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Allegro VSO SPRING FESTIVAL

DAN I E L M Ü L L E R - SCHOT T P L AYS E LG AR

VSO CHAM B E R P L AYE RS

SP R I NG F E ST IVAL: CAR M I NA B U R ANA A B E R NST E I N CE L E B R AT ION W E S T S I D E S T O RY Z U K E R M A N P L AY S M O Z A R T T H E M A G I C O F DA N C E : G O H B A L L E T VS O P O P S : T H E D O O - W O P P R OJ E C T F E B R UARY TO AP R I L, 2018


VANCOUVER SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA BRAMWELL TOVEY MUSIC DIRECTOR KAZUYOSHI AKIYAMA CONDUCTOR LAUREATE WILLIAM ROWSON ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR* Marsha & George Taylor Chair

FIRST VIOLINS Nicholas Wright, Concertmaster

Ron and Ardelle Cliff Chair

Timothy Steeves, Acting Associate Concertmaster

William and Irene McEwen Chair

Angela Schneider

Professors Mr. and Mrs. Ngou Kang Chair

CELLOS Principal Cello

Nezhat and Hassan Khosrowshahi Chair

JOCELYN MORLOCK COMPOSER-IN-RESIDENCE

Marnie Carter Chair

MARCUS GODDARD COMPOSER-IN-ASSOCIATION

Karin Walsh

Paul Moritz Chair

TROMBONES Brian Wendel, Principal

ENGLISH HORN Beth Orson

BASS TROMBONE Ilan Morgenstern

Chair in Memory of John S. Hodge

CLARINETS Jeanette Jonquil, Principal

Arthur H. Willms Family Chair

TUBA Peder MacLellan, Principal Janet Steinberg, Robert G. and Suzanne Brodie Chair Acting Principal Robert G. and Suzanne Brodie Chair TIMPANI Jae-Won Bang Zoltan Rozsnyai, Aaron McDonald, Principal Alexander Morris, Assistant Principal Mary Sokol Brown Assistant Principal Mrs. Cheng Koon Lee Chair PERCUSSION Olivia Blander Taryn Brodie Chair Vern Griffiths, Principal Gerhard and Ariane Bruendl Chair Jenny Essers Michelle Goddard Martha Lou Henley Chair Natasha Boyko Akira Nagai, Associate Michael Jarrett Mary and Gordon Christopher Chair BASS CLARINET Concertmaster Emeritus Alexander Morris Tony Phillipps Charles Inkman Jennie Press Luke Kim Xue Feng Wei E-FLAT CLARINET PIANO, CELESTE Cristian Mรกrkos Michelle Goddard Linda Lee Thomas, Principal Rebecca Whitling Timothy & Susan Wyman Chair Carter (Family) Deux Mille Yi Zhou BASSOONS Foundation Chair BASSES Julia Lockhart, Principal SECOND VIOLINS Dylan Palmer, ORCHESTRA Sophie Dansereau, Jason Ho, Principal Principal PERSONNEL MANAGER Assistant Principal Karen Gerbrecht, Pippa Williams Evan Hulbert, ยง Gwen Seaton Associate Principal Associate Principal MUSIC LIBRARIAN Jim and Edith le Nobel Chair Noah Reitman, CONTRABASSOON Minella F. Lacson Jeanette Bernal-Singh, Assistant Principal Sophie Dansereau Assistant Principal ASSISTANT MUSIC David Brown FRENCH HORNS Cassandra Bequary LIBRARIAN J. Warren Long Oliver de Clercq, Alex Clark Adrian Shu-On Chui Frederick Schipizky Principal Daniel Norton HEAD CARPENTER Russell Rybicki FLUTES Ann Okagaito Paul McManus Werner and Helga Hรถing Chair Christie Reside, Principal Ashley Plaut David Haskins, Ron and Ardelle Cliff Chair HEAD ELECTRICIAN Associate Principal Brendan Keith Chris James, Assistant VIOLAS Andrew Mee Principal Flute & Piccolo Andrew Brown, Winslow and Betsy Bennett Chair PIANO TECHNICIAN Acting Principal Rosanne Wieringa Thomas Clarke Michael and Estelle Jacobson Chair Richard Mingus, Emilie Grimes, Acting Assistant Principal HEAD SOUND Associate Principal PICCOLO Dr. Malcolm Hayes and Alex Livland TRUMPETS Chris James Lester Soo Chair Hermann and Erika Stรถlting Chair Larry Knopp, Principal Stephen Wilkes, *Supported by The Canada Marcus Goddard, Assistant Principal OBOES Council for the Arts Associate Principal Roger Cole, Principal Lawrence Blackman ยง Leave of Absence Estelle and Michael Jacobson Chair Wayne and Leslie Ann Ingram Chair Vincent Vohradsky Assistant Concertmaster

Tegen Davidge Matthew Davies

Beth Orson, Assistant Principal

The Stage Crew of the Orpheum Theatre are members of Local 118 of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees.

W. Neil Harcourt in memory of Frank N. Harcourt Chair

The Vancouver Symphony Orchestra is a proud member of


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Allegro PINCHAS ZUKERMAN

IN THIS ISSUE 3 The Orchestra 6 Government Support 7 Message from the Chairman & President 30 Advertise in Allegro 34 Vancouver Symphony Foundation 50 Patrons’ Circle 51 VSO School of Music 65 VSO Stradivarius Legacy Circle 66 Corporate Partners 69 At the Concert / VSO & Allegro Staff 70 Board of Directors / Volunteer Council

THE DOO WOP PROJECT

JOYCE YANG

21

BRAMWELL TOVEY

Allegro Magazine has been endowed by a generous gift from Adera Development Corporation.

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53

KARINA CANELLAKIS

@VSOrchestra


27

AUGUSTIN HADELICH

61

ANDERSON & ROE

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DANIEL MÜLLER-SCHOTT

CONCERTS 9  FEBRUARY 24, 26 /Musically Speaking / Westminster Savings Surrey Nights / Joshua Weilerstein conductor, Daniel Müller-Schott cello

13 FEBRUARY 28, MARCH 1, 4 /VSO Chamber Players / Schnittke & Shostakovich /

Nicholas Wright violin, Cassandra Bequary violin, Emilie Grimes viola, Olivia Blander cello, Cristian Márkos cello, Noah Reitman bass, Jeanette Bernal-Singh violin, Grace Huang piano

15 MARCH 3, 5 /Air Canada Masterworks Diamond / Michael Sanderling conductor David Fray piano

21 MARCH 17 /Spring Festival 1: Carmina Burana! / Bramwell Tovey conductor, Tracy Dahl soprano

Benjamin Butterfield tenor, James Westman baritone, UBC University Singers & Choral Union Graeme Langager director, Langley Fine Arts School Treble Choir, Jim Sparks director

27 MARCH 19 /Spring Festival 2: A Bernstein Celebration / Bramwell Tovey conductor Joyce Yang piano, Augustin Hadelich violin

31 MARCH 24 /Spring Festival 3: West Side Story/ Bramwell Tovey conductor Tracy Dahl, soprano

35 MARCH 26 /Spring Festival 4: Zukerman Plays Mozart / Bramwell Tovey conductor Pinchas Zukerman violin/viola, Amanda Forsyth cello

39 APRIL 5 /Tea & Trumpets / The Magic of Dance/ William Rowson conductor Christopher Gaze host, Goh Ballet, Sean Gao violin

43 APRIL 6, 7 /London Drugs VSO Pops / The Doo-Wop Project / Stuart Chafetz conductor The Doo Wop Project

47 APRIL 8 /Kids’ Koncerts / Magic Circle Mime Co.: Music, Noise & Silence / William Rowson conductor, Magic Circle Mime Co.

49 APRIL 11, 12, 15 /VSO Chamber Players / Tombeau, Trio & 2 / Christie Reside flute, Beth Orson oboe

Michelle Goddard clarinet, Sophie Dansereau bassoon, Russell Rybicki horn, Karen Gerbrecht violin, Aaron McDonald percussion, Yi Zhou violin, Luke Kim cello, Chiharu Iinuma piano

53 APRIL 13, 14, 16 / Classical Traditions / Westminster Savings Surrey Nights / Karina Canellakis conductor, Esther Yoo violin

57 APRIL 14 / Vancouver Sun Symphony at the Annex / Crepuscular, luminous /

William Rowson conductor, PEP – Piano & Erhu Project: Nicole Ge Li erhu, Corey Hamm piano

61 APRIL 21, 22 /Musically Speaking / RGF Integrated Wealth Management Symphony Sundays / Andrew Litton conductor, Anderson & Roe piano duo

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The Vancouver Symphony Society is grateful to the Government of Canada and the Canada Council for the Arts, Province of British Columbia and the BC Arts Council, and the City of Vancouver for their ongoing support. The combined investment in the VSO by the three levels of government annually funds over 28% of the cost of the orchestra’s extensive programs and activities. This vital investment enables the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra to present over 150 life-enriching concerts in 16 diverse venues throughout the Lower Mainland and Whistler, attract some of the world’s best musicians to live and work in our community, produce Grammy® and Juno® award-winning recordings, tour domestically and internationally, and, through our renowned educational programs, touch the lives of over 50,000 children annually.

MÉLANIE JOLY, MINISTER OF CANADIAN HERITAGE AND OFFICIAL LANGUAGES

JOHN HORGAN, PREMIER OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

GREGOR ROBERTSON, MAYOR OF VANCOUVER

Thank you!


MESSAGES FROM

FRED G. WITHERS

KELLY TWEEDDALE

THE VSO CHAIRMAN AND PRESIDENT

Hello Friends,

Dear Friends,

With Spring upon us, it continues to be a very exciting time at the VSO as we celebrate the legacy of Maestro Bramwell Tovey.

One of the most rewarding and impactful mandates of the VSO is its work in mentoring young musicians and developing new audiences for symphonic music. Annually over 50,000 students take part in a variety of VSO programs, designed to introduce, deepen, and diversify students of all ages’ musical experience. From February 28-March 1, students of grades K-3 will be introduced to the VSO in a program titled “Carnival of the Animals.” Special thanks to our corporate partners that support our educational programs: TELUS, RBC Foundation, Industrial Alliance, Goldcorp, Pan American Silver, Origin O, Great West Life, and Wheaton Precious Metals Corp.

For 18 years, Maestro Tovey has been championing our orchestra, providing rich musical experiences to audiences of all backgrounds within our community, across Canada and abroad. Grammy® and Juno® awards are a testament to the artistic excellence of our orchestra developed under Maestro Tovey’s tenure. He has been a passion advocate for music education in our schools and through our seasons’ programming. The VSO School of Music, founded through the vision of Maestro Tovey, today is a community music school adjacent to The Orpheum Theatre that provides teaching to over 1,600 music students of all ages. The Vancouver Symphony Orchestral Institute at Whistler, now in its fourth year, offers music students aged 15 to 25 years a once-in-a-lifetime comprehensive and nurturing orchestral training program. The faculty is comprised of musicians from the VSO and is under the direction of Maestro Tovey. These are a few of the legacies of Maestro Tovey that will live on as he completes his tenure as Music Director on June 30th 2018. Recently, we were delighted to have Music Director Designate, Otto Tausk, introduce our 100th Anniversary Season – a year-long celebration of the orchestra’s history and contributions to our community. President Kelly Tweeddale touches on our 100th Season program in her adjoining letter. Our upcoming 100th Anniversary provides us an opportunity to reflect on the foresight of the founders of the VSO and the role of a symphony orchestra in the community. Ours is a rich history of artistic excellence and service to our community. Ongoing support from our municipal, provincial and federal governments, corporations, individual Patrons and you, our audience, has helped make all this possible – thank you! Today, we are taking steps strategically, operationally and financially to ensure the VSO is able to continue to enrich and transform lives through music for the next 100 years. Please enjoy today’s concert. Yours sincerely,

The VSO will be celebrating the musical mavericks and legends with the 2018 Spring Festival. The festival will feature music that has been inspired by literary legends and the VSO joins the classical music world in paying tribute to Leonard Bernstein in honour of the 100th anniversary of his birth. Music Director Bramwell Tovey has invited the Canadian soprano Tracy Dahl, pianist Joyce Yang, violinist Augustin Hadelich, the incomparable Pinchas Zukerman joined by cellist Amanda Forsyth to join us for two weeks of incredible concerts from March 17-26. See pages 21-35 for complete details. As this program was sent to press, the VSO and Music Director Designate Otto Tausk announced its 100th Anniversary season, one of the first major Canadian orchestras to hit this important milestone. The season will look at the past, present, and future, feature distinguished guest artists such as Renée Fleming and Itzhak Perlman in spotlight concerts, introduce you to exciting new musicians, as well as bring back those musicians you love such as James Ehnes for our 100th Anniversary Gala and Music Director Emeritus Bramwell Tovey for two programmes, one featuring the world premiere of his 100th Anniversary commission: Concerto for Orchestra. Check out the entire announcement at the VSO’s website at www. vancouversymphony.ca. I join the entire VSO family in thanking you, our local, corporate, and government communities for supporting the role of music in our lives. We take great pride in sharing the tremendous breadth of music with you and continuing the impact it fosters in creating a language that has no limits or boundaries, just an open door to you. With gratitude,

Fred G. Withers Chair, Board of Directors

Kelly Tweeddale President, VSO & VSO School of Music

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CONCERT PROGRAM MUSICALLY SPEAKING | ORPHEUM, 8PM

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24

WESTMINSTER SAVINGS SURREY NIGHTS | BELL PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE, SURREY 8PM

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 26

JOSHUA WEILERSTEIN

JOSHUA WEILERSTEIN conductor

Mr. Weilerstein's career was launched after winning both the First Prize and the Audience Prize at the 2009 Malko Competition for Young Conductors in Copenhagen. He then completed a threeyear appointment as Assistant Conductor of the New York Philharmonic. Since then, he has steadily gained a growing profile in North America and abroad. Joshua feels that it is essential to have an open communication between the stage and audience and is always excited to hear from musicians and audiences alike. He is accessible on social media for conversations about the future of classical music, programming, and the experience of concert-going.

DANIEL MÜLLER-SCHOTT

Joshua Weilerstein conductor Daniel Müller-Schott cello GOLIJOV Night of the Flying Horses

Joshua Weilerstein is the Artistic Director of the Orchestre de Chambre de Lausanne. His clarity of musical expression, unforced manner and deep natural musicianship connects him with orchestras and has led him to conduct extensively in both Europe and America. His enthusiasm for a wide range of repertoire is combined with an ambition to bring new audiences to the concert hall.

ELGAR

Cello Concerto in E minor, Op. 85

I. Adagio – Moderato II. Lento – Allegro molto III. Adagio IV. Allegro

I N T E R M ISSI O N

BRAHMS/ORCH. SCHOENBERG

Piano Quartet No. 1 in G minor, Op. 25

I. Allegro II. Intermezzo: Allegro, ma non troppo III. Andante con moto IV.Rondo alla Zingarese: Presto

VISIT THE SYMPHONY GIFT SHOP AT THE ORPHEUM FOR CD SELECTIONS SURREY NIGHTS SERIES SPONSOR

THE VSO’S SURREY NIGHTS SERIES HAS BEEN ENDOWED BY A GENEROUS GIFT FROM WERNER AND HELGA HÖING.

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DANIEL MÜLLER-SCHOTT cello In addition to performances of the great cello concertos, Daniel Müller-Schott has a special interest in discovering unknown works and extending the cello repertoire, e.g., with his own adaptations and through cooperation with composers. Sir André Previn and Peter Ruzicka have both dedicated a cello concerto to him which he premiered under the composers’ batons. Daniel Müller-Schott is much in demand as a musical partner in Brahms’ Double Concerto and as a trio partner with the celebrated violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter. In October 2013 the Anne-Sophie Mutter Foundation awarded the Aida Stucki Prize to Daniel Müller-Schott. Daniel Müller-Schott was born in Munich. He studied under Walter Nothas, Heinrich Schiff and Steven Isserlis and benefited early on from personal sponsorship by Anne-Sophie Mutter as the holder of a scholarship from her foundation. Through this support, Daniel Müller-Schott was taught privately by Mstislav Rostropovich for a year. In 1992, at the age of fifteen, he first caused a sensation internationally by winning the 1st Prize at the Moscow International Tchaikovsky Competition for Young Musicians.

