt Law graduates have also clerked with the U.S. Supreme Court, the Delaware Court of Chancery, and various specialty courts.

“Clerkships are a one-stop shop for new lawyer training. As a clerk, you’re uniquely positioned at the right hand of the judge, managing cases, researching disputed legal issues, and drafting opinions. Perhaps most importantly, you get an insider’s look at what makes a good lawyer, which will prepare you for a law job of any type, whether you’re headed to a firm, a nonprofit organization, or the government. When you start your next job, you’ll already know what a judge is looking for.” SAMIYYAH ALI | Class of 2016 Associate, Wilkinson Walsh & Eskovitz, Washington, D.C. 2018–19 Clerk, Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, U.S. Supreme Court 2017–18 Clerk, Judge Srikanth Srinivasan, U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit 2016–17 Clerk, Judge Amul R. Thapar, U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Kentucky


VLS ranked 10th among U.S. law schools for percentage of graduates going to federal clerkships in 2018. As of August 1, 2019, members of the classes of 2017, 2018 and 2019 have served or will serve clerkships in the following courts: Class of 2017 Federal Appellate Courts (15) Judge Judith W. Rogers, District of Columbia Circuit (2018–19) Judge Timothy B. Dyk, Federal Circuit (2017–18) Judge Evan J. Wallach, Federal Circuit (2018–20) Judge Kent A. Jordan, Third Circuit (2018–19) Judge A. Marvin Quattlebaum Jr., Fourth Circuit (2018-20) Judge James L. Dennis, Fifth Circuit (2017–19) Judge James E. Graves Jr., Fifth Circuit (2020-21) Judge Carolyn Dineen King, Fifth Circuit (2017–18) Judge Julia Smith Gibbons,Sixth Circuit (2017–18) Judge Gilbert S. Merritt Jr. ’60, Sixth Circuit (2017–18) Judge John M. Rogers, Sixth Circuit (2018–19) Judge Eugene E. Siler Jr., Sixth Circuit (2018–19) Judge R. Lanier Anderson III, Eleventh Circuit (2017–18) Judge R. Lanier Anderson III, Eleventh Circuit (2019–20) Judge Kevin C. Newsom, Eleventh Circuit (2017–18)

Judge Walter E. Johnson, Northern District of Georgia (2017–19) Judge William O. Bertelsman, Eastern District of Kentucky (2019–20) Judge Claria Horn Boom ’94, Eastern and Western Districts of Kentucky (2018–19) Judge Joseph M. Hood, Eastern District of Kentucky (2017–18) Judge Gregory F. Van Tatenhove, Eastern District of Kentucky (2018–19) Judge Thomas B. Russell, Western District of Kentucky (2017–19) Judge James K. Bredar, District of Maryland (2017–18) Judge Daniel P. Jordan III, Southern District of Mississippi (2017–18) Judge James C. Mahan ’73, District of Nevada (2 clerks, 2017–18) Judge Steven M. Gold, Eastern District of New York (2017–18) Judge L. Patrick Auld, Middle District of North Carolina (2017–18) Judge J. Ronnie Greer, Eastern District of Tennessee (2018–19) Judge A. Joe Fish, Northern District of Texas (2017–18) Judge Andrew S. Hanen, Southern District of Texas (2017–18) Judge David Hittner, Southern District of Texas (2017–19)

Federal District Courts (18) Judge Anthony J. Battaglia, Southern District of California (2018–19) Judge Gregory M. Sleet, District of Delaware (2017–18)

Other Federal Courts (1) Special Master Christian J. Moran, U.S. Court of Federal Claims (2017–18)

“Clerking is an amazing opportunity to witness the American justice system in action. Through my experience, I learned a tremendous amount about many different areas of law, honed my research and writing skills, and witnessed how great judges think about their cases.”

JENNA FARLEIGH | Class of 2012 Associate, Susman Godfrey, Seattle Clerk to Judge Richard C. Tallman, 2013–14, and to Judge Ronald M. Gould, 2012–13, both of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit

