Page 1


david d avid Bowie is content

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

DaviD D Bowie is what follows Foreword Autho uthoRR nAme [9]

DaviD Bowie DaviD is in lon onD Don Bowie’s space geoff eoffRRey mAR mARsh sh [9]

DaviD D Bowie is cut up Bowie’s process Jon sAVA sAVAge [33]

DaviD Davi D Bowie is playing guitar Bowie’s music hoWARD goo ooDA DAll ll [49]

DaviD Bowie DaviD is graphic Bowie’s Design VictoRRiAA bR Victo bRo oAckes [71]

DaviD Bowie is fashion (B (Beepeep-B Beep)_ Bowie’s style oRiole oR iole cullen [103]

DaviD D Bowie is thinking aBout out a worlD worlD to come Bowie’s Underground ch hRisto istoPheR bReeWARD [129]

Davi Bowie DaviD is aDDicteD a D Bowie’s decadance cAmille cA mille PAgli P gliA [169]

DaviD Bowie is a DaviD stanD Ding cinema Bowie’s film chRRisto istoPheR fRAyling fRAyling [187]

acknowle cknowleD cknowle Dgements [220]

picture cre reD Dits [230]

inDex [232]

Idea One | Spreads | Contents

13


david d avid Bowie is content

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

DaviD D Bowie is what follows Foreword Autho uthoRR nAme [9]

DaviD Bowie DaviD is in lon onD Don Bowie’s space geoff eoffRRey mAR mARsh sh [9]

DaviD D Bowie is cut up Bowie’s process Jon sAVA sAVAge [33]

DaviD Davi D Bowie is playing guitar Bowie’s music hoWARD goo ooDA DAll ll [49]

DaviD Bowie DaviD is graphic Bowie’s Design VictoRRiAA bR Victo bRo oAckes [71]

DaviD Bowie is fashion (B (Beepeep-B Beep)_ Bowie’s style oRiole oR iole cullen [103]

DaviD D Bowie is thinking aBout out a worlD worlD to come Bowie’s Underground ch hRisto istoPheR bReeWARD [129]

Davi Bowie DaviD is aDDicteD a D Bowie’s decadance cAmille cA mille PAgli P gliA [169]

DaviD Bowie is a DaviD stanD Ding cinema Bowie’s film chRRisto istoPheR fRAyling fRAyling [187]

acknowle cknowleD cknowle Dgements [220]

picture cre reD Dits [230]

inDex [232]

Idea One | Spreads | Contents

13


GEOFF MARSH

david Bowie is in london Bowie’s space V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Dav iD B ow ie

B ow ie in Lo n Do n

David Bowie is a pioneering artist and performer, whose career in music has spanned nearly 50 years and brought him international acclaim. This book – and the exhibition it accompanies – is the first to be produced with access to the David Bowie Archive, presenting a completely new perspective on his creative work [01]. Bowie boasts both critical and commercial success, and is recognized as one of the most daring, influential and innovative of modern performers. He has sold over 140 million albums, and his numerous awards include two Grammys, two BRITs, three MTV video music awards and an Emmy. He has been cited as a major influence on contemporary artists and designers working in many different fields [02] – from Philip Glass and Tilda Swinton to Richard Nicoll, Hedi Slimane and Jean-Paul Gaultier. Bowie’s fascination with diverse cultural influences and adept manipulation of visual presentation make him a seminal postmodern pop star [03]. This book examines Bowie’s creative process, discussing how his work has channelled wider movements in art, design, theatre and contemporary culture. It presents Bowie as an astute observer of contemporary life, whose striking interventions in visual and pop culture have left a powerful legacy. The introductory essay discusses the first 27 years of Bowie’s life (1947–1974) when he was living in London. It will focus on the decade July 1963–July 1973 – from Bowie leaving school [04] to the termination of Ziggy Stardust at the Hammersmith Apollo on 3rd July 1973.

It will be based on three sections covering the changing character of London. In 1963, London was at the peak of a ‘modernist’ outward-looking transformation represented by plans for the Post Office Tower (Labour’s ‘white heat of technology’), the new Euston Station, Centre Point style skyscrapers and high-rise flats. There was universal employment, plenty of money and optimism. The collapse of Ronan Point in May 1968 symbolized the failure of this dream. The subsequent years saw a growing retro fascination with the past represented by the ‘saving’ of St Pancras Station and then Covent Garden from demolition. By 1973 conservation, with its increasing rejection of modernist tenets, and growing introspection was beginning to be firmly established – as the UK sank into economic/ social conflict of the Miner’s Strike. The ‘psycho-geography’ of how Bowie used London. Contrary to the established stories, Bowie was brought up in what was technically still Kent. Sundridge Park was a solidly middle class area, except that Bowie lived in the smallest housing (supposedly without a bathroom) – a row of ‘railway’ cottages next to Sundridge Park station – which offered the lifeline of escape, with his older halfbrother, to the West End 35 minutes away. In the 60s, Bowie’s world was the traditional entertainment/club district of Soho – rather than the Bohemian world of fashionable Chelsea and the Kings Road. Amphetamines rather than acid. Much of his time was spent in a small area marked out by Denmark Street, Dobells Records, Trident Studios off Wardour Street (his main recording base) and the Marquee Club. It was the West End world of extremely hard working professional performers, including then session musicians like Jimmy Page and Rick Wakeman. For six years prior to the break through success of Space Oddity in 1969, Bowie honed his craft with some of the best talent in the UK. The final section will consider how London shaped Bowie’s subsequent performance career. London provided the right cultural ambience for Bowie to flourish but Bowie made himself through a driving ambition fuelled like other pop stars by the stifling limitations of post-WW2 suburban life. London certainly allowed the creation of cross gender personalities which would have been inconceivable in the US of the time outside Manhattan [05]. But while Bowie conquered London, he never could settle. On Friday 29 March 1974, Bowie left London for the USA and abandoned the UK. While he has lived in other major cities – LA, Berlin and New York – he has never come back to his birthplace (apart from touring), choosing literally to live the life of an alien. In conclusion, about 1,000,000 children left UK schools in 1963. Only a handful became successful pop stars and there is only one David Bowie. London provided the environment in which he could flourish initially, but Bowie’s eventual flight showed the limitations of London in the 1970s to be a ‘world city’ – a status it has only regained in the last twenty years.

11

Idea One | Spreads | Essay Opener

15


GEOFF MARSH

david Bowie is in london Bowie’s space V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Dav iD B ow ie

B ow ie in Lo n Do n

David Bowie is a pioneering artist and performer, whose career in music has spanned nearly 50 years and brought him international acclaim. This book – and the exhibition it accompanies – is the first to be produced with access to the David Bowie Archive, presenting a completely new perspective on his creative work [01]. Bowie boasts both critical and commercial success, and is recognized as one of the most daring, influential and innovative of modern performers. He has sold over 140 million albums, and his numerous awards include two Grammys, two BRITs, three MTV video music awards and an Emmy. He has been cited as a major influence on contemporary artists and designers working in many different fields [02] – from Philip Glass and Tilda Swinton to Richard Nicoll, Hedi Slimane and Jean-Paul Gaultier. Bowie’s fascination with diverse cultural influences and adept manipulation of visual presentation make him a seminal postmodern pop star [03]. This book examines Bowie’s creative process, discussing how his work has channelled wider movements in art, design, theatre and contemporary culture. It presents Bowie as an astute observer of contemporary life, whose striking interventions in visual and pop culture have left a powerful legacy. The introductory essay discusses the first 27 years of Bowie’s life (1947–1974) when he was living in London. It will focus on the decade July 1963–July 1973 – from Bowie leaving school [04] to the termination of Ziggy Stardust at the Hammersmith Apollo on 3rd July 1973.