OSVALDO GOLIJOV

b. La Plata, Argentina / December 5, 1960

Night of the Flying Horses Golijov’s appealing, label-defying music reflects his mixed heritage and upbringing. Born into an Eastern European Jewish family who had emigrated to Argentina, his youthful ears were filled with a heady mixture of classical chamber music, Jewish liturgical and klezmer music, and the sophisticated tangos of Argentinean composer Astor Piazzolla. His many international commissions have come from such prestigious organizations as the Boston Symphony Orchestra and Lincoln Center, New York.

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Golijov composed his first film score for director/writer Sally Potter’s The Man Who Cried (2000). He adapted the soulful, neo-gypsy/neo-klezmer piece you will hear at this concert from that score. The composer writes, “The piece starts with a set of variations on a Yiddish lullaby that I composed for The Man Who Cried, set to function well in counterpoint to another important music theme in the soundtrack: Bizet’s aria ‘Je crois entendre encore’ from The Pearl Fishers. In her evocative film, Sally Potter explores the fate of Jews and gypsies in the tragic mid-years of the twentieth century, through a love story between a Jewish young woman (Christina Ricci) and a gypsy young man (Johnny Depp). Accordingly, the theme of the lullaby here metamorphoses into a dense and dark doina (a slow, rubato gypsy genre) featuring the lowest strings of the viola. The piece ends in a fast gallop boasting a theme that I stole from my friends of the wild gypsy band Taraf de Haidouks.”

“Born into an Eastern European Jewish family who had emigrated to Argentina, his youthful ears were filled with a heady mixture of classical chamber music...” SIR EDWARD ELGAR

b. Broadheath, England / June 2, 1857 d. Worcester, England / February 23, 1934

Cello Concerto in E minor, Op. 85 World War One changed Europe forever, not only on the map, but in the hearts and minds of its citizens. For Elgar, the leading English composer of the pre-war era, the effects of the political upheavals and battlefield carnage were nothing less than devastating. The warmth and confidence that illuminate and helped to popularize such pieces as the “Enigma” Variations (1899) and the concert overture Cockaigne (1901) diminished markedly, never fully to return. Elgar longed for the comfortable optimism of the past, but sensed it was irretrievably lost. He gave


voice to his world’s saddening, to its growing inwardness and pessimism. Other composers, such as Stravinsky, turned to the lean textures and buoyant optimism of Neo-Classicism. Meanwhile, Arnold Schoenberg and his disciples deconstructed traditional musical procedures in their pursuit of new means of expression.

“Schoenberg once referred to his arrangement of it, half in jest, as “Brahms’s Fifth (Symphony).” His scoring does at times go beyond what Brahms himself employed.”

In the warm, noble voice of the cello, Elgar found the perfect medium to express his brooding, nostalgic post-war emotions. The première of the Cello Concerto took place in London on October 27, 1919. Elgar himself conducted, with Felix Salmond – the performer who had given him technical advice on it, and to whom it is dedicated – playing the solo part.

My intentions: 1. To remain strictly in the style of Brahms and not to go farther than he himself would have gone if he lived today.

It is a restrained piece, at least in comparison with the more outgoing virtuoso concertos of the nineteenth century. After a brief introduction, the first movement is founded on two themes, both melancholy in character. The scherzo like second movement follows without a pause. For all its brilliance, it is far from carefree. The third movement is an interlude of searching meditation. The concerto then concludes with an energetic, if hardly exuberant, final rondo. A heartfelt coda recalls earlier material, before the concerto ends with a final statement of the rondo’s main subject.

How I did it: I am for almost 50 years very thoroughly acquainted with Brahms’ style and his principles. I have analyzed many of his works for myself and with my pupils. I have played as violist and cellist on this work and many others numerous times: I therefore know how it should sound in the orchestra and this is in fact what I did.

JOHANNES BRAHMS

ORCH. ARNOLD SCHOENBERG

b. Hamburg, Germany / May 7, 1833 d. Vienna, Austria / April 3, 1897

Piano Quartet No. 1 in G minor, Op. 25

Listeners with open ears should enjoythis creative transcription immensely. In it Schoenberg, who idolized Brahms, paid him sincere and stylistically appropriate homage. This is how he explained his reasons for creating it: 1. I like the piece. 2. It is seldom played. 3. It is always very badly played, because the better the pianist, the louder he plays and you hear nothing from the strings. I wanted once to hear everything, and this I achieved.

2. To watch carefully all these laws which Brahms obeyed and not to violate any of those which are only known to musicians educated in his environment.

Schoenberg thus continued the longstanding tradition of using transcriptions to promote what one composer considered the unjustly neglected works of others. Brahms was a fiery youth of 28 when he completed the original quartet. Its broad scale and rich, diverse contents make it a plausible candidate for conversion to the orchestral medium. Schoenberg once referred to his arrangement of it, half in jest, as “Brahms’s Fifth (Symphony).” His scoring does at times go beyond what Brahms himself employed. In the boisterous, gypsyflavoured concluding rondo, Schoenberg’s percussion-tinged scoring ventures into Rimsky-Korsakov territory. Elsewhere he stays close to Brahmsian models, even paring down the texture to the quartet’s original string trio, just before the dashing final bars.  ■ Program Notes © 2018 Don Anderson

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CONCERT PROGRAM VSO CHAMBER PLAYERS |

ALAN AND GWENDOLINE PYATT HALL

DR. H.N. MACCORKINDALE STAGE, VSO SCHOOL OF MUSIC

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 28 7:30PM THURSDAY, MARCH 1 7:30PM SUNDAY, MARCH 4 2PM SCHNITTKE & SHOSTAKOVICH ALFRED SCHNITTKE Quartet No. 3

Nicholas Wright violin Cassandra Bequary violin Emilie Grimes viola Olivia Blander cello

ALFRED SCHNITTKE Hymnus II

Cristian Mรกrkos cello Noah Reitman bass I N T E R M ISSI O N NICHOLAS WRIGHT

OLIVIA BLANDER

SHOSTAKOVICH

Piano Quintet in G minor

EMILIE GRIMES

Nicholas Wright violin Jennie Press violin Emilie Grimes viola Cristian Mรกrkos cello Grace Huang piano

CRISTIAN MรRKOS

WITH SUPPORT FROM

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CONCERT PROGRAM AIR CANADA MASTERWORKS DIAMOND | ORPHEUM, 8PM

SATURDAY & MONDAY, MARCH 3 & 5

DAVID FRAY

Michael Sanderling conductor David Fray piano WAGNER Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg: Prelude to Act I

MICHAEL SANDERLING

MENDELSSOHN Piano Concerto No. 1

in G minor, Op. 25

I. Molto allegro con fuoco II. Andante III. Presto: Molto allegro e vivace

I N T E R M ISSI O N

BRUCKNER/ED. SCHALK/NOWAK

Symphony No. 3 in D minor PRE-CONCERT TALKS Free to ticketholders, 7:05pm to 7:30pm, in the auditorium.

I. Mehr langsam, Misterioso II. Adagio, bewegt, quasi Andante III. Ziemlich schnell IV. Allegro

VISIT THE SYMPHONY GIFT SHOP FOR CD SELECTIONS MASTERWORKS DIAMOND SERIES SPONSOR

MARCH 5 CONCERT SPONSOR

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MICHAEL SANDERLING conductor The German conductor Michael Sanderling opened his seventh season as Chief Conductor of the Dresden Philharmonic with Symphony No. 8 by Gustav Mahler in the newly opened Dresden Philharmonic Concert Hall. Born in Berlin, Michael Sanderling is one of the few artists who, after an illustrious career as orchestra musician and soloist, has been able to achieve a highly successful career on the podium, establishing himself as one of the world's most appreciated conductors. In 1987, at the age of 20, he became solo cellist of the Gewandhausorchester Leipzig under Kurt Masur and, from 1994 to 2006, he held the same position in the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra. Michael Sanderling first graced the conductor’s stand at a concert of the Kammerorchester Berlin in 2000 – and caught fire. Having been familiar with the art of conducting from a young age,

EXPERIENCE MORE.

as son of the legendary Kurt Sanderling, Michael Sanderling took on more and more conducting roles, and was named the Principal Conductor and Artistic Director of the Kammerakademie Potsdam in 2006.

DAVID FRAY piano Described by the press as a “poet” and “perhaps the most inspired, certainly the most original Bach player of his generation,” David Fray continues to thrill audiences worldwide as a recitalist, soloist and chamber musician. He has collaborated with leading orchestras under distinguished conductors around the world. Mr. Fray records exclusively for Erato/ Warner Classics and his first album with works of Bach and Boulez was praised as the “best record of the year” by the London Times and Le Soir. Mr. Fray’s second release, a recording of Bach keyboard concerti with the Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen was awarded by the German Recording Academy.

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JOIN TODAY!

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The Vancouver Symphony Orchestra is a registered not-forprofit organization. Charitable Number 11928 2283 RR0001

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David holds multiple awards including the prestigious German Echo Klassik Prize for Instrumentalist of the Year and the Young Talent Award from the Ruhr Piano Festival. In 2008 he was named Newcomer of the Year by the BBC Music Magazine. At the 2004 Montréal International Music Competition, he received both the Second Grand Prize and the Prize for the best interpretation of a Canadian work.

RICHARD WAGNER

b. Leipzig, Germany / May 22, 1813 d. Venice, Italy / February 13, 1883

Prelude to Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg

“Wagner introduced Die Meistersinger with a sonorous and emotionally heartening prelude.” Wagner was incapable of composing an opera that wasn’t on a grand scale – even a comedy. This ensured that The Mastersingers of Nuremberg is the longest, richest and most eloquent work of its kind. He created it from 1861 to 1867, and the first performance took place in Munich, Germany on June 21, 1868. The title characters are merchants and tradesmen, residents of the German city of Nuremberg during the sixteenth century. Their principal diversion is vocal music. To gain entry to their exclusive guild, applicants must demonstrate talent for both composing and singing, and are obliged to do so within strict, traditional guidelines. Wagner’s hero is the wise, gentle cobbler Hans Sachs, an actual historical figure. He aids the young nobleman Walther von Stolzing in winning two things: a place among the Mastersingers, and the hand of Eva, the woman he loves. Wagner introduced Die Meistersinger with a sonorous and emotionally heartening prelude. It is constructed on two sturdy, noble themes for the Mastersingers; an expressive theme representing von Stolzing, which he will incorporate

into the Prize Song that gains him entry into the guild; and a scherzo-like tune for the comic villain, Beckmesser. At the climax, Wagner layers all these melodies together, in a display of contrapuntal ingenuity worthy of Bach.

FELIX MENDELSSOHN

b. Hamburg, Germany / February 3, 1809 d. Leipzig, Germany / November 4, 1847

Piano Concerto No. 1 in G minor, Op. 25 Mendelssohn spent the years 1830 to 1832 on a journey throughout Europe, one concerned with equal parts furthering his career and simple pleasure. En route to Italy during the summer of 1830, he stopped over in Munich, Germany. There he met Delphine von Schauroth, a seventeen-year-old pianist with whom he developed a strong mutual attraction. He continued on to Rome, where among other musical activities he sketched this concerto. He completed it on his return to Munich and dedicated it to his young lady friend.

“The orchestra accompanied well, and the work itself was truly mad.” The composer himself appeared as soloist in the première, which took place during an all-Mendelssohn concert in Munich on October 17, 1831. “My concerto was applauded long and loud,” he wrote home to his father. “The orchestra accompanied well, and the work itself was truly mad.” As for Delphine von Schauroth, time and distance gradually dissolved her relationship with Mendelssohn. In many ways, the concerto reflects Mendelssohn’s role as a bridge between the Classical and Romantic eras. On the Classical side, the three movements follow fairly traditional models: sonata, song and rondo, respectively. But following a practice instituted by Beethoven, Mendelssohn directs that they be performed as a continuous whole. He did so primarily for artistic reasons, to give the concerto a allegro 17


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greater sense of flow and cohesiveness. The concerto also employed another favourite Romantic practice: cyclical reference. The same brass fanfare introduces both the second and third movements, and the finale includes a brief quotation from the first movement.

ANTON BRUCKNER

b. Ansfelden, Austria / September 4, 1824 d. Vienna, Austria / October 11, 1896

Symphony No. 3 in D minor

ED. SCHALK/NOWAK Bruckner composed his first four symphonies from 1863 to 1872. Two of them bear numbers and two do not. Echoes of his Baroque (Palestrina) and Romantic (Beethoven, Schubert, Wagner) role models may be detected in all of them, and forecasts of his mature style are there to hear, as well. It was only with Symphony No. 3 (the fifth he composed) that he truly began to hit upon the basics of his mature, individual symphonic style. Its primary characteristics include grandeur and elevated lyricism; a spectacular, organ-like use of the brass section; the ecstatic ruminations of the slow movements; the rustic dance rhythms of the scherzos; and the monumental conclusions of the finales. The Third underwent a difficult birth and adolescence. After completing it in March 1873, he secured permission from his idol, Wagner, to dedicate the symphony to him. He inscribed it “to the unreachable worldfamous sublime master of poetry and

music.” The first draft contained quotations from Wagner’s operas in three of its four movements, but later versions reduced them significantly. Four years passed before the première, which the distinguished maestro Johann von Herbeck had agreed to conduct but who passed away before he could do so. Bruckner reluctantly stepped in to lead the début himself. The fateful date was December 16, 1877. The piece proved beyond his modest conducting talents, and it was disadvantageously placed at the conclusion of a lengthy concert. The deeply anti-Wagner Vienna critic Eduard Hanslick labelled it “A vision of how Beethoven’s Ninth befriends Wagner’s The Valkyrie and finds itself under her horse’s hooves... That fraction of the audience which remained to the end consoled the composer for the flight of the rest.” The poisonous critical atmosphere played a role in this catastrophe, but the symphony’s new, grander style might also have perplexed or even alienated some of those audience members who had appreciated his previous works. Despite the disastrous launching, one year later it became his first symphony to be published. Several major revisions followed, the last in 1888/89. It is this final version, prepared in conjunction with his pupil, Franz Schalk, and edited by Leopold Nowak for the International Bruckner Society, that the VSO will perform at these concerts.  ■ Program Notes © 2018 Don Anderson

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CONCERT PROGRAM SPRING FESTIVAL: LEGENDS | ORPHEUM, 8:00PM

SATURDAY, MARCH 17 SPRING FESTIVAL 1: CARMINA BURANA!

The 2018 VSO SPRING FESTIVAL explores musical legends, from Mozart to Bernstein, Mahler, Richard Strauss, and Pinchas Zukerman; and literary legends, from biblical Psalms, to the wisdom of Plato, the writings of medieval monks in Carmina Burana, the story of Don Quixote, the philosophical musings of Voltaire, and the poetry of W.H. Auden. Join Maestro Tovey and the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra for a magical, musical journey through some of history’s most enduring and fascinating legends, as we also honour the 100th anniversary of the birth of Leonard Bernstein.

