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WEDNESDAY

July 2 2014 Vol. 105 No. 53

OPINION 10

Geller on ‘farm’ taxes THEATRE 18

Serving up nostalgia WORLD CUP 20

Going Deutsch There’s more online at

vancourier.com MIDWEEK EDITION

THE VOICE of VANCOUVER NEIGHBOURHOODS since 1908

ACCOMPANIED MINOR Dan Minor of The Vaudevillians performs a number at the South Granville Seniors Centre during its annual Strawberry Tea last Friday afternoon. See related story on page 12. See more photos at vancourier.com or scan this page with the Layar app. PHOTO REBECCA BLISSETT

Port racket rankles residents

Noise tops list of complaints against Port MetroVancouver Naoibh O’Connor

noconnor@vancourier.com

Ken Lyotier can hear a deep, oscillating noise that goes on 24 hours a day when ships are in Port Metro Vancouver from his home at the corner of Alexander and Columbia streets. “It’s deep and vibrating and gets right into your bones,” he told the Courier, adding he suspects it comes from generators. Lyotier, a 67-year-old who’s lived in the neighbourhood since 1986, complained to the Port and recently he hasn’t heard the noise nearly as much, but he said activity at the

Port produces a “whole host” of other noises, which range from sounds from loudspeakers to warning beeps from vehicles, and that it’s been increasing steadily over the years. “I totally agree that we live in a very noisy world but I don’t totally agree that we should just accept it forever — that there’s going to be a never-ending increase in the volume of noise in our world and in our dense urban environment,” he said. “We need to be thinking about how we work to reduce noise and think about how we create an environment where people can live and work together with some sense of sanity and health.” Lyotier isn’t alone in his concerns — noise

complaints topped the list of issues raised at a Port MetroVancouver community meeting hosted byVancouver East MP Libby Davies at Hastings Community Centre last week. A couple of people brought audio recordings to illustrate the racket they put up with. Such complaints often reach Davies’ office because the Port is on federal land and isn’t subject to Vancouver noise regulations. The Port acknowledges says it’s trying to address the issue. It recently installed four noise monitors on the south shore and another four on the north shore.The port plans to make information from the monitors available on its website and it antici-

pates the monitors will help understand areas where it needs to focus to help reduce noise, and where it is safe to do so. (Certain sounds are required for worker safety, such as beeping when vehicles are backing up, and ships are required to sound horns during particular manoeuvres.) “Port Metro Vancouver is Canada’s largest and most diversified port that operates 24 hours a day. As a result of residential communities located adjacent to industrial operations, noise complaints remain the number one complaint from residents,” the Port stated in an email to the Courier. Continued on page 7


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W E DN E SDAY, J U LY 2 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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News

Happy hour changes cheered by pub owners Jennifer Thuncher

Thuncher@shaw.ca

On the first official weekend that many bars and pubs in Vancouver instituted happy hour specials, patrons and bar keeps seemed, well, happy. On June 20 the provincial government caught up to provinces in the rest of Canada when it relaxed liquor laws to allow licensed bars and restaurants to change drink prices over the course of a day.The change also came with new minimum drink pricing. Andy Gillooley, a British expatriate and fan of the pint, was thrilled he can finally have a cheap brew at his favourite Vancouver watering hole, the Butcher and Bullock, where he regularly gathers with fellow Liverpool countrymen. “Coming from Britain, it seems like it is a step forward in many respects. Obviously we are a little bit more laid back about things like that,” said Gillooley, 31, a marketer who managed pubs in Liverpool.

Donnelly Group director of marketing Damon Holowchak enjoys happy hour at The Blackbird. PHOTO ROB NEWELL

“Vancouver is an expensive place to have a drink at the best of times and it means now we can get out and just enjoy a quiet pint,” he said. According to Jeff Donnelly, founder of the Donnelly Group, which operates 14 pubs in Vancouver including the Butcher and Bullock,

the most important result of the relaxation of the rules may be a shift in the culture of drinking in the city. “You never want to mention No Fun City, if you don’t have to, but maybe this will take us out of that a little bit,” he told the Courier over the phone.