It will be based on three sections covering the changing character of London. In 1963, London was at the peak of a ‘modernist’ outward-looking transformation represented by plans for the Post Office Tower (Labour’s ‘white heat of technology’), the new Euston Station, Centre Point style skyscrapers and high-rise flats. There was universal employment, plenty of money and optimism. The collapse of Ronan Point in May 1968 symbolized the failure of this dream. The subsequent years saw a growing retro fascination with the past represented by the ‘saving’ of St Pancras Station and then Covent Garden from demolition. By 1973 conservation, with its increasing rejection of modernist tenets, and growing introspection was beginning to be firmly established – as the UK sank into economic/ social conflict of the Miner’s Strike. The ‘psycho-geography’ of how Bowie used London. Contrary to the established stories, Bowie was brought up in what was technically still Kent. Sundridge Park was a solidly middle class area, except that Bowie lived in the smallest housing (supposedly without a bathroom) – a row of ‘railway’ cottages next to Sundridge Park station – which offered the lifeline of escape, with his older halfbrother, to the West End 35 minutes away. In the 60s, Bowie’s world was the traditional entertainment/club district of Soho – rather than the Bohemian world of fashionable Chelsea and the Kings Road. Amphetamines rather than acid. Much of his time was spent in a small area marked out by Denmark Street, Dobells Records, Trident Studios off Wardour Street (his main recording base) and the Marquee Club. It was the West End world of extremely hard working professional performers, including then session musicians like Jimmy Page and Rick Wakeman. For six years prior to the break through success of Space Oddity in 1969, Bowie honed his craft with some of the best talent in the UK. The final section will consider how London shaped Bowie’s subsequent performance career. London provided the right cultural ambience for Bowie to flourish but Bowie made himself through a driving ambition fuelled like other pop stars by the stifling limitations of post-WW2 suburban life. London certainly allowed the creation of cross gender personalities which would have been inconceivable in the US of the time outside Manhattan [05]. But while Bowie conquered London, he never could settle. On Friday 29 March 1974, Bowie left London for the USA and abandoned the UK. While he has lived in other major cities – LA, Berlin and New York – he has never come back to his birthplace (apart from touring), choosing literally to live the life of an alien. In conclusion, about 1,000,000 children left UK schools in 1963. Only a handful became successful pop stars and there is only one David Bowie. London provided the environment in which he could flourish initially, but Bowie’s eventual flight showed the limitations of London in the 1970s to be a ‘world city’ – a status it has only regained in the last twenty years.

11

Idea One | Spreads | Essay Opener

15


← 01: P.00 ↓ 02: P.00 → 03: P.00

Dav i D B ow i e

B owi e i n Lo nD o n

The following chapter examines David Bowie’s collaborative work with designers and his involvement in the design industry. It charts the creative teams that Bowie has brought together and show how he has drawn on and directed the talents of designers working in performance, costume, graphics and photography in order to create a powerful and popular Bowie product. Bowie is known for his changing image and sense of fashion and style. In the 70s he had a new look for every year, but it is his design choices in commissioning and creating album covers, videos and tours, that will be investigated in this chapter. At heart it is the chapter that looks at why Bowie is the perfect subject for the V&A – as The National Museum of Art and Design – focusing on the area where pop music meets visual culture and uses it to express itself. Three areas will be included: An Album, a Video and a Tour. The intention at this stage is to look at one album cover: Ziggy Stardust (1972), which is an extraordinary and iconic image; one video: Ashes to Ashes (1980) – Bowie’s work lent itself exceptionally well to video (in which the visual is as important as the music), his early work seems to anticipate the genre that had yet to be invented. Once it was, he was immediately at its forefront. And similarly with the Tour, the example I intend to use is Diamond Dogs (1974, [06-8]), which also anticipates the major spectacular rock tours that were to be such an important part of the pop music world from the late 1980s onwards. As with so many things, Bowie was there first and led the way. We have some exceptional and never-before-seen material in the exhibition, relating to the tour and it would be thrilling to include it [9-10]. Camille Paglia’s essay will place Bowie in an international context, first describing his first impact in the US at a key moment in the sexual revolution and the re-emergence of feminism – which was taking a very censorious, anti-sexual and anti-fashion turn. She argues that it took American feminism 25 years to catch up to what Bowie was doing when he debuted in the US. He was the electrifying gender prophet of that era, but feminism, which was then rejecting popular culture wholesale, could not take it in. Bowie expanded on the Warhol legacy, which waned in visibility after Warhol was shot and nearly killed in 1968 [11]. It has been reported that Bowie may have indeed had direct contact with a theatre production by gender-bending members of the Warhol group, performing in London; this would need to be confirmed. Because Warhol’s early, short, plot-less, experimental black-andwhite films (not the later commercially released Paul Morrissey feature films) are still unavailable except at the Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, that line of artistic influence in Bowie’s career has not been appreciated. We aim to set Bowie into the larger tradition of twentiethcentury avant-garde art – preceding the Warhol-Bowie line – in

terms of radical experiments in gender. For example, there was Marcel Duchamp, with his transvestite pose as Rose Selavy, as well as Salvador Dali, who projected his quirky self-portraits and florid sexual fantasies into his paintings. (The spectacular Aladdin Sane cover image has Dali touches.) It is certainly customary in art history to see Dada and Surrealism as anticipating and influencing Pop; but the standard discourse should shift slightly toward the issue of the artist’s sexual persona. There are precedents of Bowie’s style in 1920s German cabaret [12], with its overt motifs of decadence, which passed into world culture via Marlene Dietrich’s sensational feature-film debut in The Blue Angel (1930 Bowie’s ancestry as a gender-bending dandy can be traced all the way back to the nineteenth-century art for art’s sake movement, with its self-conscious cultivation of decadence. It is not coincidental that the first course Paglia created for her first job out of graduate school (at Bennington College in 1972) was called ‘Aestheticism and Decadence’ and that this was exactly when Bowie was casting his international spell.

↑ 04: P.00

↑ 05: P.00 → 06: P.00

↑ 07: P.00 → 08–10: P.00 ↓ 11: P.00 ← 12: P.00

12

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Idea One | Spreads | Essay and forthcoming images

16


← 01: P.00 ↓ 02: P.00 → 03: P.00

Dav i D B ow i e

B owi e i n Lo nD o n

The following chapter examines David Bowie’s collaborative work with designers and his involvement in the design industry. It charts the creative teams that Bowie has brought together and show how he has drawn on and directed the talents of designers working in performance, costume, graphics and photography in order to create a powerful and popular Bowie product. Bowie is known for his changing image and sense of fashion and style. In the 70s he had a new look for every year, but it is his design choices in commissioning and creating album covers, videos and tours, that will be investigated in this chapter. At heart it is the chapter that looks at why Bowie is the perfect subject for the V&A – as The National Museum of Art and Design – focusing on the area where pop music meets visual culture and uses it to express itself. Three areas will be included: An Album, a Video and a Tour. The intention at this stage is to look at one album cover: Ziggy Stardust (1972), which is an extraordinary and iconic image; one video: Ashes to Ashes (1980) – Bowie’s work lent itself exceptionally well to video (in which the visual is as important as the music), his early work seems to anticipate the genre that had yet to be invented. Once it was, he was immediately at its forefront. And similarly with the Tour, the example I intend to use is Diamond Dogs (1974, [06-8]), which also anticipates the major spectacular rock tours that were to be such an important part of the pop music world from the late 1980s onwards. As with so many things, Bowie was there first and led the way. We have some exceptional and never-before-seen material in the exhibition, relating to the tour and it would be thrilling to include it [9-10]. Camille Paglia’s essay will place Bowie in an international context, first describing his first impact in the US at a key moment in the sexual revolution and the re-emergence of feminism – which was taking a very censorious, anti-sexual and anti-fashion turn. She argues that it took American feminism 25 years to catch up to what Bowie was doing when he debuted in the US. He was the electrifying gender prophet of that era, but feminism, which was then rejecting popular culture wholesale, could not take it in. Bowie expanded on the Warhol legacy, which waned in visibility after Warhol was shot and nearly killed in 1968 [11]. It has been reported that Bowie may have indeed had direct contact with a theatre production by gender-bending members of the Warhol group, performing in London; this would need to be confirmed. Because Warhol’s early, short, plot-less, experimental black-andwhite films (not the later commercially released Paul Morrissey feature films) are still unavailable except at the Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, that line of artistic influence in Bowie’s career has not been appreciated. We aim to set Bowie into the larger tradition of twentiethcentury avant-garde art – preceding the Warhol-Bowie line – in

terms of radical experiments in gender. For example, there was Marcel Duchamp, with his transvestite pose as Rose Selavy, as well as Salvador Dali, who projected his quirky self-portraits and florid sexual fantasies into his paintings. (The spectacular Aladdin Sane cover image has Dali touches.) It is certainly customary in art history to see Dada and Surrealism as anticipating and influencing Pop; but the standard discourse should shift slightly toward the issue of the artist’s sexual persona. There are precedents of Bowie’s style in 1920s German cabaret [12], with its overt motifs of decadence, which passed into world culture via Marlene Dietrich’s sensational feature-film debut in The Blue Angel (1930 Bowie’s ancestry as a gender-bending dandy can be traced all the way back to the nineteenth-century art for art’s sake movement, with its self-conscious cultivation of decadence. It is not coincidental that the first course Paglia created for her first job out of graduate school (at Bennington College in 1972) was called ‘Aestheticism and Decadence’ and that this was exactly when Bowie was casting his international spell.