State Courts (7) Justice Cornelia Clark ’79, Tennessee Supreme Court (2017–18) Judge Annette Ziegler, Wisconsin Supreme Court (2017–18) Judge Jay P. Cohen, Florida Fifth District Court of Appeal (2017–18) Judge Francis J. Vernoia, New Jersey Superior Court, Appellate Division (2017–18) Judge Arnold B. Goldin, Tennessee Court of Appeals (2017–18) Magistrate Judges, District of Columbia Superior Court, Criminal Division (2019-20) Judge Thomas W. Brothers ’77, Tennessee Circuit Court (2017–19) Class of 2018 Federal Appellate Courts (4) Judge Gilbert S. Merritt Jr. ’60, Sixth Circuit (2018–19) Judge Duane Benton, Eighth Circuit (2018–19) Judge Jay S. Bybee, Ninth Circuit (2020–21) Judge William H. Pryor, Eleventh Circuit (2019–20) Federal District Courts (15) Judge Karon O. Bowdre, Northern District of Alabama (2018–19) Judge R. David Proctor, Northern District of Alabama (2018–19) Judge Brian S. Miller ’95, Eastern District of Arkansas (2 clerks, 2018–19 and 2018–20)

“I can’t imagine a more rewarding start to a career in law than clerking. I got to work on cases of all types, including torts and contract disputes, First Amendment challenges, drug-conspiracy prosecutions, antitrust class actions and more. I also learned about the process of litigation from filing or removal to dispositive motions, from discovery to trial, and from sentencing to appeal. Perhaps most importantly, I gained lifelong mentors and friends in the judges and clerks I worked alongside.”

MATTHEW DOWNER | Class of 2014 Associate, Kirkland & Ellis, Washington, D.C. Clerk to Judge Raymond M. Kethledge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, 2015–16, and to Judge Amul R. Thapar of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Kentucky, 2014–15

Judge Jeffrey A. Meyer, District of Connecticut (2020-21) Judge Paul G. Byron, Middle District of Florida (2018–19) Judge Michael L. Brown, Northern District of Georgia (2018–19) Judge Leigh Martin May, Northern District of Georgia (2018–19) Judge Karen K. Caldwell, Eastern District of Kentucky (2018–19) Judge Danny C. Reeves, Eastern District of Kentucky (2018–19) Judge David J. Hale, Western District of Kentucky (2018–19) Judge Elizabeth A. Preston Deavers, Southern District of Ohio (2018–19) Judge Thomas A. Varlan ’81, Eastern District of Tennessee (2 clerks, 2018–19) Judge Cheryl A. Eifert, Southern District of West Virginia (2018–20) Federal Bankruptcy Courts (2) Judge Mark D. Houle, Central District of California (2019) Judge Louis A. Scarcella, Eastern District of New York (2018–19) State Courts (2) Judge Allison E. Accurso, New Jersey Superior Court, Appellate Division Judge Michael A. Toto, New Jersey Superior Court

Class of 2019 Federal Appellate Courts (11) Judge Karen LeCraft Henderson, District of Columbia Circuit (2019-20) Judge David B. Sentelle, District of Columbia Circuit (2020-21) Judge Michael H. Park, Second Circuit (2020-21) Judge Kent A. Jordan, Third Circuit (2021-22) Judge David Porter, Third Circuit (2020-21) Judge A. Marvin Quattlebaum Jr., Fourth Circuit (2019-20) Judge Gregg J. Costa, Fifth Circuit (2019-20) Judge Stephen A. Higginson, Fifth Circuit (2019-20) Judge Gilbert S. Merritt ’60, Sixth Circuit (2019-20) Judge John B. Nalbandian, Sixth Circuit (2019-20) Judge Duane Benton, Eighth Circuit (2019-20)

Judge Claria Horn Boom ’94, Eastern and Western Districts of Kentucky (2019-20) Judge David J. Hale, Western District of Kentucky (2019-20) Judge Lance M. Africk, Eastern District of Louisiana (2019-20) Judge Paul D. Borman, Eastern District of Michigan (2019-20) Judge David C. Bramlette III, Southern District of Mississippi (2019-20) Judge James C. Mahan ’73, District of Nevada (2019-20) Judge Travis R. McDonough ’97, Eastern District of Tennessee (2019-21) Judge Tu M. Pham, Western District of Tennessee (2019-20) State Courts (6) Justice Ricky Polston, Florida Supreme Court (2019-21) Vice Chancellor Joseph R. Slights III, Delaware Court of Chancery (2019-20) Judge Alan O. Forst, Florida Fourth District Court of Appeals (2019-20) Judge John D. Geathers, South Carolina Court of Appeals (2019-20) Judge Richard H. Dinkins ’77, Tennessee Court of Appeals (2019-21) Judge Camille R. McMullen, Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals (2019-20)

Federal District Courts (11) Judge Richard J. Leon, District of the District of Columbia (2022-23) Judge Corey L. Maze, Northern District of Alabama (2020-21) Judge Marcia Morales Howard, Middle District of Florida (2019-21)

Judicial Clerkships Nine Months After Graduation (ABA data) VLS Class

2018 2017 2016 2015 2014

Total Graduates

176 188 182 185 194

“ A clerkship is an invaluable experience for a young attorney. It’s a crash course in many substantive areas of law and in procedure. You see what it looks like to be a good lawyer, and you also gain a mentor and learn how to think and write about the law.”