He thinks happy hours will encourage more after work parties. “Welcome to the 21st century, I guess,” he said with a laugh. Donnelly isn’t concerned more relaxed rules promote irresponsible drinking. “This has been seen and

studied and research has been done on this all over the world, the more relaxed they are with the laws, the more relaxed people are,” he said. “In Europe kids start drinking at 14.Vancouver riots because we hold on to them so tight that when we finally let them go, everyone

goes crazy.” Donnelly said for his pubs, which now offer Happy Hour Prohibition is Over specials — $3 beers, wines and highballs from 3 to 6 p.m. — the change will likely mean hiring more staff and for customers it will mean being able to try higher quality drinks at lower prices. Donnelly said while he couldn’t speak for bars in the suburbs, he didn’t think bars in Vancouver would charge more for beer to meet the government’s new minimum pricing, as has been claimed by some, including NDP liquor-policy critic and Vancouver-Hastings MLA Shane Simpson. Donnelly admits some city bars may take advantage of the new cheaper price allowances and offer drinks at a reduced rate for an extended period as a way to lure business from other pubs, but he isn’t worried about a race to the bottom in liquor pricing. “I think everyone is going to try whatever they can try and they are allowed to do that,” he said. twitter.com/thuncher

“It was Peter Rabbit that taught me to love good books.” Few things in life are more rewarding than a thirst for knowledge. At Tapestry Retirement Communities, we provide you with exciting opportunities to continue learning and stimulate your imagination. Whether it’s attending our seminars and classes, discovering new hobbies, or pursuing cultural and volunteer activities in the local community, Tapestry offers the encouragement and support you need to help keep you sharp. Call us today and see what kind of individualized programs we can offer to help keep your body, mind, and spirit healthy, vibrant, and young at heart. Martha Krinsky sharing the giſt of reading

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, J U LY 2 , 2 0 1 4

News

SUMMER RUNWAY OPERATIONS AT YVR SOUTH RUNWAY MAINTENANCE

July 4 – August 1, 2014 9:00 p.m. – 7:00 a.m.

Starting July 4th, the south runway will be closed nightly at Vancouver International Airport (YVR) for annual runway maintenance and repairs. The north runway will be used for departures and arrivals during these closures. Up-to-date information about the closures will be available at www.yvr.ca/noise. We appreciate your support and thank you for your ongoing patience as we continue to maintain the highest safety standards at YVR. For more information email community_relations@yvr.ca or phone 604.207.7097.

YVR.CA

Want to keep up with the Courier online? It’s easy. Follow us on Twitter at @VanCourierNews

Our House in the middle of the streets Christopher Cheung

chrischcheung@hotmail.com

Seventy-seven-year-old Norm Sharkey roller-skates 50 kilometres along the Stanley Park seawall every weekday morning. Sharkey started the Wheels 4 Freedom fundraiser April 28 and plans to skate the length of a cross-country journey. He is raising money to fund another journey, the return of a communal house for recovering addicts to Vancouver. A former addict and now 43 years sober, Sharkey is the founder and program director of the Our House West Coast Society, a nonprofit that helps recovering addicts through communal living.The program was based in a house on Union Street but was sold as it required expensive repairs. The residents were relocated to a house in Surrey June 2013. Sharkey joined the military in his early adult life and drank his way through a UN peacekeeping tour in the Middle East and the Congo. He was released with an honourable discharge and ended up at unique facility near Montreal that helped him recover. Residents with a desire to get clean lived in a house

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beside a working farm. He started Our House in Ottawa in the ’70s, the city’s first drug recovery program. “People I’ve met living on the street have not really had the best of family lives,” said Sharkey, “so that’s the big thing we tried to pattern the house after.” Sharkey visited Vancouver in 2004 and has stayed on the West Coast since. “Once I dropped my rollerblades and got on the seawall, I said I got to move here,” said Sharkey. He decided the city had a need for the program after speaking to some individuals on theWest End who said they would consider getting clean if they had a place to live.

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Norm Sharkey rollerblades 50 km each day.

Weekday sessions at Our House run as long or as short as residents need to talk. Addicts who relapse or use are not asked to leave the program as it is understood that getting clean isn’t something that happens overnight.There is no minimum or maximum time required for stay and Our House tries to make room for new individuals when able. The Surrey location has 10 individuals living together. Sharkey says the program is no different than Vancouver’s, but he wants to be near individuals in need. “We want to get back to where we started off, talking to people wrapped up in blankets on the streets.” Samantha Andrews, public relations spokesperson and former resident of Our House, hopes they will be able to maintain two sites for different purposes. “Surrey is away from the temptation, away from Main and Hastings,” said Andrews. “Vancouver is where there are more jobs and schools, more resources for them to tap into.” The Annual Our House Roll-a-Thon runs July 16 at Second Beach at 10 a.m. for interested bikers and skaters and those who wish to get acquainted with Our House. A barbecue will follow. twitter.com/chrischcheung

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The English Language Institute is recruiting English-speaking families to host international students for August 2014. You must live within a 40-minute bus ride to UBC and be willing to include students in daily family activities. Families receive $32 per night.