BRAMWELL TOVEY

Bramwell Tovey conductor Tracy Dahl soprano Benjamin Butterfield tenor James Westman baritone UBC University Singers & Choral Union Graeme Langager director Langley Fine Arts School Treble Choir Jim Sparks director BERNSTEIN Chichester Psalms

I. Psalm 107 & Psalm 100: Maestoso ma energico – Allegro molto II. Psalm 23 & Psalm 2: Andante con moto, ma tranquillo – Allegro feroce III. P  salm 131 & Psalm 133: Prelude – Sostenuto molto – Peacefully flowing

LEONARD BERNSTEIN

I N T E R M ISSI O N

ORFF Carmina Burana

I. Fortuna Imperatrix Mundi II. Primo vere III. U  f dem anger IV. In Taberna V. Cour d’amours VI. Blanziflor et Helena VII. Fortuna Imperatrix Mundi

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BRAMWELL TOVEY conductor Grammy® and Juno® award-winning conductor/composer Bramwell Tovey was appointed Music Director of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra in 2000. He is also the Artistic Advisor of the VSO School of Music. His unprecedented 18-year tenure has included complete symphony cycles of Beethoven, Mahler, Brahms, the establishment of an annual festival dedicated to contemporary music, as well as the VSO Orchestral Institute at Whistler (VSOIW), a comprehensive orchestral training program for young musicians held in the scenic mountain resort of Whistler/ Blackcomb. In 2017/2018, Maestro Tovey’s VSO season includes monumental works such as The Dream of Gerontius by Elgar, Bruckner’s Symphony No. 9, Britten’s Peter Grimes, and the “Resurrection” Symphony of Mahler. Mr. Tovey will also lead favourite pieces by Bernstein and premieres of his own works. The season includes tours within British Columbia and across Canada, as well as a Gala Celebration (May 31). As the VSO reaches its centenary, Mr. Tovey will be honoured with the title of Music Director Emeritus. During the 2017/2018 season, Mr. Tovey’s guest performances take him to Rhode Island; Philadelphia, the New York Philharmonic, Indianapolis, St. Louis and Houston symphonies; as well Regina and Toronto. He maintains roots in the banding tradition as a frequent guest of the National Youth Brass Band of Great Britain, and as President of the Foden’s Band. In 2003 Bramwell Tovey won the Juno® Award for Best Classical Composition for his choral and brass work Requiem for a Charred Skull. His song cycle, Ancestral Voices, was written in consultation with First Nations mezzo-soprano Marion Newman, and earned much acclaim in its premiere performances in June of 2017. A talented pianist as well as conductor and composer, he has appeared as soloist 22 allegro

TRACY DAHL

BENJAMIN BUTTERFIELD

with many major orchestras, recently in the music of Gershwin with the Chicago Symphony. Mr. Tovey is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Music in London, the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto and holds honorary degrees from the universities of British Columbia, Manitoba, Kwantlen and Winnipeg. In 2013 he was appointed an honorary Officer of the Order of Canada for services to music. In 2017 he joined the faculty of Boston University where he teaches conducting and oversees BU’s extensive orchestra programme, and in January 2018 he assumed the position of Principal Conductor of the BBC Concert Orchestra.

TRACY DAHL soprano Canada’s premiere coloratura soprano, Tracy Dahl, has appeared throughout her career with such esteemed opera companies as the Metropolitan, San Francisco, Houston Grand, Santa Fe and Calgary operas; the Canadian Opera Company, Teatro alla Scala (Milan) and the Théâtre du Châtelet (Paris). The “incredible Canadian soprano,” known for her agility and vocal range, values education alongside her impressive performing career as a Professor of Voice at the University of Manitoba. Born in Winnipeg, Tracy Dahl commenced her vocal training at age twelve, and had her heart set on a career in musical theatre. During her studies at the Banff Centre, she successfully debuted as


JAMES WESTMAN

UBC UNIVERSITY SINGERS & CHORAL UNION

Barbarina in Mozart’s Le nozze di Figaro with the Manitoba Opera. Under the guidance of Mary Morrison and Martin Isepp, Dahl developed her career in opera, ultimately performing with world renowned symphonies, orchestras, and opera companies. In July 2017, Tracy Dahl had the high honour of being appointed to the Order of Canada for her accomplishments as an opera singer and for her commitment to mentoring the next generation of Canadian singers.

BENJAMIN BUTTERFIELD tenor Praised by The New York Times as, “clarionvoiced and vibrant”, Benjamin Butterfield is known for his performances throughout North America, Europe, the Middle East, and Asia. He has performed with many of the world’s leading conductors. A prolific recording artist, he has recorded for Analekta, Dorian, CBC Records, Koch International and Timpani (France). He has also been featured in Messiah on ZDF at the Handel-Festspiele Halle with Trevor Pinnock and the English Concert and on CBC Radio as a guest host forThis is My Music. Associate Professor, head of voice and co-head of performance for the School of Music at the University of Victoria, Butterfield is the 2015 recipient of the UVic. Craigdarroch Award for Excellence in Artistic Expression. He has also served as guest faculty for Opera Nuova, the Amalfi Coast Music Festival in Italy, The Victoria

Conservatory Summer Vocal Academy, Vancouver International Song Institute, Yellow Barn, and Opera on the Avalon.

JAMES WESTMAN baritone Internationally acclaimed Canadian baritone James Westman, “acts as impressively as he sings, stealing the show.” – London, England Financial Times Whether performing song, concert or opera throughout the world, baritone James Westman’s passion and musicianship bring an extra dimension to his performances. His success on the concert stage continues to flourish and he has performed with many of the world’s leading orchestras; Messiah alone has taken him to the New York Philharmonic, Toronto Symphony Orchestra, San Francisco Symphony, National Arts Centre Orchestra (Ottawa), Vancouver Symphony, Baltimore Symphony and the Detroit Symphony. Formerly a successful boy treble, Mr. Westman toured with the American Boychoir, the Paris Boys Choir and the Vienna Boys Choir. Known as Jamie Westman, he was the first boy ever to perform the fourth movement of Mahler’s Symphony No. 4, (A Child's View of Heaven) and toured this work with the Boston Philharmonic Orchestra in Austria, Poland, Czechoslovakia, East and West Germany and Russia, performing in the Musikverein, Roy Thomson Hall and Carnegie Hall at the age of twelve. allegro 23


GRAEME LANGAGER

LANGLEY FINE ARTS SCHOOL TREBLE CHOIR

UBC UNIVERSITY SINGERS & CHORAL UNION University Singers is the premier choral ensemble in the UBC School of Music. This 40-voice ensemble performs the most advanced and exciting music for chamber choir written in recent decades, as well as motets and other historically important works. Previous choral experience, a strong ear, and music reading ability is encouraged for participation in this ensemble. The University Singers performs four feature concerts each year, as well as occasional run-out performances throughout the Vancouver area. The University Singers won first place among university choirs in the Choral Canada’s National Competition for Canadian Amateur Choirs in 2015. Choral Union is UBC’s largest choir. Boasting over 150 singers, the Choral Union performs major choral repertoire from beautiful pieces of Renaissance music to dynamic modern compositions. As well, the Choral Union performs with the UBC Symphony Orchestra each year, including works such as Mozart’s Requiem, and Orff’s Carmina Burana. This ensemble is comprised of both music majors and non-music majors. The Choral Union performs four concerts each year.

JIM SPARKS

GRAEME LANGAGER director Dr. Graeme Langager is Director of Choral Activities at the UBC School of Music, and the Artistic Director and Conductor of the acclaimed Phoenix Chamber Choir. A native of Lethbridge, Alberta, Langager received the doctor of musical arts degree at the Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music and the masters degree at California State University, Long Beach. Langager returned to Vancouver in 2009 to take over the reins as UBC’s Director of Choirs after a 15-year career in the US, with conducting positions in California, North Carolina, Ohio, and Arkansas. Langager is sought after as a guest conductor, choral clinician, and adjudicator, and is active as a composer and arranger. Langager’s choirs have been invited to perform at major music conferences, including ACDA, MENC, NCCO, and IAJE. His choirs have performed throughout Europe and the United States including such prestigious venues as St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome, Stefansdom in Vienna, Notre Dame in Paris, St. Nicholas in Prague, and St. Stephen’s in Budapest.

LANGLEY FINE ARTS SCHOOL TREBLE CHOIR The Langley Fine Arts School is a grade 1-12 public school in the heart of Fort Langley, BC. The LFAS Treble Choir is one of four secondary choirs and is made up of arts students of dance, drama, writing, visual

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art, and music. Choirs from LFAS have earned numerous awards and opportunities, including the FCMF national festival Paul Bourret award, and have performed and recorded major works such as Mozart’s Requiem, Mendelssohn’s Elijah, Orff’s Carmina Burana, and Ola Gjeilo’s Sunrise Mass. In addition, the choirs have been pursuing innovative music projects such as joining rock group, Marianna’s Trench, on their Face the Music Tour (Vancouver performance), and the Arts Matter Lectures series performances with Alex Cuba, Sir Ken Robinson, and Maestro Bramwell Tovey. The LFAS Treble Choir joined the Vancouver Symphony, soloists, and UBC Choirs for Jeffery Ryan’s Requiem for a Generation in January of 2017, and returned to add their voices to Walton’s score Henry V during the VSO’s 2017 Spring Festival.

JIM SPARKS chorus director Jim Sparks serves as adjunct professor at the University of British Columbia School of Music (UBC Choirs) and director of music at the Langley Fine Arts School (LFAS) in Fort Langley, British Columbia. With a PhD in Philosophy (Simon Fraser University) and Masters of Music Degree in Choral Conducting (University of Arizona), and undergraduate degree in Piano and Voice (University of British Columbia), Jim has taught all levels of choirs in BC as choral director and vocal coach. Jim is currently a research affiliate with the MODAL Research Group at Simon Fraser University and also heads the Learning Engagement Division of Music Mentors International (mmiachieve.com). In demand as an adjudicator and guest conductor, Jim’s work continues in Europe, Kenya, Cuba and Brazil, where in July 2015, Jim was keynote speaker at CIEMS, the international conference of music education, and guest conductor of Eurochestries in Sobral, Brazil, one of the several international youth choir and orchestra festivals held in Europe, Canada, Mexico, and Brazil in 2015.

LEONARD BERNSTEIN

b. Lawrence, Massachusetts, USA / August 25, 1918 d. New York, USA / October 14, 1990

Chichester Psalms Conductor, composer, pianist, author, broadcaster, humanitarian – Leonard Bernstein left indelible marks on an astonishing range of endeavors. Perhaps his most enduring achievement sprang from his tremendous communication skills, on and off the podium. He had a particular understanding of television. The New York Philharmonic Young People’s Concerts were inspired examples of how to open up a frequently mysterious and forbidding art to receptive and imaginative minds. He composed music throughout his career, ranging from witty, light-hearted songs and superb stage musicals (West Side Story, Candide) to substantial operas, ballets, concertos and symphonies. In 1965, he took a sabbatical from his position as music director of the New York Philharmonic. His goal was to spend time composing. “I wrote a lot of music,” he said, “twelve-tone music and avant garde music of various kinds, and a lot of it was very good, and I threw it all away. And what I came out with at the end of the year was a piece called Chichester Psalms, which is simple and tonal and tuneful and as pure B-flat as any piece you can think of.” Bernstein scored the piece for mixed chorus and an orchestra consisting of trumpets, trombones, percussion, two harps and strings. The texts are sung in Hebrew. The first section consists of a dramatic introduction (Awake, psaltery and harp! with text from Psalm 108), followed by a festive setting of Psalm 100 (Make a joyful noise unto the Lord). In the second part, a gentle setting of Psalm 23 (The Lord is my shepherd, featuring a boy soprano or countertenor soloist) is briefly interrupted by the harsh words and music of Psalm 2 (Why do the nations rage). The final section is the longest. After an anxious orchestral introduction, Bernstein presents a gently flowing interpretation of Psalm 131 (Lord, allegro 25


Lord, my heart is not haughty). The coda comes with a setting, mostly a cappella, of Behold how good, Psalm 133’s plea for peace and unity.

CARL ORFF

b. Munich, Germany / July 10, 1895 d. Munich, Germany / March 29, 1982

Carmina Burana By the mid 1920s, music – especially the works of Arnold Schoenberg and his followers – had become more complicated and more intellectualized than most listeners could grasp, or were willing to tolerate. Composers in several lands recognized the need for a shift in attitude. German composer Carl Orff chose the approach of creating theatrical spectacles in which straightforward, communicative music, words and movement combined to produce immediate and striking impressions that appealed to a broad range of audiences. At the beginning of the `30s, while serving as conductor of the Munich Bach Society, he produced a number of arrangements of early music. His researches in this area eventually led to the creation of Carmina Burana, his first (and greatest) success. The texts are what gave the score its name. In 1803, at the monastery of Benediktbeuern in Upper Bavaria, musicologist J. A. Schmeller discovered a manuscript collection of lyrics, dating from the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. When it was published in 1847, Schmeller dubbed it Carmina Burana (Songs from the beuern, or in Latin, Burana district). Probably the work of wandering scholars and defrocked priests, its texts are mostly in Latin, with a sprinkling of old German. The polite side of the collection includes six plays based on the Christmas, Passion and Easter mysteries. The earthier part contains some 200 drinking songs, love lyrics and recruiting songs. When Orff came across the manuscript in 1935, he saw in it the ideal vehicle to express the kind of basic, uncomplicated human emotions he had in mind. Choosing 26 allegro

two dozen poems from the collection, with the assistance of Michel Hofmann, he matched them with equally direct music, featuring simple yet striking rhythms, melodies and harmonies. “It’s not sophisticated, not intellectual,” he wrote, “and the themes of my work are themes that everyone knows...There is a spiritual power behind my work, that’s why it is accepted throughout the world.” The première took place in Frankfurt on June 8, 1937. The illuminated pictures that accompanied the original poems intrigued Orff virtually as much as the words. The cover showed luck as a revolving wheel, blindly governing people’s destinies. Orff began his Carmina Burana with a grandiose hymn, Fortuna Imperatrix Mundi (Luck, Empress of the World), saluting this inscrutable, unpredictable concept. Primo vere (In Springtime), follows. It deals, mostly in quiet, mysterious fashion, with the anticipated arrival of that season. Joy eventually breaks forth as spring itself appears. Orff celebrated it in the section entitled Uf dem anger (On the Green). The next segment, In Taberna (In the Tavern) salutes the juice of the grape in riotous fashion. The tenor soloist, singing in falsetto, takes the role of a swan roasting slowly and sadly on a spit. The baritone is an Abbot who launches the men of the choir into a rollicking ode to drink. Cour d’amours (Court of Love) brings several of Orff’s loveliest, most lyrical moments. The soprano solo In trutina (In the Balance), a glowing anticipation of fulfillment, is a particular highlight. After the ecstatic fervour of Blanziflor et Helena (Blanchefleur and Helen, the principal characters in a medieval romance), Orff brought back his ode to luck, to close Carmina Burana as majestically as it began.  ■ Program Notes © 2018 Don Anderson


CONCERT PROGRAM SPRING FESTIVAL: LEGENDS | ORPHEUM, 8:00PM

MONDAY, MARCH 19 SPRING FESTIVAL 2: A BERNSTEIN CELEBRATION

AUGUSTIN HADELICH

LEONARD BERNSTEIN & BRAMWELL TOVEY, 1986

Bramwell Tovey conductor Augustin Hadelich violin Joyce Yang piano

BERNSTEIN Overture to Candide BERNSTEIN Serenade (after Plato’s “Symposium”)

I. Phaedrus; Pausanias: Lento – Allegro II. Aristophanes: Allegretto III. E  rixymachus: Presto IV. Agathon: Adagio V. Socrates; Alcibiades: Molto tenuto – Allegro molto vivace

I N T E R M ISSI O N

BERNSTEIN Symphony No. 2 The Age of Anxiety PART ONE

I. The Prologue II. The Seven Ages III. Th  e Seven Stages

PART TWO

JOYCE YANG

I. The Dirge II. The Masque III. Th  e Epilogue

allegro 27


BRAMWELL TOVEY conductor

Please refer to page 22 for a biography of Maestro Tovey.

AUGUSTIN HADELICH violin

Musical America’s “2018 Instrumentalist of the Year,” Augustin Hadelich has firmly established himself as one of the great violinists of today. He has performed with every major orchestra in the U.S., as well a number of major orchestras in the UK, Europe, and the Far East. Recent summer appearances included his 2017 solo debut at the Grand Teton Music Festival, his 2016 debut at the BBC Proms, return engagements with the Boston Symphony at Tanglewood and the Cleveland Orchestra at Blossom. Augustin Hadelich’s career took off when he was named Gold Medalist of the 2006 International Violin Competition of Indianapolis. Since then, he has garnered an impressive list of honors, including the inaugural Warner Music Prize in 2015, and a 2016 Grammy Award for his recording of Dutilleux’s Violin Concerto, L’arbre des songes, with the Seattle Symphony under Ludovic Morlot (Seattle Symphony MEDIA). Mr. Hadelich plays the 1723 “ExKiesewetter” Stradivari violin, on loan from Clement and Karen Arrison through the Stradivari Society of Chicago.

