Page 1

{

Promising Technologies of the Future

Information for Industry

CTTC staff members’ insights continue to guide our efforts as we make the critical transition from scientific discovery to product development and deployment. —Laurence Zwiebel, professor of biological sciences

Genetic Testing Contributes to Personalized Medicine

New, Powerful Insect Repellent Under Development

Vanderbilt is leading the nation in personalizing medicine by linking its sophisticated Electronic Medical Record (EMR) to patient genomic information in point-of-care decision making. An example of this ground breaking approach to personalized patient care is Vanderbilt’s Pharmacogenomic Resource for Enhanced Decisions in Care and Treatment (PREDICT) program. PREDICT applies genomic testing to drug prescribing, which then allows physicians to tailor drug therapies based on individual patient needs.

An insect repellent that is thousands of times more effective than DEET—the active ingredient in most commercial mosquito repellents—is in development in the laboratory of Vanderbilt Professor of Biological Sciences and Pharmacology Laurence Zwiebel. The compound works by affecting insects’ sense of smell through a newly discovered molecular channel. This product is intended to provide a new way to control the spread of malaria by disrupting a mosquito’s sense of smell, and has been supported by the Grand Challenges in Global Health Initiative funded through the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Research Program Leads to New Innovations Researchers at Vanderbilt University’s School of Engineering have developed a pipeline of technologies in energy storage and usage by virtue of participation in the Center for Compact and Efficient Fluid Power (CCEFP). Vanderbilt is developing energy storage solutions based on the efficient utilization of fluid power. One game-changing innovation from Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering Eric Barth’s laboratory utilizes elastomers in high energy-density accumulators. These accumulators are potential candidates for use in regenerative braking systems, earth moving equipment, and stationary energy storage.

{

CTTC has done an outstanding job of helping us to protect our inventions while simultaneously providing a supporting infrastructure that facilitates and enables corporate partnerships. —Eric Skaar, associate professor of pathology, microbiology, and immunology

“Vanderbilt” and the Vanderbilt logo are registered trademarks and service marks of Vanderbilt University. Produced by Vanderbilt University Creative Services and Vanderbilt Printing Services, 2012.

1207 17th Avenue South, Suite 105 Nashville, TN 37212 Phone: 615.343.2430 Fax: 615.343.4419 Email: cttc@vanderbilt.edu Web: vanderbilt.edu/cttc

facebook.com/vanderbiltCTTC

This publication is printed on FSC-certified paper with ink made from renewable resources, as part of the university’s commitment to environmental stewardship and natural resource protection.

This publication is recyclable. Please recycle it. Contains 10% recycled post-consumer content

twitter.com/vanderbiltCTTC

Mission Statement To provide professional technology commercialization services to the Vanderbilt community, thus optimizing the flow of innovation to the marketplace and generating revenue that supports future research activities, while having a positive impact on society.

Overview Vanderbilt’s Center for Technology Transfer and Commercialization (CTTC) bridges the gap between academia and industry by moving innovative products from the lab bench to the marketplace. We accomplish this by (i) serving as an efficient and effective conduit for the transfer of promising Vanderbilt technologies to industry; (ii) contributing to regional economic development by licensing locally and supporting new venture creation; and (iii) encouraging greater collaboration between academia and industry.

Focus CTTC is the conduit through which companies access technologies that are created in the course of performing research and caring for patients at Vanderbilt. We work closely with faculty researchers to evaluate, protect, and license inventions to companies, which they then develop into new products that benefit society. Vanderbilt’s expansive portfolio includes:  Educational software, content, and tools  Engineering systems  Health care IT and biomedical informatics

 Materials science nanomaterials  Medical devices and imaging  Therapeutics and diagnostics

Vanderbilt Sponsored Research and Project Awards: $587.2 million  National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding: $370.3 million  Ranked 10th in NIH funding among medical schools, based on the most recent available reports  Ranked 20th in federal research and development funding obligations among U.S. colleges and universities, based on the most recent available reports.

u.s. patents 31 issued u.s. patent applications filed 162 disclosures 167

licenses 69 and options executed

tinyurl.com/77ka499

FY 2011


Select Core Areas of Research

{

Many of Vanderbilt’s centers and institutes focus on translating methods, techniques, and devices to practical applications during the course of research. CTTC works closely with these offices to ensure that commercialization is achieved via licensing to commercial partners, or through the creation of new ventures if appropriate.