ADELE EL-KHOURI

| Class of 2013 Litigation Associate, Munger Tolles & Olson, Washington, D.C. Clerk to Judge Pamela A. Harris of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, 2014–15, and to Judge Stephen A. Higginson of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, 2013–14

% Federal Clerks

Rank Among U.S. Law Schools

9.5% 9.6% 9.9% 10.3% 11.3%

10th 10th 12th 10th 8th

Learn more about Vanderbilt’s Clerkship Program.

“I can’t imagine a better transition from student to lawyer than a clerkship. Helping my judge resolve actual cases brings everything I learned in law school to life. And it has given me invaluable insight into how cases get decided and what it takes to persuade judges--my target audience for the next phase of my career.”

CAMERON NORRIS | Class of 2014 Associate, Consovoy McCarthy, Washington, D.C. Clerk to Justice Clarence Thomas of the U.S. Supreme Court, 2017–18; to Judge William H. Pryor Jr. of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit, 2015–16; and to Judge Karen LeCraft Henderson of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, 2014–15


JUDICIAL CLERKSHIP PROGRAM FAST FACTS

FAST FACTS

Start your legal career with a judicial clerkship. A judicial clerkship is one of the most prestigious and valuable employment experiences available to a graduating student or recent law graduate. Judicial clerks gain inside knowledge of how parties pursue actual cases and how judges resolve legal issues, which is valued highly by legal employers and clients. Clerks are exposed to substantive law and procedure while developing their research and writing skills. They also have the opportunity to develop a mentoring relationship with an experienced judge and a professional network of fellow and former clerks. Clerkships are available at all levels of the federal and state court systems and with specialized courts such as bankruptcy and tax courts. The process for obtaining a clerkship is extremely competitive. Vanderbilt’s Judicial Clerkship Program provides support throughout the hiring process and has enjoyed great success in helping students and graduates secure clerkships at all levels of the judicial system. Guidance Throughout Law School and Beyond Starting in their 1L year, students are invited to general information sessions about clerkship

Vanderbilt Law School 131 21st Avenue South Nashville Tennessee 37203 (615) 322-6452 (615) 322-1531 fax law.vanderbilt.edu

© 2019 Vanderbilt University Law School

opportunities, which cover the courses and extracurricular activities during law school that help prepare a candidate for a judicial clerkship after graduation. Clerkship Program Director Michael Bressman holds informational meetings detailing the application and interviewing process and then meets with each interested student individually. Students and graduates receive guidance throughout the application process, including assistance completing and submitting application packages and preparing for interviews. Some judges prefer to hire clerks with one or more years of work experience, and Vanderbilt’s Clerkship Program supports graduates seeking a clerkship as well as current students. Success in Clerkship Placements Each year, Vanderbilt students and graduates secure clerkships with federal appellate and trial court judges, federal bankruptcy judges, and judges in state supreme, appellate and trial courts. In recent years, Vanderbilt Law graduates have also clerked with the U.S. Supreme Court, the Delaware Court of Chancery, and various specialty courts.

“Clerkships are a one-stop shop for new lawyer training. As a clerk, you’re uniquely positioned at the right hand of the judge, managing cases, researching disputed legal issues, and drafting opinions. Perhaps most importantly, you get an insider’s look at what makes a good lawyer, which will prepare you for a law job of any type, whether you’re headed to a firm, a nonprofit organization, or the government. When you start your next job, you’ll already know what a judge is looking for.” SAMIYYAH ALI | Class of 2016 Associate, Wilkinson Walsh & Eskovitz, Washington, D.C. 2018–19 Clerk, Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, U.S. Supreme Court 2017–18 Clerk, Judge Srikanth Srinivasan, U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit 2016–17 Clerk, Judge Amul R. Thapar, U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Kentucky

Profile for Vanderbilt Law School

2019 Vanderbilt Law School Judicial Clerkship Program  

2019 Vanderbilt Law School Judicial Clerkship Program