JOYCE YANG piano

Born in 1986 in Seoul, South Korea, Yang received her first piano lesson from her aunt at the age of four. She quickly took to the instrument, and over the next few years won several national piano competitions. By the age of ten, she had entered the School of Music at the Korea National University of Arts. In 1997, Yang moved to the United States to begin studies at the pre-college division of The Juilliard School with Dr. Yoheved Kaplinsky. After winning The Philadelphia Orchestra’s Greenfield Student Competition, she performed Prokofiev’s Third Piano Concerto with that orchestra at just twelve years old.

28 allegro

Yang made her celebrated New York Philharmonic debut with Maazel at Avery Fisher Hall in November 2006 and performed on the orchestra’s tour of Asia, making a triumphant return to her hometown of Seoul, South Korea. Yang appears in the film In the Heart of Music, a documentary about the 2005 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition. She is a Steinway artist.

LEONARD BERNSTEIN

b. Lawrence, Massachusetts, USA / August 25, 1918 d. New York, USA / October 14, 1990

Overture to Candide Based on a satiric tale by eighteenthcentury French author Voltaire, Bernstein’s comic operetta Candide premièred on Broadway in 1956, without much success. Several revisions were needed before it reached its definitive form in the late 1980s as a semi-opera. Bernstein set the stage for Candide with a sparkling and tuneful overture, based on themes from the show.

LEONARD BERNSTEIN

Serenade (after Plato’s “Symposium”) Bernstein composed this work in 1954 on a commission from the Koussevitzky Foundation, that would feature Isaac Stern as soloist. Originally conceived as a traditional violin concerto, it evolved into something more personal: a tribute to the serenades of Mozart, and a reaction to a literary work from Classical Greece: Plato’s dialogue The Symposium. Bernstein wrote, “For the benefit of those interested in literary allusion, I might suggest the following points as guideposts. Phaedrus; Pausanias: Phaedrus opens the symposium with a lyrical oration in praise of Eros, the god of love. Pausanias continues by describing the duality of lover and beloved. Aristophanes: Aristophanes does not play the role of clown in this dialogue, but instead that of the bedtime storyteller, invoking the fairy tale mythology of love. Eryximachus: The physician speaks of bodily harmony as a scientific model for the workings of love patterns.


Agathon: Perhaps the most moving speech of the dialogue. Agathon’s panegyric enhances all aspects of love’s powers, charms and functions. Socrates; Alcibiades: Socrates describes his visit to the seer Diotima, quoting her speech on the demonology of love. This is a slow introduction of greater weight than any of the preceding movements…The famous interruption by Alcibiades and his band of drunken revellers ushers in the Allegro, which is an extended rondo ranging in spirit from agitation through jig like dance music to joyful celebration.”

LEONARD BERNSTEIN

Symphony No. 2 The Age of Anxiety Bernstein read W.H. Auden’s poem The Age of Anxiety in 1947. It immediately inspired him to compose a musical response. Following is a synopsis of the composer’s introduction. “I imagine that the conception of a symphony with piano solo emerges from the extremely personal identification of myself with the poem. In this sense, the pianist provides almost an autobiographical protagonist, set against the orchestral mirror in which he sees himself, analytically, in the modern ambience. The essential line of the poem (and of the music) is the record of our difficult and problematical search for faith. In the end, two of the characters enunciate the recognition of this faith – even a passive submission to it – at the same time revealing an inability to relate to it personally in their daily lives, except through blind acceptance. Part One (a) The Prologue finds four lonely characters, a girl and three men, in a Third Avenue bar, all of them insecure and trying, through drink, to detach themselves from their conflicts, or, at best, to resolve them. They are drawn together by this common urge and begin a kind of symposium on the state of man. (b) The Seven Ages. The life of man is reviewed from the four personal points of view. This is a set of variations which differ from conventional variations in that they do not vary any one common theme. Each

variation seizes upon some feature of the preceding one and develops it. (c) The Seven Stages. The variation form continues for another set of seven, in which the characters go on an inner and highly symbolic journey according to a geographical plan leading back to a point of comfort and security. The four try every means, going singly and in pairs, exchanging partners, and always missing the objective. When they awaken from this dreamodyssey, they are closely united through a common experience (and through alcohol), and begin to function as one organism. Part Two (a) The Dirge is sung by the four as they sit in a cab en route to the girl’s apartment for a nightcap. They mourn the loss of the “colossal Dad,” the great leader who can always give the right orders and satisfy the universal need for a father-symbol. (b) The Masque finds the group in the girl’s apartment, weary, guilty, determined to have a party, each one afraid of spoiling the others’ fun by admitting that he should be home in bed. This is a scherzo for piano and percussion alone, in which a kind of fantastic piano-jazz is employed, by turns nervous, sentimental, self-satisfied, vociferous. The party ends in anti-climax and the dispersal of the actors. When the orchestra stops, as abruptly as it began, a pianino in the orchestra is continuing the Masque, as the Epilogue begins. Thus a kind of separation of the self from the guilt of escapist living has been effected, and the protagonist is free again to examine what is left beneath the emptiness. (c) The Epilogue. What is left, it turns out, is faith. The trumpet intrudes its statement of “something pure” upon the dying pianino; the strings answer in a melancholy reminiscent of the Prologue; again and again the strings re-iterate “something pure” against the mounting tension of the strings’ loneliness. All at once the strings accept the situation, in a sudden radiant pianissimo, and begin to build, with the rest of the orchestra, to a positive statement of the newly recognized faith.”  ■ Program Notes © 2018 Don Anderson

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CONCERT PROGRAM SPRING FESTIVAL: LEGENDS | ORPHEUM, 8:00PM

SATURDAY, MARCH 24 SPRING FESTIVAL 3: WEST SIDE STORY

LEONARD BERNSTEIN & BRAMWELL TOVEY, 1986

TRACY DAHL

Bramwell Tovey conductor Tracy Dahl soprano BERNSTEIN Symphonic Dances from West Side Story MAHLER Symphony No. 4 in G major

I. Bedächtig. Nicht eilen II. In gemächlicher Bewegung. Ohne Hast III. R  uhevoll (Poco adagio) IV. Sehr behaglich

BRAMWELL TOVEY

allegro 31


BRAMWELL TOVEY conductor Please refer to page 22 for a biography of Maestro Tovey.

TRACY DAHL soprano Please refer to page 22 for a biography of Ms. Dahl.

LEONARD BERNSTEIN

b. Lawrence, Massachusetts, USA / August 25, 1918 d. New York, USA / October 14, 1990

Mambo: Reality again; competitive dance between the gangs. Cha-cha: The star-crossed lovers see each other for the first time and dance together. Meeting Scene: Music accompanies their first spoken words. “Cool” Fugue: An elaborate dance sequence in which the Jets practice controlling their hostility.

Symphonic Dances from West Side Story

Rumble: Climactic gang battle during which the two gang leaders are killed.

The virtually operatic West Side Story (1957) is Bernstein’s masterpiece of musical theatre. It updates the spirit of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet into the twentieth century, placing the star-crossed lovers Tony and Maria on opposite sides of a conflict between street gangs in the slums of New York’s Manhattan Island.

Finale: Love music developing into a procession, which recalls, in tragic reality, the vision of Somewhere.

The concert suite Symphonic Dances from West Side Story appeared in the wake of the show’s 1961 film version. It used the original Broadway orchestrations by Sid Ramin and Irwin Kostal, expanded under Bernstein’s supervision to full symphony orchestra. Lukas Foss conducted the New York Philharmonic in the première, in February 1961.

After creating colossal canvasses that addressed profound philosophical issues in his previous two symphonies, Mahler decided to shift direction in the Fourth. The result was a shorter, gentler composition, scored for a smaller orchestra.

Dance – dramatic, even violent in nature – plays a prominent role in the show. It provided plentiful material for this symphonic synthesis, which links together many of the most familiar themes into a digest of the plot. The following synopsis appears in the published score. Prologue: The growing rivalry between the teenage street gangs, the Sharks and the Jets. Somewhere: In a visionary dance sequence, the two gangs are united in friendship. Scherzo: In the same dream, they break through the city walls and suddenly find themselves in a world of space, air and sun. 32 allegro

GUSTAV MAHLER

b. Kalischt, Bohemia / July 7, 1860 d. Vienna, Austria / May 18, 1911

Symphony No. 4 in G Major

Its origins lay several years in the past. In 1892, he composed a setting for soprano and orchestra of The Heavenly Life, a poem from The Youth’s Magic Horn, a collection of German folklore. Intending to use it as the seventh and final movement of his Third Symphony, instead he put it aside because this would have made the piece nearly two hours long. When he began his Fourth in 1899, he settled on using the discarded movement as the finale, then composed the first three sections. He completed the symphony during the summer of 1900, and conducted the première himself, in Munich on November 25, 1901. Few listeners cared for it initially. Its lightness and grace confounded many who had come to appreciate his massive, soul-stirring creations. His numerous detractors fell upon it like wolves, condemning it as a sick joke, a


circus act, or even a “Black Mass,” to quote one reviewer. They also criticized him for concluding so serious a work as a symphony with a folk-like song. During the remaining decade of his life, as audiences came to understand what to expect of it, it won its due share of esteem. The naïveté which may appear so pervasive an ingredient on first hearing proves entirely superficial on closer acquaintance. A sophisticated creative mind and a total mastery of the orchestra are at work in every bar. Mahler’s previously demonstrated insight into life, and his deep faith in humanity, here strike no less moving a chord for his clothing them in such intimate, literally angelic radiance. The first movement immediately captures the ear with the most innocent sounds imaginable: silvery flutes and jingling sleigh bells. The movement presents a wide array of concise, warm-hearted themes. The art that underlies their evolution – materials blend into each other and back out again – is altogether extraordinary. Mid-way through, trumpets sound a clear reference to the opening theme of Mahler’s Fifth Symphony, which he began to compose during the summer of 1901. The scherzo-like second movement evokes the fairy-tale world of the Brothers Grimm,

1993

and The Youth’s Magic Horn. It has the character of the ländler, a lilting Austrian peasant dance which prefigured the waltz. Early on in the symphony’s composition, Mahler wrote that in this section “Friend Death strikes up the dance for us.” The music is too genteel ever to venture anywhere near the truly macabre. He instructs the orchestra’s concertmaster to tune his or her violin a whole tone higher than normal to give an eerie effect in solo passages. This is usually accomplished by the concertmaster’s using a separate instrument for this movement. The slow third movement presents expansive variations on two themes. The first is serene, the second, unsettling. After a series of compelling passages, the gates of heaven burst open gloriously at the climax. In the finale, the sleigh bell theme of the opening movement returns as a lively refrain, as a young angel praises the manifold delights of her domain. Mahler asked the soloist to “adopt a joyous, child-like tone, without the slightest hint of parody.” At first, the subject of her song is largely food. In the final verse, it shifts to music, surely the art through which one draws closest to the deity.  ■ Program Notes © 2018 Don Anderson

2 0 18

Silver Anniversary Season B E L L I N G H A M Michael Palmer, Artistic Director

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VANCOUVER SYMPHONY FOUNDATION

Ensure the VSO’s future with a special gift to the Vancouver Symphony Foundation, established to secure the long term success of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra. The Vancouver Symphony family extends its sincere thanks to these donors whose gifts will ensure that the VSO remains a strong and vital force in our community long into the future. $4,000,000 or more Government of Canada through the Department of Canadian Heritage Endowment Incentives Program

Malcolm Hayes and Lester Soo Michael and Estelle Jacobson S.K. Lee in memory of Mrs. Cheng Koon Lee Katherine Lu in memory of Professors $1,000,000 or more Mr. and Mrs. Ngou Kang Robert G. and Suzanne Brodie McGrane-Pearson Endowment Fund Ron and Ardelle Cliff Nancy and Peter Paul Saunders Martha Lou Henley, C.M. Ken and Patricia Shields Werner (Vern) and Helga Höing Whittall Family Fund William and Irene McEwen Fund Tim Wyman and Susan Scott Gabe Province of BC through the BC Arts $50,000 or more Renaissance Fund under the Adera Development Corporation stewardship of the Vancouver Winslow and Betsy Bennett Foundation The Bruendl Foundation Alan and Gwendoline Pyatt Etienne Bruson and Anny Morrisette The Jim Pattison Foundation Sam and Anita Lee $500,000 or more Alexandra Mauler-Steinmann and Carter (Family) Deux Mille Foundation Michael Steinmann Wayne & Leslie Ann Ingram Leon and Joan Tuey Hermann and Erika Stölting Rosemarie Wertschek, Q.C. $250,000 or more $25,000 or more Mr. Hassan and Jeff and Keiko Alexander Mrs. Nezhat Khosrowshahi Kathy and Stephen Bellringer Sheahan and Gerald McGavin, C.M., O.B.C. Brazfin Investments Ltd. The Tong and Geraldine Louie Mrs. May Brown, C.M., O.B.C. Family Foundation Eva and Doug Christopher Arthur H. Willms and Mary Ann Clark Mrs. Margaret M. Duncan Elizabeth and David Finch $100,000 or more Cathy Grant Taryn Brodie Mollie Massie and Hein Poulus Mary and Gordon Christopher Mrs. Gordon T. Southam, C.M. Janey Gudewill and Peter Cherniavsky Melvyn and June Tanemura In memory of their Father Maestro Bramwell Tovey and Jan Cherniavsky and Grandmother Mrs. Lana Penner-Tovey Mrs. B.T. Rogers Beverley and Eric Watt

$10,000 or more Mrs. Marti Barregar Mrs. Geraldine Biely Douglas and Marie-Elle Carrothers Mr. Justice Edward Chiasson and Mrs. Dorothy Chiasson David Cunningham Daniella and John Icke Dr. Marla Kiess Dan and Trudy Pekarsky Bob and Paulette Reid Joanne and Stanis Smith Nancy and Robert Stewart Anonymous (2) $5,000 or more Charles and Barbara Filewych Stephen F. Graf Edwina and Paul Heller Marietta Hurst Kaatza Foundation Prof. Kin Lo Rex and Joanne McLennan Roy Millen and Ruth Webber Chantal O’Neil and Colin Erb Marion L. Pearson and James M. Orr In Memory of Pauline Summers Bella Tata/Zarine Dastur: In Memory of Shiring (Kermani) and Dali Tata Nico and Linda Verbeek Anonymous (1) The Vancouver Symphony gratefully acknowledges the support of those donors who have made a commitment of up to $5,000 to the Vancouver Symphony Foundation. Regretfully, space limitations prevent a complete listing.

Tax creditable gifts of cash, securities and planned gifts are gratefully received and your gift is enhanced with matching funds from the Federal Government.

Please call Leanne Davis, Vice President, Chief Development Officer at 604.684.9100 x 236 or email leanne@vancouversymphony.ca to learn more.


CONCERT PROGRAM SPRING FESTIVAL: LEGENDS | ORPHEUM, 8:00PM

MONDAY, MARCH 26 SPRING FESTIVAL 4: ZUKERMAN PLAYS MOZART

AMANDA FORSYTH

Bramwell Tovey conductor Pinchas Zukerman violin/viola Amanda Forsyth cello

MOZART Violin Concerto No. 5 in A Major, K. 219 Turkish I. Allegro aperto

II. Adagio III. R  ondeau: Tempo di menuetto

I N T E R M ISSI O N

PINCHAS ZUKERMAN

BRAMWELL TOVEY

R. STRAUSS Don Quixote, Op. 35 Introduction Variation 1: The Adventure with the Windmills Variation 2: The Battle with the Sheep Variation 3: Dialogue Between Knight and Servant: Sancho’s Demands, Questions and Proverbs Variation 4: Th e Adventure with the Procession of Penitents Variation 5: Don Quixote’s Vigil During the Summer Night Variation 6: Meeting with a Country Lass; Sancho Tells His Master She is Dulcinea Bewitched Variation 7: The Flight Through the Air Variation 8: The Adventure of the Enchanted Boat (Barcarolle) Variation 9: The Contest with the Supposed Magician; The Attack on the Monks Variation 10: Duel with the Knight of the White Moon; The Defeated Don Quixote Decides to Give up Fighting, Contemplates Being a Shepherd, and Goes Home Finale: Death of Don Quixote allegro 35


BRAMWELL TOVEY conductor

Please refer to page 22 for a biography of Maestro Tovey.

