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Allegro

BRAMWELL TOVEY

AUSTRALIAN STRING QUARTET WITH BRAMWELL TOVEY LANG LANG! F R E D P E N N E R VA D I M G LU Z M A N W I T H T H E VS O N AT I O N A L A RTS C E N T R E O R C H E ST R A : L I F E R E F L E C T E D T E R R A A N D B E YO N D , W I T H C H R I S H A D F I E L D A N D DA N N Y M I C H E L DA M E E V E LY N G L E N N I E

SE P T E M B E R TO NOVE M B E R, 2017


VANCOUVER SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA BRAMWELL TOVEY MUSIC DIRECTOR KAZUYOSHI AKIYAMA CONDUCTOR LAUREATE WILLIAM ROWSON ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR*

JOCELYN MORLOCK COMPOSER-IN-RESIDENCE MARCUS GODDARD COMPOSER-IN-ASSOCIATION

FIRST VIOLINS Nicholas Wright, Concertmaster Timothy Steeves, Acting Associate Concertmaster Boson Mo, Acting Assistant Concertmaster Jae-Won Bang Mary Sokol Brown

ENGLISH HORN Beth Orson

Marsha & George Taylor Chair

Mrs. Cheng Koon Lee Chair

Jenny Essers Akira Nagai, Associate Concertmaster Emeritus Xue Feng Wei Yi Zhou SECOND VIOLINS Jason Ho, Principal Karen Gerbrecht, Associate Principal

Jim and Edith le Nobel Chair

Jeanette Bernal-Singh, Assistant Principal Cassandra Bequary Adrian Shu-On Chui Daniel Norton Ann Okagaito Ashley Plaut VIOLAS Andrew Brown, Acting Principal Emilie Grimes, Acting Associate Principal

CELLOS Principal Cello

Nezhat and Hassan Khosrowshahi Chair

CLARINETS Janet Steinberg, Jeanette Jonquil, Acting Principal Principal Zoltan Rozsnyai, Alexander Morris, Assistant Principal Assistant Principal Olivia Blander Gerhard and Ariane Bruendl Chair Michelle Goddard Natasha Boyko BASS CLARINET Mary & Gordon Christopher Chair Alexander Morris Charles Inkman E-FLAT CLARINET Luke Kim Michelle Goddard Cristian Márkos BASSOONS BASSES Julia Lockhart, Principal Dylan Palmer, Sophie Dansereau, Principal Assistant Principal Evan Hulbert, § Gwen Seaton Associate Principal CONTRABASSOON Noah Reitman, Sophie Dansereau Assistant Principal David Brown FRENCH HORNS J. Warren Long Oliver de Clercq, Principal Frederick Schipizky Russell Rybicki FLUTES Werner & Helga Höing Chair Christie Reside, Principal David Haskins, Ron & Ardelle Cliff Chair Associate Principal Chris James, Assistant Andrew Mee Principal Flute & Piccolo Rosanne Wieringa

Michael & Estelle Jacobson Chair

Dr. Malcolm Hayes and Lester Soo Chair

PICCOLO Chris James

Stephen Wilkes, Assistant Principal Lawrence Blackman

Hermann & Erika Stölting Chair

OBOES Roger Cole, Principal

Tegen Davidge Matthew Davies Angela Schneider

Beth Orson, Assistant Principal Karin Walsh

Estelle & Michael Jacobson Chair

Professors Mr. & Mrs. Ngou Kang Chair

Chair in Memory of John S. Hodge

Wayne & Leslie Ann Ingram Chair

Paul Moritz Chair

The Stage Crew of the Orpheum Theatre are members of Local 118 of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees.

BASS TROMBONE Ilan Morgenstern

Arthur H. Willms Family Chair

TUBA Peder MacLellan, Principal TIMPANI Aaron McDonald, Principal PERCUSSION Vern Griffiths, Principal Martha Lou Henley Chair

Michael Jarrett Tony Phillipps HARP Elizabeth Volpé Bligh, Principal PIANO, CELESTE Linda Lee Thomas, Principal Carter (Family) Deux Mille Foundation Chair

ORCHESTRA PERSONNEL MANAGER Ryan Purchase MUSIC LIBRARIAN Minella F. Lacson ASSISTANT MUSIC LIBRARIAN Alex Clark

Winslow & Betsy Bennett Chair

HEAD CARPENTER Paul McManus

Richard Mingus, Assistant Principal

HEAD ELECTRICIAN Brendan Keith

TRUMPETS Larry Knopp, Principal Marcus Goddard, Associate Principal Vincent Vohradsky

PIANO TECHNICIAN Thomas Clarke

W. Neil Harcourt in memory of Frank N. Harcourt Chair

TROMBONES Brian Wendel, Principal Gregory A. Cox The Vancouver Symphony Orchestra is a proud member of

HEAD SOUND Alex Livland *Supported by The Canada Council for the Arts § Leave of Absence


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3 The Orchestra 6 Government Support 7 Message from the Chairman & President 10 VSO BC Tour 20 Advertise in Allegro 48 VSO Lottery 50 A Traditional Christmas 52 Patrons’ Circle 53 VSO School of Music 60 Upcoming Concerts 64 VSO Group Sales 65 VSO Stradivarius Legacy Circle 66 Corporate Partners 68 At the Concert / VSO & Allegro Staff 69 Vancouver Symphony Foundation 70 Board of Directors / Volunteer Council

LANG LANG

BRAMWELL TOVEY

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CHRIS HADFIELD

Allegro Magazine has been endowed by a generous gift from Adera Development Corporation.

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DAME EVELYN GLENNIE

@VSOrchestra


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AUSTRALIAN STRING QUARTET

ANGELA CHENG

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FRED PENNER

CONCERTS 9 SEPTEMBER 22, 23 / Goldcorp Masterworks Gold /

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VADIM GLUZMAN

Bramwell Tovey, conductor, Australian String Quartet

15 SEPTEMBER 25 / Specials / Lang Lang! With the VSO / Bramwell Tovey, conductor, Lang Lang, piano, Maxim Lando, piano, Australian String Quartet

19 OCTOBER 5 / Tea & Trumpets / Ludwig van Beethoven / William Rowson, conductor, Christopher Gaze, host, Alexander Knopp, violin

23 OCTOBER 6, 7 / London Drugs VSO Pops / Terra and Beyond, with Chris Hadfield and Danny Michel / William Rowson, conductor, Chris Hadfield, vocals and guitar, Danny Michel, vocals and guitar

27 OCTOBER 8 / OriginO Kids’ Koncerts / Fred Penner / William Rowson, conductor, Fred Penner 31 OCTOBER 14, 15, 16 / Air Canada Masterworks Diamond / Westminster Savings Surrey Nights / Otto Tausk, conductor, Vadim Gluzman, violin

37 OCTOBER 20, 21, 23 / Classical Traditions / North Shore Classics / Cristian Măcelaru, conductor, Angela Cheng, piano

41 OCTOBER 28, 29, 30 / Goldcorp Masterworks Gold / Rogers Group Financial Symphony Sundays / Bramwell Tovey, conductor, Dame Evelyn Glennie, percussion

45 NOVEMBER 2 / Specials / National Arts Centre Orchestra: Life Reflected /

Alexander Shelley, conductor, Donna Feore, creative producer and director

49 NOVEMBER 5 / Specials / VSO@ISCM: The Vancouver Symphony Performs at ISCM World New Music Days 2017 / Bramwell Tovey, conductor, Mohamed Assani, sitar

55 NOVEMBER 4, 6 / Air Canada Masterworks Diamond / Bramwell Tovey, conductor,

Susan Platts, mezzo-soprano, Anthony Dean Griffey, tenor, Nathan Berg, baritone, UBC University Singers & Choral Union, Graeme Langager, director

59 NOVEMBER 8, 9, 12 / VSO Chamber Players / Robyn Driedger-Klassen, soprano,

Jae-Won Bang, violin, Ann Okagaito, violin, Tegen Davidge, viola, Zoltan Rozsnyai, cello, Jeanette Jonquil, clarinet, Terence Dawson, piano

61 NOVEMBER 11, 13 / Musically Speaking / Westminster Savings Surrey Nights / Alexandre Bloch, conductor, Blake Pouliot, violin

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The Vancouver Symphony Society is grateful to the Government of Canada and the Canada Council for the Arts, Province of British Columbia and the BC Arts Council, and the City of Vancouver for their ongoing support. The combined investment in the VSO by the three levels of government annually funds over 28% of the cost of the orchestra’s extensive programs and activities. This vital investment enables the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra to present over 150 life-enriching concerts in 16 diverse venues throughout the Lower Mainland and Whistler, attract some of the world’s best musicians to live and work in our community, produce Grammy® and Juno® award-winning recordings, tour domestically and internationally, and, through our renowned educational programs, touch the lives of over 50,000 children annually.

MÉLANIE JOLY, MINISTER OF CANADIAN HERITAGE AND OFFICIAL LANGUAGES

JOHN HORGAN, PREMIER OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

GREGOR ROBERTSON, MAYOR OF VANCOUVER

Thank you!


MESSAGES FROM

FRED G. WITHERS

KELLY TWEEDDALE

THE VSO CHAIRMAN AND PRESIDENT

Hello Friends,

Welcome!

Welcome to the opening concerts of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra’s 99th Season! The VSO is proud to have been performing for the people of British Columbia since 1919, and we are delighted you are with us for today’s concert.

The 99th VSO season is upon us as we celebrate the thoughtful and dynamic impact that Music Director Bramwell Tovey has had on the orchestra and musical life in Vancouver. This season represents many incredible partnerships that have developed during Maestro Tovey’s tenure beginning with opening night and the return of former concertmaster Dale Barltrop as a member of the Australian String Quartet, followed by a one-night only performance with superstar pianist Lang Lang and 14-year old prodigy, Maxim Lando.

This 2017/2018 season marks the 18th year in the remarkable tenure of Maestro Bramwell Tovey. At the end of this season, Maestro Tovey will become the Music Director Emeritus of the VSO. There will be many special moments and memories in the concert hall during this season as we recognize and celebrate Maestro Tovey’s many accomplishments and contributions to the VSO.

This season, thanks in part to the support of the Vancouver Foundation, the VSO embarks on important work tying symphonic repertoire to the social issues of today. In that light, the Orchestra embarks on its first tour of the BC interior in over twenty years, taking Tovey’s recent The purpose of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra composition Ancestral Voices on the road as well as is to enrich and transform lives through music. expanding our work with First Nations and extending support Our many program offerings – the Masterworks, to first responders who continue to play an important role in Musically Speaking, Tea & Trumpets, Pops, VSO at the our province’s wild fires. In October, Canadian astronaut Chris Movies; as well as our more than 14 education and Hadfield returns to the Orpheum stage with Danny Michel in community programs, including the concerts for Tiny a Pops concert that combines environmental conservation Tots and over 100 classroom visits by Maestro Tovey with the power of music and song. In early November, and members of the orchestra – help us to achieve the VSO will partner with the International Society of our purpose and reach music lovers of all ages, Contemporary Musicians’ Conference as musicians from ethnicities and economic backgrounds. We are your around the world visit Vancouver. The VSO will present the and our community’s orchestra! world première of John Oliver’s Sitar Concerto as well as present the National Arts Centre Orchestra in a multi-media During the 2017/2018 season the orchestra will evening entitled Life Reflected, based on the stories of four perform over 150 concerts in 16 different venues Canadian women, one composed by our own composer-inthroughout the Lower Mainland and in Whistler – residence Jocelyn Morlock. and in late September the orchestra tours British Columbia with performances in Kamloops, Vernon, We will also be welcoming back Music Director Designate Kelowna, Penticton and Chilliwack. We will welcome Otto Tausk in mid-October for a weekend of music-making a number of new members to the orchestra; see the featuring violinist Vadim Gluzman in Shostakovich’s Second return visits of well-known and accomplished guest Violin Concerto and the orchestra in Sibelius’ First Symphony. performers and conductors, as well as the debuts While in Vancouver, Maestro Tausk will continue his work with with the orchestra of exciting new artists; and have musicians, staff, board, and community partners on shaping two visits from Music Director Designate, Otto Tausk our next season, the VSO’s centenary season. – in October and January. I invite you to join us for many more musical events during Thank you for your commitment to the VSO – I wish the 2017/2018 season. It is a season that pays tribute to the you a most delightful and inspirational 2017/2018 power of music to enhance the narrative of our lives. Let the season. music begin!

Fred G. Withers Chair, Board of Directors

Kelly Tweeddale President, VSO & VSO School of Music

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CONCERT PROGRAM GOLDCORP MASTERWORKS GOLD | ORPHEUM, 8PM

FRIDAY & SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22 & 23

AUSTRALIAN STRING QUARTET

Bramwell Tovey conductor Australian String Quartet

BRAMWELL TOVEY Time Tracks (North American Première) ◆

BRAMWELL TOVEY

JOHN ADAMS Absolute Jest for String Quartet and Orchestra I N T E R M ISSI O N

TCHAIKOVSKY

Symphony No. 5 in E minor, Op. 64

I. Andante – Allegro con anima II. Andante cantabile, con alcuna licenza III. Valse: Allegro moderato

PRE-CONCERT TALKS Free to ticketholders, 7:05pm to 7:30pm, in the auditorium. VISIT THE SYMPHONY GIFT SHOP FOR CD SELECTIONS MASTERWORKS GOLD SERIES SPONSOR

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THE VANCOUVER SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA BC TOUR 2017

BRAMWELL TOVEY WITH THE VSO

In Maestro Bramwell Tovey's final season as Music Director, the VSO embarks on a tour of the Okanagan and Fraser Valley, with five performances and multiple community outreach and educational activities with students and First Nations groups. The orchestra will perform Maestro Tovey's Ancestral Voices with First Nations mezzo-soprano Marion Newman, and Tchaikovsky's magnificent Symphony No. 5.

KAMLOOPS – SEPTEMBER 28, 7:30PM

SAGEBRUSH THEATRE

KELOWNA – SEPTEMBER 29, 7:30PM

KELOWNA COMMUNITY THEATRE

PENTICTON – SEPTEMBER 30, 7:30PM

CLELAND THEATRE

VERNON – OCTOBER 1, 7:00PM

VERNON & DISTRICT PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE

CHILLIWACK – OCTOBER 3, 7:30PM

HUB INTERNATION THEATRE ORCHESTRA SPONSOR:

SEPTEMBER 29 KELOWNA SPONSOR:

MARION NEWMAN

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT INITIATIVE:

TOUR SUPPORTERS: MCGRANE-PEARSON ENDOWMENT FUND DIANE HODGINS ALEXANDRA MAULER-STEINMANN AND MICHAEL STEINMANN AJ MCLEAN FRED PLETCHER FRED WITHERS AND KATHY JONES

vancouversymphony.ca/bctour @VSOrchestra


BRAMWELL TOVEY conductor Grammy® and Juno® award-winning conductor/composer Bramwell Tovey was appointed Music Director of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra in 2000. Under his leadership the VSO has toured to China, Korea, across Canada and the United States. Mr. Tovey is also the Artistic Advisor of the VSO School of Music. His unprecedented 18-year tenure as VSO Music Director has included complete symphony cycles of Beethoven, Mahler and Brahms, the establishment of an annual festival dedicated to contemporary music, as well as the VSO Orchestral Institute at Whistler (VSOIW), a comprehensive orchestral training program for young musicians held in the scenic mountain resort of Whistler/ Blackcomb. In 2017/2018, as the VSO marks its 99th season, Maestro Tovey’s long tenure will be celebrated with Mahler's monumental “Resurrection” Symphony. Mr. Tovey will also lead some of his favourite works by Leonard Bernstein and première new compositions of his own. Bookending the season will be tours within British Columbia and across Canada, as well as a Gala Celebration (May 31). As the VSO reaches its centenary season, Mr. Tovey will be honored with the title of Music Director Emeritus. Throughout the summer Mr. Tovey has led performances at the Elora Festival; at Bravo! Vail with the New York Philharmonic; with the Boston Symphony at Tanglewood; in Saratoga with the Philadelphia Orchestra; and at the Hollywood Bowl. During the 2017/2018 season Mr. Tovey’s guest appearances will see him return to Rhode Island; Philadelphia, the New York Philharmonic, Indianapolis, St. Louis and Houston symphonies; as well Regina and Toronto. He maintains roots in the banding tradition as a frequent guest of the National Youth Brass Band of Great Britain, and as President of the Foden’s Band. In 2003 Bramwell Tovey won the JUNO® Award for Best Classical Composition for his choral and brass work Requiem for a Charred Skull. His song cycle, Ancestral

Voices, was written in consultation with First Nations mezzo-soprano Marion Newman, and earned much acclaim in its première performances in June of 2017. His trumpet concerto, Songs of the Paradise Saloon, was performed in 2014 by the LA Philharmonic and the Philadelphia Orchestra, both with Alison Balsom as soloist. A recording of his opera, The Inventor, features the original cast, members of UBC Opera and the VSO. A talented pianist as well as conductor and composer, he has appeared as soloist with many major orchestras, including his own work Pictures in the Smoke with the Melbourne and Helsingborg Symphonies and the Royal Philharmonic, and recently in the music of Gershwin with the Chicago Symphony

“... Tovey won the Juno® Award for Best Classical Composition... ” Mr. Tovey is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Music in London, the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto and holds honorary degrees from the universities of British Columbia, Manitoba, Kwantlen and Winnipeg. In 2013 he was appointed an honorary Officer of the Order of Canada for services to music.