↑ 04: P.00

↑ 05: P.00 → 06: P.00

↑ 07: P.00 → 08–10: P.00 ↓ 11: P.00 ← 12: P.00

12

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Idea One | Spreads | Essay and forthcoming images

16


▩← [1] opposite | Still from Life on Mars promotional video | Costume designed by Freddie Burretti | Photograph by Mick Rock, 1973 | David Bowie Archive, New York ▩↑ [2] above | Kate Moss modelling suit worn by David Bowie in the Life on Mars promotional video | Costume designed by Freddie Burretti | Photograph by Nick Knight, 2003 | Courtesy of Trunk Archive © Nick Knight, 2003

19

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Idea One | Spreads | Image spread

17


▩← [1] opposite | Still from Life on Mars promotional video | Costume designed by Freddie Burretti | Photograph by Mick Rock, 1973 | David Bowie Archive, New York ▩↑ [2] above | Kate Moss modelling suit worn by David Bowie in the Life on Mars promotional video | Costume designed by Freddie Burretti | Photograph by Nick Knight, 2003 | Courtesy of Trunk Archive © Nick Knight, 2003

19

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Idea One | Spreads | Image spread

17


david Bowie is asking what sex are we? 20

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Idea One | Spreads | Image and David Bowie Is Statement

18


david Bowie is asking what sex are we? 20

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Idea One | Spreads | Image and David Bowie Is Statement

18


22

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Idea One | Spreads | Image spread

19


22

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Idea One | Spreads | Image spread

19


JOn SAvAGE

david Bowie is cut up Bowie’s process

[buRRoughs] The weapon of the Wild Boys is a bowie knife, an 18-inch bowie knife, did you know that? [boWie] An 18-inch bowie knife…you don’t do things by halves do you. No, I didn’t know that was their weapon, The name Bowie just appealed to me when I was younger. I was into a kind of heavy philosophy thing when I was 16 years old, and I wanted a truism about cutting through the lies and all that. [buRRoughs] Well, it cuts both ways, you know, double-edged on the end. [boWie] I didn’t see it cutting both ways till now. Craig Copetas: ‘Beat Godfather meets Glitter Mainman: William Burroughs, say hello to David Bowie’ (Rolling Stone, 28 February 1974)

On 28 February 1974, Rolling Stone published a remarkable encounter between David Bowie and William Burroughs. Entitled ‘Beat Godfather meets Glitter Mainman’, the event had been hosted in November 1973 by the American journalist A. Craig Copetas, who hoped to ‘develop a new interview style’. As published it took the form of a Q+A between the writer and the musician that, in retrospect, was an inspired piece of positioning for both parties. David Bowie was then at the zenith of his pop star cycle. Five days before the cover date, Bowie’s latest single “Rebel Rebel”, entered the British charts, where it would peak at number 5. It’s a powerful rocker – built around an irresistible riff – that is aimed directly at his audience: ‘you’ve got your mother in a whirl cause she’s/ Not sure if you’re a boy or a girl/ Hey babe, your hair’s alright/ Hey babe let’s stay out tonight/ You like me and I like it all/ We like dancing and we look divine’. With its teen address, deep androgyny and dancehall imperative, “Rebel Rebel” was very much in a line with previous Bowie hits like “John I’m Only Dancing” and “The Jean Genie”. But although nobody knew it at the time, it would be the last in that sequence. For Bowie wasn’t a traditional pop star, happy to be known for one sound or one idea and then to be quickly discarded by a fickle public. That was the Ziggy Stardust storyline and he was determined to avoid the fate of his fictional alter-ego. Late 1973 saw Bowie at a particular crossroads. Stardom had come hard and fast, after a long apprenticeship. 1972 had been his breakthrough year, with three hit singles and an extraordinarily successful album – “The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders From Mars”. His success pulled into the charts previous albums like “Hunky Dory”, “Space Oddity” and “The Man Who Sold The World” – as new fans delved into his past. He became a kind of impresario, producing hit records for Lou Reed (“Walk on the Wild Side”) and Mott the Hoople (“All The Young Dudes”) and promoting the most feral rock group then in existence, Iggy and the Stooges.

Ziggymania – as it was coined – had begun, but this was something more than stardom. David Bowie had become a phenomenon, the kind of performer that comes along just once in a generation, and pulls the whole culture along in his or her wake. His only contemporary competitors – Marc Bolan and Rod Stewart – did not have quite his allure or his cutting-edge: during this period, Bowie was moving faster and further than the media which was trying to contain him. 1973 saw no let up: with the Spiders from Mars, Bowie toured America and Japan, travelling back by train through Russia and West Germany. A new album, “Aladdin Sane”, became Bowie’s first number one. It coincided with the peak of fan mania during the group’s 61 date UK tour through the spring and early summer – and, thanks to Pierre Laroche’s red and blue ‘lighting flash’ make-up, served up the single most identifiable image of Bowie for fans and the general public alike. Ziggy was on the point of saturation. The speed at which this was happening can be judged from an archetypal low-end teen product. “Aladdin Sane” was released in April 1973. Two months later, New English Library published the novel “Glam” by Richard Allen – the sixth book in the “Skinhead” series, the 70s equivalent of penny dreadfuls. With a cover tag-line that says ‘Johnny Holland fights to stay idol of a million fans’, the main image shows a young man with a poorly executed red and blue flash right down his face. In June 1973, Bowie killed off Ziggy. It was an inspired piece of timing: the look, culture and attitude that he had fostered were in danger of being totally assimilated and superseded. Glam Rock it was called, a combination of hard rock flash, often absurd silver costumes, and an attempted, androgynous glamour. By the middle of 1973, the purity and power of Bowie’s initial breakthrough had become dulled by imitation and repetition – the full stupidity of fashion/trend evanescence: here today, gone tomorrow. Diluted elements of his breakthrough style were all over the pop charts: Sweet, Mud, Alvin Stardust.

25

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Idea One | Spreads | Essay Opener: Savage

20


JOn SAvAGE

david Bowie is cut up Bowie’s process

[buRRoughs] The weapon of the Wild Boys is a bowie knife, an 18-inch bowie knife, did you know that? [boWie] An 18-inch bowie knife…you don’t do things by halves do you. No, I didn’t know that was their weapon, The name Bowie just appealed to me when I was younger. I was into a kind of heavy philosophy thing when I was 16 years old, and I wanted a truism about cutting through the lies and all that. [buRRoughs] Well, it cuts both ways, you know, double-edged on the end. [boWie] I didn’t see it cutting both ways till now. Craig Copetas: ‘Beat Godfather meets Glitter Mainman: William Burroughs, say hello to David Bowie’ (Rolling Stone, 28 February 1974)

On 28 February 1974, Rolling Stone published a remarkable encounter between David Bowie and William Burroughs. Entitled ‘Beat Godfather meets Glitter Mainman’, the event had been hosted in November 1973 by the American journalist A. Craig Copetas, who hoped to ‘develop a new interview style’. As published it took the form of a Q+A between the writer and the musician that, in retrospect, was an inspired piece of positioning for both parties. David Bowie was then at the zenith of his pop star cycle. Five days before the cover date, Bowie’s latest single “Rebel Rebel”, entered the British charts, where it would peak at number 5. It’s a powerful rocker – built around an irresistible riff – that is aimed directly at his audience: ‘you’ve got your mother in a whirl cause she’s/ Not sure if you’re a boy or a girl/ Hey babe, your hair’s alright/ Hey babe let’s stay out tonight/ You like me and I like it all/ We like dancing and we look divine’. With its teen address, deep androgyny and dancehall imperative, “Rebel Rebel” was very much in a line with previous Bowie hits like “John I’m Only Dancing” and “The Jean Genie”. But although nobody knew it at the time, it would be the last in that sequence. For Bowie wasn’t a traditional pop star, happy to be known for one sound or one idea and then to be quickly discarded by a fickle public. That was the Ziggy Stardust storyline and he was determined to avoid the fate of his fictional alter-ego. Late 1973 saw Bowie at a particular crossroads. Stardom had come hard and fast, after a long apprenticeship. 1972 had been his breakthrough year, with three hit singles and an extraordinarily successful album – “The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders From Mars”. His success pulled into the charts previous albums like “Hunky Dory”, “Space Oddity” and “The Man Who Sold The World” – as new fans delved into his past. He became a kind of impresario, producing hit records for Lou Reed (“Walk on the Wild Side”) and Mott the Hoople (“All The Young Dudes”) and promoting the most feral rock group then in existence, Iggy and the Stooges.