Center for Structural Biology (CSB)

Vanderbilt Institute for Integrative Biosystems Research and Education (VIBRE)

CSB leverages a host of various experimental and computational approaches to calculate the structure of various macromolecules. The center is comprised of experts skilled in bio macromolecular structure determination, modeling, and analysis. This research helps identify novel targets for therapies, as well as facilitates the improvement in the design of future drugs.

VIBRE invents and deploys techniques used to understand the intracellular metabolic and signaling control mechanisms by which biological systems regulate homeostasis, differentiation, development, growth, repair, and responses to physiological and environmental stimuli.

Areas of focus include:  Protein characterization

 Macromolecular crystallography  Biomolecular nuclear magnetic resonance  Computational structural biology  Cryo electron microscopy

Department of Biomedical Informatics (DBMI) DBMI is the largest academic department of biomedical informatics in the country. It focuses on acquiring, structuring, analyzing, and providing access to biomedical data, information, and knowledge. Major programs also exist for processing mass spectrometry data, computational structural and chemical biology, and receptor and pathway mapping software. Areas of focus include:  Computer science  Information

science  Cognitive science  Social science  Clinical and basic biological sciences  Engineering

Institute for Space and Defense Electronics (ISDE) ISDE designs and analyzes radiation-hardened electronics, develops test methods and plans for assuring radiation hardness, and creates solutions to system-specific problems related to radiation effects. Areas of focus include:  Design support, analysis, and simulation

 Test capabilities  Virtual irradiation capabilities  Computing capabilities  Facilities

Core Area Guide

Areas of focus include:  Cellular biosensors  Cellular/tissue

Mass Spectrometry Research Center (MSRC) MSRC is a state-of-the-art mass spectrometry facility and home to the National Research Resource for Imaging Mass Spectrometry, which focuses on developing imaging mass spectrometry for a host of diagnostic/prognostic purposes in areas from cancer to infectious disease. Areas of focus include:  Mass spectrometry  Proteomics

 Bioinformatics

Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience and Drug Discovery (VCNDD) VCNDD applies an academic understanding of neuroscience to the drug discovery process, thus pioneering a new model in academic drug discovery. Specialized teams of medicinal chemists, pharmacologists, and pharmacokineticists develop novel compounds with enhanced selectivity, efficacy, and in vivo safety profiles that are ready for clinical testing. VCNDD expertise includes early target validation, discovery efforts, lead optimization, and preclinical candidates. Areas of focus include:  Parkinson’s  Fragile X/autism

engineering  Biomedical imaging  Bioprocess controllers  Mathematical models for wound healing and cancer  Infectious disease detection

Vanderbilt Institute of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (VINSE)

Vanderbilt Institute of Chemical Biology (VICB) VICB membership spans 18 different Vanderbilt departments, creating a broad range of research interests including cancer, neurodegenerative disease, infectious disease, metabolic disorders, and natural products. VICB facilities provide chemical synthesis, high throughput screening, antibody production, and small molecule nuclear magnetic resonance services for members.

Vanderbilt Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (VICTR) VICTR provides a centralized structure to efficiently manage, enhance, and promote all aspects of clinical and translational research. It is the home of the Vanderbilt Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA), and serves as the coordinating center for the National Institutes of Health’s entire CTSA system. VICTR provides access to clinical investigational infrastructure, collaboration resources, and informatics and biostatistical systems to support translational research.

 Schizophrenia  Alzheimer’s

VINSE is an institute focused on new science and technology based on nanoscale materials. VINSE provides an environment where physicists, chemists, biologists, and engineers can collaboratively solve forefront problems and create new scientific understanding. Areas of focus include:  Nanobio  Nanoscale electronics

 Nanoscale optics  Nanoscience theory  Nanotechnology and new materials

Vanderbilt University Institute for Imaging Science (VUIIS) VUIIS provides state-of-the-art facilities for imaging research via multiple modalities with animals and human subjects. This allows researchers to explore disease pathophysiologies using advanced biomarkers and novel probes, apply in vivo imaging methods for monitoring disease and treatment progression, and employ contrast agents and other image enhancement techniques for improved imaging and image analysis. Areas of focus include:  Cancer  Neurological disorders

 Metabolic disorders  Cardiovascular disease

Medical-Related Areas

Therapeutics

Diagnostics/Imaging

Medical Devices

Engineering

CSB DBMI MSRC VICTR

VCNDD VICB

VUIIS

VINSE

ISDE VIBRE VINSE

{

CTTC has been essential in helping me to commercialize the injectable bone grafts we have developed at Vanderbilt, including licensing the technology to our corporate partner. —Scott Guelcher, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering


{

Promising Technologies of the Future

Information for Industry

CTTC staff members’ insights continue to guide our efforts as we make the critical transition from scientific discovery to product development and deployment. —Laurence Zwiebel, professor of biological sciences

Genetic Testing Contributes to Personalized Medicine

New, Powerful Insect Repellent Under Development

Vanderbilt is leading the nation in personalizing medicine by linking its sophisticated Electronic Medical Record (EMR) to patient genomic information in point-of-care decision making. An example of this ground breaking approach to personalized patient care is Vanderbilt’s Pharmacogenomic Resource for Enhanced Decisions in Care and Treatment (PREDICT) program. PREDICT applies genomic testing to drug prescribing, which then allows physicians to tailor drug therapies based on individual patient needs.

An insect repellent that is thousands of times more effective than DEET—the active ingredient in most commercial mosquito repellents—is in development in the laboratory of Vanderbilt Professor of Biological Sciences and Pharmacology Laurence Zwiebel. The compound works by affecting insects’ sense of smell through a newly discovered molecular channel. This product is intended to provide a new way to control the spread of malaria by disrupting a mosquito’s sense of smell, and has been supported by the Grand Challenges in Global Health Initiative funded through the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Research Program Leads to New Innovations Researchers at Vanderbilt University’s School of Engineering have developed a pipeline of technologies in energy storage and usage by virtue of participation in the Center for Compact and Efficient Fluid Power (CCEFP). Vanderbilt is developing energy storage solutions based on the efficient utilization of fluid power. One game-changing innovation from Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering Eric Barth’s laboratory utilizes elastomers in high energy-density accumulators. These accumulators are potential candidates for use in regenerative braking systems, earth moving equipment, and stationary energy storage.

{

CTTC has done an outstanding job of helping us to protect our inventions while simultaneously providing a supporting infrastructure that facilitates and enables corporate partnerships. —Eric Skaar, associate professor of pathology, microbiology, and immunology

“Vanderbilt” and the Vanderbilt logo are registered trademarks and service marks of Vanderbilt University. Produced by Vanderbilt University Creative Services and Vanderbilt Printing Services, 2012.

1207 17th Avenue South, Suite 105 Nashville, TN 37212 Phone: 615.343.2430 Fax: 615.343.4419 Email: cttc@vanderbilt.edu Web: vanderbilt.edu/cttc

facebook.com/vanderbiltCTTC

This publication is printed on FSC-certified paper with ink made from renewable resources, as part of the university’s commitment to environmental stewardship and natural resource protection.

This publication is recyclable. Please recycle it. Contains 10% recycled post-consumer content

twitter.com/vanderbiltCTTC

Mission Statement To provide professional technology commercialization services to the Vanderbilt community, thus optimizing the flow of innovation to the marketplace and generating revenue that supports future research activities, while having a positive impact on society.

Overview Vanderbilt’s Center for Technology Transfer and Commercialization (CTTC) bridges the gap between academia and industry by moving innovative products from the lab bench to the marketplace. We accomplish this by (i) serving as an efficient and effective conduit for the transfer of promising Vanderbilt technologies to industry; (ii) contributing to regional economic development by licensing locally and supporting new venture creation; and (iii) encouraging greater collaboration between academia and industry.

Focus CTTC is the conduit through which companies access technologies that are created in the course of performing research and caring for patients at Vanderbilt. We work closely with faculty researchers to evaluate, protect, and license inventions to companies, which they then develop into new products that benefit society. Vanderbilt’s expansive portfolio includes:  Educational software, content, and tools  Engineering systems  Health care IT and biomedical informatics

 Materials science nanomaterials  Medical devices and imaging  Therapeutics and diagnostics

Vanderbilt Sponsored Research and Project Awards: $587.2 million  National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding: $370.3 million  Ranked 10th in NIH funding among medical schools, based on the most recent available reports  Ranked 20th in federal research and development funding obligations among U.S. colleges and universities, based on the most recent available reports.

u.s. patents 31 issued u.s. patent applications filed 162 disclosures 167

licenses 69 and options executed

tinyurl.com/77ka499

FY 2011

CTTC Information for Industry  

Informational brochure for industry partners interested in Vanderbilt technologies.