AUSTRALIAN STRING QUARTET For over 30 years, the Australian String Quartet (ASQ) has created unforgettable chamber music experiences for national and international audiences. From its home base at the University of Adelaide, Elder Conservatorium of Music, the ASQ reaches out across Australia and the world to engage people with an outstanding program of performances, workshops, commissions and education projects. In recent years the ASQ has appeared at international music festivals and toured extensively throughout the United Kingdom, Europe, New Zealand and Asia. The Quartet members are Dale Barltrop (Violin), Francesca Hiew (Violin), Stephen King (Viola) and Sharon Grigoryan (Cello). allegro 11


The distinct sound of the ASQ is enhanced and unified by its matched set of 18th century Guadagnini instruments, handcrafted by Giovanni Battista Guadagnini between (circa) 1743 and 1784 in Turin and Piacenza, Italy. They are on loan to the ASQ for their exclusive use through the generosity of Ulrike Klein and UKARIA.

BRAMWELL TOVEY

b. Ilford Essex, England / July 11, 1953

Time Tracks (North American Première) Bramwell Tovey found inspiration for his first opera, The Inventor, when he began reading an excerpt from Ann Larabee’s The Dynamite Fiend. The book told the extraordinary story of the life and death of Sandy Keith, a con-artist and accidental mass murderer. As Tovey has said, "When I first read the story I was so captivated by the drama of it and the tragedy at the end… I didn’t realize at all that Sandy Keith actually had a very likeable side, a contrast between good and evil, between funny and tragic. He was a sociopath but loving father, an adored husband yet a notorious criminal.” Five years later, after working with librettist John Murrell, Tovey’s opera The Inventor was premièred by Calgary Opera, in 2011. Set in the 19th century, the opera follows Keith's betrayal of Confederate sympathizers and subsequent escape to New York, his abandonment of his lover and child, and his marriage to Cecilia Paris. It culminates with an insurance swindle gone wrong, and a premature explosion on the docks of Bremerhaven that kills more than 80 people. Wracked by remorse, Sandy Keith then kills himself. It is understandable that this full-length opera has since been re-arranged for the concert hall. Tovey’s Songs of The Paradise Saloon for orchestra and solo trumpet was commissioned by the Toronto Symphony and re-contextualises music from the opera’s first act. This evening’sTime Tracks is the North American première of an orchestral suite also taken from the opera.

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JOHN ADAMS

b. Worcester, Massachusetts, USA / February 15, 1947

Absolute Jest for String Quartet and Orchestra Absolute Jest for string quartet and full orchestra (2012) was commissioned by the San Francisco Symphony for its one-hundredth anniversary. It ingeniously combines original material with quotations from major works of Beethoven, especially the string quartets that were his final compositions. “Six months after the première, I decided to compose a different beginning to Absolute Jest,” John Adams wrote. “a full 400 bars of completely new music, replacing the ‘quadrangular’ feel of (Beethoven’s) Op. 131 scherzo with a bouncing 6/8 pulse that that launches the piece in what is to my ears a far more satisfying fashion. The rolling 6/8 patterns recall the Ninth Symphony scherzo but also sum up other references – of the Hammerklavier Sonata, of the Eighth Symphony and other archetypal Beethoven motives that come and go like cameo appearances on a stage. “The high-spirited triple-time scherzo of the F Major Quartet, Op. 135 (Beethoven’s final work in that medium) enters about a third of the way through, and becomes the dominant motivic material for the remainder of the piece, interrupted only by a brief slow section that interweaves fragments of the Grosse Fuge with the opening fugue theme of the C-sharp minor Quartet. A final furious coda features the solo string quartet charging ahead at full speed over an extended orchestral pedal based on the famous Waldstein Sonata harmonic progression. “The act of composing the work (one that took nearly a year of work) was the most extended experience in pure ‘invention’ that I’ve ever undertaken. Its creation was for me a thrilling lesson in counterpoint, in thematic transformation and formal design. The ‘jest’ of the title should be understood in terms of its Latin meaning, ‘gesta:’ doings, deeds, exploits. I like to think of ‘jest’ as indicating an exercising of one’s wit by means of imagination and invention.”


PYOTR IL’YICH TCHAIKOVSKY

b. Kamsko-Votkinsk, Russia / May 7, 1840 d. St. Petersburg, Russia / November 6, 1893

Symphony No. 5 in E minor, Op. 64 Tchaikovsky saw himself as the victim of a cold, heartless fate. He confronted this situation head on in Symphony No. 4 (1877). In it, he used a recurring theme, a harsh brass fanfare, to represent fate. It may appear that he has dealt fate a lethal blow in the jubilant concluding bars, but the near-hysterical rejoicing bears an uneasy, hollow ring. Ten years passed before he began his next symphony. He made sketches for it during the summer of 1887, set to work in earnest in May 1888, and completed it four months later. In November, he conducted the first two performances himself. Audiences loved it. Critics, on the other hand, reacted with hostility. Tchaikovsky was devastated. In typically mercurial fashion, a performance in Hamburg, under another conductor, instantly erased his pessimistic feelings. Everyone there adored the piece, and their acclaim convinced him of its worth. Once again, he based a symphony on a recurring theme that represented his outlook on life at the time. By then, his attitude to fate had softened somewhat, possibly due to a rebirth in religious feeling. He now referred to it by the less intimidating name “providence.” Reflecting this shift, he made the Fifth Symphony’s “providence” theme much less aggressive than its counterpart in Symphony No. 4. It appears in the opening bars, intoned quietly and soberly by the clarinets. Where the Fourth Symphony’s “fate” theme is heard only in the first and last movements, and remains unchanged from one appearance to the next, the Fifth’s “providence” theme appears in all four movements. Its character also evolves to mirror the music’s emotional progress. After the introduction, the opening movement contrasts restless striving, represented in the first theme, a marchlike variant of “providence,” with a second

subject whose heartfelt yearning is expressed with maximum eloquence by the strings. Tchaikovsky developed these melodies with what for him was unusual restraint and economy. The first theme strides across the scene sternly and defiantly to crown the movement. The second movement can only be described as a passionate love-idyll. Its materials number among Tchaikovsky’s most compelling and best-loved inspirations: a ravishing theme introduced by solo horn, and a more wistful idea first played by solo oboe. Both melodies grow in fervour as this expansive movement unfolds. Its sweeping, swelling raptures are twice interrupted, with a newly developed sense of forcefulness, by the “providence” theme. The concluding pages return the music to the hushed stillness from which it emerged. Next comes a typically elegant Tchaikovsky waltz. He based it on a popular song he heard being sung by a boy in the street during a visit to Florence, Italy. The sole blemish on its courtly façade is provided by a brief, almost offhand appearance of “providence,” just before the end. Thus softened, it sounds ripe for transfiguration. It stands proudly on display in the slowtempo introduction to the finale, where it is heard in a warm major key for the first time. The finale proper emerges swiftly out of the final bars of this passage. It is one of Tchaikovsky’s most joyous and most energetic symphonic movements, strongly coloured with the hearty flavours and dancing rhythms of Russian folk music. Brass fanfares and a thunderous timpani roll herald a pause for breath (no applause, please!). Its transformation complete, “providence” passes by in a sturdy processional, before a whirlwind coda brings the symphony home.  ■ Program Notes © 2017 Don Anderson

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CONCERT PROGRAM SPECIALS | ORPHEUM, 8PM

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 25 LANG LANG! WITH THE VSO

BRAMWELL TOVEY

AUSTRALIAN STRING QUARTET

LANG LANG

BRAHMS Hungarian Dance No. 5 ▼

ROSSINI William Tell: Overture ELGAR Introduction and Allegro, Op. 47

SAINT-SAËNS Aquarium from Carnival of the Animals

BERNSTEIN America from West Side Story

TCHAIKOVSKY Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy from The Nutcracker

I N T E R M ISSI O N

GERSHWIN Rhapsody in Blue

MAXIM LANDO

Bramwell Tovey conductor Lang Lang piano Maxim Lando piano Australian String Quartet

VISIT THE SYMPHONY GIFT SHOP FOR CD SELECTIONS PRESENTED BY

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BRAMWELL TOVEY conductor Please refer to page 11 for a biography of Maestro Tovey.

LANG LANG piano Few artists can claim to have the same profound impact on the world of music as Lang Lang has had. As a pianist, educator and philanthropist, as well as an influential ambassador for the arts, Lang Lang has fully embraced new technology and innovation, leading the way in bringing classical music into the 21st century. Lang Lang was seventeen when his big break came, substituting for André Watts at the Gala of the Century, playing Tchaikovsky’s First Piano Concerto with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Christoph Eschenbach: he became an overnight sensation and the invitations started to pour in. In December 2011 he was honoured with the highest prize awarded by the Ministry of Culture of the People’s Republic of China and received the highest civilian honours in Germany (Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany) and France (Medal of the Order of Arts and Letters). In 2016 Lang Lang was invited to the Vatican to perform for Pope Francis. He has also performed for numerous other international dignitaries, including four US presidents and monarchs from many nations.

MAXIM LANDO piano Fourteen-year-old American pianist Maxim Lando has been described by Berkshire Fine Arts as having an “ever so clear approach to the keyboard, and the molding and shaping of phrases straight from the musical angels.” Maxim’s concerts and collaborations have recently brought him to the international stage, with invitations to perform spanning from across the globe. Dedicated to making classical music accessible to his own generation, Maxim has been featured performing on CNN’s Best of Quest, NPR’s From The Top, Bavarian Radio’s On Stage, Russian TV-Kultura, CNC News, as well as television talk shows in Italy, Armenia, and 16 allegro

Kazakhstan. He has performed on numerous occasions with Lang Lang. Maxim is an Artemisia Akademie Fellow at Yale University, an alumnus of the Lang Lang International Music Foundation, and a student of Hung-Kuan Chen and Tema Blackstone at Juilliard Pre-College.

AUSTRALIAN STRING QUARTET Please refer to page 11 for a biography of the Australian String Quartet.

JOHANNES BRAHMS

b. Hamburg, Germany / May 7, 1833 d. Vienna, Austria / April 3, 1897

Hungarian Dance No. 5 When Brahms was twenty, he undertook a concert tour as the piano accompanist to a Hungarian violinist, Ede Reményi. Reményi’s repertoire gave him his first exposure to Gypsy or Romani music. It affected him profoundly, and inspired him to compose the Hungarian Dances for piano duet. The first two sets were published in 1869 and the second two in 1880, for a total of 21 pieces. Research has shown that some of the tunes he used are neither Gypsy/Romani tunes nor Hungarian folk melodies – they were so familiar that they just seemed to be! They are concert works by a variety of lesser-known composers. Orchestral transcriptions of all 21 Hungarian Dances have been prepared. Brahms himself orchestrated three of them: Nos. 1, 3 and 10. This arrangement of the most familiar of the dances, No. 5, was prepared by Martin Schmeling.

GIOACCHINO ROSSINI

b. Pesaro, Italy / February 29, 1792 d. Passy, France / November, 13 1868

William Tell: Overture By the time Rossini set to work on Guillaume Tell in 1828 (this original title reflects the fact that the libretto he set was in French), he had already announced that it would be his final opera. Premièring in Paris in 1829, this melodious four-hour spectacle proved to be a suitably monumental farewell to the stage. The source of the libretto was a play by German author Friedrich Schiller. Based


on historical fact, it told the story of the thirteenth-century Swiss patriot who led his countrymen in a heroic struggle against their Austrian oppressors. Rossini introduced the opera with an expansive overture. In the opening section, five solo cellos take the spotlight for a gently lyrical meditation. Rossini next marshals the full orchestra to vividly depict an Alpine storm. From its wake emerges a gentle pastoral scene, a duet between the throaty, expressive voice of the English horn, and the silvery, fluttering sound of the flute. The brass abruptly announce the vigorous galop of the concluding section. Rossini intended it to portray the daring charge and victory of William Tell’s patriotic followers. Several generations of listeners will instantly associate it with a different setting: the American West. It was the theme for The Lone Ranger, a long-running, mid-twentieth-century radio and television series. It accompanied a heroic masked avenger as he set out to do battle on behalf of truth and justice – a character firmly in the tradition of the original William Tell.

SIR EDWARD ELGAR b. Broadheath, England / June 2, 1857 d. Worcester, England / February 23, 1934

Introduction and Allegro, Op. 47 Numerous front-rank British composers, including Vaughan Williams, Britten and Holst, have found writing for the rich, expressive medium of the string orchestra a highly congenial practice. Elgar’s contributions, including this stirring work, were small in number but substantial in every other sense. The newly founded London Symphony Orchestra was eager to have Elgar conduct a concert of his music, hopefully to include a new work. The concert, which included the first performance of the Introduction and Allegro for string quartet and string orchestra, took place on March 8, 1905. It drew a cool reception. So technically demanding a piece needed time to be mastered by the players. This kept it from widespread popularity until the general upgrade in playing standards that came in the wake of the Second World War. The introduction is a bustling, rhythmic tour de force. What Elgar called “a very

devil of a fugue…with all sorts of japes and counterpoints” follows. After much masterfully constructed elaboration, the work concludes with a triumphant return of the introduction.