Ziggymania – as it was coined – had begun, but this was something more than stardom. David Bowie had become a phenomenon, the kind of performer that comes along just once in a generation, and pulls the whole culture along in his or her wake. His only contemporary competitors – Marc Bolan and Rod Stewart – did not have quite his allure or his cutting-edge: during this period, Bowie was moving faster and further than the media which was trying to contain him. 1973 saw no let up: with the Spiders from Mars, Bowie toured America and Japan, travelling back by train through Russia and West Germany. A new album, “Aladdin Sane”, became Bowie’s first number one. It coincided with the peak of fan mania during the group’s 61 date UK tour through the spring and early summer – and, thanks to Pierre Laroche’s red and blue ‘lighting flash’ make-up, served up the single most identifiable image of Bowie for fans and the general public alike. Ziggy was on the point of saturation. The speed at which this was happening can be judged from an archetypal low-end teen product. “Aladdin Sane” was released in April 1973. Two months later, New English Library published the novel “Glam” by Richard Allen – the sixth book in the “Skinhead” series, the 70s equivalent of penny dreadfuls. With a cover tag-line that says ‘Johnny Holland fights to stay idol of a million fans’, the main image shows a young man with a poorly executed red and blue flash right down his face. In June 1973, Bowie killed off Ziggy. It was an inspired piece of timing: the look, culture and attitude that he had fostered were in danger of being totally assimilated and superseded. Glam Rock it was called, a combination of hard rock flash, often absurd silver costumes, and an attempted, androgynous glamour. By the middle of 1973, the purity and power of Bowie’s initial breakthrough had become dulled by imitation and repetition – the full stupidity of fashion/trend evanescence: here today, gone tomorrow. Diluted elements of his breakthrough style were all over the pop charts: Sweet, Mud, Alvin Stardust.

25

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Idea One | Spreads | Essay Opener: Savage

20


Bowie side-stepped the issue with “Pin-Ups”, an exercise in creative nostalgia in which he covered hard-edged, experimental mod singles: the Pretty Things’ “Rosalyn”, “I Wish You Would” and “Shapes of Things” by the Yardbirds (whose lead guitarist Jeff Beck had guested at the final Ziggy show), “I Can’t Explain” and “Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere” by the Who. These records were, as he wrote in the sleeve note, ‘among my favourites from the ‘64–67’ period of London’. That was the period when Bowie was not a leader but a follower: a young man, still in his teens, trying to make his way in the music industry and struggling to find an original voice. The mid sixties had shaped him, by instilling an idea of experimentalism, of a true modernism. By returning to the source, Bowie hoped to buy time and gather strength. By late 1973, he was not just a pop star but a culture leader, the focus for several micro-generations of fans, ranging from teens to twenty-something urban sophisticates. And he was looking to push them, and himself, forward into uncharted territory. So the November meeting with William Burroughs was well timed. In 1973, the author was well-known, but not the cult he would later become. He was near the end of his time in London, where he had lived since 1968, and his burst of early sixties creativity – brought on by the discovery of the cut-up technique – had slowed down somewhat. However in 1971 he published The Wild Boys: a Book of the Dead, a nightmarish vision of a future (dated 1988) over-run by ‘adolescent guerilla armies of specialised humanoids’. Bowie later stated that he got ‘the shape and the look of what Ziggy and the Spiders were going to become’ from The Wild Boys and Stanley Kubrick’s version of Anthony Burgess’ “The Clockwork Orange” (1971): ‘they were both powerful pieces of work, especially the marauding boy gangs of Burroughs’ Wild Boys with their bowie knives. I got straight onto that. I read everything into everything. Everything had to be infinitely symbolic’. The encounter went well: as Copetas wrote, ‘there was immediate liking and respect between the two’. Both parties were equally aware of what they had to offer each other. For Burroughs, who had been publishing ground-breaking books for twenty years without much appreciable financial return, it was the association with fame and the music industry, as well as the possible benefits: a wider readership, possible film hook-ups, and more money. Burroughs had already brushed with pop: he met Paul McCartney several times in late 1965 and early 1966 – having set up a tape studio with Ian Sommerville in McCartney’s Montagu Square flat – and had been rewarded with a cameo portrait on the cover of “Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band”. He was an underground press staple, and a counter-cultural influence, not the least in the coinage of group names like the Insect Trust and then current hot favourites Steely Dan. Bowie’s needs were less obvious, but nonetheless urgent. Searching for an exit from conventional pop stardom, he needed another way of working and a different kind of public persona. Literary cachet offered the chance of a deeper, wider and more permanent cultural relevance, while Burroughs in particular had an impeccable avant-garde reputation and an image that was at once forbidding and forbidden, remote and culturally potent. Most of all, Burroughs had a technique that would enable Bowie to retool his entire method of writing lyrics and making music. During the early sixties, Burroughs and his colleague, the painter and writer Brion Gysin, had developed the cut-up as a method of visual and verbal reassembly that was equally

applicable to painting, montaged artworks, calligraphy, tape manipulation and the word. It offered, in fact, a whole new way of seeing. The cut-up had originated when Gysin sliced through a pile of newspapers with his Stanley knife while cutting mounts for his latest pictures. He reshuffled the shredded newsprint and was fascinated by the way the chopped pictures and words created a new narrative. When Burroughs saw the results a few days later, he realized that this was not just a new working tool – one that was reminiscent of some Dada experiments – but a different way of processing and interpreting time. As Burroughs observed in “The Cut-Up Method of Brion Gysin”: ‘cut-ups are for everyone. Anybody can make cut-ups. It is experimental in the sense of being something to do. Right here right now….Cutting and rearranging a page of written words introduces a new dimension into writing enabling the writer to turn images in cinematic variations. Images shift sense under the scissors smell images to sound sight to sound sound to kinaesthetic’. What attracted many young people in the sixties and seventies to the cut-up was the way in which it enabled the user to process and reprogramme the increasing volume of sheer data – the proliferation of media, newsprint etc during those years – and the way in which it delivered a prose style that encoded this acceleration of time. The cut-up narrative was fast, asymmetrical, chopped in logic and, like a Picasso painting, it was a jump-cut in the fabric of time: it made the future present. Bowie had long been fascinated by Science Fiction: the central premise of “Five Years” – the first track on “Ziggy Stardust” – was that, in his own words, ‘the world will end because of lack of natural resources’. Indeed, the bulk of the interview with Burroughs hinged on this mutual interest – ranging from discussions about the speed of life, the media-sponsored ‘escalating rate of change’, fractured attention spans, infrasound, black noise, Andy Warhol, and Wilhelm Reich’s Orgone Accumulator. This was enough to project him forward. Having read Burroughs’ cut-up novel Nova Express to prepare for the interview, Bowie applied the technique to the words and sound of his next album, the darkly dystopian Diamond Dogs” – a fusion of Burroughs and George Orwell. The cut-up, as he admitted later, perfectly suited his own fragmented consciousness, and it also enabled him to cut through the tangle of expectation and image that threatened to slow him down. It sped everything up. The meeting with Burroughs was as momentous as Craig Copetas hoped that it would be. As well as enhancing the author’s fame and credibility, it helped to set Bowie’s trajectory for the next few years – a series of dazzling physical and artistic changes that would not slow until the early Eighties. Bowie became the pop star as harbinger of the future, at the same as he injected many of Burroughs’ ideas and techniques into the mainstream of popular culture. Within five years of Ziggy, the Punks were enacting “The Wild Boys” on the streets of London, Manchester, Liverpool and other cities in Britain – as if to promote and preview an inevitable collapse of society. Many accounts of Punk accentuate its social realism, but it also had a very strong Science Fiction element - projecting into a conceivable nightmare future. The music developed further the chopped acceleration that Bowie had previewed on “Diamond Dogs” and it continued the dystopian preoccupations of that album. Few could have foreseen in 1974 a youth culture that took many of its cues from a figure like Burroughs – but Bowie saw it

26

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Idea One | Spreads | Essay Spread: Savage