PINCHAS ZUKERMAN violin/viola

Pinchas Zukerman has remained a phenomenon in the world of classical music for over four decades. His musical genius, prodigious technique and unwavering artistic standards are a marvel to audiences and critics. Devoted to the next generation of musicians, he has inspired younger artists with his magnetism and passion. A devoted and innovative pedagogue, Mr. Zukerman chairs the Pinchas Zukerman Performance Program at the Manhattan School of Music, where he pioneered the use of distance-learning technology in the arts over two decades ago. In Canada, where he served as Music Director of the National Arts Centre Orchestra from 19992015, he established the NAC Institute for Orchestra Studies and the Summer Music Institute encompassing the Young Artists, Conductors and Composers Programs. He currently serves as Conductor Emeritus of the National Arts Centre Orchestra, as well as Artistic Director of its Young Artist Program. Born in Tel Aviv in 1948, Pinchas Zukerman came to America in 1962 where he studied at The Juilliard School with Ivan Galamian as a recipient of the American Israel Cultural Federation scholarship. An alumnus of the Young Concert Artists program, Mr. Zukerman has also received honourary doctorates from Brown University, Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, and University of Calgary.

AMANDA FORSYTH cello

Canadian Juno Award-winning Amanda Forsyth is considered one of North America's most dynamic cellists. She has achieved her international reputation as soloist, chamber musician and was principal cello of Canada’s National Arts Centre Orchestra from 1999 to 2015. Her intense richness of tone, remarkable technique and exceptional musicality combine to enthrall audiences and critics alike. Last season Ms. Forsyth was invited for her first homecoming tour of South Africa 36 allegro

performing Malcom Forsyth's Elektra Rising among other repertoire. In 2002 she was the subject of the Bravo! Canada television documentary Amanda Rising: The Amanda Forsyth Story. The program followed Ms. Forsyth’s life from her early years as a young South African immigrant to her later success on the international music scene. Born in South Africa, Ms. Forsyth moved to Canada as a child and began playing cello at age three. She became a protégé of William Pleeth in London, and later studied with Harvey Shapiro at the Juilliard School. Ms. Forsyth performs on a rare 1699 Italian cello by Carlo Giuseppe Testore.

WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART

b.Salzburg, Austria / January 27, 1756 d. Vienna, Austria / December 5, 1791

Violin Concerto No. 5 in A Major, K. 219 Turkish Between April and December 1775, Mozart composed the last four of his five violin concertos. He probably wrote at least some of them to play himself. He completed No. 5 on December 20. It is not only the most accomplished of the series, but also the most unusual. The soloist’s first entry, for example, is remarkable for being quite different in tempo and mood – quiet and dreamy – from the preceding orchestral introduction. It’s as if the violinist were saying to the orchestra, “catch your breath while I introduce myself.” The second movement is a true adagio, slow and heartfelt, in contrast to the easy, flowing andante that was typically of the era. Its lyrical intensity borders on the operatic. The finale, a rondo in the style of a minuet, is the source of the concerto’s nickname. In the delightfully startling minor key episode mid-way through, Mozart instructed the cellos and basses to strike their strings with the wood of the bow, and asks the soloist for virtuoso pyrotechnics. These practices recall the Turkish military music that was all the rage in Austria at the time, a lingering effect of the sieges that the Turkish army, with its percussion-laden military bands, had made against Vienna during the previous two centuries.


RICHARD STRAUSS

b. Munich, Germany / June 11, 1864 d. Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany / September 8, 1949

Don Quixote, Op. 35 Don Quixote is the most mature, ingenious and subtle of Strauss’s tone poems. Dating from the period between Also sprach Zarathustra and Ein Heldenleben, it was performed for the first time in Cologne on March 8, 1898. Spanish author Miguel de Cervantes’s timeless fable about an aging knight and his imaginary adventures was published in 1605. Strauss subtitled his version “fantastic variations on a theme of knightly character.” His fertile Romantic imagination made each variation a showcase for his unsurpassed skills at orchestration and musical characterization. He gave the role of Don Quixote to the solo cello, and the solo viola represents his faithful servant, Sancho Panza. The piece consists of an introduction, theme (actually, themes), ten variations and finale. The events depicted in the variations are clearly spelled out in the score. Strauss chose them carefully to offer plentiful variety of mood, and to present a satisfying mixture of pure story-telling, character portrayal and graphic description. Together they create a compelling, often poignant overview of this fascinating character. The expansive introduction shows Don Quixote at home, sound of mind although intensely absorbed in books on chivalry. The numerous thematic fragments include a gentle oboe melody representing Dulcinea, the ideal, imaginary lady patron on whose behalf he will shortly seek to perform noble deeds. With a crash, the Don crosses the line into a world of delusion. The solo cello presents the theme characterizing his new self-image as a mighty hero, and Sancho Panza’s earthy, humorous themes follow. Their adventures are launched with Variation 1, the famous episode of the windmills. Quixote believes them to be evil giants and rides forward to skewer them with his lance, only to be knocked from his horse instead. In Variation 2, he charges boldly into a herd of sheep, thinking them

enemy warriors. Strauss’s use of fluttertonguing in the wind instruments to imitate the baaing of the sheep caused a furor at early performances. He called Variation 3 “Sancho’s conversations, questions, demands and proverbs, Don Quixote’s instructing, appeasings and promises.” After a furious central outburst, the Don outlines in noble tones the goodness and generosity of spirit that underlie his quest. In Variation 4, the travelers encounter a religious procession bearing a statue of the Virgin Mary. Mistaking the icon for a maiden who is being abducted, the Don attacks, only to be knocked from his horse once again. The radiant Variation 5 shows him keeping lonely watch over his armour, with gallant devotion, on a warm, moonlit summer night. Quixote mistakes an earthy peasant girl for Dulcinea in the playful Variation 6. Strauss then brings in a wind machine to bolster a literal depiction of the next adventure. The Don and his servant believe themselves borne aloft on a magic flying horse. In mundane reality, they never leave the ground. Variation 8 finds them boarding a boat which bears them downstream to near-disaster as they rapidly approach a mill. Sopping wet, they offer a prayer of thanks for their deliverance. Another mistaken attack follows in Variation 9. The Don routs a group of horsemen accompanying a wealthy lady’s coach. In his mind’s eye, they are enchanters bearing off a princess. The tone shifts to tragedy in Variation 10. One of Quixote’s neighbours, concerned that the Don’s adventures will end in death, defeats him at a joust. Thus condemned by the rules of chivalry to return home and refrain from heroic pursuits for a year, the Don makes his disheartened way back, to the strains of a funeral march. With great beauty and eloquence, the finale portrays his final, once again lucid moments. His quest may have been illusory and a failure, Strauss tells us, but the sincerity that inspired it – a mark of true nobility – was utterly genuine.  ■ Program Notes © 2018 Don Anderson

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CONCERT PROGRAM TEA & TRUMPETS | ORPHEUM, 2PM

THURSDAY, APRIL 5 THE MAGIC OF DANCE

GOH BALLET

SEAN GAO

▼ ◆

WILLIAM ROWSON

William Rowson conductor Christopher Gaze host Goh Ballet Sean Gao violin DVOŘÁK Slavonic Dances, Op. 72 No. 1 in B Major No. 2 in E minor

TCHAIKOVSKY Sleeping Beauty: Waltz DELIBES Coppelia: Waltz of the Hours LEHAR Gold & Silver Waltz CELEBRATING 15 YEARS OF CHRISTOPHER GAZE AS HOST OF TEA & TRUMPETS

TEA & COOKIES served in the lobby one hour before each concert. Tea compliments of Tetley Tea.

BRAHMS Hungarian Dances Nos. 1, 3, 10 VIVALDI The Four Seasons: Winter, Mvt. 2 Largo TCHAIKOVSKY The Nutcracker: Waltz of the Flowers

VISIT THE SYMPHONY GIFT SHOP FOR CD SELECTIONS Goh Ballet is synonymous with training talent and fostering excellence in the presentation of classical ballet. It provides extraordinary opportunities for each dancer to reach their full potential, while contributing to the very fabric of our city’s and country’s artistic well-being. At the forefront of the performing arts community, Goh Ballet is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year and we are so pleased to feature once again in the VSO’s Tea and Trumpets series.

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WILLIAM ROWSON conductor

Conductor William Rowson is rapidly establishing a reputation as one of Canada's most versatile emerging talents. Known for his intimate knowledge of the standard repertoire as well as his facile handling of new works, Rowson recently completed his first season as the Assistant Conductor of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra. Bill grew up in a musical family, starting the violin at age three in his hometown of Saskatoon. He began the study of conducting at the Curtis Institute of Music and since then, has been a frequent guest of many of Canada’s leading ensembles. In the 2016/17 season Rowson led the VSO in 45 performances as well as guest conducting appearances with the Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra and Stratford Symphony Orchestra. Also an accomplished composer, the Toronto Symphony Orchestra performed the world première of his Fanfare-A Sesquie for Canada’s 150th to critical acclaim. His film score for the feature length film Big Muddy has been showcased at the Toronto International Film Festival.

CHRISTOPHER GAZE host

Christopher Gaze is best known as the Founding Artistic Director of Bard on the Beach Shakespeare Festival. He hosts the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra's ever popular Tea & Trumpets series and has hosted their annual traditional Christmas concerts for 25 years. Christopher plays a leading role in British Columbia as an advocate for the arts in general, and his passionate dedication to Bard on the Beach has fueled its growth into one of the largest professional theatre companies in Canada, drawing more than 1.7 million patrons since its inception in 1990. His many honours include Canada’s Meritorious Service Medal, Honorary Doctorates from UBC & SFU, the Mayor’s Arts Award for Theatre and the Order of British Columbia.

GOH BALLET

Since 1978, Vancouver, Canada, has been home to Goh Ballet, a vibrant, innovative and diverse dance organization. Following

the vision of its founders while expanding on current artistic aspirations, Goh Ballet pursues technical and artistic excellence while raising cultural awareness in our communities through dance instruction and performance productions. The Goh Ballet is synonymous with excellence, training talent and fostering the presentation of classical ballet. It provides extraordinary opportunities for dancers to reach their full potential, while contributing to the artistic well-being of our city and country. Goh Ballet is always at the forefront of the arts community. With a wide-ranging and ever-expanding repertoire that encompasses classical and contemporary ballet, jazz, character and national dance, the Goh Ballet’s reach extends internationally. The achievements of their students at international competitions, and the visibility of their graduates who fill the ranks of world renowned companies, continue to prove Goh Ballet is a justly celebrated cultural ambassador on world stages.

SEAN GAO violin

Violinist Sean Gao began studying with his father Tony Gao at the age of six. When he was thirteen years old, Sean made his debut as a soloist with the Vancouver Youth Symphony Orchestra, and is the winner of the Vancouver Philharmonic Orchestra Concerto Competition, Vancouver Youth Symphony Orchestra Concerto Competition, Seattle Young Artists Music Competition, and a finalist of the Shean National Strings Competition. Sean has recently collaborated with the Vancouver Metropolitan Orchestra, Seattle Northwest Philharmonia, and the Vancouver Philharmonic Orchestra. He’s had the opportunity to play in master classes for many world renowned soloists such as Ray Chen and Rachel Barton Pine, and has taken lessons with Vadim Gluzman, Noah Bendix-Balgley, and more. He is also an avid chamber musician, winning 1st prize in the annual Friends of Chamber Music Competition. Sean has been studying with Nicholas Wright, Concertmaster of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, since 2014.  ■ allegro 41


CONCERT PROGRAM LONDON DRUGS VSO POPS | ORPHEUM, 8PM

FRIDAY & SATURDAY, APRIL 6 & 7 THE DOO WOP PROJECT

THE DOO WOP PROJECT

Stuart Chafetz conductor The Doo Wop Project Dominic Nolfi Charl Brown Dominic Scaglione Jr. Dwayne Cooper Sonny Paladino STUART CHAFETZ

SELECTIONS INCLUDE: I Only Have Eyes for You Remember Then The Way You Make Me Feel Tracks of My Tears Tears of a Clown Come and Go With Me Sherry Big Girls Don’t Cry Walk Like a Man and more!

VISIT THE SYMPHONY GIFT SHOP FOR CD SELECTIONS VSO POPS SERIES SPONSOR

VSO POPS RADIO SPONSOR

APRIL 6 CONCERT SPONSOR

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STUART CHAFETZ conductor

Stuart Chafetz is the newly appointed Principal Pops Conductor of the Columbus Symphony. Chafetz, a conductor celebrated for his dynamic and engaging podium presence, is increasingly in demand with orchestras across the continent and this season Chafetz will be on the podium in Seattle, Detroit, Naples, Phoenix, Cincinnati, Milwaukee, Vancouver and many more. He previously held posts as resident conductor of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra and associate conductor of the Louisville Orchestra. As principal timpanist of the Honolulu Symphony for twenty years, Chafetz would also conduct the annual Nutcracker performances with Ballet Hawaii and principals from the American Ballet Theatre. It was during that time that Chafetz led numerous concerts with the Maui Symphony and Pops. Chafetz makes his home near San Francisco, CA, with his wife Ann Krinitsky. Chafetz holds a bachelor’s degree in music performance from the College-Conservatory of Music at the University of Cincinnati and a master’s from the Eastman School of Music.

The Doo Wop Project

DOMINIC NOLFI

Dominic is currently performing on Broadway in Chazz Palminteri's A Bronx Tale - The Musical, directed by Robert DeNiro and Jerry Zaks. As an Original Cast member of A Bronx Tale, Motown: The Musical (Grammy® nominated) and Jersey Boys (Grammy Award for Best Cast Album), he can be heard on all three soundtracks. Dominic also performed in the World Prémiere productions of A Bronx Tale and Jersey Boys at the Paper Mill Playhouse and the La Jolla Playhouse, respectively. Dom was born and raised in San Francisco where he studied youth acting at ACT and performed annually in their production of A Christmas Carol. He studied voice at the San Francisco Conservatory, and attended the Boston Conservatory on scholarship where he graduated with a BFA in Theater. Upon graduation Dominic joined the European production of Grease. It was there that he met his future wife Sonia Iannetti; they have a daughter Vivienne.

44 allegro

CHARL BROWN

Charl originated the role of Smokey Robinson in Motown: The Musical, garnering a nomination for a 2013 Tony Award for Best Featured Actor in a Musical on Broadway. He is also featured on the Motown Grammy® Nominated Original Broadway Cast recording, and recently returned from 6 months in London’s West End reprising his Smokey Robinson role. In 2014 Charl worked with legendary composer Steven Schwartz playing the role of Adam/Noah in Children of Eden at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C.. Other credits include Jersey Boys on Broadway and Las Vegas, Sister Act on Broadway, Hair in Europe, Ever After, Johnny Baseball, Dreamgirls, Six Degrees of Separation, Jesus Christ Superstar, A Chorus Line, and Star Wars Trilogy in 30 Minutes at Edinburgh Fringe Festival. Charl has also appeared on television on Madam Secretary, Britain's Got Talent, America's Got Talent, Macy's 85th & 87th Thanksgiving Parade, 63rd Annual Tony Awards, and A Capitol 4th. He is a proud Graduate of the University of Southern California School of Theater.

DOMINIC SCAGLIONE JR.

Dominic was most recently seen in the starring role of Frankie Valli in Jersey Boys on Broadway - on an eight year run! He’s also played Frankie in the Las Vegas and Chicago companies. He performed on The Oprah Winfrey Show and was personally asked by Frankie Valli to sing at his New Jersey Hall of Fame induction ceremony. Early on in his career, Dominic was a member of the Sony music group called Sygnature and toured with the likes of Christina Aguilera, Destiny’s Child, Beyoncé, Robin Thicke and Boyz 2 Men. He is proud to be one of the creators of The Doo Wop Project and marvels at how far this little idea has come. Love to His fiancé Tara "Janie" and Family for their support.