GEORGE GERSHWIN

b. Brooklyn, New York, USA / September 26, 1898 d. Hollywood, California, USA / July 11, 1937

Rhapsody in Blue Gershwin was the original and greatest American “crossover” artist. His gifts won him fame and fortune both in popular and classical music. While still a teenager, he landed a job in the music publishing business, resulting in a solid grounding in popular taste. By the early `20s, he was earning a healthy income from composing for the pop song market. For several years he had also been taking private instruction in classical techniques. Sooner or later these two streams were bound to merge. In 1922, he contributed a one act opera, Blue Monday, to a Broadway revue. Band leader Paul Whiteman was one of the few people who were impressed by it. He and Gershwin discussed the idea of a jazz flavoured piano concerto, without setting a firm date for launching it. The following year, Whiteman decided it was time to show off the growing popularity of jazz by staging a formal concert. Without telling Gershwin, he published a newspaper article stating that Gershwin’s “jazz concerto” would be premièred on Whiteman’s programme – in four weeks’ time! He then convinced Gershwin, who harboured doubts about his ability to write such a large scale piece, that he had what it takes. The première of Rhapsody in Blue took place in New York in February 1924. Even though it came at the end of a long, varied program, it was still received with overwhelming enthusiasm. This irresistible blend of freewheeling `20s jazz and daredevil, Lisztlike classical virtuosity remains one of the most beloved and frequently performed of all American compositions.  ■ Program Notes © 2017 Don Anderson

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CONCERT PROGRAM TEA & TRUMPETS | ORPHEUM, 2PM

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 5 LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN

WILLIAM ROWSON

CHRISTOPHER GAZE

William Rowson conductor Christopher Gaze host Alexander Knopp violin

BEETHOVEN

Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67

IV. Allegro

Coriolan Overture, Op. 62 Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67 ◆

ALEXANDER KNOPP

I. Allegro con brio

Prometheus: Overture Romance No. 2 in F Major, Op. 50 Leonore Overture No. 3, Op. 72b

TEA & COOKIES served in the lobby one hour before each concert. Tea compliments of Tetley Tea. VISIT THE SYMPHONY GIFT SHOP FOR CD SELECTIONS

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WILLIAM ROWSON conductor Conductor William Rowson is rapidly establishing a reputation as one of Canada's most versatile emerging talents. Known for his intimate knowledge of the standard repertoire as well as his facile handling of new works, Rowson recently completed his first season as the Assistant Conductor of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra. Bill grew up in a musical family, starting the violin at age 3 in his hometown of Saskatoon. He began the study of conducting at the Curtis Institute of Music and since then, has been a frequent guest of many of Canada’s leading ensembles. In the 2016/17 season Rowson led the VSO in 45 performances as well as guest conducting appearances with the Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra and Stratford Symphony Orchestra. Also an accomplished composer, the Toronto Symphony Orchestra performed the world première of his Fanfare-A Sesquie for Canada’s 150th to critical acclaim. His film score for the feature length film Big Muddy has been showcased at the Toronto International Film Festival.

CHRISTOPHER GAZE host Christopher Gaze is best known as the Founding Artistic Director of Bard on the Beach Shakespeare Festival. He hosts the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra's ever popular Tea & Trumpets series and has hosted their annual traditional Christmas concerts for 25 years. Christopher plays a leading role in British Columbia as an advocate for the arts in

general, and his passionate dedication to Bard on the Beach has fueled its growth into one of the largest professional theatre companies in Canada, drawing more than 1.7 million patrons since its inception in 1990. His many honours include Canada’s Meritorious Service Medal, Honorary Doctorates from UBC & SFU, the Mayor’s Arts Award for Theatre and the Order of British Columbia.

ALEXANDER KNOPP violin Alexander Knopp began violin at age five. A high school senior at Deer Lake School in Burnaby, he spent the summer as a first violinist in the VSO Orchestral Institute at Whistler under the direction of Maestro Bramwell Tovey, and enjoyed a four-week string session at Domaine Forgét, an internationally renowned music academy in Québec. Alexander had the privilege of playing in the Tutti World Youth Orchestra in Beijing in 2013, and was concertmaster of both the Junior and Intermediate Vancouver Academy of Music Orchestras. He is currently co-concertmaster of the Vancouver Youth Symphony Orchestra. While Alexander has monthly lessons with Nicholas Wright, concertmaster of the VSO, and weekly lessons with David Gillham from UBC, he has the advantage of daily lessons with his father, Larry Knopp, who is principal trumpet of the VSO! Alexander is very interested in a career with his violin, and loves to perform. He believes in reaching out to those around him in whatever way he can, especially with the gift of music.  ■

CONNECT WITH THE VSO! @VSOrchestra

604.876.3434 vancouversymphony.ca allegro 21


CONCERT PROGRAM LONDON DRUGS VSO POPS | ORPHEUM, 8PM

FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6 & 7 TERRA AND BEYOND, WITH CHRIS HADFIELD AND DANNY MICHEL

WILLIAM ROWSON

DANNY MICHEL

CHRIS HADFIELD

William Rowson conductor Chris Hadfield vocals and guitar Danny Michel vocals and guitar

I N T E R M ISSION

GLINKA Ruslan and Ludmila: Overture DANNY MICHEL Khlebnikov DANNY MICHEL 24, 000 Horses GLIERE Red Poppy: Russian Sailors’ Dance CHRIS HADFIELD/DANNY MICHEL Fall CHRIS HADFIELD/DANNY MICHEL

Beyond the Terra

The Dishwasher’s Dream

STRAVINSKY Firebird Suite (excerpts)

STRAUSS Also Sprach Zarathustra (opening) HOLST The Planets (excerpts) CHRIS HADFIELD/EVAN HADFIELD CHRIS HADFIELD/ARR. PELLET

Space Lullaby

GIACCHINO Theme from Star Trek 2009 CHRIS HADFIELD/ARR. DAVID YACKLEY

Big Smoke

CHRIS HADFIELD/ED ROBERTSON

Is Somebody Singing?

VISIT THE SYMPHONY GIFT SHOP FOR CD SELECTIONS VSO POPS SERIES SPONSOR

VSO POPS RADIO SPONSOR

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Share Colonel Chris Hadfield’s viewpoint Beyond the Terra, with music and inspiring images from the International Space Station. As a special guest, Chris welcomes singer/ songwriter Danny Michel. Last Fall, they shared the experience of exploring the High Arctic aboard the Russian Icebreaker Kapitan Khlebnikov, resulting in an album that features Hadfield and Michel in collaboration on multiple songs, which will also be featured in this unique and exciting Pops concert.

WILLIAM ROWSON conductor Please refer to page 21 for a biography of William Rowson.

CHRIS HADFIELD vocals and guitar Through his 21-years as an astronaut, three spaceflights, and 2600 orbits of Earth, Colonel Hadfield has become a worldwide sensation, harnessing the power of social media to make outer space accessible to millions and infusing a sense of wonder into our collective consciousness not felt since humanity first walked on the Moon. Called “the most famous astronaut since Neil Armstrong,” Colonel Hadfield continues to bring the marvels of science and space travel to everyone he encounters. During his multi-faceted career, Colonel Hadfield has intercepted Soviet bombers in Canadian airspace, lived on the ocean floor, been NASA’s Director of Operations in Russia, and recorded science and music videos seen by hundreds of millions. Colonel Hadfield is the author of three internationally bestselling books, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth, You Are Here, and his children's book, The Darkest Dark. Additionally, he released his musical album, Space Sessions: Songs From A Tin Can, in 2015.

expedition through the northwest passage. Danny was invited to join “Generator Arctic” by Canadian Astronaut Chris Hadfield who assembled a small group of scientists, photographers, writers, musicians, and videographers to capture a unique experience unlike ever before. Once home from the Arctic, Danny’s recordings were arranged for brass and strings by film composer Rob Carli. The result is a suite of atmospheric and haunting songs about the Arctic, our planet and our place in it. Possibly the farthest north an album has ever been recorded (it was recorded above 80 degrees latituded), Danny, Chris & Rob are performing Khlebnikov with orchestras throughout Toronto, Ottawa, Vancouver, London and more in 2017.  ■

THE SYMPHONY

GIFT SHOP VISIT US IN THE ORPHEUM LOBBY ON THE ORCHESTRA LEVEL

DANNY MICHEL vocals and guitar Danny Michel is unquestionably one of Canada’s finest songwriters whose hopeful songs find a home in everyone's heart. His thoughtful lyrics and earnest performances have earned him a devoted fan base, nominations for three Juno® awards, and The CBC’s "Heart Of Gold." Danny’s most recent project Khlebnikov was written and recorded aboard the legendary Soviet-era Russian ice-breaker, Kapitan Khlebnikov during an 18-day arctic

Specially selected CDs including classics and current best-sellers. Unique giftware, books and musically themed items.

Open 75 minutes prior to concert, during intermission & post concert. YOUR PURCHASES SUPPORT THE VSO.

Staffed by VSO Volunteers.

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CONCERT PROGRAM ORIGINO KIDS' KONCERTS | ORPHEUM, 2PM

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 8 FRED PENNER

FRED PENNER

WILLIAM ROWSON

William Rowson conductor Fred Penner AL HOFFMAN/BOB MERRILL/ CLEM WATTS Baked a Cake FRED PENNER What A Day HOBERMAN/PENNER House For Me LOESSER The Ugly Duckling FRED PENNER I Am the Wind

FRED PENNER Bienvenue FRED PENNER Poco TRADITIONAL I Am a Fine Musician FRED PENNER Children’s Garden TOM PAXTON The Marvelous Toy FRED PENNER You Can Do It TRADITIONAL The Cat Came Back GUTHRIE/BRAND This Land Is Your Land

VSO INSTRUMENT FAIR The Kids' Koncerts series continues with the popular VSO Instrument Fair, which allows music lovers of all ages (but especially kids!) to touch and play real orchestra instruments in the Orpheum lobby one hour before concert start time. All instruments are generously provided by Tom Lee Music. VISIT THE SYMPHONY GIFT SHOP FOR CD SELECTIONS KIDS' KONCERTS SERIES SPONSOR

PREMIER EDUCATION PARTNER

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WILLIAM ROWSON conductor Please refer to page 21 for a biography of William Rowson.

FRED PENNER At a recent keynote address to an early childhood education conference, acclaimed family entertainer, singer/songwriter, composer, actor, writer, author, TV host and keynote speaker Fred Penner delivered a simple, yet powerful message. “Never underestimate your ability to make a difference in the life of a child.” A gentle giant with kind eyes and an undeniable ability to make you feel good about yourself, this musical master brings 25 years of commitment, consistency and depth to a career that skillfully blends the many genres of performing and communication. His diverse repertoire includes a prolific 12 Children’s Albums, countless energetically packed live shows for throngs of eager audiences across North America, composing the music for

APTN/YTV’s Tipi Tales, and writing the score and hosting the TV documentary The Simple Way. He has established himself as a fundamental part of the North American family entertainment scene.

“Never underestimate your ability to make a difference in the life of a child.” A humanitarian always conscious of the “delicate balance required to create a positive influence that fosters healthy self-esteem in the life of a child,” his work is infused with a steadfast commitment to communicating with children and families in a clear, non-condescending way. “More than just fun,” this multi-talented artist has the wisdom and humility to know that the importance and the meaning of what he does can reach deeply into the lives of others.  ■

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CONCERT PROGRAM AIR CANADA MASTERWORKS DIAMOND | ORPHEUM, 8PM

SATURDAY & MONDAY, OCTOBER 14 & 16

WESTMINSTER SAVINGS SURREY NIGHTS | BELL PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE, 7PM

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15

VADIM GLUZMAN

Otto Tausk conductor Vadim Gluzman violin

GLINKA Ruslan and Ludmila: Overture SHOSTAKOVICH Violin Concerto No. 2 in C-sharp minor, Op. 129

I. Moderato II. Adagio III. Adagio – Allegro

I N T E R M ISSI O N

SIBELIUS Symphony No. 1 in E minor, Op. 39

OTTO TAUSK

PRE-CONCERT TALKS Free to ticketholders, October 14 & 16: 7:05pm to 7:30pm, in the auditorium.

I. Andante, ma non troppo – Allegro energico II. Andante (ma non troppo lento) III. Scherzo: Allegro IV. Finale (Quasi una Fantasia): Andante – Allegro molto

VISIT THE SYMPHONY GIFT SHOP FOR CD SELECTIONS MASTERWORKS DIAMOND SERIES SPONSOR

OCTOBER 14 & 16 CONCERT SPONSOR

SURREY NIGHTS SERIES SPONSOR

THE VSO’S SURREY NIGHTS SERIES HAS BEEN ENDOWED BY A GENEROUS GIFT FROM WERNER AND HELGA HÖING.

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OTTO TAUSK conductor The 2017/18 season sees Otto Tausk debuting with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra and Lahti Symphony Orchestra. He continues his guest conducting relationships with BBC National Orchestra of Wales, Danish National Symphony and Orquestra Sinfónica de Galicia, as well as making his anticipated return as Music Director designate in Vancouver. 2017/18 also celebrates his final season as Music Director of the Opera Theatre and Tonhalle orchestra St Gallen, which will see Otto Tausk conduct a complete Beethoven cycle and return to the opera pit for Fidelio. Soloists he will work with include Saleem Ashkar, Kristof Barati, Vadim Gluzman, Harriet Krijgh, Johannes Moser, Beatrice Rana and singers Fatma Said and Erin Wall amongst others. Otto Tausk is also a hugely respected musical personality in his native Holland, working with all its major orchestras and composers. Otto Tausk will assume the title of Music Director of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra in the 2018/19 season.

VADIM GLUZMAN violin Vadim Gluzman’s extraordinary artistry brings to life the glorious violinistic tradition of the 19th and 20th centuries. Gluzman’s wide repertoire embraces adventurous new music and his performances are heard around the world through live broadcasts and a striking catalogue of award-winning recordings exclusively for the BIS label. The Israeli violinist performs with the Berlin Philharmonic, Boston Symphony, Cleveland Orchestra, Chicago Symphony, Philadelphia Orchestra, San Francisco Symphony, Israel Philharmonic, London Philharmonic, London Symphony, Leipzig Gewandhaus, and many others, and enjoys collaborations with today’s leading conductors, including Riccardo Chailly, Christoph von Dohnányi, Tugan Sokhiev, Sir Andrew Davis, Neeme Järvi, Michael Tilson Thomas, Semyon Bychkov, Jukka-Pekka Saraste, Paavo Järvi, and Hannu Lintu. His festival appearances include Tanglewood, Ravinia, Lockenhaus, Verbier, and the North Shore Chamber

Music Festival in Chicago, which he founded with pianist Angela Yoffe. Highlights this season include Gluzman’s debut appearance with the Royal Concertgebouw and performances with the Boston Symphony and Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra. He celebrates Leonard Bernstein’s centennial year with both the BBC and San Francisco Symphonies, and gives the European première of Sofia Gubaidulina’s Triple Concerto with the Tonhalle Orchestra Zürich. He plays the legendary 1690 ‘ex-Leopold Auer’ Stradivari on extended loan to him through the generosity of the Stradivari Society of Chicago.

MIKHAIL GLINKA

b. Novospasskoye, Russia / June 1, 1804 d. Berlin, Germany / February 15, 1857

Ruslan and Ludmila: Overture Sporting melodies patterned on folk music, and scored in lavish orchestral colours, Ruslan and Ludmila (1842) founded the allegro 33


Russian national school of opera. The wedding between Ludmila, daughter of the grand prince of Kiev, and Ruslan, a knight in the prince’s service, is disrupted when the bride is abducted by Chernomor, an evil magician. Ruslan locates the magician’s castle and cuts off Chernomor’s beard, the source of his evil power, then revives Ludmila with the help of a magic ring. Glinka sets the scene for these fanciful goingson with the perfect curtain-raiser: brisk, compact and tuneful.