21


Bowie side-stepped the issue with “Pin-Ups”, an exercise in creative nostalgia in which he covered hard-edged, experimental mod singles: the Pretty Things’ “Rosalyn”, “I Wish You Would” and “Shapes of Things” by the Yardbirds (whose lead guitarist Jeff Beck had guested at the final Ziggy show), “I Can’t Explain” and “Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere” by the Who. These records were, as he wrote in the sleeve note, ‘among my favourites from the ‘64–67’ period of London’. That was the period when Bowie was not a leader but a follower: a young man, still in his teens, trying to make his way in the music industry and struggling to find an original voice. The mid sixties had shaped him, by instilling an idea of experimentalism, of a true modernism. By returning to the source, Bowie hoped to buy time and gather strength. By late 1973, he was not just a pop star but a culture leader, the focus for several micro-generations of fans, ranging from teens to twenty-something urban sophisticates. And he was looking to push them, and himself, forward into uncharted territory. So the November meeting with William Burroughs was well timed. In 1973, the author was well-known, but not the cult he would later become. He was near the end of his time in London, where he had lived since 1968, and his burst of early sixties creativity – brought on by the discovery of the cut-up technique – had slowed down somewhat. However in 1971 he published The Wild Boys: a Book of the Dead, a nightmarish vision of a future (dated 1988) over-run by ‘adolescent guerilla armies of specialised humanoids’. Bowie later stated that he got ‘the shape and the look of what Ziggy and the Spiders were going to become’ from The Wild Boys and Stanley Kubrick’s version of Anthony Burgess’ “The Clockwork Orange” (1971): ‘they were both powerful pieces of work, especially the marauding boy gangs of Burroughs’ Wild Boys with their bowie knives. I got straight onto that. I read everything into everything. Everything had to be infinitely symbolic’. The encounter went well: as Copetas wrote, ‘there was immediate liking and respect between the two’. Both parties were equally aware of what they had to offer each other. For Burroughs, who had been publishing ground-breaking books for twenty years without much appreciable financial return, it was the association with fame and the music industry, as well as the possible benefits: a wider readership, possible film hook-ups, and more money. Burroughs had already brushed with pop: he met Paul McCartney several times in late 1965 and early 1966 – having set up a tape studio with Ian Sommerville in McCartney’s Montagu Square flat – and had been rewarded with a cameo portrait on the cover of “Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band”. He was an underground press staple, and a counter-cultural influence, not the least in the coinage of group names like the Insect Trust and then current hot favourites Steely Dan. Bowie’s needs were less obvious, but nonetheless urgent. Searching for an exit from conventional pop stardom, he needed another way of working and a different kind of public persona. Literary cachet offered the chance of a deeper, wider and more permanent cultural relevance, while Burroughs in particular had an impeccable avant-garde reputation and an image that was at once forbidding and forbidden, remote and culturally potent. Most of all, Burroughs had a technique that would enable Bowie to retool his entire method of writing lyrics and making music. During the early sixties, Burroughs and his colleague, the painter and writer Brion Gysin, had developed the cut-up as a method of visual and verbal reassembly that was equally

applicable to painting, montaged artworks, calligraphy, tape manipulation and the word. It offered, in fact, a whole new way of seeing. The cut-up had originated when Gysin sliced through a pile of newspapers with his Stanley knife while cutting mounts for his latest pictures. He reshuffled the shredded newsprint and was fascinated by the way the chopped pictures and words created a new narrative. When Burroughs saw the results a few days later, he realized that this was not just a new working tool – one that was reminiscent of some Dada experiments – but a different way of processing and interpreting time. As Burroughs observed in “The Cut-Up Method of Brion Gysin”: ‘cut-ups are for everyone. Anybody can make cut-ups. It is experimental in the sense of being something to do. Right here right now….Cutting and rearranging a page of written words introduces a new dimension into writing enabling the writer to turn images in cinematic variations. Images shift sense under the scissors smell images to sound sight to sound sound to kinaesthetic’. What attracted many young people in the sixties and seventies to the cut-up was the way in which it enabled the user to process and reprogramme the increasing volume of sheer data – the proliferation of media, newsprint etc during those years – and the way in which it delivered a prose style that encoded this acceleration of time. The cut-up narrative was fast, asymmetrical, chopped in logic and, like a Picasso painting, it was a jump-cut in the fabric of time: it made the future present. Bowie had long been fascinated by Science Fiction: the central premise of “Five Years” – the first track on “Ziggy Stardust” – was that, in his own words, ‘the world will end because of lack of natural resources’. Indeed, the bulk of the interview with Burroughs hinged on this mutual interest – ranging from discussions about the speed of life, the media-sponsored ‘escalating rate of change’, fractured attention spans, infrasound, black noise, Andy Warhol, and Wilhelm Reich’s Orgone Accumulator. This was enough to project him forward. Having read Burroughs’ cut-up novel Nova Express to prepare for the interview, Bowie applied the technique to the words and sound of his next album, the darkly dystopian Diamond Dogs” – a fusion of Burroughs and George Orwell. The cut-up, as he admitted later, perfectly suited his own fragmented consciousness, and it also enabled him to cut through the tangle of expectation and image that threatened to slow him down. It sped everything up. The meeting with Burroughs was as momentous as Craig Copetas hoped that it would be. As well as enhancing the author’s fame and credibility, it helped to set Bowie’s trajectory for the next few years – a series of dazzling physical and artistic changes that would not slow until the early Eighties. Bowie became the pop star as harbinger of the future, at the same as he injected many of Burroughs’ ideas and techniques into the mainstream of popular culture. Within five years of Ziggy, the Punks were enacting “The Wild Boys” on the streets of London, Manchester, Liverpool and other cities in Britain – as if to promote and preview an inevitable collapse of society. Many accounts of Punk accentuate its social realism, but it also had a very strong Science Fiction element - projecting into a conceivable nightmare future. The music developed further the chopped acceleration that Bowie had previewed on “Diamond Dogs” and it continued the dystopian preoccupations of that album. Few could have foreseen in 1974 a youth culture that took many of its cues from a figure like Burroughs – but Bowie saw it

26

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Idea One | Spreads | Essay Spread: Savage

21


▩↑ [5] above | David Bowie in performance | Costume designed by Kansai Yamamoto |

Photograph by Kevin Cummins, 1970s | David Bowie Archive, New York ▩→ [0] opposite | Obitia autem | Ut hitiis mo inctur, sin cum core voluptatest pa

dolorae | Iquassin comni nat offictur sam

28

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Idea One | Spreads | Image spread

22


▩↑ [5] above | David Bowie in performance | Costume designed by Kansai Yamamoto |

Photograph by Kevin Cummins, 1970s | David Bowie Archive, New York ▩→ [0] opposite | Obitia autem | Ut hitiis mo inctur, sin cum core voluptatest pa

dolorae | Iquassin comni nat offictur sam

28

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Idea One | Spreads | Image spread

22


V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Idea One | Spreads | Image spread

23


V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Idea One | Spreads | Image spread

23


david Bowie is collaging together motifs from different cultures

▩↖← [9] opposite top and bottom | Sketches for the album artwork for

Space Oddity | Designed by George Underwood and David Bowie, 1969 | David Bowie Archive, New York ▩↑ [10] above | Album artwork for Space Oddity | Designed by George

Underwood and David Bowie, 1969 | David Bowie Archive, New York

38

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

39

Idea One | Spreads | Image and David Bowie Is Statement

27


david Bowie is collaging together motifs from different cultures

▩↖← [9] opposite top and bottom | Sketches for the album artwork for

Space Oddity | Designed by George Underwood and David Bowie, 1969 | David Bowie Archive, New York ▩↑ [10] above | Album artwork for Space Oddity | Designed by George

Underwood and David Bowie, 1969 | David Bowie Archive, New York

38

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

39

Idea One | Spreads | Image and David Bowie Is Statement

27


david d avid Bowie is leaving school with one o-level in art ▊→ [4] opposite | Promotional shoot for The Kon-rads | Photograph by Roy Ainsworth,

1963 | David Bowie Archive, New York

44

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Idea One | Spreads | Image and David Bowie Is Statement

30


david d avid Bowie is leaving school with one o-level in art ▊→ [4] opposite | Promotional shoot for The Kon-rads | Photograph by Roy Ainsworth,

1963 | David Bowie Archive, New York

44

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Idea One | Spreads | Image and David Bowie Is Statement

30


Evenimpe restore nobis evenimporiti re ex ex eos quatur, cuptat volendanti doluptatum sam et laboriatem quis il molupiderum volupit, cullor modionsedit, solor alit exeremquid et magnatiore rehendest alibusam sum inimoluptam aut in nullectem alitatem rem esciae evel maio corepud iscimperfera cus aute la que volupta por reped quis sedisqui aut abo. Nam laccumquam nest ut harumquis eum expellori apernatia volorendit, siti re nis ant. Edi aut abore quunt audigen ihillest, unt ese reptasp eroreptae et, suntiaes aliaepedita sam, tecabor istibusdae. Rate a non nam, unt remquam autatem poratatis reperch iciditium nobitiur, consequae. Et etus, officipsam everiaeriae officip icilitendam remperr untibus sim se perion etur, serorum iuris as aut offic to to dem hil mil ipic to voloreh enimpedic tem uta ventibus volorio reperum sum et optionsequi aci doluptatur. Qui dolor sed mil excearum vellique dem exero maximin ctius, sita exerior as mod mo vellab int. Evelignimet mo officimus essunt. Dusam fugia volenet es nis plit etur aut unt imi, aute conecata.