RUSSELL FISCHER

Standing five-foot-six with a tenor voice and falsetto range, Fischer landed the role of Joe Pesci in the Broadway company of Jersey Boys on his 22nd birthday, marking his Broadway debut. Fischer starred in the second national tour of Big: The Musical as Billy Kopecki. His regional credits include Jimmy Smith in Thoroughly Modern Millie, Tommy Djilas in The Music Man at Chautauqua Opera, the American prémiere of Children of Eden at Papermill Playhouse, and Tommy Swank in Baby Fat,


Act 1: A Rock Opera based on Verdi’s Rigoletto at LaMama Experimental Theater Club in Manhattan. On television Fischer has appeared on the live broadcast of the 2015 Belmont Stakes, the 2009 Tony Awards, and several spots for TV Land’s 60 Second Sitcoms. He is truly grateful for the opportunity to tour with this group, sharing this music with audiences around the world.

DWAYNE COOPER

Dwayne (The Bass) is from Florence, SC and currently lives in New York City. He first began singing with a Christian a cappella group called “The Cunningham Singers”. Often referred to as a modern day Sammy Davis Jr. meets Barry White, he is what the industry calls a “triple threat” and has performed in the Broadway casts of Motown: The Musicial, Hairspray, and several national tours, including Smokey Joe’s Cafe and Showboat. As a songwriter/producer, he has charted on Billboard’s Top Ten Dance chart and as a sketch comedy writer YouTube videos have been seen by viewed millions of times. Dwayne’s film and television credits include Law And Order, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, Difficult People and RuPaul's Drag

Race. Much love and thanks to family, friends and fans for the support!

SONNY PALADINO

Currently Sonny is the Music Supervisor for the Broadway Musical, Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812, as well as Music Director for the upcoming Broadway revival of Smokey Joe’s Café. Sonny’s recent credits include: Associate Conductor, The Last Ship (written by 16 time Grammy® Award winner, Sting), and the Tony-winning revival of Pippin. Other Broadway credits include, Jesus Christ Superstar, Billy Elliot, Grease, Priscilla - Queen of the Desert, Guys and Dolls, Mama Mia, Promises, Promises, Addams Family, and Women on the Verge. Sonny was the Music Supervisor for Disney’s High School Musical Italian tour and his national tour credits include Dirty Rotten Scoundrels and Grease. His arrangements and orchestrations have been performed by the The Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra and he has worked with the likes of Alicia Keys, Ke$ha, and Matthew Morrison. Sonny’s work for television has been featured on The X-Factor Australia and The Next Big Thing. He earned his B.F.A. in Jazz Piano from CUNY City College, New York.  ■

Proud to celebrate and support the 27th Annual Vancouver Symphony Ball kpmg.ca

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CONCERT PROGRAM ORIGINO KIDS' KONCERTS | ORPHEUM, 2PM

SUNDAY, APRIL 8 MAGIC CIRCLE MIME CO: MUSIC, NOISE & SILENCE

WILLIAM ROWSON

MAGIC CIRCLE MIME CO.

William Rowson conductor Magic Circle Mime Co. Three meddlesome spirits Music, Noise and Silence - invade the Orpheum. The concert seems doomed as Silence and Noise attempt to seize control of the orchestra. Only with the help of the audience, and Music, will the conductor be able to break the fierce grip of Noise and bring harmony back to the orchestra.

VON SUPPÉ Poet and Peasant Overture MENDELSSOHN Dance of the Clowns BACH/STOKOWSKI Little Fugue in G (Fugue in G – The Lesser) STRAUSS Pizzicato Polka IVES Country Band March GROFÉ Cloudburst from the Grand Canyon Suite

By arrangement with ALLIANCE ARTIST MANAGEMENT 5030 Broadway, Suite 812, New York, NY 10034 www.allianceartistmanagement.com

VSO INSTRUMENT FAIR The Kids' Koncerts series continues with the popular VSO Instrument Fair, which allows music lovers of all ages (but especially kids!) to touch and play real orchestra instruments in the Orpheum lobby one hour before concert start time. All instruments are generously provided by Tom Lee Music. VISIT THE SYMPHONY GIFT SHOP FOR CD SELECTIONS KIDS' KONCERTS SERIES SPONSOR

PREMIER EDUCATION PARTNER

THE VSO’S KID’S KONCERTS HAVE BEEN ENDOWED BY A GENEROUS GIFT FROM THE WILLIAM AND IRENE McEWEN FUND

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WILLIAM ROWSON conductor Please refer to page 41 for a biography of William Rowson.

MAGIC CIRCLE MIME CO. Magic Circle Mime Company is regarded as one of today’s premier family attractions. Its highly acclaimed performances, which unite the concert orchestra with visual theater, are consistently praised for imaginative and innovative content. Magic Circle Mime Company performs with nearly every major orchestra in North America and has performed on numerous occasions with the symphony orchestras of Atlanta, Detroit, Chicago, Montreal, Saint Louis, Seattle, Toronto, Vancouver and Winnipeg; the Cleveland Orchestra, Minnesota Orchestra and Philadelphia

Orchestra; and on more than a dozen occasions at The Kennedy Center For The Performing Arts with the National Symphony Orchestra. 2016 marked the fifth appearance at the National Arts Centre of Canada. Magic Circle Mime Company also has a growing reputation outside North America. They have performed at festivals and with orchestras in Australia, China, Colombia (SA), Japan, Hong Kong, Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Singapore, Spain and Taiwan. In 2018 they will perform for the first time in Denmark with the Aalborg Symfoniorkester. International festival appearances include the Beijing Music Festival, Shanghai International Children's Festival and Taiwan International Children's Festival.  ■

CONNECT WITH THE VSO! @VSOrchestra

604.876.3434 vancouversymphony.ca

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CONCERT PROGRAM VSO CHAMBER PLAYERS |

ALAN AND GWENDOLINE PYATT HALL

DR. H.N. MACCORKINDALE STAGE, VSO SCHOOL OF MUSIC

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY, APRIL 11 & 12 7:30PM SUNDAY, APRIL 15 2:00PM TOMBEAU, TRIO & 2 RAVEL Le Tombeau de Couperin Christie Reside flute Beth Orson oboe Michelle Goddard clarinet Sophie Dansereau bassoon Russell Rybicki horn

KEERIL MAKAN "2" Karen Gerbrecht violin Aaron McDonald percussion I N T E R M ISSI O N

CHRISTIE RESIDE

AARON MCDONALD

YI ZHOU

KAREN GERBRECHT

CHAUSSON Piano Trio in G minor Yi Zhou violin Luke Kim cello Chiharu Iinuma piano

VISIT THE SYMPHONY GIFT SHOP FOR CD SELECTIONS WITH SUPPORT FROM

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The Vancouver Symphony gratefully acknowledges the generosity of these community leaders whose ongoing annual support makes it possible to present 150 performances and 13 inspiring education and community programs every year.Thank you for your loyalty and commitment to the VSO’s ongoing success.

GOLD BATON CLUB Gifts from $50,000 and Up Dr. Peter and Mrs. Stephanie Chung Heathcliff Foundation Mr. Alan and Mrs. Gwendoline Pyatt MAESTRO’S CIRCLE GIFTS FROM $35,000 TO $49,999 The R & J Stern Family Foundation GIFTS FROM $25,000 TO $34,999 The Christopher Foundation (Education Fund) Signe Jurcic Lagniappe Foundation Mr. Gerald McGavin, C.M., O.B.C. and Mrs. Sheahan McGavin McGrane-Pearson Endowment Fund Jane McLennan Mr. Fred Withers and Dr. Kathy Jones CONCERTMASTER’S CIRCLE GIFTS FROM $15,000 TO $24,999 Mary and Gordon Christopher Foundation Martha Lou Henley, C.M. The Lecky Foundation Mrs. Irene McEwen George W. Norgan Fund, held at Vancouver Foundation Thomas and Lorraine Skidmore Anonymous (1) GIFTS FROM $10,000 TO $14,999 Larry and Sherrill Berg Gerhard and Ariane Bruendl Mrs. Joyce E. Clarke Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Cooper Mrs. Margaret M. Duncan Mohammed A. Faris The Gudewill Family In Memory of John Hodge Diane Hodgins Werner (Vern) and Helga Höing

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CONCERT PROGRAM CLASSICAL TRADITIONS | CHAN CENTRE FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS, 8PM

FRIDAY & SATURDAY, APRIL 13 & 14

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Karina Canellakis conductor Esther Yoo violin

ESTHER YOO

DVOŘÁK The Noon Witch, Op. 108 ◆

KARINA CANELLAKIS

SIBELIUS

Violin Concerto in D minor, Op. 47

I. Allegro moderato II. Adagio di molto III. Allegro, ma non tanto

I N T E R M ISSI O N

BRAHMS Symphony No. 3 in F Major, Op. 90

THE PRESENTATION OF THIS SERIES IS MADE POSSIBLE, IN PART, THROUGH THE GENEROUS ASSISTANCE OF THE CHAN ENDOWMENT FUND AT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.

I. Allegro con brio II. Andante III. Poco Allegretto IV. Allegro

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KARINA CANELLAKIS conductor Winner of the 2016 Sir Georg Solti Conducting Award, Karina Canellakis is internationally acclaimed for her emotionally charged performances, technical command and interpretive depth. She made her European conducting debut in 2015 with the Chamber Orchestra of Europe in Graz, Austria. She first made headlines in 2014 filling in at the last-minute for Jaap van Zweden in Shostakovich Symphony No. 8 with the Dallas Symphony Orchestra, where she held the position of Assistant Conductor for two seasons. Already known to many in the classical music world for her virtuoso violin playing, Ms. Canellakis was initially encouraged to pursue conducting by Sir Simon Rattle while she was playing regularly in the Berlin Philharmonic for two years as a member of their Orchester-Akademie. She plays a 1782 Mantegazza violin on generous loan from a private patron. Ms. Canellakis is a graduate of the Curtis Institute of Music and the Juilliard School. She was born and raised in New York City and speaks French, German and Italian.

ESTHER YOO violin Esther Yoo, the young American-Korean violinist, is the first ever Artist-in-Residence with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra – a year long residency starting in 2018. Acclaimed for her “dark, aristocratic tone” (Gramophone Magazine) and “impeccable artistry” (South Florida Classical Review), Esther Yoo first came to international attention in 2010 when she became the youngest prizewinner of the 10th International Sibelius Violin Competition (aged sixteen). In spring 2016 Deutsche Grammophon released her Tchaikovsky album with the Philharmonia Orchestra under Vladimir Ashkenazy, following her 2015 debut on the label, featuring the Glazunov and Sibelius concertos. Born in the U.S. and raised in Europe since the age of six, Esther began playing the violin at 54 allegro

the age of four and made her concerto debut aged eight. She is currently a student of Ana Chumachenco in the Excellence Bachelor Programme at the Hochschule für Musik und Theater in Munich. Esther plays the 1704 “Prince Obolensky” Stradivarius, generously lent to her by a private collector.

ANTONÍN DVOŘÁK

b. Nelahozeves, Bohemia / September 8, 1841 d. Prague, Bohemia / May 1, 1904

The Noon Witch, Op. 108 Dvořák’s late compositions included several operas (including Rusalka, his one internationally successful stage work) and five symphonic poems. He composed the latter pieces in 1896 and 1897. The plots are rather gruesome, centering on the antics of evil spirits, witches and other nasty creatures. Portraying the stories in close detail, Dvořák illustrated them in melodious, atmospheric, and immensely colourful fashion. The opening section of The Noon Witch portrays a domestic scene: a mother prepares the noon meal and a child plays happily. Bored with its games, the child cries out restlessly. Increasingly annoyed, the mother eventually threatens it with a visit from the legendary midday witch, “a little shrivelled spectral woman leaning on a crooked stick.” Much to the family’s horror, the witch appears, accompanied by appropriately sinister music. Claiming the child for her own, she pursues her victims in a nightmarish scherzo. At the climax, the noon bell sounds, the witch disappears and the mother faints, the child clasped tightly in her arms. When father arrives later in the day, he is able to revive the mother but the child is dead. The witch’s theme rings out in hellish triumph.

JEAN SIBELIUS

b. Hämeenlinna, Finland / December 8, 1865 d. Järvenpää, Finland / September 20, 1957

Violin Concerto in D minor, Op. 47 Sibelius’s early desire had been for a career as a violin soloist, but his talent as a performer wasn’t equal to the task. On the other hand, these circumstances


ensured that he had no need to consult a professional soloist when he set to a work on this concerto in September 1902. The acclaimed soloist Willy Burmester had made repeated requests for him to do so, and Sibelius now felt prepared to fulfill the commission. The prémiere was given at a hastilyorganized concert in Helsinki on February 8, 1904. Burmester being unavailable on short notice, the solo part was played by the relatively inexperienced Viktor Nováček, and the composer conducted. The concerto failed miserably. Sibelius revised it during the summer of 1905. Richard Strauss conducted the Berlin Philharmonic in the second debut on October 19, with the orchestra’s Concertmaster, Carl Halir, as soloist. That version achieved everything that the first had not. The solo violin emerges out of a murmuring bed of strings, with a long, yearning theme of ever-growing intensity. The second subject is highly expressive, almost passionate. A substantial, turbulent solo cadenza appears at the midway point. The first half of the second movement is quite restrained. The emotional temperature rises towards the middle, first through orchestral surges then increasingly so as the soloist joins in, leading to a powerful climax. Typically for Sibelius, the finale isn’t a jolly, dancing romp, but an exciting, insistently rhythmic rondo. It contains the concerto’s highest share of technical demands, and builds up a considerable head of steam en route to the dynamic conclusion.

JOHANNES BRAHMS

b. Hamburg, Germany / May 7, 1833 d. Vienna, Austria / April 3, 1897

Symphony No. 3 in F Major, Op. 90 Brahms needed an unusually long time to develop an individual style. Much of the difficulty sprang from his awe of Beethoven, even though many of his supporters and colleagues saw him as the earlier composer’s true symphonic heir. “I shall never write a symphony,” he told conductor

Hermann Levi. “You have no idea how the likes of us feel when we hear the tramp of a giant like him (Beethoven) behind us.” Time and experience eventually convinced him to renounce that vow. Some 20 years passed after he began work on his first symphony before he felt it was ready to be played in public. The great success that this powerfully dramatic work earned at its première in 1876 confirmed that he possessed the necessary skills to follow in Beethoven’s footsteps as a great composer of symphonic music. The much more relaxed and genial Symphony No. 2 followed just one year later. He composed Symphony No. 3 in 1883. It is a more individual symphony than its two predecessors. In its striking mixture of passion and pessimism, of restlessness and serenity, Brahms offers a compelling, highly revealing musical self portrait. “What harmonious mood pervades the whole!” his close friend, Clara Schumann, wrote to him after playing through the symphony at the piano. “All the movements seem to be of one piece, one beat of the heart, each one a jewel.” One of its most striking features is that all four movements end quietly. Such an unusually reserved practice reveals the degree of confidence that Brahms had attained by this point in his career, and also perhaps a growing pessimism. The opening movement is rich with incident and feeling. Surges of emotion, positive and doubting alike, roll across its richly textured surface. The following two movements are peaceful interludes. Only at the climax of the second section does its overall atmosphere of almost rustic gentleness give way to a more heated style of utterance. The third movement is a dance: slow, melancholy, hauntingly beautiful. The symphony’s emotional conflicts are resumed in the finale, only to dissipate, unresolved, as the music winds down to a resigned, almost exhausted coda.  ■ Program Notes © 2018 Don Anderson

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CONCERT PROGRAM VANCOUVER SUN SYMPHONY AT THE ANNEX | ANNEX, DOWNTOWN VANCOUVER, 7:30PM

SATURDAY, APRIL 14 CREPUSCULAR, LUMINOUS

NICOLE GE LI & COREY HAMM

WILLIAM ROWSON conductor

Please refer to page 41 for a biography of William Rowson.

William Rowson conductor PEP - Piano & Erhu Project: Nicole Ge Li erhu Corey Hamm piano

HELEN GRIME A Cold Spring (Canadian Première) DOROTHY CHANG Chamber Concerto for the Piano Erhu Project, Gateways (World Première)

I. a letter to home II. slow fires III. games

INTERMISSION

KEVIN LAU Nocturne and Toccata HK GRUBER Zeitfluren

NICOLE GE LI erhu

Nicole Ge Li is currently Concert Master of the B.C. Chinese Orchestra and gaohu soloist with the BC Chinese Music Ensemble. Li began learning the erhu at the early age of six and started training professionally at the age of 11 at the Wu Conservatory of Music Affiliated Secondary School, where she received a full scholarship for four consecutive years. Li was later admitted to the prestigious Shanghai Conservatory of Music, where she earned her Bachelor of Music degree in erhu performance in 2008. An active erhu performer, both as a solo artist and as a member of an ensemble, since 2000, Li is a much sought after performing artist in Vancouver. In 2015, Li was a recipient of the prestigious Outstanding Young Leaders Medal of Merit Award.