DMITRI SHOSTAKOVICH

b. St. Petersburg, Russia / September 25, 1906 d. Moscow, Russia / August 9, 1975

Violin Concerto No. 2 in C-sharp minor, Op. 129 This is the last of Shostakovich’s six concertos (two each for piano, violin and cello). Violin Concerto No. 1 is performed frequently, but its successor is much less well-known. These concerts offer a welcome opportunity to become better acquainted with his final thoughts on the concerto genre. As with the cello concertos (1959 and 1966), the violin concertos were dedicated to, and premièred by a specific Russian artist: instead of cellist Mstislav Rostropovich, it was violinist David Oistrakh. Shostakovich composed the first violin concerto in 1947. Sensing that the repressive political climate in the USSR would not welcome such a “personal” work, he kept it under wraps until the death of Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin in 1953 stimulated a thaw in artistic expression. The concerto received its belated première in 1955. Twelve years passed before the appearance of Concerto No. 2. In the interim, Shostakovich had composed numerous major scores, including Symphonies 11, 12 and 13. His health had already been perilous for several years when he suffered a major heart attack in 1966. For the remaining nine years of his life, the dark shadow of death fell across much of his music. 34 allegro

Also, the physical act of composing, which had previously been easy for him, became difficult and draining. He was, as he wrote to a friend, writing a violin concerto, slowly ringing it out of himself, note by note. His physical trials continued when he suffered a broken leg in early September 1967, which kept him from attending the concerto’s début. Following a run-through and some finetuning, the première took place in late September. The concerto was received warmly, both in the USSR and during the tours that Oistrakh made with it, to England and America, shortly thereafter. Only a year had passed since the appearance of the second cello concerto. In its spare emotions and lean textures, the second violin concerto resembles it more closely than it does the earlier violin concerto. Shostakovich characterized the new violin piece as less “symphonic” than the first. “In the new concerto,” he wrote, “virtually everything is set out by the solo violin, everything is concentrated in its part and the orchestra accompanies…” The sorrowful lament that launches the opening movement grows in intensity to heights of passion. Wind instruments decorate the almost-whimsical second theme. Shostakovich gradually rekindled the aggressive tension of the movement’s early pages, before a brief cadenza for the soloist ushers in the delicately orchestrated pages of relative calm (if not peacefulness) that close the movement. The second movement continues the grieving mood, gently softened by passages where solo wind instruments support the soloist. Without pause, the unaccompanied violin leads the way into the lively but caustic rondo-finale.

JEAN SIBELIUS

b. Hämeenlinna, Finland / December 8, 1865 d. Järvenpää, Finland / September 20, 1957

Symphony No. 1 in E minor, Op. 39 By 1898, Sibelius felt sufficiently confident and experienced to write a symphony, a genre considered at the time the highest


form of musical expression. He conducted the première of Symphony No. 1 himself, in Helsinki on April 26, 1899. It won an exceptionally warm reception. Soon afterwards it won success abroad, too, laying the foundation for what became his towering international stature. To his great satisfaction, his reputation was founded upon his abilities as a composer, not just the novelty of being Finnish. Symphony No. 1 presents many turns of phrase and touches of harmony and orchestration which would become increasingly familiar in later works. With its rich colours (including inventive use of the harp) and overt emotional expressiveness, however it is the least economical, the most Romantic Sibelius symphony. It opens quietly, mysteriously, with the solo clarinet giving out a melancholy theme. This introduction paves the way for the first movement proper, an epic creation built on an array of sharply characterized ideas. After a grand build-up in tension, it concludes with strong pizzicato chords.

The slow movement begins with a heartfelt string theme. A series of contrasting episodes follows, some fanciful, some lyrical, leading to a harsh and agitated climax. Finally, the opening subject returns to restore calm.

“After a grand build-up in tension, it concludes with strong pizzicato chords.” Timpani set the pace for the following scherzo, a dynamic piece fuelled by a tremendous sense of forward drive. Horns introduce the contrasting trio section, an oasis of repose amidst the fireworks. The finale opens with a passionate restatement of the theme which began the first movement. The main body contrasts drama with yearning, the latter expressed in another big, passionate tune. The conclusion is emotionally enigmatic, and once again pizzicato.  ■ Program Notes © 2017 Don Anderson


CONCERT PROGRAM CLASSICAL TRADITIONS | CHAN CENTRE FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS, 8PM

FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20 & 21

NORTH SHORE CLASSICS | CENTENNIAL THEATRE, 8PM

MONDAY, OCTOBER 23

CRISTIAN MĂCELARU

ENESCU Rumanian Rhapsody in A Major, Op. 11, No. 1

ANGELA CHENG

Cristian Măcelaru conductor Angela Cheng piano

RAVEL Piano Concerto in G Major

I. Allegramente II. Adagio assai III. Presto

I N T E R M ISSI O N

DVOŘÁK Symphony No. 5 in F Major, Op. 76

I. Allegro ma non troppo II. Andante con moto III. Scherzo: Allegro scherzando IV. Finale: Allegro molto

THE PRESENTATION OF THIS SERIES IS MADE POSSIBLE, IN PART, THROUGH THE GENEROUS ASSISTANCE OF THE CHAN ENDOWMENT FUND AT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.

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CRISTIAN MĂCELARU conductor

Newly appointed Music Director and Conductor of the Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music, Cristian Măcelaru is one of the fast-rising stars of the conducting world. Măcelaru came to public attention in 2012 when he conducted the Chicago Symphony Orchestra as a replacement for Pierre Boulez in critically acclaimed performances.

Măcelaru regularly conducts top orchestras around the world including the Chicago Symphony, New York Philharmonic, Philadelphia Orchestra, Los Angeles Philharmonic, National Symphony Orchestra, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Bayerischen Rundfunk Symphonieorchester and WDR Sinfonieorchester. The 2017/18 season sees Măcelaru guestconducting the symphony orchestras of National, Dallas, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, Atlanta, Seattle, Cincinnati, Milwaukee, San Diego and Vancouver. He recently completed his tenure with the Philadelphia Orchestra as Conductor-in-Residence and leads them in three subscription programs plus Messiah concerts. Internationally he conducts the DSO Berlin, Bayerische Staatsoper, WDR Sinfonieorchester, Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, Swedish Radio Symphony, Danish National Symphony Orchestra and more.

ANGELA CHENG piano

Consistently praised for her brilliant technique, tonal beauty, and superb musicianship, Canadian pianist Angela Cheng is one of her country’s national treasures. In addition to regular guest appearances with virtually every orchestra in Canada, she has performed with the symphonies of Alabama, Annapolis, Colorado, Flint, Houston, Indianapolis, Jacksonville, Saint Louis, San Diego, Syracuse, and Utah, as well as the philharmonic orchestras of Buffalo, Louisiana, London, Minas Gerais/Brazil, and Israel. In June 2016, she returned to Virtuosi Concerts Winnipeg as “Poet of the Piano,” in celebration of their 25th anniversary season. Highlights of the 2017/2018 season include return performances with the Edmonton 38 allegro

Symphony and Vancouver Symphony, performing Ravel’s Concerto in G; Victoria Symphony, performing Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 9, K.271; and Orchestre Métropolitain/Montréal, performing Strauss’s Burleske in D Minor under the direction of Yannick Nezet-Seguin. She will also be making her debut with the Dayton Philharmonic. In August, she will make her Argentinian recital debut in Buenos Aires at the Auditorio de la Fundación Beethoven. Her performance schedule also includes extensive touring as collaborative pianist with Pinchas Zukerman and as a member of the ZukermanTrio.

GEORGE ENESCU

b. Liveni Virnav, Romania / August 19, 1881 d. Paris, France , May 4, 1955

Rumanian Rhapsody in A Major, Op. 11 No. 1 Enescu was the most important musician his country has produced, as well as one of the most active and versatile musical figures of his era. He won renown as composer, conductor, violinist and teacher. His modesty in regard to his own music and his dislike of self-promotion led to an underevaluation of his compositions. They include chamber works, piano pieces and choral music. The orchestral creations include three each of symphonies and suites. Only a pair of early works, the Rumanian Rhapsodies, keeps his name alive in the concert halls of the world. He composed them between 1900 and 1901. The model was the folksy, free-wheeling Hungarian Rhapsodies of Franz Liszt. Nostalgic longing for Enescu’s homeland may also have played a role in their creation. Addressing the nature of the musical materials he used in them, he wrote, “Contrary to the general idea, Romania is not a Slavic country, but Latin. Settled 2000 years ago, it has maintained its completely Latin character... Our music, curiously enough, is influenced not by the neighbouring Slav, but by members of these remote races, now classed as Gypsies, brought to Romania as servants of the Roman conquerors. The deeply oriental character of our own folk music derives from these sources and possesses a flavour as singular as it is beautiful.” The first rhapsody


is a straightforward medley of traditional rustic dance themes. It builds in intensity to a final round dance of delirious, almost savage abandon.

MAURICE RAVEL

b. Ciboure, Basses Pyrénées, France / March 7, 1875 d. Paris, France / December 28, 1937

Piano Concerto in G Major Ravel’s two piano concertos are his final major works. Even though he composed them during the same period, 1929-1931, they are quite different from each other. The Concerto in G Major for two hands is bright and breezy; the Concerto for the Left Hand in D Major is a more sombre affair. One thing they share is the influence of jazz, which Ravel first heard during a concert tour of North America in 1928. This is how he described the G Major: “It is a concerto in the truest sense of the word, written very much in the same spirit as those of Mozart and Saint-Saëns. The music of a concerto, in my opinion, should be light-hearted and brilliant, and not aim at profundity or at dramatic effects. Too many classical concertos were composed not so much ‘for’ as ‘against’ the piano. I had thought of entitling mine divertissement but the title ‘concerto’ is specific enough.” The first performance took place in Paris on January 14, 1932, with Ravel conducting the Lamoureux Orchestra and Marguerite Long as soloist. The opening movement balances the playful and the dreamy. Ravel deployed his orchestra with a maximum of colourful ingenuity. Complete and utterly bewitching contrast comes in the slow movement. Marguerite Long called its principal theme, introduced unaccompanied by the soloist, as “one of the most touching melodies which has come from the human heart.” After a climax of restrained melancholy, the music gradually and nostalgically winds down to a peaceful reprise of its beginning. The finale is a headlong chase led by the soloist. Ravel dots its breakneck course with mischievous tunes, pizzicato strings and playfully jingling percussion.

ANTONÍN DVOŘÁK

b. Nelahozeves, Bohemia / September 8, 1841 d. Prague, Bohemia / May 1, 1904

Symphony No. 5 in F Major, Op. 76 News that Dvořák had won an Austrian government grant for impoverished young composers arrived in February 1875. It coincided with his discovering his own creative voice, by turning away from Austro-German models and pouring into his compositions the life-loving warmth and exuberant rhythms of his country’s folk music. The joy brought on by these developments was reflected in the astonishingly rapid creation of two enchanting, folk-flavoured works: the Serenade for Strings, Op. 22 and Symphony No. 5, originally (and more accurately) designated Op. 24. He composed the symphony in a concentrated period of just five weeks, between June and July. It had to wait four years for its first performance, which Adolf Čech conducted in Prague during March 1879. When it came into print in 1888, the publisher attached the misleadingly high opus number 76, in hopes of passing it off as a more recent work. Its principal quality is sunny, pastoral warmth. The open-air first movement contrasts a genial initial theme spotlighting wind instruments, with a lilting second subject introduced by strings. The second movement radiates a melancholy glow. Dvořák offsets this tone with an attractive woodwind theme underpinned by pizzicato strings. After a brief linking passage which continues the mood of the second movement, an exuberant scherzo propelled by Czech dance rhythms kicks joyfully in. The central trio section virtually overflows with attractive themes. It comes as something of a shock when the finale opens in a mood of urgency and high drama, in strong contrast to all the preceding movements. This dark tone wages a substantial, at times heated see-saw conflict with positive elements. It is only at the close, with trumpets pealing heroically, that the clouds part for good and the sun once again shines upon the landscape.  ■ Program Notes © 2017 Don Anderson

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CONCERT PROGRAM GOLDCORP MASTERWORKS GOLD | ORPHEUM, 8PM

SATURDAY & MONDAY, OCTOBER 28 & 30

ROGERS GROUP FINANCIAL SYMPHONY SUNDAYS | ORPHEUM, 2PM

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 29

DAME EVELYN GLENNIE

Bramwell Tovey conductor Dame Evelyn Glennie percussion

BRAMWELL TOVEY

JENNIFER HIGDON Percussion Concerto I N T E R M ISSI O N

SHOSTAKOVICH

Symphony No. 10 in E minor, Op. 93

I. Moderato II. Allegro III. Allegretto IV. Andante – Allegro

PRE-CONCERT TALKS Free to ticketholders, October 28 & 30: 7:05pm to 7:30pm, in the auditorium. VISIT THE SYMPHONY GIFT SHOP FOR CD SELECTIONS MASTERWORKS GOLD SERIES SPONSOR

SYMPHONY SUNDAYS SERIES SPONSOR

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BRAMWELL TOVEY conductor Please refer to page 11 for a biography of Maestro Tovey.

DAME EVELYN GLENNIE

percussion

Evelyn Glennie is the first person in history to successfully create and sustain a full-time career as a solo percussionist, performing worldwide with the greatest conductors, orchestras, and artists. She fondly recalls having played the first percussion concerto in the history of The Proms at the Albert Hall in 1992, which paved the way for orchestras around the world to feature percussion concerti. She had the honour of a leading role in the Opening Ceremony of the London 2012 Olympic Games. Evelyn regularly provides masterclasses and consultations designed to guide the next generation. With over 80 international awards to date, including the Polar Music Prize and the Companion of Honour, Evelyn is also a leading commissioner of new works for solo percussion, with more than 200 pieces to her name from many of the world’s most eminent composers. The film ‘Touch the Sound’ and her enlightening TED speech remain key testimonies to her approach to sound-creation. To this day, Evelyn continues to invest in realising her vision – to Teach the World to Listen – while looking to open a centre that embodies her mission: “to improve communication and social cohesion by encouraging everyone to discover new ways of listening. We want to inspire, to create, to engage and to empower”.

JENNIFER HIGDON

b. Brooklyn, New York, USA / December 31, 1962

Percussion Concerto Jennifer Higdon is a major figure in contemporary classical music, receiving the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for her Violin Concerto. She enjoys several hundred performances a year of her works, with blue cathedral (2000) alone receiving more than 600 performances worldwide. Her works have

been recorded on over four dozen CDs. Among her recent creations is an opera based on the best-selling novel, Cold Mountain, by Charles Frazier. She has written the following introduction to the Grammy®-winning Percussion Concerto. The twentieth century saw the percussion section grow as no other section in the orchestra. Both the music and the performers grew in visibility as well as in capability. And while the form of the concerto wasn’t the least bit new in the century, the appearance and growth of the percussion concerto as a genre exploded during the later half of the century. My Percussion Concerto of 2005 follows the normal relationship of a dialogue between soloist and orchestra. In this work, however, there is an additional relationship with the soloist interacting extensively with the percussion section. The ability of performers has grown to such an extent that it has become possible to have sections within the orchestra interact at the same level as the soloist.

“...an additional relationship with the soloist interacting extensively with the percussion section.” When writing a concerto I think of two things: the particular soloist for whom I am writing and the nature of the solo instrument. In the case of percussion, this means a large battery of instruments, from vibraphone and marimba (the favourite instrument of the concerto's first soloist, Colin Currie), to non-pitched smaller instruments (brake drum, wood blocks, Peking Opera gong), and to the drums themselves. Not only does a percussionist have to perfect playing all of these instruments, but he must make hundreds of decisions regarding the use of sticks and mallets, as there is an infinite variety of possibilities from which to choose. Not to mention the choreography of the movement of the player; where


most performers do not have to concern themselves with movement across the stage during a performance, a percussion soloist must have every move memorized. No other instrumentalist has such a large number of variables to challenge and master. Written for Colin Currie, this work is dedicated to him. This work begins with the sound of the marimba, as Colin early on informed me that he has a fondness for this instrument. I wanted the opening to be exquisitely quiet and serene, with the focus on the soloist. Then the percussion section enters, mimicking the gestures of the soloist. Only after this dialogue is established does the orchestra enter. There is significant interplay between the soloist and the orchestra with a fairly beefy accompaniment in the orchestral part, but at various times the music comes back down to the sound of the soloist and the percussion section playing together, without orchestra. Eventually, the music moves through a slow lyrical section, which requires simultaneous bowing and mallet playing by the soloist, and then a return to the fast section, where a cadenza ensues with both the soloist and the percussion section. A dramatic close to the cadenza leads back to the orchestra’s opening material and the eventual conclusion of the work.