eli.ubc.ca/homestay 604.822.1536


W E DN E SDAY, J U LY 2 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

News Cops apologize for mistaken identity 12TH & CAMBIE Mike Howell

mhowell@vancourier.com

I know for a fact there are people in this world who happen to be lucky enough to have the same first name and surname as yours truly. Thankfully, none of those guys live on my street. I tell you this to begin a tale of a Vancouver resident who coincidentally lives on the same street as a guy who shares the same name. What are the chances, right? Let’s call them Guy A and Guy B. Turns out Guy A had an interest in volunteering at the Hastings-Sunrise community policing centre. So he applied to volunteer. Unfortunately, the Vancouver Police Department rejected his application. Guy A wanted to know why, so he asked and no reason was given. So he made a request under the Freedom of

Information and Protection of Privacy Act to find out. He attached a copy of his driver’s licence to the form to help with the search. He received a letter but, again, received no answer as to why he was rejected. Subsequently, he wrote a letter asking the VPD for all records and documents related to him. He hit the motherlode, he thought, when he received a package that contained 11 pages of documents. But guess what? The documents were all related to his neighbour, Guy B, who happens to have a criminal record. There was nothing in the package about Guy A, let alone an explanation of why he didn’t get the volunteer gig at the community policing centre. And, yes, he was more than a little upset. Here’s an excerpt of a letter he wrote to the police board: “It is appalling to discover that my identity is tied to a criminal, un-

knowingly. How can this happen in today’s society with all the security and technology available? Who is going to be held responsible, accountable and liable for this sordid mess?” He went on to say the mix-up by the VPD caused him considerable stress, anxiety and loss of enjoyment of life. He added that “I have always been a good citizen and consider myself law abiding.” So what happened? According to VPD senior staffer Dawna Marshall-Cope, a mistake occurred in the department’s information and privacy unit when someone forgot to match the driver’s licence with Guy A’s information request. Though Guy A and Guy B share the same name, live on the same street and each have two of the same digits in their address, they were actually born on different dates. “Had it have been checked on the driver’s licence, which we need

to process a request, it wouldn’t have happened,” Marshall-Cope told the police board at its June 19 meeting. “So it was a human error, it’s not a systemic error. It was very unfortunate. We treat it very, very seriously.” Marshall-Cope said the department checked to ensure Guy A’s information wasn’t circulated to anybody else, including Guy B. The VPD also requested Guy A return Guy B’s information. She said the VPD has apologized verbally and in writing to Guy A and notified Guy B about the mistake; hmmm, wonder what his reaction was? “It was a mistake and I don’t think there needs to be a change to any of our policies or systems,” Marshall-Cope added. Guy A, meanwhile, still doesn’t know why he didn’t get the volunteer gig at the community policing centre. And citing privacy reasons, the department is not going to tell me, either. twitter.com/Howellings

A5

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A6

THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, J U LY 2 , 2 0 1 4

Kidding Around

Professional Gymnasiums Offer a Safe Environment

If you have ever watched children participating in a gymnastics class you will already know that apart from it being a great physical outlet, it’s a lot of fun. But what you may not know is that it is one of the most comprehensive foundation “lifestyle exercise programs” available to children - building strength, courage, flexibility, speed, balance, coordination, power, respect and discipline, preparing them for any sport and life.

Professional gymnasiums, such as Vancouver Phoenix Gymnastics offer a safe environment with professional coaches, an abundance of equipment, padded mats and foam pits where a child can be challenged and have fun, at the same time learn new skills safely.

logical extension of lessons in discipline and social skills such as listening, taking turns, following directions, working independently, being quiet, respecting the coach and others students, create happy children in a fun learning environment.

Learning to perform in front of others is probably the most overlooked lesson that children learn in gymnastics. They are taught that performance is simply part of life as they build up their confidence in their ability to do their best when others are watching; they learn to embrace Research suggests a strong correlation and live it.

Many of the benefits from participating in gymnastics are NOT directly related to learning gymnastics skills, however, through a child’s participation they will increase in many developmental areas that between physically fit children and will help them become a academic achievement happier and more content All children benefit child. Research suggests from participation in a strong correlation Gymnastics so get your between physically fit children child involved in this fun and As a child takes the steps and and academic achievement. educational sport that can set learns the skills they develop Every time a child participates them up for life. confidence in their abilities, in a gymnastics class, they to learn how to progress and are engaging in physical Vancouver Phoenix Gymnastics achieve their goals. This selfexercise that aids in nerve cell offers a variety of recreational confidence carries over into multiplication strengthening programs for children from the their schoolwork and other connections in the brain age of 6 months to young adults current or future sports that thus creating healthier brain in two facilities in Vancouver. they are involved in. functions. They also learn that the harder they try and the Full and half day summer camp Every child wants to feel they fit registration is now on going. more effort they give the more in, so learning to respect, both they will learn which develops For more information call other students and coaches self-confidence, therefore, 604-737-7693 or check out is also a top core value and increasing their self-esteem by www.phoenixgymnastics.com important life lesson. Teaching actually achieving success.