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FINANCIAL SUPPORT FOR THE ANNEX SERIES PROVIDED BY

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DOROTHY CHANG’S GATEWAYS WAS COMMISSIONED WITH THE GENEROUS SUPPORT OF THE CANADA COUNCIL FOR THE ARTS.

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As a performing artist, Li is known for her interpretive expressiveness, stylistic versatility and ability to transverse a wide range of musical genres from the East to the West, from the traditional to the avant-garde. Li works out of her, JW Musical Studio, in Richmond, BC where she teaches, rehearses and records her growing erhu repertoire.

COREY HAMM piano Pianist Corey Hamm is establishing a unique musical profile performing widely in North America and in Asia as both a soloist and as a chamber musician. His CD of Frederic Rzewski’s hour-long solo piano epic The People United Will Never Be Defeated! won Spotify's Best Classical Recording 2014, and Best Classical Recording at the 2014 Western Canadian Music Awards. Corey Hamm has commissioned, premièred and recorded over 200 works by composers from all over the world. His most extensive collection of commissioned works includes over 60 pieces for PEP (Piano and Erhu Project). Dr. Hamm is an award-winning Associate Professor of Piano at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. He is on the Piano Faculty of the Summer Institute for Contemporary Performance Practice (SICPP) at NEC in Boston. His beloved teachers include Lydia Artymiw, Marek Jablonski, Stéphane Lemelin, Ernesto Lejano, and Thelma Johannes O'Neill.

Program Notes Each piece in Crepuscular, luminous features contrasts in timbre, moods ranging from dark and macabre to bright and ebullient - each composer shifts between light and darkness in a unique way. Helen Grime’s A Cold Spring is a bracing work that focuses on various soloists within the ensemble, creating dramatic changes of colour and texture. The dark lullaby of the middle movement, with its soloistic horn line, 58 allegro

is juxtaposed with outer sections of fierce activity. Kevin Lau’s Nocturne and Toccata explores the historical meaning of nocturne – “night music”, while creating a modern twist on historical two-part, contrasting forms. His night music begins in a place of uncertainty and disquiet, and battles furiously to triumph. Gateways, Dorothy Chang’s brilliant new chamber concerto for the Piano & Erhu Project utilizes extremes of range, timbre and musical influence to create a piece that explores both the hopeful optimism and the dark, entrapping connotations of a gateway. Calling to mind musical recollections as disparate as Berg, Weill, and 1920s jazz, HK Gruber’s Zeitfluren is the most ghostly and funereal, yet ultimately sunniest of these works.

HELEN GRIME

b. York, England / April 13, 1981

Helen Grime grew up in Scotland and studied at the Royal College of Music in London and at Tanglewood Music Center. Between 2011 and 2015 she was Associate Composer to the Hallé Orchestra and is currently Composer in Residence at Wigmore Hall. A portrait disc of her orchestral and ensemble works is available on the NMC label. helengrime.com

A Cold Spring falls into three movements

although these are played almost without a break. The first movement is fast-moving and features an exuberant duet for two clarinets. The second is a mini concerto for solo horn accompanied by the ensemble. More nocturnal in character, a repetitive rocking rhythm lends it a feel of a lullaby. The third movement opens with an energetic outburst for the whole group. Solos and duets are juxtaposed with the combined ensemble to create an impression of stark contrast. Program Notes © 2018 Helen Grime

DOROTHY CHANG

b. Winfield, Illinois, USA / November 12, 1970

Described as "evocative and kaleidoscopic,” the music of Dorothy Chang often


embraces the eclectic mix of musical influences from her youth, ranging from popular and folk music to elements of traditional Chinese music. Since 2003, Dorothy has served as a member of the composition faculty at the University of British Columbia. dorothychang.com

Gateways: In writing this double concerto

featuring the Piano-Erhu Project, I wrestled for some time with how I might address the issue of ‘east meets west,’ especially given the solo instruments’ highly distinct and disparate sonic characteristics, performance practices and musical traditions. Gradually, the piece evolved as a patchwork of musical fragments, moments and memories gathered from my own multicultural experiences as a first-generation Chinese American, a Western expatriate living in Taiwan, and now an immigrant to Canada. Woven into the three movements are references to a 90’s Chinese pop song, a children’s rhyme, opulent Romanticism, American minimalism, and other influences both subtle and not. The title refers to a Tang dynasty poem that depicts a gateway as both an opportunity and a barrier, reflecting a deep yearning for a faraway time, place or memory. Program Notes © 2018 Dorothy Chang

KEVIN LAU

b. Hong Kong / November 22, 1982

Kevin Lau’s music has been performed and recorded by major ensembles across Canada. From 2012­–2015 he served as the Toronto Symphony Orchestra’s RBC Affiliate Composer. Recently, he composed the score for the National Ballet of Canada’s Le Petit Prince (2016) and the National Arts Centre Orchestra’s Dark Angels (2017). He holds a doctorate in composition from the University of Toronto. kevinlaumusic.com The title Nocturne and Toccata is intended to reference the two-part narratives of certain musical forms—Prelude and Fugue, Introduction and Allegro, etc.— while also evoking, and at times contradicting,

the historical associations of each. ‘Nocturne’ means ‘music of the night’—in this case, music which emerges from the darkness of the unknown. Restless, fragmentary thoughts eventually coalesce into a propulsive, machine-like section: the toccata. A penultimate moment of tranquillity, like the breaking of dawn, is interrupted by a searing climax in which the first violin climbs to its highest register, heaven-bound. Program Notes © 2018 Kevin Lau

HK GRUBER

b. Vienna, Austria / January 3, 1943

HK Gruber discovered Stravinsky’s music at age 12, and wanted to be a composer from that time on. In 1968, finding himself disenchanted with the surfeit of avantgarde music by which he was surrounded, he helped create a music-theatre collective called “MOB art & tone Art,” whose work was influenced by early jazz and cabaret music, and interested in engaging a broad audience. As his musical language developed, it grew to embrace many styles of music, including even the earlier-rejected serialism. boosey.com/composer/HK+Gruber

Zeitfluren (Timescapes) is written in

two extremely contrasting movements of approximately equal duration. The first, Nachtstaub (night dust) begins very sparsely and delicately, focused on long, sustained tones creating very slow, linear sonorities. It gradually becomes more disturbed, until, in Gruber’s own words, “elements coalesce until there is something of the mood of a funeral march, with shadows of Mahler or Berg accompanying the procession.” The second movement, Anderstag (Another Day) is brilliantly energetic and joyous, full of dance-like energy and engaging rhythms that harken back to music of the early twentieth century.  ■ Program Notes © 2018 Jocelyn Morlock

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CONCERT PROGRAM MUSICALLY SPEAKING | ORPHEUM, 8PM

SATURDAY, APRIL 21

RGF INTEGRATED WEALTH MANAGEMENT SYMPHONY SUNDAYS | ORPHEUM, 2PM

SUNDAY, APRIL 22

ANDREW LITTON

Andrew Litton conductor Anderson & Roe piano duo

ADAMS Short Ride in a Fast Machine MOZART Concerto for Two Pianos in E-flat Major, K. 365

I. Allegro II. Andante III. Rondeaux: Allegro

ANDERSON & ROE

I N T E R M ISSI O N

TCHAIKOVSKY Symphony No. 4

in F minor, Op. 36

I. Andante sostenuto – Moderato con anima II. Andantino in modo di canzone III. Scherzo: Pizzicato ostinato, Allegro IV. Allegro con fuoco

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ANDREW LITTON conductor Andrew Litton, Music Director of the New York City Ballet, also is Artistic Director of Minnesota Orchestra’s Sommerfest, Principal Guest Conductor of the Colorado Symphony, Conductor Laureate of Britain’s Bournemouth Symphony and Music Director Laureate of Norway’s Bergen Philharmonic. Recently named Principal Guest Conductor of the Singapore Symphony Orchestra, he begins his new duties this fall. Litton, an acknowledged expert on George Gershwin, has performed and recorded Gershwin widely as both pianist and conductor and serves as Advisor to the University of Michigan Gershwin Archives. After leading the Covent Garden debut of Porgy and Bess, he arranged his own concert suite of that work, which is now performed around the world. Born in New York City, Litton is a graduate of New York’s Fieldston School. Litton

earned degrees from the Juilliard School in piano and conducting. He served as assistant conductor at La Scala and at the National Symphony under Rostropovich. Among his numerous awards are Yale’s Sanford Medal, the Elgar Society Medal, and an honorary Doctorate from the University of Bournemouth. For his work with the Bergen Philharmonic, Norway’s King Harald V knighted Litton with the Norwegian Royal Order of Merit.

ANDERSON & ROE piano duo Known for their adrenalized performances, original compositions, and notorious music videos, Greg Anderson and Elizabeth Joy Roe are revolutionizing the piano duo experience for the 21st century. Described as and “the most dynamic duo of this generation” (San Francisco Classical Voice), and “rock stars of the classical music world” (Miami Herald), the Anderson & Roe Piano Duo aims to make classical music a relevant and powerful force around the world. Their


albums on the Steinway Label (When Words Fade, An Amadeus Affair, and The Art of Bach) were released to critical acclaim and have spent dozens of weeks at the top of the Billboard Classical Charts. Since forming their dynamic musical partnership in 2002 as students at The Juilliard School, Anderson & Roe have toured extensively worldwide as recitalists and orchestral soloists, presented at numerous international leader symposiums, and appeared on MTV, PBS, NPR, and the BBC. A live performance by Anderson & Roe was handpicked to appear on the Sounds of Juilliard CD celebrating the school’s centenary. Highlights for 2017/18 include the release of their latest album, Mother Muse, and webcast hosting for the 15th Van Cliburn International Piano Competition.

JOHN ADAMS

b. Worcester, Massachusetts, USA / February 15, 1947

Short Ride in a Fast Machine Composer, conductor, and creative thinker, John Adams occupies a unique position in the world of American music. The most frequently performed living American composer of orchestral music, his works, both operatic and symphonic, stand out among contemporary classical compositions for their depth of expression, brilliance of sound, and the profoundly humanist nature of their themes. He also maintains an active life as a conductor, appearing with the world’s greatest orchestras and with programs combining his own works with composers as diverse as Debussy and Stravinsky to Glass and Ellington. The title of this rousing fanfare, composed in 1986 and premièred by the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, describes it to perfection.

WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART

b. Salzburg, Austria / January 27, 1756 d. Vienna, Austria / December 5, 1791

Concerto for Two Pianos in E-flat Major, K. 365 After spending six unhappy months in Paris, Mozart returned to Salzburg in January 1779. It was a dismal homecoming. He had set out 18 months earlier in search of greater fame and appreciation than he had been receiving. Although he was greeted with acclaim in several cities, no offer of employment was forthcoming. He was forced to return to his job as Concertmaster at the court of Prince-Archbishop Hieronymous Colleredo. He despised his autocratic employer and the drudgery of working for him. Still, those feelings didn’t keep him from producing a steady stream of superb music. This included the well known “Coronation” Mass; two fine symphonies (Nos. 32 and 33); the splendid Sinfonia Concertante for Violin, Viola and Orchestra; and this immensely appealing Concerto for Two Pianos.

“The accompanying ensemble of oboes, bassoons, horns and strings provides a warmly textured background...” He composed the concerto in early 1779, to be played by himself and his older sister Maria Anna (nicknamed Nannerl). The warmth of his affection for her comes through clearly. The accompanying ensemble of oboes, bassoons, horns and strings provides a warmly textured background, especially in the gracefully flowing slow movement. The playful concluding rondo restores the amiable mood of the opening movement. Mozart clearly held a lasting affection for this piece. He performed it, along with a pupil, Fraulein Auernhammer, on several occasions in Vienna during the 1780s.

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PYOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY

b. Kamsko-Votkinsk, Russia / May 7, 1840 d. St. Petersburg, Russia / November 6, 1893

Symphony No. 4 in F minor, Op. 36 Tchaikovsky’s Fourth Symphony reflected the personal turmoil he underwent during its creation. He began composing it in February 1877, during the same period that he entered into highly influential relationships with two women. The first was Nadezhda von Meck, an immensely wealthy patron of music. She agreed to supply him with a monthly allowance that would give him the freedom to compose more freely. The second was Antonina Milyukova, an emotionally unstable former student in his composition class at the Moscow Conservatory. Her declarations of love left him deeply confused. His desperate desire to conceal his homosexuality, and Milyukova’s persistence, led him to give into her advances. They were married on July 6, but the relationship quickly fell apart. He had a nervous breakdown and attempted suicide. Fleeing to Italy, he completed the symphony in Venice during January 1878.

“The latter offers some moments of consolation, only to be driven savagely into the background by the ‘fate’ theme.” In a letter to his patroness, Tchaikovsky disclosed the emotions that he had borne in mind while composing it. A harsh brass fanfare opens the symphony and recurs throughout it. “This is fate,” he wrote, “the power which hinders one in the pursuit of happiness from gaining the goal, which jealousy provides that peace and comfort do not prevail, that the sky is not free from clouds – a might that swings, like the sword of Damocles, constantly over the head, that poisons continually the soul. There is nothing to do but submit and vainly to complain.” The two main themes of the first movement proper are a restless, yearning 64 allegro

string melody and a wistful, dance-like theme introduced by solo clarinet. The latter offers some moments of consolation, only to be driven savagely into the background by the ‘fate’ theme.