DMITRI SHOSTAKOVICH

b. St. Petersburg, Russia / September 25, 1906 d. Moscow, Russia / August 9, 1975

Symphony No. 10 in E minor, Op. 93 Shostakovich spent many of his most productive years under the oppressive regime of Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin. Following Stalin’s death in 1953, Shostakovich quickly set to work on a new symphony, his first in eight years. The debate over its merits, which was eventually resolved in his favour, played a role in the reinstatement of increased artistic expression in the USSR. When he was asked if it had a program, he replied, “No, let them listen and guess for

themselves,” adding that he wanted simply “to portray human emotions and passions.” In Testimony, the controversial book of memoirs that was published in 1979, he gave quite a different account, stating “It’s about Stalin and the Stalin years. The second part, the scherzo, is a musical portrait of him, roughly speaking. Of course, there are other things in it, but that’s the basis.”

“Harshly scored and driven by relentless, maniacal energy, the brief second movement delivers one of the most concentrated outbursts of fury in all music.” Opening with sober, desolate ruminations, the first movement rises to a prolonged climax of searing intensity. The music winds down slowly, to end as bleakly as it began. In the final pages, two piccolos warble forlornly as dusk falls over a battle-scarred landscape. Harshly scored and driven by relentless, maniacal energy, the brief second movement delivers one of the most concentrated outbursts of fury in all music. Enigmatic and unsettling, the third movement refuses to offer consolation for what has preceded it. It features a series of expressive solos for wind instruments and a bitter, ironic climax that borders on hysteria. The finale opens with a mournful introduction in slow tempo, once again featuring wind solos. But then clarinet and strings announce a merry dance tune, at last allowing a ray of sunlight to brighten the scene. There can be no possibility of unclouded optimism; shadowed moments crop up, and at times the rejoicing takes on an almost frenzied edge. This music does not so much celebrate the present as it expresses a wish for freer, less troubled days ahead.  ■ Program Notes © 2017 Don Anderson

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CONCERT PROGRAM SPECIALS | THE CENTRE, 777 HOMER STREET, 7:30PM

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 2 NATIONAL ARTS CENTRE ORCHESTRA: LIFE REFLECTED

Alexander Shelley conductor Erin Wall soprano Monique Mojica actor Donna Feore creative producer and director ZOSHA DI CASTRI Dear Life* JOCELYN MORLOCK

My Name is Amanda Todd

NICOLE LIZÉE Bondarsphere JOHN ESTACIO I Lost My Talk**

Four Canadian composers created compelling musical portraits of four exceptional Canadian women. Roberta Bondar, Rita Joe, Alice Munro, and Amanda Todd are the inspiration behind Life Reflected, a unique symphonic and multi-media celebration of youth, promise, and courage. The National Arts Centre Orchestra commissioned four works by Zosha Di Castri, Jocelyn Morlock, Nicole Lizée, and John Estacio to create its largest production ever. The staging includes stunning projections, which immerse the audience in sound, motion picture, photography, and graphic design. Opening Concert of ISCM World New Music Days 2017.

NATIONAL ARTS CENTRE ORCHESTRA: Alexander Shelley Music Director John Storgårds Principal Guest Conductor Pinchas Zukerman Conductor Emeritus

Jack Everly Principal Pops Conductor Alain Trudel Principal Youth and Family Conductor

*Words and lyrics adapted from the story by Alice Munro. Adaptation by Merilyn Simonds **commissioned for the NationaL Arts Centre Orchestra to commemorate the 75th birthday of the Right Honourable Joe Clark, P.C., C.C., A.O.E by his family

The Canada 150 Tour is made possible with leadership support from Tour Patrons Gail and David O’Brien, Presenting Supporters Alice and Grant Burton, Supporting Partners Peng Lin and Yu Gu, Education Partner Dasha Shenkman, OBE, Hon RCM and Digital Partner Facebook

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ALEXANDER SHELLEY

ERIN WALL

ALEXANDER SHELLEY conductor Alexander Shelley is Music Director of the National Arts Centre Orchestra, Principal Associate Conductor of the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, and was Chief Conductor of the Nuremberg Symphony Orchestra from 2009 to 2017. He is also Artistic Director of the Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen’s ECHO and Deutsche Gründerpreis winning “Zukunftslabor”. Born in London in 1979, Shelley studied cello and conducting in Germany. Unanimous winner of the 2005 Leeds Conductor’s Competition, he works regularly with leading international orchestras including the DSO Berlin, Leipzig Gewandhaus and Orchestre de la Suisse Romande. Shelley’s operatic engagements have included The Merry Widow (Royal Danish Opera); La Bohème (Opera Lyra), Le nozze di Figaro (Opera North) and Così fan tutte (Montpellier), and in 2017 Harry Somers’ Louis Riel with the NAC Orchestra. Shelley has released recordings with Deutsche Grammophon, and Life Reflected and Encount3rs with the NAC Orchestra on the Analekta label.

ERIN WALL soprano Soprano Erin Wall is acclaimed for her musicality and versatility, with an extensive opera and concert repertoire that spans three centuries from Mozart and Beethoven, to Britten and Strauss. She

MONIQUE MOJICA

DONNA FEORE

has sung leading roles in the world’s great opera houses, including the Metropolitan Opera, La Scala, the Vienna Staatsoper, Opéra National de Paris and Lyric Opera of Chicago, and appears in concert with leading symphony orchestras and conductors worldwide. Recent career highlights include the title role in Strauss’s Arabella and Helena in Britten’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream with the Metropolitan Opera; a highly acclaimed debut as Clémence in L’amour de loin with the Canadian Opera Company in 2012; the title role in Thaïs at the Edinburgh Festival; and the 50th Anniversary performance of Britten’s War Requiem with the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra led by Andris Nelsons at Coventry Cathedral. She has been a regular guest of the NAC Orchestra since making her debut at the 2007 Gala — she appeared as soloist for Mahler’s Eighth and Fourth Symphonies in 2010, and 2011 and 2015, respectively, and Orff’s Carmina Burana in 2012. She performed in the world première of Zosha Di Castri’s Dear Life in September 2015, and again in May 2016 and June 2017 in Life Reflected. Ms. Wall’s most recent commercial release is Strauss’s Vier Letzte Lieder with the Melbourne Symphony.

MONIQUE MOJICA actor Monique Mojica, from the Guna and Rappahannock nations, is passionately dedicated to theatrical practice as an


act of healing, of reclaiming historical/ cultural memory and of resistance. Spun directly from the family-web of New York’s Spiderwoman Theater, her first play Princess Pocahontas and the Blue Spots was produced in 1990. Ms. Mojica founded Chocolate Woman Collective in 2007 to develop the play Chocolate Woman Dreams the Milky Way, a performance created by devising a dramaturgy specific to Guna cultural aesthetics, story narrative and literary structure. She has taught Indigenous Theatre — theory, process and practice — at the University of Illinois, the Institute of American Indian Arts and McMaster University. Upcoming projects include Side Show Freaks & Circus Injuns, with an illustrious team of indigenous artists from diverse disciplines, co-written with Choctaw playwright LeAnne Howe, and the première of Kaha:wi Dance Theatre’s Re-Quickening, a new work by Santee Smith.

DONNA FEORE

creative producer and director Donna Feore is one of Canada’s most versatile creative talents and has been highly praised for her work with the

Stratford Festival. She directed and choreographed last season’s smash hit, A Chorus Line, which enjoyed an extended run. This came on the heels of her previous hugely acclaimed productions of the popular The Sound of Music (2015), Crazy for You (2014), and Fiddler on the Roof (2013). She returned to the NAC act as Creative Producer & Director for the NACcommissioned Life Reflected and Director for Mendelssohn’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Other directing credits include Tom Stoppard’s Rock & Roll and It’s a Wonderful Life for Canadian Stage, and Lecture on the Weather by John Cage and A Soldier’s Tale with F. Murray Abraham for the Detroit Symphony. Selected opera credits include staging and choreography for the Canadian Opera Company’s Siegfried, which she remounted for the Opera National de Lyon. Also for the COC: Tosca, Red Emma and Oedipus Rex, which earned her a Dora Mavor Moore Award for Best Choreography. Selected film and television credits include Mean Girls, Eloise, Treading Water, Politics is Cruel, Martin and Lewis and Stormy Weather. In 2017, Ms. Feore directed and choreographed Guys and Dolls for the Stratford Festival.  ■

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CONCERT PROGRAM SPECIALS | ORPHEUM, 7:30PM

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 5 VSO@ISCM: THE VANCOUVER SYMPHONY PERFORMS AT ISCM WORLD NEW MUSIC DAYS 2017

BRAMWELL TOVEY

MOHAMED ASSANI

Bramwell Tovey conductor Mohamed Assani sitar JOCELYN MORLOCK

That Tingling Sensation

CHARLOTTE BRAY

At the Speed of Stillness I N T E R M ISSI O N

FRIEDRICH HEINRICH KERN

Indigo

From November 2-8, 2017, Canada welcomes the world as Vancouver hosts the ISCM World New Music Days 2017. Since its founding in 1922, the International Society for Contemporary Music has been the world’s premier network for new music. Each year, its festival is hosted in a different city around the globe. In 2017, the Canadian League of Composers and Music on Main welcome nearly 50 countries for a festival of new music and a celebration of new ideas, new collaborations, and new fusions. Presented with the support of the Department

MOHAMED ASSANI (‫ )یناسآ دمحم‬of Canadian Heritage, the Canada Council for the Arts, the Province of British Columbia, the City of & JOHN OLIVER

Pressed for Time (World Première)* Vancouver, the Deux Mille Foundation, the Hamber Foundation, the SOCAN Foundation, and donors like you. iscm2017.ca/home VISIT THE SYMPHONY GIFT SHOP FOR CD SELECTIONS * PRESSED FOR TIME CREATED WITH SUPPORT FROM

* WITH FURTHER

SUPPORT FROM

THE DR. HARI SHARMA FOUNDATION

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BRAMWELL TOVEY conductor Please refer to page 11 for a biography of Maestro Tovey.

MOHAMED ASSANI sitar Mohamed Assani is a celebrated sitar player known for being a proactive ambassador for his rich musical tradition. Throughout his extensive career, he has brought the sitar to new audiences through innovative collaborations that have stretched the boundaries of his instrument. He has performed Hindustani classical music as well as his own original music across the

globe—with orchestras, string quartets, hip hop artists, DJs, world music ensembles, jazz artists, Indian classical artists—and as a soloist. Mohamed has been invited to present his music to royalty and heads of state, including the Governor General of Canada, Royal Family of Dubai and HRH Prince Karim Aga Khan. According to the Georgia Straight, "Assani is both a musician who’s deeply rooted in the artistic traditions of South Asia and a one-of-akind innovator who’s bent on ensuring that those age-old forms will survive, and grow, in the modern era.”  ■

TRADITIONAL CHRISTMAS CONCERTS

William Rowson

Christopher Gaze

William Rowson conductor Christopher Gaze host EnChor Gerald van Wyck director UBC Opera Ensemble Nancy Hermiston director

ST. ANDREW’S-WESLEY CHURCH, VANCOUVER Friday, December 8 at 7:30pm Saturday, December 9 at 4pm & 7:30pm Sunday, December 10 at 7:30pm

Celebrating the 25th Anniversary of the Lower Mainland’s most beloved Christmas music tradition. Kick off your Holiday season on the perfect note, with the VSO Traditional Christmas concerts.

KAY MEEK CENTRE, WEST VANCOUVER Thursday, December 14 at 4pm & 7:30pm

SOUTH DELTA BAPTIST CHURCH, DELTA Wednesday, December 13 at 7:30pm

CENTENNIAL THEATRE, NORTH VANCOUVER Friday, December 15 at 4pm & 7:30pm BELL PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE, SURREY Saturday, December 16 at 4pm & 7:30pm MICHAEL J. FOX THEATRE, BURNABY Sunday, December 17 at 4pm & 7:30pm

@VSOrchestra

TICKETS: vancouversymphony.ca

604.876.3434


The Vancouver Symphony gratefully acknowledges the generosity of these community leaders whose ongoing annual support makes it possible to present 150 performances and 13 inspiring education and community programs every year.Thank you for your loyalty and commitment to the VSO’s ongoing success.

GOLD BATON CLUB Gifts from $50,000 and Up Dr. Peter and Mrs. Stephanie Chung Heathcliff Foundation Mr. Alan and Mrs. Gwendoline Pyatt MAESTRO’S CIRCLE GIFTS FROM $35,000 TO $49,999 The R & J Stern Family Foundation GIFTS FROM $25,000 TO $34,999 The Christopher Foundation (Education Fund) Lagniappe Foundation Mr. Gerald McGavin, C.M., O.B.C. and Mrs. Sheahan McGavin Jane McLennan Mr. Fred Withers and Dr. Kathy Jones CONCERTMASTER’S CIRCLE GIFTS FROM $15,000 TO $24,999 Mary and Gordon Christopher Foundation Martha Lou Henley, C.M. The Lecky Foundation Mrs. Irene McEwen George W. Norgan Fund, held at Vancouver Foundation Anonymous (1) GIFTS FROM $10,000 TO $14,999 Larry and Sherrill Berg Gerhard and Ariane Bruendl Mrs. Joyce E. Clarke Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Cooper Mrs. Margaret M. Duncan Mohammed A. Faris The Gudewill Family In Memory of John Hodge Diane Hodgins Werner (Vern) and Helga Höing

Ms. Sumiko Hui Yoshiko Karasawa McGrane-Pearson Endowment Fund Thomas and Lorraine Skidmore Arthur H. Willms Family Gordon W. Young Anonymous (1) PRINCIPAL PLAYERS GIFTS FROM $7,500 TO $9,999 Kenneth W. and Ellen L. Mahon Mollie Massie and Hein Poulus GIFTS FROM $5,000 TO $7,499 Dr. and Mrs. J. Abel Hans and Nancy Alwart Eric and Alex Bretsen Etienne Bruson Ian and Frances Dowdeswell Elisabeth and David Finch Debra Finlay David Garofalo Cathy Grant Mr. and Mrs. Sam Gudewill Hillary Haggan Paula and Doug Hart Hank and Janice Ketcham Dr. Marla Kiess Judi and David Korbin Sam and Anita Lee Doug and Teri Loughran The Lutsky Families Bruce and Margo MacDonald Alexandra Mauler-Steinmann and Michael Steinmann John S. McDonald AJ and Jason McLean Monique Mercier Roy Millen and Ruth Webber Mirhady Family Fund, held at Vancouver Foundation

André and Julie Molnar Fred R. Pletcher and Beverley G. Ellingson Vince and Noella Ready Joanne and Stanis Smith Mel and June Tanemura The Tuey Charitable Foundation Dean and Kelly Tweeddale Dr. Rosemary Wilkinson Anonymous (2) BENEFACTORS GIFTS FROM $3,500 TO $4,999 Ann Claire Angus Fund Fred Boyd Brown Fund, held at Vancouver Foundation Count Enrico and Countess Aline Dobrzensky Jill and Matt Tipping Fei Wong Anonymous (1) GIFTS FROM $2,500 TO $3,499 Jeff and Keiko Alexander Anako Foundation Nicholas Asimakopulos The Ken Birdsall Fund Dallas Brodie Dr. and Mrs. J. Deen Brosnan Marnie Carter Ms. Louise M. Cecil Eva and Doug Christopher Edward Colin and Alanna Nadeau Dave Cunningham and Katarina Osterlind Jean Donaldson Rafael and Miryam Filosof Ms. Judy Garner David and Julia Hodder Heather Holmes Olga Ilich