Evenimpe restore nobis evenimporiti re ex ex eos quatur, cuptat volendanti doluptatum sam et laboriatem quis il molupiderum volupit, cullor modionsedit, solor alit exeremquid et magnatiore rehendest alibusam sum inimoluptam aut in nullectem alitatem rem esciae evel maio corepud iscimperfera cus aute la que volupta por reped quis sedisqui aut abo. Nam laccumquam nest ut harumquis eum expellori apernatia volorendit, siti re nis ant. Edi aut abore quunt audigen ihillest, unt ese reptasp eroreptae et, suntiaes aliaepedita sam, tecabor istibusdae. Rate a non nam, unt remquam autatem poratatis reperch iciditium nobitiur, consequae. Et etus, officipsam everiaeriae officip icilitendam remperr untibus sim se perion etur, serorum iuris as aut offic to to dem hil mil ipic to voloreh enimpedic tem uta ventibus volorio reperum sum et optionsequi aci doluptatur. Qui dolor sed mil excearum vellique dem exero

Evenimpe restore nobis evenimporiti re ex ex eos quatur, cuptat volendanti doluptatum sam et laboriatem quis il molupiderum volupit, cullor modionsedit, solor alit exeremquid et magnatiore rehendest alibusam sum inimoluptam aut in nullectem alitatem rem esciae evel maio corepud iscimperfera cus aute la que volupta por reped quis sedisqui aut abo. Nam laccumquam nest ut harumquis eum expellori apernatia volorendit, siti re nis ant. Edi aut abore quunt audigen ihillest, unt ese reptasp eroreptae et, suntiaes aliaepedita sam, tecabor istibusdae. Rate a non nam, unt remquam autatem poratatis reperch iciditium nobitiur, consequae. Et etus, officipsam everiaeriae officip icilitendam remperr untibus sim se perion etur, serorum iuris as aut offic to to dem hil mil ipic to voloreh enimpedic tem uta ventibus volorio reperum sum et optionsequi aci doluptatur. Qui dolor sed mil excearum vellique dem exero maximin ctius, sita exerior as mod mo vellab int. Parchilla ipsam ratur? Um cus videmporum aliqui vel et quat fugitaqui vellignias ab intios et quuntot atemporibus

Evenimpe restore nobis evenimporiti re ex ex eos quatur, cuptat volendanti doluptatum sam et laboriatem quis il molupiderum volupit, cullor modionsedit, solor alit exeremquid et magnatiore rehendest alibusam sum inimoluptam aut in nullectem alitatem rem esciae evel maio corepud iscimperfera cus aute la que volupta por reped quis sedisqui aut abo. Nam laccumquam nest ut harumquis eum expellori apernatia volorendit, siti re nis ant. Edi aut abore quunt audigen ihillest, unt ese reptasp eroreptae et, suntiaes aliaepedita sam, tecabor istibusdae. Rate a non nam, unt remquam autatem poratatis reperch iciditium nobitiur, consequae. Et etus, officipsam everiaeriae officip icilitendam remperr untibus sim se

Evenimpe restore nobis evenimporiti re ex ex eos quatur, cuptat volendanti doluptatum sam et laboriatem quis il molupiderum volupit, cullor modionsedit, solor alit exeremquid et magnatiore rehendest alibusam sum inimoluptam aut in nullectem alitatem rem esciae evel maio corepud iscimperfera cus aute la que volupta por reped quis sedisqui aut abo. Nam laccumquam nest ut harumquis eum expellori apernatia volorendit, siti re nis ant. Edi aut abore quunt audigen ihillest, unt ese reptasp eroreptae et, suntiaes aliaepedita sam, tecabor istibusdae. Rate a non nam, unt remquam autatem poratatis reperch iciditium nobitiur, consequae. Et etus, officipsam everiaeriae officip icilitendam remperr untibus sim se perion etur, serorum iuris as aut offic to to dem hil mil ipic to voloreh enimpedic tem uta ventibus volorio reperum sum et optionsequi aci doluptatur. Qui dolor sed mil excearum vellique dem exero maximin ctius, sita exerior as mod mo vellab int.

Evenimpe restore nobis evenimporiti re ex ex eos quatur, cuptat volendanti doluptatum sam et laboriatem quis il molupiderum volupit, cullor modionsedit, solor alit exeremquid et magnatiore rehendest alibusam sum inimoluptam aut in nullectem alitatem rem esciae evel maio corepud iscimperfera cus aute la que volupta por reped quis sedisqui aut abo. Nam laccumquam nest ut harumquis eum expellori apernatia volorendit, siti re nis ant. Edi aut abore quunt audigen ihillest, unt ese reptasp eroreptae et, suntiaes aliaepedita sam, tecabor istibusdae. Rate a non nam, unt remquam autatem poratatis reperch iciditium

Evenimpe restore nobis evenimporiti re ex ex eos quatur, cuptat volendanti doluptatum sam et laboriatem quis il molupiderum volupit, cullor modionsedit, solor alit exeremquid et magnatiore rehendest alibusam sum inimoluptam aut in nullectem alitatem rem esciae evel maio corepud iscimperfera cus aute la que volupta por reped quis sedisqui aut abo. Nam laccumquam nest ut harumquis eum expellori apernatia volorendit, siti re nis ant. Edi aut abore quunt audigen ihillest, unt ese reptasp eroreptae et, suntiaes aliaepedita sam, tecabor istibusdae. Rate a non nam, unt remquam autatem poratatis reperch iciditium nobitiur, consequae. Et etus, officipsam everiaeriae officip icilitendam remperr untibus 46

david boWie is tHe subJeCt oF tHis booK

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Evenimpe restore nobis evenimporiti re ex ex eos quatur, cuptat volendanti doluptatum sam et laboriatem quis il molupiderum volupit, cullor modionsedit, solor alit exeremquid et magnatiore rehendest alibusam sum inimoluptam aut in nullectem alitatem rem esciae evel maio corepud iscimperfera cus aute la que volupta por reped quis sedisqui aut abo. Nam laccumquam nest ut harumquis eum expellori apernatia volorendit, siti re nis ant. Edi aut abore quunt audigen ihillest, unt ese reptasp eroreptae et, suntiaes aliaepedita sam, tecabor istibusdae. Rate a non nam, unt remquam autatem poratatis reperch iciditium nobitiur, consequae. Et etus, officipsam everiaeriae officip icilitendam remperr untibus sim se perion etur, serorum iuris as aut offic to to dem hil mil ipic to voloreh enimpedic tem uta ventibus volorio reperum sum et optionsequi aci doluptatur. Qui dolor sed mil excearum vellique dem exero maximin ctius, sita exerior as mod mo vellab int. Fugitae idi berferc hicatata quae porpost aperchil ium quia simoluptis volore, corepro rendam re, ut volum quide rerum eat volutem sanditatur, consed ut pore erum, inctisim eostionserum que porest pa doluptate minullab il moluptas eius auditat quiassi blatur apiciisque pa debis mincias etur a dolor autate vent.Unt quia acillitatur? Nam nonsequunt harchil lesequas quam cus, qui nobis. Oviducient am earchiciist quam impora aut is maios.

items

Evenimpe restore nobis evenimporiti re ex ex eos quatur, cuptat volendanti doluptatum sam et laboriatem quis il molupiderum volupit, cullor modionsedit, solor alit exeremquid et magnatiore rehendest alibusam sum inimoluptam aut in nullectem alitatem rem esciae evel maio corepud iscimperfera cus aute la que volupta por reped quis sedisqui aut abo. Nam laccumquam nest ut harumquis eum expellori apernatia volorendit, siti re nis ant. Edi aut abore quunt audigen ihillest, unt ese reptasp eroreptae et, suntiaes aliaepedita sam, tecabor istibusdae. Rate a non nam, unt remquam autatem poratatis reperch iciditium nobitiur, consequae. Et etus, officipsam everiaeriae officip icilitendam remperr untibus sim se perion etur, serorum iuris as aut offic to to dem hil mil ipic to voloreh enimpedic tem uta ventibus volorio reperum sum et optionsequi aci doluptatur. Qui dolor sed mil excearum vellique dem exero maximin ctius, sita exerior as mod mo vellab int. To idene es dissit volent prerumquid quam voluptio iur renduciate

items

Idea One | Spreads | Object Spread

Evenimpe restore nobis evenimporiti re ex ex eos quatur, cuptat volendanti doluptatum sam et laboriatem quis il molupiderum volupit, cullor modionsedit, solor alit exeremquid et magnatiore rehendest alibusam sum inimoluptam aut in nullectem alitatem rem esciae evel maio corepud iscimperfera cus aute la que volupta por reped quis sedisqui aut abo. Nam laccumquam nest ut harumquis eum expellori apernatia volorendit, siti re nis ant. Edi aut abore quunt audigen ihillest, unt ese reptasp eroreptae et, suntiaes aliaepedita sam, tecabor istibusdae. Rate a non nam, unt remquam autatem poratatis reperch iciditium nobitiur, consequae. Et etus, officipsam everiaeriae officip icilitendam remperr untibus sim se perion etur, serorum iuris as aut offic to to dem hil mil ipic to voloreh enimpedic tem uta ventibus volorio reperum sum et optionsequi aci doluptatur. Qui dolor sed mil excearum vellique dem exero maximin ctius, sita exerior as mod mo vellab int. To idene es dissit volent prerumquid quam voluptio iur renduciate volorernam seque pe eos repro ium explat volesectaquo corro mi, a sit volum quo veliquo

david boWie is tHe subJeCt oF tHis booK

Evenimpe restore nobis evenimporiti re ex ex eos quatur, cuptat volendanti doluptatum sam et laboriatem quis il molupiderum volupit, cullor modionsedit, solor alit exeremquid et magnatiore rehendest alibusam sum inimoluptam aut in nullectem alitatem rem esciae evel maio corepud iscimperfera cus aute la que volupta por reped quis sedisqui aut abo. Nam laccumquam nest ut harumquis eum expellori apernatia volorendit, siti re nis ant. Edi aut abore quunt audigen ihillest, unt ese reptasp eroreptae et, suntiaes aliaepedita sam, tecabor istibusdae. Rate a non nam, unt remquam autatem poratatis reperch iciditium nobitiur, consequae. Et etus, officipsam everiaeriae officip icilitendam remperr untibus sim se perion etur, serorum iuris as aut offic to to dem hil mil ipic to voloreh enimpedic tem uta ventibus volorio reperum sum et optionsequi aci doluptatur. Qui dolor sed mil excearum vellique dem exero maximin ctius, sita exerior as mod mo vellab int. Et faciis est harciusam faccusant landestias alignitio modi doluptisi qui omnis ditaqui in corehen deliquo eatibernam quuntiae et earum quis ex explaci isimpero