“It is sad, yet sweet, to lose one's self in the past.” “The second movement shows another phase of sadness,” Tchaikovsky continued. “Here is that melancholy feeling that enwraps one when he sits alone at night in the house exhausted by work; a swarm of reminiscences arises. It is sad, yet sweet, to lose one’s self in the past.” The atmosphere of gloom is dispelled by the playful third movement, where the strings play pizzicato from first bar to last. “Here are capricious arabesques, vague figures which slip into the imagination when one has taken wine and is slightly intoxicated,” according to Tchaikovsky. A brilliant flourish for full orchestra gets the finale under way at top speed. Woodwinds introduce the main theme, a Russian folk song called In the Meadow There Stands a Birch Tree. This builds rapidly to the appearance of a confident, march like theme. After this sequence is repeated more elaborately, the atmosphere gradually loses its sense of well being. The “fate” theme makes a catastrophic reappearance, bringing the festivities to a grinding halt. “If you find no pleasure in yourself, look about you,” Tchaikovsky wrote. “Go to the people. See how they can enjoy life and give themselves up entirely to festivity. There still is happiness, simple, naive happiness. Rejoice in the happiness of others – and you can still live.” The music regains its momentum, to end in a blaze of celebration.  ■ Program Notes © 2018 Don Anderson


The Vancouver Symphony wishes to thank all those who have made arrangements to leave a bequest or planned gift in their will or estate plans. We are honoured to recognize you in your lifetime for your foresight, commitment and generosity. George Abakhan Janet M. Allan Renate A. Anderson K.-Jane Baker Lorna Barr Dr. Vicky Bernstein Susan Boutwood Janice Brown Scott Brown Peter & Mary Brunold Nadia Campagnolo Ralph & Gillian Carder John Chapman Marylin P. Clark Dr. Philip Clement Mrs. Diana Gael Coomber Mr. and Mrs. G.A. Cooper Brigitte Daigle David & Valerie Davies Gloria Davies

BEQUESTS Bequests to the Vancouver Symphony Foundation $500,000 or more Taryn Brodie Jim and Edith le Nobel Kathleen Margaret Mann $100,000 or more Brian William Dunlop Steve Floris Howard and Jean Mann John Rand Hermann and Erika Stölting $50,000 or more Winslow Bennett Margaret Jean Paquin Josephine Norah Reid Rachel Tancred Rout Winnifred Searle Mary Flavelle Stewart $25,000 or more Dorothy Freda Bailey Phyllis Celia Fisher Margot Lynn McKenzie $10,000 or more Cecilia & Bruce Carter Muriel Kathleen Don

Julia Dodwell Sharon Douglas Michael L. Fish Jacklin Frangi Robert & Ann-Shirley Goodell Lorraine Grescoe James Harcott W. Neil Harcourt in memory of Frank N. Harcourt John Hooge Renate R. Huxtable Wayne & Leslie Ann Ingram Margaret Irving Estelle & Michael Jacobson Mary Jordan Lorna Jean Klohn Dorothy Kuva Clive Langley Hugh & Judy Lindsay

Nancy Macdonald Dorothy MacLeod Robert Maxwell Irene McEwen Myrna Elizabeth McRae Piet Meyerhof Paul Richard Moritz Barbara Morris Martin O’Connor Liisa O’Hara Sue M. Okuda Josephine Pegler Eleanor Phillips Marion Poliakoff Diane Ronan Louis & Rhona Rosen Jan and Vicki Roubicek Bernard Rowe & Annette Stark L.S. Sawatsky

Dorothy Shields Mary Anne Sigal Doris Smit Robert & Darlene Spevakow Elizabeth Tait Melvyn & June Tanemura Bella Tata Marsha & George Taylor Lillian J. Thom Lisa Tucker Tuey Family Trust Robert & Carol Tulk David & Ruth Turnbull Ruth Warren Beryl Wilson Tessa Wilson Kelley Wong Bob Wood in memory of my parents, John & Hazel Wood Anonymous (4)

The Vancouver Symphony has received bequests since 2000 from the following individuals for which we extend our sincere gratitude. The Kitty Heller Alter Ego Trust Dorothy Elizabeth Hilton Anna Ruth Leith Kaye Leaney $5,000 or more Anne de Barrett Allwork Anne Claire Angus Clarice Marjory Bankes Lawrence M. Carlson Muriel F. Gilchrist J. Stuart Keate Gerald Nordheimer Audrey M. Piggot Elisabeth Schipizky Ronald Albert Timmis Mary Isabel Whyte Jan Wolf Wynand $1,000 or more Eleanor Doke Caldwell Jean Ethel Holler Bernard Van Snellenberg Bequests to the Vancouver Symphony Society $250,000 or more Ruth Ellen Baldwin

$100,000 or more Reta Alden Dorothy Jane Boyce Roy Joseph Fietsch Hector MacKay Valerie Taggart $50,000 or more Clayton K. Williams Fritz Ziegler $25,000 or more Dorothy M. Grant Lillian Erva Hawkins Florence Elizabeth Kavanagh Mary Fassenden Law Geraldine Oldfield Alice Rumball Dr. Barbara Iola Stafford Anne Ethel Stevens Dorothy Ethel Williams $10,000 or more John Michael Dayton Dr. Sherold Fishman John Devereux Fitz-Gerald Dorothea Leuchters Verna Noble Robert V. Osokin Elizabeth Jean Proven

Freda Margaret Rush Doris Kathleen Skelton Sharone Young $5,000 or more Kathleen Grace Boyle Raymond John Casson Heather Gillis Alfred Knowles Gordon McConkey Evelyn Ann van der Veen Joan Marion Wasson $1,000 or more Phyllis Victoria Ethel Bailly Joyce Basham Adele Wulsin Bennett Doris May Bond Kathleen Mary DeClerq Betty Dunhaver Jean Haszard Grace Barbara Isobel Hooper Lewis Wilkinson Hunter Marjorie Lucille Keddy Annie Velma Pickell Jean Semple Kathleen Stemshorn Wilhelmina Stobie Marion Kathleen Laurette Whyte

For further information on leaving a LEGACY gift to the VSO please contact Mary Butterfield, Director, Individual & Legacy Giving at 604.684.9100 x238 or email mary@vancouversymphony.ca

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VANCOUVER SYMPHONY PARTNERS

The Vancouver Symphony Orchestra gratefully acknowledges the generosity of the following Government Agencies, Corporations and Foundations that have made a financial contribution through sponsorship, charitable donation or participation in a Special Event.

VANCOUVER SYMPHONY FOUNDATION

SERIES SPONSORS

CONCERT AND SPECIAL EVENT SPONSORS

MARTHA LOU HENLEY CHARITABLE FOUNDATION

EDUCATION AND COMMUNITY OUTREACH SPONSORS AND PARTNERS PREMIER EDUCATION PARTNER


MEDIA PARTNERS

BC TOUR SPONSORS

McGrane-Pearson Endowment Fund Diane Hodgins AJ McLean

Alexandra Mauler-Steinmann and Michael Steinmann Fred Pletcher Fred Withers and Kathy Jones Jill Tipping

CANADA TOUR SPONSORS Michael L. Fish $500,000+ Vancouver Symphony Foundation Endowment Fund VSO Patrons’ Circle $250,000+ Friends of the Vancouver Symphony Vancouver Sun $150,000+ Alan and Gwendoline Pyatt Foundation TELUS Corporation $100,000+ Creative BC: BC Music Fund Goldcorp Inc. $60,000+ iA Financial Group Vancouver Foundation $50,000+ Air Canada BMO Financial Group City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services CKNW Georgia Straight QM-FM $40,000+ London Drugs RBC Foundation Vancouver Symphony Volunteers $30,000+ PwC $20,000+ Avigilon BC Lottery Corp. Borden Ladner Gervais LLP

The Chan Endowment Fund of UBC CIBC CN Rail Concord Pacific Developments Inc. Deloitte The McLean Group Martha Lou Henley Charitable Foundation Mercedes-Benz Vancouver Area Retail Group Origin Organic Farms Osler, Hoskin & Harcourt LLP Poly Culture North America RGF Integrated Wealth Management Scotia Wealth Management TD Bank Group Wesbild Holdings Limited Westminster Savings Anonymous (1) $10,000+ Blake, Cassels & Graydon LLP Canadian Western Bank Century Group Craftsman Collision Ernst & Young LLP Great-West Life, London Life and Canada Life Holland America Line Inc. Hugh Davidson Fund through the Victoria Foundation Intergulf Development Group The Kingswood Group of Companies KPMG LLP Lawson Lundell LLP MacDonald Development Corporation

McCarthy Tétrault LLP Montecristo Jewellers Montridge Advisory Group Pacific Surgical Spectra Energy Sun Life Financial Terus Construction Ltd. Time & Gold Tom Lee Music Upright Decor Rentals and Event Design Visual College of Art and Design Wall Financial Corporation Wheaton Precious Metals $5,000+ Anthem Properties Beedie Development Group Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP Centerplate at Vancouver Convention Centre Delphos Investments Inc. Dentons Canada LLP Element Lifestyle Retirement Genus Capital Management Grosvenor Americas Hamber Foundation HSBC Bank Canada Image Group Inc. Innovation Lighting Korn Ferry Ledcor Group Macdonald Development Corporation Marin Investments Limited Dr. Tom Moonen Inc. Nordstrom Norton Rose Fulbright Canada LLP

Fred Withers and Kathy Jones Odlum Brown Limited Opal by element Pan American Silver RBC Royal Bank RBC PH&N Investment Counsel Inc. Ready and Korbin, Arbitrators Reliance Properties Scotia Wealth Management — Greyell Portfolio Management Stantec Consulting Stikeman Elliott LLP TD Wealth Tim Wyman, TD Wealth UBS Bank (Canada) Wilson M. Beck Insurance $2,500+ The Collective You Face Of Today INF Influencer Agency Inc. and Gillian Segal Design PARTYSKIRTS SOCAN Foundation Tree of Life (Walkers Shortbread) Windsor Plywood Foundation Xibita $1,000+ BFL Canada Bing Thom Architects CIBO Trattoria Ethical Bean Coffee Gearforce Granville Island Florist IGA Robson Street The Lazy Gourmet Norburn Lighting & Bath Centre Windsor Plywood Foundation ■

For more information about the VSO Corporate Partners Programs and the exclusive benefits associated with this program contact Jason Hulbert, Manager Corporate Programs at 604.684.9100 x260 or email jasonhulbert@vancouversymphony.ca


AT THE CONCERT CONCERT COURTESIES

For your enjoyment, and the enjoyment of others, please remember concert etiquette. Talking, coughing, leaning over the balcony railings, unwrapping candies, and the wearing of strong perfume may disturb the performers as well as other audience members.

LATECOMERS

Ushers will escort latecomers into the auditorium at a suitable break in the performance chosen by the conductor. Patrons who leave the auditorium during the performance will not be re-admitted until a suitable break in the performance.

HEARING-ASSIST SYSTEMS

Hearing-impaired patrons may borrow complimentary Sennheiser Infrared Hearing System headsets, available at the coat-check in the Orpheum Theatre only, after leaving a driver’s licence or credit card. PROGRAM, GUEST ARTISTS AND/OR PROGRAM ORDER ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.

CELL PHONES, PAGERS, DIGITAL WATCHES

Please turn off cell phones and ensure that digital watches do not sound during performances. Doctors and other professionals expecting calls are asked to please leave personal pagers, telephones and seat locations at the coat check.

CAMERAS, RECORDING EQUIPMENT

Photography and video/audio recording of any kind are prohibited during the performance. Pictures taken pre-concert, at intermission, and post-concert are encouraged. Please feel free to tweet and post to Facebook or Instagram preconcert, during intermission or after the concert @VSOrchestra. During the performance, please do not use your mobile device in any way.

SMOKING AND SCENTS

All venues are non-smoking and scent-free environments.

VANCOUVER SYMPHONY ADMINISTRATION 604.684.9100 Kelly Tweeddale, President, VSO & VSO School of Music Mehgan Atchison, Executive Assistant Finance & Administration: Mary-Ann Moir, Vice-President, Finance & Administration Debra Marcus, Director, Information Technology & Human Resources Diane Chen Liu, Accountant Ray Wang, Payroll Clerk & IT Assistant Marketing, Sales & Customer Service: Matthew Baird, Public Relations Manager & Assistant to the Music Director Elyse Bannerman, Marketing Coordinator Castine Breckwoldt, Manager, Gift Shop & Volunteers

Estelle and Michael Jacobson Chair

Anna Gove, Editor & Publisher, Allegro Magazine Katherine Houang, Group Sales & Special Ticket Services Kenneth Livingstone, Database Manager Robert Rose, Front of House Coordinator Cameron Rowe, Director, Audience & Ticket Services Customer Service Representatives: Jason Ho and Audrey Ling, Senior Customer Service Representatives Kathy Siu, Concert Shift Captain Rati Arora Taylor Beaumont Shawn Lau

Kate Mill Anthony Soon Mark Sutherland

Development: Leanne Davis, Vice-President, Chief Development Officer Pegah Behnammoradi, Development Officer, Special Projects Mary Butterfield, Director, Individual & Legacy Giving Jason Hulbert, Manager, Corporate Programs Kate Lucas, Director, Annual Giving § Natalina MacLeod, 100th Anniversary Campaign Director Denise Nguyen, Special Projects Assistant Ann True, Development Officer, Direct Response Lauren Watson, Manager, Annual Giving Artistic Operations & Education: Joanne Harada, Vice-President, Artistic Operations & Education Alex Clark, Assistant Librarian & Artistic Operations Assistant Kaylie Hanna, Artistic Operations & Education Assistant Sarah Jacques, Operations Manager Ryan Kett, Artistic Operations & Education Assistant Minella F. Lacson, Music Librarian Christin Reardon MacLellan, Director of Education & Community Programmes

Ken & Patricia Shields Chair

Duncan Watts-Grant, Community Engagement Specialist Pippa Williams, Orchestra Personnel Manager Tracie Yee, Artistic Operations Associate § Leave of Absence

The Vancouver Symphony Society is grateful to the ALAN AND GWENDOLINE PYATT FOUNDATION for generously providing its Administrative Offices.

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VANCOUVER SYMPHONY SOCIETY BOARD OF DIRECTORS Board Executive Committee

Board Members

Fred Withers, Chair

Doug Christopher

Chief Development Officer (Ret.) Ernst & Young LLP

Fred Pletcher

Partner, Chair of the National Mining Group Borden Ladner Gervais LLP

President, Montrose Development Ltd.

Elisabeth Finch

Judith Korbin, Vice Chair

Stanis Smith

Partner, PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

Arbitrator

Executive Vice President, Buildings, Stantec

David Garofalo

Etienne Bruson, Treasurer

President, Goldcorp

Managing Partner, BC, Deloitte

Melvyn R.T. Tanemura

Doug Hart

Diane Hodgins, Secretary

M.R.T. Tanemura CPA Inc.

Director, Century Group Lands Corporation

Vice President, Sales & Officer (Ret.) Industrial Alliance Pacific Life Insurance

Suzanne Anton, Q.C.

Sam Lee

Musician Representatives Aaron McDonald Principal Timpani

Corporate Director

Debra Finlay

Managing Director, Global Mining Group CIBC World Markets

Vern Griffiths Principal Percussion

AJ McLean

Honorary Life President

Michael L. Fish

Portfolio Manager, McLean Group

Ronald Laird Cliff, C.M.

Alexandra Mauler

Honorary Life Vice-Presidents

Partner, McCarthy Tetrault LLP President, Pacific Surgical Limited

President, AMS Petrography Ltd.

Cathy Grant

Senior Vice President, Sales & Marketing Coromandel Properties Ltd.

Nezhat Khosrowshahi Gerald A.B. McGavin, C.M., O.B.C. Ronald N. Stern Arthur H. Willms

Monique Mercier

Hein Poulus, Q.C.

Executive Vice President, Corporate Affairs, Telus Corporation

Jill Tipping

Partner, Blake, Cassels & Graydon LLP

Partner, Stikeman Elliott LLP

Roy Millen

President & CEO, BC Tech Association

VANCOUVER SYMPHONY FOUNDATION BOARD OF TRUSTEES Ronald Laird Cliff, C.M., Chair Dallas Brodie

Marnie Carter Lindsay Hall Irene McEwen

Gerald A.B. McGavin, C.M., O.B.C. Alan Pyatt Arthur H. Willms

Fred Withers Tim Wyman

VSO SCHOOL OF MUSIC SOCIETY Board of Directors

Administration

Gordon R. Johnson, Chair Dave Cunningham Claire Hunter Hein Poulus, Q.C. Patricia Shields Ned Southerland Eric Watt Arthur H. Willms

Louise Ironside Assistant Director

Rob Fulton

Operations & Facilities Manager

Scott Jeffrey

School Operations Manager

Anna Chen

Olga Vrublevskaya

Wesley Jay

Rentals Manager

Assistant Registrar & Chinese Language Student Services

Gillian Hunter-Gibbs

Jose Valenzuela

Debra Marcus

Registrar

Early Years Program Director

Accountant/Comptroller

Payroll/Accounts Payable

VANCOUVER SYMPHONY VOLUNTEER COUNCIL 2017/2018 Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paddy Aiken Vice-Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Azmina Manji Secretary/Treasurer . . . . . . Marlies Wagner Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Candace Bailes Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noelene Buckner Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Beryl Ferguson Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barbara Morris Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jean Pirie Immediate Past Chair . . . . . . Nancy Wu

Scheduling Car Lottery: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Evelyn Kenny Gift Shop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barbara Morris Reception Shifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gloria Davies Tea & Trumpets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marlene Strain

Membership Volunteer Hours . . . . . . . . Sheila Foley Manager, Gift Shop & Volunteer Resources Castine Breckwoldt 604.684.9100 ext 240 Castine@vancouversymphony.ca

Special Events Assistant Gift Shop Managers Symphony of Style 2018 . . . . Paddy Aiken Robert Rose Azmina Manji Stacey Menzies Holland America Luncheon 2018 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noelene Buckner

Allegro contact and advertising enquiries: allegro@vancouversymphony.ca / Published by The Vancouver Symphony Society / Allegro staff: editor publisher: Anna Gove / orchestra photo credit: Johnathon Vaughn / orchestra photo credit: Albert Law / art direction, design & production: bay6 creative inc. Printed in Canada by Web Impressions Ltd. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written consent is prohibited. Contents copyrighted by the Vancouver Symphony, with the exception of material written by contributors.

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17/18 VSO Allegro Issue #4  
17/18 VSO Allegro Issue #4  
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