For more information about the PATRONS' CIRCLE and exclusive benefits associated with this program, please contact Mary Butterfield, Director, Individual & Legacy Giving at x238 or email mary@vancouversymphony.ca 52 604.684.9100 allegro


Herbert Jenkin Gordon and Kelly Johnson Signe Jurcic Don and Lou Laishley Bill and Risa Levine Violet Macdonald Dr. and Mrs. Nizar R. Makan M. Lois Milsom Joan Morris in loving memory of Dr. Hugh C. Morris Christine Nicolas Dr. Robert S. Rothwell Mr. Ken and Mrs. Patricia Shields Wallace and Gloria Shoemay Mrs. Mary Anne Sigal Arthur Toft in memory of Fred and Minnie Toft Mr. and Mrs. David H. Trischuk Denis Walker Michael Williams Dr. and Mrs. Edward Yeung Mrs. Guoxiang Zhou PATRONS GIFTS FROM $2,000 TO $2,499 P. Carnsew and D. Janzen Leslie Cliff and Mark Tindle Anne and Douglas Courtemanche Dolores de Paiva Ann Ehrcke and Michael Levy In Memory of Betty Howard Steven and Frances Huang

Find

C.V. Kent in memory of Vivian Jung Hugh and Judy Lindsay Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Menten George Pick and Santi Pelaez Jan and Ken Rea Maurice and Vi Roden Bella Tata Anonymous (4) GIFTS OF $1,500 TO $1,999 Olin and Suzanne Anton Gordon and Minke Armstrong Derek and Stella Atkins Mr. R. Paul and Mrs. Elizabeth Beckmann Roberta Lando Beiser Jay Biskupski and Catherine Imrie Joanne Boyd Mrs. May Brown, C.M., O.B.C. Dr. Kam and Mrs. Katie Cheung Mr. Justice Edward Chiasson and Mrs. Dorothy Chiasson Leanne Davis and Vern Griffiths Feisal Dedhar and Angela Stopa Barbara J. Dempsey Sharon F. Douglas Darren Downs and Jacqueline Harris Nancy and Alain Duncan Michael and Dana Freeman Dennis Friesen for Gwen Mrs. San Given Anna and Alan Gove

JOY

in making music

YO-YO MA with VSOSoM Sinfonietta

JOIN NOW:

John Hooge Marietta Hurst Michael and Estelle Jacobson Sharon Jeroski Amy Jiang Uri and Naomi Kolet Harold and Jenny Locke Harvey Loen and Lois Binder In tribute of late Johnny Loh Hank and Andrea Luck Nancy Morrison Mr. Cleveland Mullings Dal Richards Foundation, held at Vancouver Foundation Dr. William H. and Ruthie Ross Bernard Rowe and Annette Stark Mrs. Joan Scobell David and Cathy Scott Dr. Peter and Mrs. Sandra Stevenson-Moore Zelie and Vincent Tan L. Thom Garth and Lynette Thurber Nico and Linda Verbeek G. S. Webster James and Veronica Weinkam Dr. Brian Willoughby Eric and Shirley Wilson Dr. I. D. Woodhouse Nancy Wu Anonymous (3)

Take part in joyful learning and playing opportunities for ALL ages and abilities at the VSO School of Music.

LANG LANG with VSOSoM Pianists

vsoschoolofmusic.ca

• Classical, Jazz and World music • Private Lessons, group classes, ensembles and lecture series • Acclaimed faculty including members of the VSO

604.915.9300 allegro 53


CONCERT PROGRAM AIR CANADA MASTERWORKS DIAMOND | ORPHEUM, 8PM

SATURDAY & MONDAY, NOVEMBER 4 & 6

ANTHONY DEAN GRIFFEY

BRAMWELL TOVEY

UBC UNIVERSITY SINGERS WITH GRAEME LANGAGER

Bramwell Tovey conductor Susan Platts mezzo-soprano Anthony Dean Griffey tenor Nathan Berg baritone UBC University Singers & Choral Union Graeme Langager director

NATHAN BERG

SUSAN PLATTS

ELGAR The Dream of Gerontius, Op. 38 Part One I. Prelude II. Jesu, Maria—I am near to death III. Rouse thee, my fainting soul IV. Sanctus fortis, sanctus Deus V. Proficiscere, anima Christiana

Part Two I. I went to sleep II. It is a member of that family III. But hark! upon my sense comes a fierce hubbub IV. I see not those false spirits V. But hark! a grand mysterious harmony PRE-CONCERT TALKS VI. Thy judgment now is near Free to ticketholders, 7:05pm to 7:30pm, VII. I go before my judge VIII. Softly and gently, dearly-ransomed soul in the auditorium. VISIT THE SYMPHONY GIFT SHOP FOR CD SELECTIONS MASTERWORKS DIAMOND SERIES SPONSOR

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BRAMWELL TOVEY conductor Please refer to page 11 for a biography of Maestro Tovey.

SUSAN PLATTS mezzo-soprano Rolex-Prize-winning Mahler specialist Susan Platts enjoys international renown for performing the composer’s symphonies and song cycles, including recordings of the full and chamber versions of Das Lied von der Erde. She has appeared with the Baltimore, Seattle, Boston, Houston, Montreal, Milwaukee, Minnesota, Toronto, Colorado and London B.B.C. Symphonies; Philadelphia and Cleveland Orchestras; Malaysian Philharmonic, Royal Scottish National Orchestra, Tokyo Metropolitan Orchestra and Orchestre de Paris; and been welcomed at La Scala and New York’s Carnegie Hall. She has sung with Pacific Opera Victoria and the Vancouver Opera and recently made her Royal Opera House, Covent Garden debut as the Third Lady in Die Zauberflöte. The Canadian mezzo has given recitals at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., for the Ladies' Morning Musical Club in Montreal, and at the Frick Collection and on Lincoln Center “Art of the Song” series in New York City. Her first solo disc, of songs by Robert Schumann, Clara Schumann and Johannes Brahms on the ATMA label earned considerable critical acclaim.

ANTHONY DEAN GRIFFEY tenor American tenor Anthony Dean Griffey has captured critical and popular acclaim on opera, concert and recital stages around the world. Mr. Griffey has appeared in the world’s most prestigious opera houses including the Metropolitan Opera, San Francisco Opera, Lyric Opera of Chicago, Paris Opera, Teatro Comunale di Firenze, and more. He is particularly noted for his portrayal of the title role in Peter Grimes which has won him international acclaim, including in a new production at the Metropolitan Opera that was broadcast live in the company’s Met: Live in HD series and subsequently released on DVD. A celebrated concert performer, Mr. Griffey 56 allegro

appears regularly with many distinguished international orchestras and festivals, led by the leading conductors of today. He is a four time Grammy-winning recording artist with an extensive discography on DVD and compact disc. Mr. Griffey holds degrees from Wingate University, the Eastman School of Music, the Juilliard School and was a member of the Metropolitan Opera’s Lindemann Young Artists Development Program.

NATHAN BERG baritone A “tall, majestic bass” with “impeccable technique” and “a palpable presence on stage” Canadian bass-baritone Nathan Berg’s career has spanned a vast range of repertoire on the concert and operatic stage. His recent dramatic work has earned acclaim around the globe from the title role in Der fliegende Holländer in his Bolshoi Theatre debut, Alberich in Das Rheingold with Minnesota Opera, Doktor in Wozzeck with the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra. An incredible presence on the symphonic stage, this season Nathan Berg will perform Elgar’s The Dream of Gerontius with both the Melbourne and Vancouver symphony orchestras. He will also perform with conductor Hannu Lintu, first in Beethoven’s Missa Solemnis with the Finnish National Radio Orchestra, then with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra in Rachmaninoff’s The Bells. Another season highlight will be Detlev Glanert’s Requiem at the new Elbphilharmonie concert hall in Hamburg. Born in Saskatchewan, Nathan Berg studied in his native Canada, the United States, Paris and at the Guildhall School of Music, London, where he won the prestigious Gold Medal for Singers. nathanberg.com

UBC UNIVERSITY SINGERS & CHORAL UNION University Singers is the premier choral ensemble in the UBC School of Music. This 40-voice ensemble performs the most advanced and exciting music for chamber choir written in recent decades, as well as motets and other historically important


works. The University Singers also performs with orchestra annually, including such works as Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, Handel’s Messiah, and Brahms’ Requiem. The choir has won several awards, including the CBC National Choral Competition and the BBC International Choral Competition. The choir tours often, including local, North American, and international destinations. Previous choral experience, a strong ear, and music reading ability is encouraged for participation in this ensemble. The University Singers performs four feature concerts each year, as well as occasional run-out performances throughout the Vancouver area. The University Singers won first place among university choirs in the Choral Canada’s National Competition for Canadian Amateur Choirs in 2015. Choral Union is UBC’s largest choir. Boasting over 150 singers, the Choral Union performs major choral repertoire from beautiful pieces of Renaissance music to dynamic modern compositions. As well, the Choral Union performs with the UBC Symphony Orchestra each year, including works such as Mozart’s Requiem, and Orff’s Carmina Burana. This ensemble is comprised of both music majors and non-music majors. The Choral Union performs four concerts each year.

GRAEME LANGAGER director Dr. Graeme Langager is Director of Choral Activities at the UBC School of Music, and the Artistic Director and Conductor of the acclaimed Phoenix Chamber Choir. A native of Lethbridge, Alberta, Langager received the doctor of musical arts degree at the Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music and the masters degree at California State University, Long Beach. Langager returned to Vancouver in 2009 to take over the reigns as UBC’s Director of Choirs after a 15-year career in the US, with conducting positions in California, North Carolina, Ohio, and Arkansas. Langager is sought after as a guest conductor, choral clinician, and adjudicator, and is active as a composer and arranger.

Langager’s choirs have been invited to perform at major music conferences, including ACDA, MENC, NCCO, and IAJE. His choirs have performed throughout Europe and the United States including such prestigious venues as St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome, Stefansdom in Vienna, Notre Dame in Paris, St. Nicholas in Prague, and St. Stephen’s in Budapest.

SIR EDWARD ELGAR

b. Broadheath, England / June 2, 1857 d. Worcester, England / February 23, 1934

The Dream of Gerontius, Op. 38 Elgar first read The Dream of Gerontius, a poem by John Henry Newman (1801-1890) during the late 1870s. He quickly came to regard it very highly, both as literature and for its spiritual content. Virtually from first acquaintance, he wished to set it to music, but the right opportunity took a long time to present itself. In November 1898, the Birmingham Festival Committee finally supplied that stimulus. Its members offered Elgar a commission for a sacred choral work, to be performed at their organization’s next gathering, scheduled for the autumn of 1900. He accepted their request gladly, then set about finding a suitable subject. It was only after first considering the life of St. Augustine, and the teachings of Christ’s church, that it became clear that the time for him to work with his beloved Gerontius had at last arrived. He was aware that ten years earlier, no less a composer than Antonín Dvořák had considered setting the same verses, at the invitation of the same organization. The Czech master had been dissuaded from doing so, however because the poem was considered “too Catholic” for English audiences. Elgar’s staunch belief in his Catholic faith may well have increased his determination to make Gerontius his choice. Newman’s poem had been published in 1865, 24 years after he had become a Roman Catholic priest, and 14 years before he was elevated to the rank of Cardinal. Its subject is the Catholic view of allegro 57


the human soul, its worth and its destiny (including the concept of purgatory). As an upholder of traditional values, the poem was largely out of step with its time. In Elgar, the conservative, Roman Catholic English composer, it found its ideal musical advocate.

strongly to make amends for the shoddy première, led the next performance, with the Hallé orchestra and Chorus of Manchester, on March 12, 1902. It came off brilliantly. Within a few short years, Gerontius established itself as a cornerstone of English choral music.

He worked on his setting throughout the summer of 1900. At the head of the score he inscribed, as Bach often had, the letters A.M.D.G., standing for Ad maiorem Dei gloriam (To the greater glory of God). Elgar took special pains over Gerontius, considering it his most important creation to date. He completed it on August 3. On the final page he added a quotation from poet John Ruskin: “This is the best of me; for the rest, I ate, and drank, and slept, loved and hated, like another: my life was as the vapour and is not; but this I saw and knew; this, if anything of mine, is worth your memory.”

“He wished it to be an approachable, universally understandable work, representing the culminating drama which is shared by every human soul.”

The first performance took place two months later, on October 3. For a variety of reasons it proved a disaster. The major problem rested with the chorus. They were given insufficient time to learn and to understand so demanding, so innovative and so emotionally rich a score. To make matters worse, the eminent German conductor Hans Richter, who had directed the triumphant first performances of Elgar’s “Enigma” Variations the year before, had underestimated the new piece’s difficulties. He made considerable efforts during rehearsals, but was unable to save the day. Julius Buths, Music Director of the German city of Düsseldorf, came to the rescue. He had attended the première, and the music so impressed him that he took the full score back home with him. He conducted the second complete reading, on December 19, 1901. Preceded by intense and thorough rehearsals, it scored an enormous success for Elgar, completely reversing the fiasco of the première. This triumph on the continent spurred English performers to give Gerontius another chance. Hans Richter, wishing 58 allegro

Elgar was greatly concerned that his piece not be sanctimonious and emotionally remote, as so many sacred compositions had been. He wished it to be an approachable, universally understandable work, representing the culminating drama which is shared by every human soul. He wrote that Gerontius, the principal character (whose name derives from the Latin word for old age), is “a man like us, a sinner, a repentant one of course, but still no end of a worldly man in his life. Therefore I’ve not filled his part with church tunes and rubbish, but a good, healthy, full blooded Romanticism, remembered worldliness, so to speak. It is, I imagine, much more difficult to tear oneself away from a well-to-do world than from a cloister.” That element of earthliness helps forge a compelling link between the subject matter and a wide range of listeners. The music itself is quiet and gentle on the whole, a fact which throws its more dramatic moments – such as the chorus of demons and Gerontius’s glimpse of God – into sharp relief. Perhaps it is this understated approach, born of Elgar’s faith, that is the score’s most impressive feature. Those who hold such beliefs know that no grandiose gestures are needed to proclaim it.  ■ Program Notes © 2017 Don Anderson


CONCERT PROGRAM VSO CHAMBER PLAYERS |

ALAN AND GWENDOLINE PYATT HALL

DR. H.N. MACCORKINDALE STAGE, VSO SCHOOL OF MUSIC

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8 & 9 7:30PM SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12 2:00PM SCHUBERT & BRAHMS SCHUBERT Quartettsatz

Jae-Won Bang violin Ann Okagaito violin Tegen Davidge viola Zoltan Rozsnyai cello SCHUBERT Der Hirt auf dem Felsen (The Shepherd on the Rock)

Robyn Driedger-Klassen soprano Jeanette Jonquil clarinet Terence Dawson piano BRAHMS String Quartet No. 2 in A minor Jae-Won Bang violin Ann Okagaito violin Tegen Davidge viola Zoltan Rozsnyai cello

JEANETTE JONQUIL

ANN OKAGAITO

TEGEN DAVIDGE

ZOLTAN ROZSNYAI

VISIT THE SYMPHONY GIFT SHOP FOR CD SELECTIONS WITH SUPPORT FROM

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UPCOMING CONCERTS VSO AT THE MOVIES

JURASSIC PARK

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 7PM, ORPHEUM SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2PM, ORPHEUM Constantine Kitsopoulos conductor One of the most thrilling science fiction adventures ever made! Audiences can experience the full ground-breaking film as never before: projected in HD with the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra performing the magnificent John Williams score LIVE to picture. Welcome...to Jurassic Park!