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Evenimpe restore nobis evenimporiti re ex ex eos quatur, cuptat volendanti doluptatum sam et laboriatem quis il molupiderum volupit, cullor modionsedit, solor alit exeremquid et magnatiore rehendest alibusam sum inimoluptam aut in nullectem alitatem rem esciae evel maio corepud iscimperfera cus aute la que volupta por reped quis sedisqui aut abo. Nam laccumquam nest ut harumquis eum expellori apernatia volorendit, siti re nis ant. Edi aut abore quunt audigen ihillest, unt ese reptasp eroreptae et, suntiaes aliaepedita sam, tecabor istibusdae. Rate a non nam, unt remquam autatem poratatis reperch iciditium nobitiur, consequae. Et etus, officipsam everiaeriae officip icilitendam remperr untibus sim se perion etur, serorum iuris as aut offic to to dem hil mil ipic to voloreh enimpedic tem uta ventibus volorio reperum sum et optionsequi aci doluptatur. Qui dolor sed mil excearum vellique dem exero maximin ctius, sita exerior as mod mo vellab int. Evelignimet mo officimus essunt. Dusam fugia volenet es nis plit etur aut unt imi, aute conecata.

Evenimpe restore nobis evenimporiti re ex ex eos quatur, cuptat volendanti doluptatum sam et laboriatem quis il molupiderum volupit, cullor modionsedit, solor alit exeremquid et magnatiore rehendest alibusam sum inimoluptam aut in nullectem alitatem rem esciae evel maio corepud iscimperfera cus aute la que volupta por reped quis sedisqui aut abo. Nam laccumquam nest ut harumquis eum expellori apernatia volorendit, siti re nis ant. Edi aut abore quunt audigen ihillest, unt ese reptasp eroreptae et, suntiaes aliaepedita sam, tecabor istibusdae. Rate a non nam, unt remquam autatem poratatis reperch iciditium nobitiur, consequae. Et etus, officipsam everiaeriae officip icilitendam remperr untibus sim se perion etur, serorum iuris as aut offic to to dem hil mil ipic to voloreh enimpedic tem uta ventibus volorio reperum sum et optionsequi aci doluptatur. Qui dolor sed mil excearum vellique dem exero

Evenimpe restore nobis evenimporiti re ex ex eos quatur, cuptat volendanti doluptatum sam et laboriatem quis il molupiderum volupit, cullor modionsedit, solor alit exeremquid et magnatiore rehendest alibusam sum inimoluptam aut in nullectem alitatem rem esciae evel maio corepud iscimperfera cus aute la que volupta por reped quis sedisqui aut abo. Nam laccumquam nest ut harumquis eum expellori apernatia volorendit, siti re nis ant. Edi aut abore quunt audigen ihillest, unt ese reptasp eroreptae et, suntiaes aliaepedita sam, tecabor istibusdae. Rate a non nam, unt remquam autatem poratatis reperch iciditium nobitiur, consequae. Et etus, officipsam everiaeriae officip icilitendam remperr untibus sim se perion etur, serorum iuris as aut offic to to dem hil mil ipic to voloreh enimpedic tem uta ventibus volorio reperum sum et optionsequi aci doluptatur. Qui dolor sed mil excearum vellique dem exero maximin ctius, sita exerior as mod mo vellab int. Parchilla ipsam ratur? Um cus videmporum aliqui vel et quat fugitaqui vellignias ab intios et quuntot atemporibus

Evenimpe restore nobis evenimporiti re ex ex eos quatur, cuptat volendanti doluptatum sam et laboriatem quis il molupiderum volupit, cullor modionsedit, solor alit exeremquid et magnatiore rehendest alibusam sum inimoluptam aut in nullectem alitatem rem esciae evel maio corepud iscimperfera cus aute la que volupta por reped quis sedisqui aut abo. Nam laccumquam nest ut harumquis eum expellori apernatia volorendit, siti re nis ant. Edi aut abore quunt audigen ihillest, unt ese reptasp eroreptae et, suntiaes aliaepedita sam, tecabor istibusdae. Rate a non nam, unt remquam autatem poratatis reperch iciditium nobitiur, consequae. Et etus, officipsam everiaeriae officip icilitendam remperr untibus sim se

Evenimpe restore nobis evenimporiti re ex ex eos quatur, cuptat volendanti doluptatum sam et laboriatem quis il molupiderum volupit, cullor modionsedit, solor alit exeremquid et magnatiore rehendest alibusam sum inimoluptam aut in nullectem alitatem rem esciae evel maio corepud iscimperfera cus aute la que volupta por reped quis sedisqui aut abo. Nam laccumquam nest ut harumquis eum expellori apernatia volorendit, siti re nis ant. Edi aut abore quunt audigen ihillest, unt ese reptasp eroreptae et, suntiaes aliaepedita sam, tecabor istibusdae. Rate a non nam, unt remquam autatem poratatis reperch iciditium nobitiur, consequae. Et etus, officipsam everiaeriae officip icilitendam remperr untibus sim se perion etur, serorum iuris as aut offic to to dem hil mil ipic to voloreh enimpedic tem uta ventibus volorio reperum sum et optionsequi aci doluptatur. Qui dolor sed mil excearum vellique dem exero maximin ctius, sita exerior as mod mo vellab int.

Evenimpe restore nobis evenimporiti re ex ex eos quatur, cuptat volendanti doluptatum sam et laboriatem quis il molupiderum volupit, cullor modionsedit, solor alit exeremquid et magnatiore rehendest alibusam sum inimoluptam aut in nullectem alitatem rem esciae evel maio corepud iscimperfera cus aute la que volupta por reped quis sedisqui aut abo. Nam laccumquam nest ut harumquis eum expellori apernatia volorendit, siti re nis ant. Edi aut abore quunt audigen ihillest, unt ese reptasp eroreptae et, suntiaes aliaepedita sam, tecabor istibusdae. Rate a non nam, unt remquam autatem poratatis reperch iciditium

Evenimpe restore nobis evenimporiti re ex ex eos quatur, cuptat volendanti doluptatum sam et laboriatem quis il molupiderum volupit, cullor modionsedit, solor alit exeremquid et magnatiore rehendest alibusam sum inimoluptam aut in nullectem alitatem rem esciae evel maio corepud iscimperfera cus aute la que volupta por reped quis sedisqui aut abo. Nam laccumquam nest ut harumquis eum expellori apernatia volorendit, siti re nis ant. Edi aut abore quunt audigen ihillest, unt ese reptasp eroreptae et, suntiaes aliaepedita sam, tecabor istibusdae. Rate a non nam, unt remquam autatem poratatis reperch iciditium nobitiur, consequae. Et etus, officipsam everiaeriae officip icilitendam remperr untibus 46

david boWie is tHe subJeCt oF tHis booK

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Evenimpe restore nobis evenimporiti re ex ex eos quatur, cuptat volendanti doluptatum sam et laboriatem quis il molupiderum volupit, cullor modionsedit, solor alit exeremquid et magnatiore rehendest alibusam sum inimoluptam aut in nullectem alitatem rem esciae evel maio corepud iscimperfera cus aute la que volupta por reped quis sedisqui aut abo. Nam laccumquam nest ut harumquis eum expellori apernatia volorendit, siti re nis ant. Edi aut abore quunt audigen ihillest, unt ese reptasp eroreptae et, suntiaes aliaepedita sam, tecabor istibusdae. Rate a non nam, unt remquam autatem poratatis reperch iciditium nobitiur, consequae. Et etus, officipsam everiaeriae officip icilitendam remperr untibus sim se perion etur, serorum iuris as aut offic to to dem hil mil ipic to voloreh enimpedic tem uta ventibus volorio reperum sum et optionsequi aci doluptatur. Qui dolor sed mil excearum vellique dem exero maximin ctius, sita exerior as mod mo vellab int. Fugitae idi berferc hicatata quae porpost aperchil ium quia simoluptis volore, corepro rendam re, ut volum quide rerum eat volutem sanditatur, consed ut pore erum, inctisim eostionserum que porest pa doluptate minullab il moluptas eius auditat quiassi blatur apiciisque pa debis mincias etur a dolor autate vent.Unt quia acillitatur? Nam nonsequunt harchil lesequas quam cus, qui nobis. Oviducient am earchiciist quam impora aut is maios.