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W E DN E SDAY, J U LY 2 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

News

A7

Public Workshop – July 10 Thunderbird Park Precinct Plan

Please join us at a public workshop to learn about and discuss planned changes to the Thunderbird Park Precinct. UBC is upgrading the facilities at Thunderbird Park. The upcoming changes will include both new facilities and the relocation and improvement to existing facilities. A precinct plan for Thunderbird Park is being prepared to provide design guidance for these upcoming changes to the area.

Date: Thursday, July 10, 2014 Time: 5:00 – 7:00pm Place: MBA House Commons Room, 3385 Wesbrook Mall Ken Lyotier is concerned about the increasing port noise outside his home at the Four Sisters Co-op.

Refreshments will be served.

PHOTO ROB NEWELL

For additional information, contact: Kavie Toor, Associate Director – Facilities & Business Development at 604.822.1688 or go to planning.ubc.ca

Some noises needed for safety reasons

Continued from page 1 “To address these concerns, and in order to gain a better understanding of the existing noise environment, Port Metro Vancouver has developed a noise monitoring program that will allow us to obtain and record existing noise levels and determine how much noise is attributable to port operations compared with other community noise sources. It will also help us to identify where there might be a noise problem, and if we can make operational improvements to help reduce that noise.” In 2013, 56 per cent of complaints to the Port stemmed from noise: • 21 per cent concerned vessel noise (mostly generators); • 21 per cent concerned terminal/tenants operations; • nine per cent concerned rail; and • five per cent are categorized as “other.” Davies said her office has fielded complaints from as far west as Columbia Street

and as far east as the Second Narrows bridge near New Brighton and a little bit beyond. “Clearly, the big issue [at last week’s meeting] was noise. I felt that the Port carried that away with them — that they really got the message, so I hope there will be constructive follow-up.” Davies wants the Port to adopt Metro Vancouver noise guidelines and she wants it to work more closely with its tenants to identify specific noises and turn the volume down where it can while still meeting safety considerations. She said some noise is to be expected, but it’s increased a lot over the years and operations continue to expand. “This is always the balance — we live next door to the Port.The Port is our neighbour. It’s a huge neighbour and it has a giant impact.There were people at that meeting whose family members work at the port — I know that because they told me,” she said. “So it’s a very important base of

operation, but it doesn’t dismiss the idea that somehow we’ve got to keep working at a constructive solution to problems that arise from Port operations.The Port is generally aware of that and we keep pushing them.” Port spokespeople noted at the community meeting that new technology will help curb some noises, and that it will check with tenants to see if the volume of certain sounds can be turned down without affecting worker safety. For his part, Lyotier maintains he shouldn’t have to move to find relief and he said studies have shown the harm of noise pollution on people’s health. “I live in an area where I can afford to live. Just because I’m poor shouldn’t mean that I have to suffer health consequences. If we couldn’t change it, that’s different.These are things we can work on and change. That’s the objective of this — where we can make change, we should,” he said. twitter.com/naoibh

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E D N E SDAY, J U LY 2 , 2 0 1 4

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W E DN E SDAY, J U LY 2 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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News

Pivot wants rules for police dogs

Report claimsVPD dogs inflict disproportionately high number of bites Mike Howell

mhowell@vancourier.com

The Pivot Legal Society is calling on the provincial government to create clear guidelines on the deployment of police dogs in B.C. after issuing a report that says a person is injured by a dog every two days in the province. Lawyer Douglas King, who authored the report, said most departments in B.C. have few, if any, policies restricting the use of police dogs. Also, the majority of police forces, including the Vancouver Police Department, train dogs to bite and hold a suspect rather than what is known as the bark-and-hold method. “Police dogs are actually the number one cause of injury in our province to citizens — more than empty hand [arrests], more than the beanbag gun, than the baton,Taser or pepper spray,” said King at a press conference Thursday, held at Pivot’s office in the Downtown Eastside. Pivot collected data over three years from Freedom of Information requests, statistics from the Office of the Police Complaint Commissioner and various police departments that showed police dogs in B.C. bit and injured 490 people between early 2010 and early 2012. Though King said the data received is limited and a sign of the lack of transparency on dog bites, he pointed out dogs working in departments in Vancouver and Abbotsford inflicted a disproportionately high number of bites to suspects compared to other B.C. police forces. King learned in his research that while the Vancouver Police Department polices 58 per cent of B.C.’s urban population, its