A JANN ARDEN CHRISTMAS WITH THE VSO

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 6, 8PM, ORPHEUM William Rowson conductor Jann Arden singer Canada’s beloved pop diva Jann Arden brings her sensational voice and warm, witty personality to this Holiday-season extravaganza! Featured tunes include such timeless numbers as Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree, Silver Bells, It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year, and much more – all done the inimitable Jann Arden way. JANN ARDEN

VIVALDI'S FOUR SEASONS

FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 15 & 16, 8PM, CHAN CENTRE FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS, UBC SUNDAY DECEMBER 17, 2PM, MASSEY THEATRE, NEW WESTMINSTER Philippe Quint violin/leader Christie Reside flute*

PHILIPPE QUINT

HASSE Sinfonia in G minor TELEMANN Concerto for Flute and Violin in E minor* GEMINIANI/CORELLI Concerto grosso No. 12 in D minor, La folia VIVALDI Th  e Four Seasons

OTTO TAUSK WITH THE VSO

OTTO TAUSK

SATURDAY & MONDAY, JANUARY 13 & 15, 8PM, ORPHEUM SUNDAY, JANUARY 14, 2PM, ORPHEUM Otto Tausk conductor Harriet Krijgh cello* BERLIOZ Roman Carnival Overture DVOŘÁK Cello Concerto in B minor* BRAHMS S  ymphony No. 1 in C minor  Music Director Designate Maestro Otto Tausk returns to the VSO to conduct a beautiful program of classics.

FULL CONCERT LISTINGS AT

vancouversymphony.ca 604.876.3434


CONCERT PROGRAM MUSICALLY SPEAKING | ORPHEUM, 8PM

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11

WESTMINSTER SAVINGS SURREY NIGHTS | BELL PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE, 8PM

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13

BLAKE POULIOT

Alexandre Bloch conductor Blake Pouliot violin

MENDELSSOHN Ruy Blas: Overture BRUCH Scottish Fantasy, Op. 46

I. Introduction: Grave – Adagio cantabile II. Allegro III. Andante sostenuto IV. Finale: Allegro guerriero

I N T E R M ISSI O N

ALEXANDRE BLOCH

BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67

I. Allegro con brio II. Andante con moto III. Allegro IV. Allegro

VISIT THE SYMPHONY GIFT SHOP FOR CD SELECTIONS SURREY NIGHTS SERIES SPONSOR

THE VSO’S SURREY NIGHTS SERIES HAS BEEN ENDOWED BY A GENEROUS GIFT FROM WERNER AND HELGA HÖING.

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ALEXANDRE BLOCH conductor Admired for his enthusiasm and energy, Alexandre Bloch is Music Director of Orchestre National de Lille and Principal Guest Conductor of Düsseldorfer Symphoniker. The French conductor came to international attention as winner of Donatella Flick’s LSO Conducting Competition in October 2012, after which he served as Assistant Conductor at the London Symphony Orchestra. The 2017/18 season includes debuts with Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, return visits to Vancouver Symphony, Musikkollegium Winterthur, Royal Northern Sinfonia, Nordwestdeutsche Philharmonie, BBC National Orchestra of Wales, and visits to Musikalische Akademie in Mannheim and Orchestra of the National Centre for Performing Arts Beijing. Highlights of recent seasons include debuts with Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, Orchestre National d’Ile-de-France, Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, Orchestre Métropolitain and Brussels Philharmonic, and return visits to Scottish Chamber Orchestra and Seoul Philharmonic. In Dusseldorf he recently conducted l’Elisir d’Amore at the Deutsche Oper am Rhein, and with Lille, a concert version of Bizet’s Les Pêcheurs de Perles including at the Théâtre des Champs-Elysées.

BLAKE POULIOT violin Twenty-two-year-old Canadian violinist Blake Pouliot is the Grand Prize winner of the 2016 Orchestre Symphonique de Montréal Manulife Competition. A charismatic and multifaceted performer, Mr. Pouliot has garnered many accolades as a concert violinist, starred in two successful films, made numerous television appearances, and performed as keyboardist in an award-winning pop band. Since his solo orchestral debut with the Toronto Trinity Chamber Orchestra at age eleven, Mr. Pouliot has performed as soloist with orchestras including the Aspen Philharmonic Orchestra, Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra, Hamilton 62 allegro

Philharmonic Orchestra, Toronto Symphony Orchestra, and the Colburn Orchestra at Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles. He has performed with many of the world’s most celebrated conductors, including Sir Neville Marriner, Nicholas McGegan, Alain Trudel, and Hugh Wolff. Mr. Pouliot is currently studying with Robert Lipsett, the Jascha Heifetz Distinguished Violin Chair at the Colburn Conservatory. As first laureate of their 2015 competition, Mr. Pouliot performs on the 1729 Guarneri del Gesù, on generous loan from the Canada Council for the Arts Musical Instrument Bank. blakepouliot.com

FELIX MENDELSSOHN

b. Hamburg, Germany / February 3, 1809 d. Leipzig, Germany / November 4, 1847

Ruy Blas Overture, Op. 95 French author Victor Hugo’s play Ruy Blas premièred in Paris in 1838. Set during the seventeenth century, it centres on intrigues at the court of King Charles II of Spain . One year after its debut, the directors of the Leipzig Theatre Society decided to mount a production of it, and they invited Mendelssohn to compose incidental music for the occasion. Their request placed him in a dilemma. As he had seen the play and found it distasteful, he was reluctant to lend his musical support. He sent along a brief, inconsequential piece for female chorus and strings. The directors wrote him a warm letter of thanks. Since they assumed his reason for not contributing more music was lack of time, they expressed their apologies as well. Shamed, Mendelssohn decided to write an overture for Ruy Blas after all. It is a polished, melodious and dramatically effective scene‑setter.

MAX BRUCH

b. Cologne, Rhine Province / January 6, 1838 d. house in Berlin Friedenau / October 2, 1920

Scottish Fantasy, Op. 46 Concert and operatic music based on folk melodies became hugely popular in the mid-nineteenth century. Nationalism even inspired composers to set folk music from other lands. Bruch is a prime example. In


addition to the Scottish Fantasy, he created works derived from Swedish, Irish, Russian and Welsh materials. “As a rule, a good folk tune is more valuable than 200 created works of art,” he wrote. “I would never have come to anything in this world if I had not, since my twenty fourth year, studied the folk music of all nations with seriousness, perseverance, and unending interest. There is nothing to compare with the feeling, power, originality and beauty of the folk song...This is the route one should now take – here is the salvation of our unmelodic times...” He became acquainted with The Scots Musical Museum, an exhaustive collection of authentic melodies. The first fruits of this encounter were his Twelve Scottish Folk Songs for voice and piano, followed by the Scottish Fantasy, which he composed in Berlin during the winter of 1879–1880. He shaped it with the skills of a particular violin soloist in mind: the Spaniard Pablo de Sarasate, but it was another eminent soloist and colleague of Bruch’s who gave the première. Joseph Joachim played the first performance, under Bruch’s direction, in Liverpool, England on February 22, 1881. In addition to Bruch’s own, original themes, the fantasy makes use of traditional Scottish airs, some of which are known by several different names. First movement: Auld Rob Morris; second movement: Hey, the Dusty Miller; third movement: I’m a’ doun for lack o’ Johnnie; and fourth movement: Scots wha hae.

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN

b. Bonn, Germany / baptized December 17, 1770 d. Vienna, Austria / March 26, 1827

Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67 When Beethoven’s Third Symphony, the mighty “Eroica,” burst upon the world in 1805, it trumpeted that he was no longer content to imitate; from now on he would innovate. It broke new ground on many fronts: it runs twice as long as the average Classical symphony; introduces the funeral march as a symphonic movement; contains a scherzo of unprecedented vigour and formal innovation; and concludes with a set

of variations in which a naïve tune is raised to the same lofty plateau as the first three movements. He began sketching what would become his Fifth Symphony early in 1804. An overwhelming number of pressing deadlines, and difficulties in finalizing its formal layout led him to set it aside temporarily. After clearing the decks of various projects (including the Violin Concerto, the opera Fidelio and Piano Concerto No. 4), he completed the Fifth during the first months of 1808. It and the Sixth premièred at the same, all-Beethoven marathon concert in December 1808 (albeit in reverse order of their numbering). Another work dating from the intermediary period was Symphony No. 4, composed in 1807. It is, at least relatively speaking, a light-hearted and humorous work. It makes a fascinating pair with No. 3, launching a cycle of alternation in personality which would continue with Nos. 5 and 6, and Nos. 7 and 8.

“This is also, surely, the most intense, even obsessive first movement anyone had written up to that time.” The Fifth has perhaps the most familiar opening of any piece of classical orchestral music. This is also, surely, the most intense, even obsessive first movement anyone had written up to that time. Beethoven’s friend Anton Schindler, whose reminiscences are not always to be trusted, claimed that the composer pointed to the opening notes in the score and stated, “Thus fate knocks at the door!” That opening rhythm appears in almost every bar of the first movement. Whether listeners take the analogy that Schindler mentions literally or metaphorically, it is clear that Beethoven is addressing momentous concepts in this music. Recognizing the need to follow such a revolutionary tempest with something relaxed and traditional, in the second allegro 63


movement Beethoven offers a Haydnesque set of variations, cast as a nonchalant stroll punctuated with pompous fanfares. The third movement is a dark, dramatic scherzo. After the whispered opening on the strings, the horns introduce a bold theme, clearly related to the opening movement’s first subject. Later, Beethoven puts the lower strings through some spectacular paces. Composer Hector Berlioz compared them with “the gambols of a delighted elephant.”

“Then with heart-stirring suddenness, we emerge into the blazing sunlight of a glorious new dawn.” The scherzo’s closing measures, veiled in uncertainty, point to a tragic conclusion. In another act of symphonic innovation, Beethoven leads us straight on to the finale; the path lies through a tunnel, echoing eerily with the muffled, heart-like beat of

the timpani, the rhythm once again recalling the symphony’s opening motive. Then with heart-stirring suddenness, we emerge into the blazing sunlight of a glorious new dawn. Beethoven gives extra color and solidity to this exhilarating finale (which includes a reprise of the main scherzo theme) by bringing piccolo, trombones and contrabassoon into the symphonic orchestra for the first time. With this section, Beethoven and his listeners conclude an emotional journey from darkness to light, the first such expedition undertaken in a symphony. This sequence of moods has the power to stir audiences on a fundamental level, embracing them in a common sense of victory. It also holds out the promise of hope, a tonic whose necessity never fades. This generosity of spirit is the foundation stone of Beethoven’s reputation – and his immortality.  ■ Program Notes © 2017 Don Anderson

LET OUR GROUP ENTERTAIN YOUR GROUP!

GET A GROUP TOGETHER & SAVE: Groups of 10 or more receive DISCOUNTS and PREFERRED SEATING! CONTACT KATHERINE, GROUP SALES MANAGER AT

604.684.9100 EXT 252

groupsales@vancouversymphony.ca @VSOrchestra

64 allegro


THE STRADIVARIUS LEGACY CIRCLE stradivarius LEGACY CIRCLE

The Vancouver Symphony wishes to thank all those who have made arrangements to leave a bequest or planned gift in their will or estate plans. We are honoured to recognize you in your lifetime for your foresight, commitment and generosity.

George Abakhan Janet M. Allan Renate A. Anderson K.-Jane Baker Lorna Barr Dr. Vicky Bernstein Susan Boutwood Janice Brown Scott Brown Peter & Mary Brunold Nadia Campagnolo Ralph & Gillian Carder John Chapman Marylin P. Clark Dr. Philip Clement Mrs. Diana Gael Coomber Mr. and Mrs. G.A. Cooper Brigitte Daigle David & Valerie Davies Gloria Davies Julia Dodwell Sharon Douglas Michael L. Fish Jacklin Frangi Robert & Ann-Shirley Goodell

BEQUESTS

Marion Poliakoff Diane Ronan Louis & Rhona Rosen Bernard Rowe & Annette Stark L.S. Sawatsky Dorothy Shields Mary Anne Sigal Doris Smit Robert & Darlene Spevakow Elizabeth Tait Melvyn & June Tanemura Bella Tata Marsha & George Taylor Lillian J. Thom Tuey Family Trust Robert & Carol Tulk David & Ruth Turnbull Ruth Warren Tessa Wilson Kelley Wong Bob Wood in memory of my parents, John & Hazel Wood Anonymous (4)

The Vancouver Symphony has received bequests since 2000 from the following individuals for which we extend our sincere gratitude.

Bequests to the Vancouver Symphony Foundation $500,000 or more Jim and Edith le Nobel Kathleen Margaret Mann $100,000 or more Brian William Dunlop Steve Floris Howard and Jean Mann John Rand Hermann and Erika Stölting $50,000 or more Winslow Bennett Margaret Jean Paquin Rachel Tancred Rout Mary Flavelle Stewart $25,000 or more Dorothy Freda Bailey Phyllis Celia Fisher Margot Lynn McKenzie $10,000 or more Cecilia & Bruce Carter The Kitty Heller Alter Ego Trust Dorothy Elizabeth Hilton Anna Ruth Leith Kaye Leaney $5,000 or more Anne de Barrett Allwork Anne Claire Angus Clarice Marjory Bankes Lawrence M. Carlson Muriel F. Gilchrist J. Stuart Keate

Lorraine Grescoe James Harcott W. Neil Harcourt in memory of Frank N. Harcourt Renate R. Huxtable Wayne & Leslie Ann Ingram Margaret Irving Estelle & Michael Jacobson Mary Jordan Lorna Jean Klohn Dorothy Kuva Clive Langley Hugh & Judy Lindsay Nancy Macdonald Dorothy MacLeod Robert Maxwell Irene McEwen Piet Meyerhof Paul Richard Moritz Barbara Morris Liisa O’Hara Martin O’Connor Sue M. Okuda Josephine Pegler Eleanor Phillips

Gerald Nordheimer Audrey M. Piggot Elisabeth Schipizky Ronald Albert Timmis Mary Isabel Whyte Jan Wolf Wynand $1,000 or more Eleanor Doke Caldwell Jean Ethel Holler Bernard Van Snellenberg Bequests to the Vancouver Symphony Society $250,000 or more Ruth Ellen Baldwin $100,000 or more Reta Alden Dorothy Jane Boyce Roy Joseph Fietsch Hector MacKay Valerie Taggart $50,000 or more Clayton K. Williams Fritz Ziegler $25,000 or more Dorothy M. Grant Lillian Erva Hawkins Florence Elizabeth Kavanagh Mary Fassenden Law Geraldine Oldfield Alice Rumball Dr. Barbara Iola Stafford Anne Ethel Stevens Dorothy Ethel Williams

$10,000 or more Dr. Sherold Fishman John Devereux Fitz-Gerald Dorothea Leuchters Verna Noble Robert V. Osokin Elizabeth Jean Proven Freda Margaret Rush Doris Kathleen Skelton Sharone Young $5,000 or more Kathleen Grace Boyle Raymond John Casson Heather Gillis Alfred Knowles Gordon McConkey Evelyn Ann van der Veen Joan Marion Wasson $1,000 or more Phyllis Victoria Ethel Bailly Joyce Basham Doris May Bond Kathleen Mary DeClerq Betty Dunhaver Jean Haszard Grace Barbara Isobel Hooper Lewis Wilkinson Hunter Marjorie Lucille Keddy Annie Velma Pickell Jean Semple Kathleen Stemshorn Wilhelmina Stobie Marion Kathleen Laurette Whyte

For further information on leaving a LEGACY gift to the VSO please contact Mary Butterfield, Director, Individual & Legacy Giving at 604.684.9100 x238 or email mary@vancouversymphony.ca allegro 65


VANCOUVER SYMPHONY PARTNERS

The Vancouver Symphony Orchestra gratefully acknowledges the generosity of the following Government Agencies, Corporations and Foundations that have made a financial contribution through sponsorship, charitable donation or participation in a Special Event.