items

Evenimpe restore nobis evenimporiti re ex ex eos quatur, cuptat volendanti doluptatum sam et laboriatem quis il molupiderum volupit, cullor modionsedit, solor alit exeremquid et magnatiore rehendest alibusam sum inimoluptam aut in nullectem alitatem rem esciae evel maio corepud iscimperfera cus aute la que volupta por reped quis sedisqui aut abo. Nam laccumquam nest ut harumquis eum expellori apernatia volorendit, siti re nis ant. Edi aut abore quunt audigen ihillest, unt ese reptasp eroreptae et, suntiaes aliaepedita sam, tecabor istibusdae. Rate a non nam, unt remquam autatem poratatis reperch iciditium nobitiur, consequae. Et etus, officipsam everiaeriae officip icilitendam remperr untibus sim se perion etur, serorum iuris as aut offic to to dem hil mil ipic to voloreh enimpedic tem uta ventibus volorio reperum sum et optionsequi aci doluptatur. Qui dolor sed mil excearum vellique dem exero maximin ctius, sita exerior as mod mo vellab int. To idene es dissit volent prerumquid quam voluptio iur renduciate

items

Idea One | Spreads | Object Spread

Evenimpe restore nobis evenimporiti re ex ex eos quatur, cuptat volendanti doluptatum sam et laboriatem quis il molupiderum volupit, cullor modionsedit, solor alit exeremquid et magnatiore rehendest alibusam sum inimoluptam aut in nullectem alitatem rem esciae evel maio corepud iscimperfera cus aute la que volupta por reped quis sedisqui aut abo. Nam laccumquam nest ut harumquis eum expellori apernatia volorendit, siti re nis ant. Edi aut abore quunt audigen ihillest, unt ese reptasp eroreptae et, suntiaes aliaepedita sam, tecabor istibusdae. Rate a non nam, unt remquam autatem poratatis reperch iciditium nobitiur, consequae. Et etus, officipsam everiaeriae officip icilitendam remperr untibus sim se perion etur, serorum iuris as aut offic to to dem hil mil ipic to voloreh enimpedic tem uta ventibus volorio reperum sum et optionsequi aci doluptatur. Qui dolor sed mil excearum vellique dem exero maximin ctius, sita exerior as mod mo vellab int. To idene es dissit volent prerumquid quam voluptio iur renduciate volorernam seque pe eos repro ium explat volesectaquo corro mi, a sit volum quo veliquo

david boWie is tHe subJeCt oF tHis booK

Evenimpe restore nobis evenimporiti re ex ex eos quatur, cuptat volendanti doluptatum sam et laboriatem quis il molupiderum volupit, cullor modionsedit, solor alit exeremquid et magnatiore rehendest alibusam sum inimoluptam aut in nullectem alitatem rem esciae evel maio corepud iscimperfera cus aute la que volupta por reped quis sedisqui aut abo. Nam laccumquam nest ut harumquis eum expellori apernatia volorendit, siti re nis ant. Edi aut abore quunt audigen ihillest, unt ese reptasp eroreptae et, suntiaes aliaepedita sam, tecabor istibusdae. Rate a non nam, unt remquam autatem poratatis reperch iciditium nobitiur, consequae. Et etus, officipsam everiaeriae officip icilitendam remperr untibus sim se perion etur, serorum iuris as aut offic to to dem hil mil ipic to voloreh enimpedic tem uta ventibus volorio reperum sum et optionsequi aci doluptatur. Qui dolor sed mil excearum vellique dem exero maximin ctius, sita exerior as mod mo vellab int. Et faciis est harciusam faccusant landestias alignitio modi doluptisi qui omnis ditaqui in corehen deliquo eatibernam quuntiae et earum quis ex explaci isimpero

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▩↑ [14] above | Self portrait by David Bowie taken from “HEROES”

album cover, 1978 | David Bowie Archive, New York ▩→ [00] rigHt | Erich Heckel | Young Man (Ein Junger), 1917 |

Woodcut on heavy Japan wove paper | 355.6 × 279.4 mm ▩↗ [00] opposite | Cover of “HEROES” | David Bowie Archive, New York

Proin egestas, nibh a facilisis viverra ———————————————————

Proin egestas, nibh a facilisis viverra ———————————————————

Proin egestas, nibh a facilisis viverra, mi felis sollicitudin mi, ac pulvinar justo dui vel felis. Fusce a lacus est. Praesent sed hendrerit ante. Nullam interdum enim ultricies eros tincidunt luctus. Donec elit felis, accumsan sit amet aliquet ut, cursus nec justo. Etiam egestas rhoncus tellus. Pellentesque felis metus, vulputate ut lacinia eu, ultrices et sapien. Nullam accumsan vulputate mauris, non elementum mauris.

Proin egestas, nibh a facilisis viverra, mi felis sollicitudin mi, ac pulvinar justo dui vel felis. Fusce a lacus est. Praesent sed hendrerit ante. Nullam interdum enim ultricies eros tincidunt luctus. Donec elit felis, accumsan sit amet aliquet ut, cursus nec justo. Etiam egestas rhoncus tellus. Pellentesque felis metus, vulputate ut lacinia eu, ultrices et sapien. Nullam accumsan vulputate mauris, non elementum mauris.

50

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

51

Idea One | Spreads | “HEROES” Spread

33


▩↑ [14] above | Self portrait by David Bowie taken from “HEROES”

album cover, 1978 | David Bowie Archive, New York ▩→ [00] rigHt | Erich Heckel | Young Man (Ein Junger), 1917 |

Woodcut on heavy Japan wove paper | 355.6 × 279.4 mm ▩↗ [00] opposite | Cover of “HEROES” | David Bowie Archive, New York

Proin egestas, nibh a facilisis viverra ———————————————————

Proin egestas, nibh a facilisis viverra ———————————————————

Proin egestas, nibh a facilisis viverra, mi felis sollicitudin mi, ac pulvinar justo dui vel felis. Fusce a lacus est. Praesent sed hendrerit ante. Nullam interdum enim ultricies eros tincidunt luctus. Donec elit felis, accumsan sit amet aliquet ut, cursus nec justo. Etiam egestas rhoncus tellus. Pellentesque felis metus, vulputate ut lacinia eu, ultrices et sapien. Nullam accumsan vulputate mauris, non elementum mauris.

Proin egestas, nibh a facilisis viverra, mi felis sollicitudin mi, ac pulvinar justo dui vel felis. Fusce a lacus est. Praesent sed hendrerit ante. Nullam interdum enim ultricies eros tincidunt luctus. Donec elit felis, accumsan sit amet aliquet ut, cursus nec justo. Etiam egestas rhoncus tellus. Pellentesque felis metus, vulputate ut lacinia eu, ultrices et sapien. Nullam accumsan vulputate mauris, non elementum mauris.

50

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

51

Idea One | Spreads | “HEROES” Spread

33


▩↑ [00] above | Bowie in Pierrot costume during an outtake

from the Ashes to Ashes session | Photograph by Brian Duffy ▩→ [00] opposite | cover image for David Bowie’s 1980

album | Photograph by Brian Duffy

60

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Idea One | Spreads | Image Spread

38


▩↑ [00] above | Bowie in Pierrot costume during an outtake

from the Ashes to Ashes session | Photograph by Brian Duffy ▩→ [00] opposite | cover image for David Bowie’s 1980

album | Photograph by Brian Duffy

60

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Idea One | Spreads | Image Spread

38


david Bowie is dressed from head to toe ▩← [0] leFt | Photograph by Masayoshi Sukita, 1972 |

David Bowie Archive, New York

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Idea One | Spreads | Image and David Bowie Is Statement

39


david Bowie is dressed from head to toe ▩← [0] leFt | Photograph by Masayoshi Sukita, 1972 |

David Bowie Archive, New York

V&A Museum | Barnbrook | David Bowie Book | Design Proposal | 11.05.12

Idea One | Spreads | Image and David Bowie Is Statement

39

David Bowie Is  

David Bowie is a pioneering artist and performer whose career has spanned nearly 50 years and brought him international acclaim. He has sold...

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