VANCOUVER SYMPHONY FOUNDATION

SERIES SPONSORS

CONCERT AND SPECIAL EVENT SPONSORS

MARTHA LOU HENLEY CHARITABLE FOUNDATION

Poly Culture North America 保


EDUCATION AND COMMUNITY OUTREACH SPONSORS AND PARTNERS PREMIER EDUCATION PARTNER

MEDIA PARTNERS

BC TOUR SPONSORS

$500,000+ Vancouver Symphony Foundation Endowment Fund VSO Patrons’ Circle $250,000+ Friends of the Vancouver Symphony Vancouver Sun $150,000+ Alan and Gwendoline Pyatt Foundation TELUS Corporation $100,000+ Goldcorp Inc. $60,000+ iA Financial Group Vancouver Foundation $50,000+ Air Canada BMO Financial Group City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services CKNW Georgia Straight QM-FM $40,000+ London Drugs RBC Foundation Vancouver Symphony Volunteers $30,000+ PwC $20,000+ Avigilon BC Lottery Corp. Borden Ladner Gervais LLP

McGrane-Pearson Endowment Fund Diane Hodgins AJ McLean

The Chan Endowment Fund of UBC CIBC Concord Pacific Developments Inc. Deloitte The McLean Group Martha Lou Henley Charitable Foundation Mercedes-Benz Vancouver Area Retail Group Origin Organic Farms Osler, Hoskin & Harcourt LLP Poly Culture North America Rogers Group Financial Scotia Wealth Management TD Bank Group Wesbild Holdings Limited Westminster Savings Anonymous (1) $10,000+ Blake, Cassels & Graydon LLP Canadian Western Bank Century Group Craftsman Collision Ernst & Young LLP Great-West Life, London Life and Canada Life Holland America Line Inc. Hugh Davidson Fund through the Victoria Foundation Intergulf Development Group The Kingswood Group of Companies KPMG LLP Lawson Lundell LLP MacDonald Development Corporation McCarthy Tétrault LLP

Montecristo Jewellers Montridge Advisory Group Pacific Surgical Spectra Energy Sun Life Financial Terus Construction Ltd. Time & Gold Tom Lee Music Upright Decor Rentals and Event Design Visual College of Art and Design Wall Financial Corporation Wheaton Precious Metals $5,000+ Anthem Properties Beedie Development Group Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP Centerplate at Vancouver Convention Centre Delphos Investments Inc. Dentons Canada LLP Element Lifestyle Retirement Genus Capital Management Grosvenor Americas Hamber Foundation HSBC Bank Canada Image Group Inc. Innovation Lighting Korn Ferry Ledcor Group Macdonald Development Corporation Marin Investments Limited Dr. Tom Moonen Inc. Nordstrom Norton Rose Fulbright Canada LLP Odlum Brown Limited

Alexandra Mauler-Steinmann and Michael Steinmann Fred Pletcher Fred Withers and Kathy Jones Jill Tipping Opal by element Pan American Silver RBC Royal Bank RBC PH&N Investment Counsel Inc. Ready and Korbin, Arbitrators Reliance Properties Scotia Wealth Management — Greyell Portfolio Management Stantec Consulting Stikeman Elliott LLP TD Wealth Tim Wyman, TD Wealth UBS Bank (Canada) Wilson M. Beck Insurance $2,500+ The Collective You Face Of Today INF Influencer Agency Inc. and Gillian Segal Design Nesters Market Yaletown PARTYSKIRTS SOCAN Foundation Tree of Life (Walkers Shortbread) Windsor Plywood Foundation Xibita $1,000+ BFL Canada Bing Thom Architects Cibo Trattoria Ethical Bean Coffee Gearforce Granville Island Florist The Lazy Gourmet Norburn Lighting & Bath Centre Windsor Plywood Foundation ■

For more information about the VSO Corporate Partners Programs and the exclusive benefits associated with this program contact Jason Hulbert, Manager Corporate Programs 604.684.9100 x260 or email jason.hulbert@vancouversymphony.ca


AT THE CONCERT CONCERT COURTESIES

For your enjoyment, and the enjoyment of others, please remember concert etiquette. Talking, coughing, leaning over the balcony railings, unwrapping candies, and the wearing of strong perfume may disturb the performers as well as other audience members.

LATECOMERS

Ushers will escort latecomers into the auditorium at a suitable break in the performance chosen by the conductor. Patrons who leave the auditorium during the performance will not be re-admitted until a suitable break in the performance.

HEARING-ASSIST SYSTEMS

Hearing-impaired patrons may borrow complimentary Sennheiser Infrared Hearing System headsets, available at the coat-check in the Orpheum Theatre only, after leaving a driver’s licence or credit card. PROGRAM, GUEST ARTISTS AND/OR PROGRAM ORDER ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.

CELL PHONES, PAGERS, DIGITAL WATCHES

Please turn off cell phones and ensure that digital watches do not sound during performances. Doctors and other professionals expecting calls are asked to please leave personal pagers, telephones and seat locations at the coat check.

CAMERAS, RECORDING EQUIPMENT

Photography and video/audio recording of any kind are prohibited during the performance. Pictures taken pre-concert, at intermission, and post-concert are encouraged. Please feel free to tweet and post to Facebook or Instagram preconcert, during intermission or after the concert @VSOrchestra. During the performance, please do not use your mobile device in any way.

SMOKING AND SCENTS

All venues are non-smoking and scent-free environments.

VANCOUVER SYMPHONY ADMINISTRATION 604.684.9100 Kelly Tweeddale, President, VSO & VSO School of Music Mehgan Atchison, Executive Assistant Finance & Administration: Mary-Ann Moir, Vice-President, Finance & Administration Debra Marcus, Director, Information Technology & Human Resources Diane Chen Liu, Accountant Ray Wang, Payroll Clerk & IT Assistant Marketing, Sales & Customer Service: Alan Gove, Vice-President, Marketing & Sales; Matthew Baird, Public Relations Manager & Assistant to the Music Director Elyse Bannerman, Marketing Coordinator Manager, Gift Shop & Volunteers

Estelle and Michael Jacobson Chair

Anna Gove, Editor & Publisher, Allegro Magazine Katherine Houang, Group Sales & Special Ticket Services Kenneth Livingstone, Database Manager Robert Rose, Front of House Coordinator Cameron Rowe, Director, Audience & Ticket Services Customer Service Representatives: Jason Ho and Audrey Ling, Senior Customer Service Representatives Kathy Siu, Concert Shift Captain Fiona Li Anthony Soon Rati Arora Jade McDonald Mark Sutherland Taylor Beaumont Xin-Xuan Song Shawn Lau

68 allegro

Development: Leanne Davis, Vice-President, Chief Development Officer Pegah Behnammoradi, Development Officer, Special Projects Rochelle Blaak-Herron, Development Assistant Mary Butterfield, Director, Individual & Legacy Giving Jason Hulbert, Manager, Corporate Programs Kate Lucas, Director, Annual Giving § Natalina MacLeod, 100th Anniversary Campaign Director Dawn Nash, Stewardship Officer Ann True, Development Officer, Direct Response Lauren Watson, Manager, Annual Giving Matheus Ferreira, Special Projects Assistant Artistic Operations & Education: Joanne Harada, Vice-President, Artistic Operations & Education Alex Clark, Assistant Librarian & Artistic Operations Assistant Kaylie Hanna, Artistic Operations & Education Assistant Sarah Jacques, Operations Manager Ryan Kett, Artistic Operations & Education Assistant Minella F. Lacson, Music Librarian Ryan Purchase, Orchestra Personnel Manager Christin Reardon MacLellan, Director of Education & Community Programmes

Ken & Patricia Shields Chair

Duncan Watts-Grant, Community Engagement Specialist Tracie Yee, Artistic Operations Associate § Leave of Absence The Vancouver Symphony Society is grateful to the ALAN AND GWENDOLINE PYATT FOUNDATION for generously providing its Administrative Offices.


VANCOUVER SYMPHONY FOUNDATION

Ensure the VSO’s future with a special gift to the Vancouver Symphony Foundation, established to secure the long term success of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra. The Vancouver Symphony family extends its sincere thanks to these donors whose gifts will ensure that the VSO remains a strong and vital force in our community long into the future. $4,000,000 or more Government of Canada through the Department of Canadian Heritage Endowment Incentives Program

Michael and Estelle Jacobson S.K. Lee in memory of Mrs. Cheng Koon Lee Katherine Lu in memory of Professors Mr. and Mrs. Ngou Kang $1,000,000 or more McGrane-Pearson Endowment Fund Ron and Ardelle Cliff Nancy and Peter Paul Saunders Martha Lou Henley, C.M. Ken and Patricia Shields Werner (Vern) and Helga Höing Whittall Family Fund William and Irene McEwen Fund $50,000 or more Province of BC through the BC Arts Adera Development Corporation Renaissance Fund under the Winslow and Betsy Bennett stewardship of the Vancouver The Bruendl Foundation Foundation Etienne Bruson Alan and Gwendoline Pyatt Mary Ann Clark The Jim Pattison Foundation Sam and Anita Lee $500,000 or more Alexandra Mauler-Steinmann and Wayne & Leslie Ann Ingram Michael Steinmann Leon and Joan Tuey $250,000 or more Rosemarie Wertschek, Q.C. Carter (Family) Deux Mille Foundation Mr. Hassan and $25,000 or more Mrs. Nezhat Khosrowshahi Jeff and Keiko Alexander Sheahan and Gerald McGavin, C.M., O.B.C. Kathy and Stephen Bellringer The Tong and Geraldine Louie Brazfin Investments Ltd. Family Foundation Robert G. Brodie and K. Suzanne Brodie Arthur H. Willms Family Mrs. May Brown, C.M., O.B.C. Eva and Doug Christopher $100,000 or more Mrs. Margaret M. Duncan Mary and Gordon Christopher Cathy Grant Janey Gudewill and Peter Cherniavsky Mollie Massie and Hein Poulus In memory of their Father Mrs. Gordon T. Southam, C.M. Jan Cherniavsky and Grandmother Maestro Bramwell Tovey and Mrs. B.T. Rogers Mrs. Lana Penner-Tovey Malcolm Hayes and Lester Soo

$10,000 or more Mrs. Marti Barregar Mrs. Geraldine Biely K. Taryn Brodie Douglas and Marie-Elle Carrothers Mr. Justice Edward Chiasson and Mrs. Dorothy Chiasson Daniella and John Icke Dr. Marla Kiess Dan and Trudy Pekarsky Bob and Paulette Reid Joanne and Stanis Smith Nancy and Robert Stewart Beverley and Eric Watt Anonymous (2) $5,000 or more Charles and Barbara Filewych Stephen F. Graf Edwina and Paul Heller Marietta Hurst Kaatza Foundation Prof. Kin Lo Rex and Joanne McLennan Chantal O’Neil and Colin Erb Marion L. Pearson and James M. Orr In Memory of Pauline Summers Melvyn and June Tanemura Bella Tata/Zarine Dastur: In Memory of Shiring (Kermani) and Dali Tata Nico and Linda Verbeek Anonymous (1)

The Vancouver Symphony gratefully acknowledges the support of those donors who have made a commitment of up to $5,000 to the Vancouver Symphony Foundation. Regretfully, space limitations prevent a complete listing.

Tax creditable gifts of cash, securities and planned gifts are gratefully received and your gift is enhanced with matching funds from the Federal Government.

Please call Leanne Davis, Vice President, Chief Development Officer at 604.684.9100 x 236 or email leanne@vancouversymphony.ca to learn more. allegro 69


VANCOUVER SYMPHONY SOCIETY BOARD OF DIRECTORS Debra Finlay

Hein Poulus, Q.C.

Chief Development Officer (Ret.) Ernst & Young LLP

Elisabeth Finch

Stanis Smith

Judith Korbin, Vice Chair

David Garofalo

Board Executive Committee

Partner, McCarthy Tetrault LLP

Fred Withers, Chair

Partner, Stikeman Elliott LLP

Partner, PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

Arbitrator

Executive Vice President, Buildings, Stantec

Melvyn R.T. Tanemura

President, Goldcorp

Etienne Bruson, Treasurer

M.R.T. Tanemura CPA Inc.

Doug Hart

Managing Partner, BC, Deloitte

Jill Tipping

Vice President, Sales & Officer (Ret.) Industrial Alliance Pacific Life Insurance

Diane Hodgins, Secretary

Director, Century Group Lands Corporation

Vice President, Operations & CFO, Schneider Electric

Sam Lee

Managing Director, Global Mining Group CIBC World Markets

Michael L. Fish

President, Pacific Surgical Limited

Musician Representatives Larry Knopp Principal Trumpet

AJ McLean

Cathy Grant

President, Cathy Grant Inc. Real Estate Sales and Marketing Specialist

Lindsay Hall

Portfolio Manager, McLean Group

Vern Griffiths Principal Percussion

Alexandra Mauler

Honorary Life President

President, AMS Petrography Ltd.

Senior Vice-President & CFO Hecla Mining Company

Ronald Laird Cliff, C.M.

Monique Mercier

Executive Vice President, Corporate Affairs, Telus Corporation

Board Members

Roy Millen

Eric Bretsen

Partner, Blake, Cassels & Graydon LLP

Partner, International Tax Services Ernst & Young LLP

Fred Pletcher

Honorary Life Vice-Presidents

Nezhat Khosrowshahi Gerald A.B. McGavin, C.M., O.B.C. Ronald N. Stern Arthur H. Willms

Partner, Chair of the National Mining Group Borden Ladner Gervais LLP

Doug Christopher

President, Montrose Development Ltd.

VANCOUVER SYMPHONY FOUNDATION BOARD OF TRUSTEES Ronald Laird Cliff, C.M., Chair Marnie Carter Richard Mew

Irene McEwen Gerald A.B. McGavin, C.M., O.B.C. Hein Poulus, Q.C.

Alan Pyatt Arthur H. Willms

Fred Withers Tim Wyman

VSO SCHOOL OF MUSIC SOCIETY Board of Directors

Gordon R. Johnson, Chair Dave Cunningham Claire Hunter Fiona Lin Hein Poulus, Q.C. Patricia Shields

Eric Watt Arthur H. Willms Administration

Ms. Curtis Pendleton Executive Director

Louise Ironside Assistant Director

Rob Fulton

Operations & Facilities Manager

Wesley Jay

Rental Coordinator

Jose Valenzuela Accountant

Scott Jeffrey Registrar

Anna Chen

Assistant Registrar & Chinese Language Student Services

Cathy Savard

Payroll/Accounts Payable

VANCOUVER SYMPHONY VOLUNTEER COUNCIL 2017/2018 Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paddy Aiken Vice-Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Azmina Manji Secretary/Treasurer . . . . . . Marlies Wagner Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Candace Bailes Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noelene Buckner Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Beryl Ferguson Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jean Pirie Immediate Past Chair . . . . . . Nancy Wu

Scheduling Gift Shop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barbara Morris Reception Shifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gloria Davies Tea & Trumpets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marlene Strain Special Events Symphony of Style 2017 . . . . Paddy Aiken Azmina Manji Holland America Luncheon 2017 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marlies Wagner

Membership Volunteer Hours . . . . . . . . Sheila Foley Manager, Gift Shop and Volunteer Resources volunteers@vancouversymphony.ca Assistant Gift Shop Manager Robert Rose

Allegro contact and advertising enquiries: allegro@vancouversymphony.ca / Allegro staff: published by The Vancouver Symphony Society / editor publisher: Anna Gove / orchestra photo credit: Johnathon Vaughn / orchestra photo credit: Albert Law / art direction, design & production: bay6 creative inc. Printed in Canada by Web Impressions Ltd. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written consent is prohibited. Contents copyrighted by the Vancouver Symphony, with the exception of material written by contributors.

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17/18 VSO Allegro Issue #1  
17/18 VSO Allegro Issue #1  
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