dog squad is responsible for 80 per cent of all police dog bites in urban areas. In 2011, there were 14.75 dog bites per 100,000 persons in Vancouver compared to 12.73 in Abbotsford, 2.5 in Victoria and 2.34 in West Vancouver. Saanich and New Westminster, where departments use the bark-and-hold method, had no recorded police dog bites in 2011. King said police dogs should only be used to investigate serious crimes or where public safety is at risk — not in shoplifting cases such as one involving Andrew Rowe in 2007 in Langley. Rowe, now 51, joined King at the press conference to tell his story of how he had his left ear bitten off and his left arm severely injured after he stole a DVD from a store. He said the theft came after he suffered a serious brain injury in an assault, lost his children to the government and ended up homeless. Rowe said the dog attacked him after he attempted to hide under a small shrub, adding that he wasn’t hidden when the police dog bit into his arm.Then after police laid him face down in a nearby parking lot, Rowe said the police deployed the dog again. “He latched onto my head, punctured the back of my skull, ripping me to the front of my skull, removing my ear and tearing my face apart,” said Rowe, who is working with King to launch legal action against the RCMP. Justice Minister Suzanne Anton refused to answer questions about Pivot’s report Thursday when asked at a press conference unrelated to the topic. Anton’s office, instead, issued a statement saying police dogs “are an important, effective

policing tool — but like any tool, they must be used consistently and effectively.” Anton said the government’s police dog working group is working with senior police managers and “nonpolice stakeholders” to devise common standards, which are being finalized. Const. Brian Montague, aVPD media liaison officer, said Pivot previously brought

a complaint before theVancouver Police Board about what it said was an inappropriate use of police dogs. He referred the Courier to the police board’s response, which was to dismiss the complaint.That occurred at a police board meeting in 2012, where Deputy Chief Doug LePard said to be convinced the number of bites was a concern, he

would need to see proof there is an unreasonable number of cases where the dog and its master have behaved inappropriately and the use of force was not justified. “The fact is that our dog masters have an excellent reputation, conduct themselves extremely professionally and that’s borne out in the most important court,

which is when they have to account for their actions in the criminal courts,” LePard said at the time. In 2010, the VPD dog squad attended 1,023 calls, with 140 apprehensions by dogs.The result was 35 to 40 minor injuries and 85 that required medical attention, according to a police board report. twitter.com/Howellings

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, J U LY 2 , 2 0 1 4

Opinion Land title decision Putting all your eggs validates judge’s work into one bracket Les Leyne Columnist lleyne@timescolonist.com Pat Vickers’ daughter phoned her at 6:30 last Thursday morning and told her to turn on the TV. She did, and they both started crying. They were watching the beginning of hours of coverage of the Supreme Court of Canada decision on what the words “aboriginal title” mean. It had special resonance for them, because it was clear from the start that the judgment amounts to a vindication for Vickers’ late husband, David. He was the B.C. Supreme Court judge who immersed himself in the Tsilhqot’in Nation’s claim for ownership of a remote chunk of Chilcotin wilderness. (It’s wilderness because about 100 native people blocked the loggers more than 20 years ago, which started the case.) After delving exhaustively into every aspect of the aboriginal existence and history in the region, he decided the Tsilhqot’in had proven rights to much of the Nemiah Valley and those rights were being violated by government logging plans. The decision stopped short of granting title outright because of a technicality relating to the “all or nothing” approach from the plaintiffs. But his 458-page judgment in 2007 joined the list of momentous aboriginal title decisions. It was appealed for various reasons and five years later the B.C. Court of Appeals scaled back the import of the ruling.The case progressed from there to the Supreme Court of Canada last winter.Thursday’s decision was the word from on high about the case. And the word is mostly a broad endorsement of Vickers’ interpretation of the case. “The trial judge was correct,” the high court said. “Absent demonstrated error, his findings should not be disturbed.” It was good news for First Nations, but they were also sweet words for the Vickers family to hear. “We are just over the moon,” Pat Vickers said. “Delighted.” She recalled the phenomenal amount of work he put into the case. It arrived in his Victoria courtroom in 2002 and proceeded over 339 days during the next five years. It cost a staggering amount of money, at least $30 million, all of it funded by governments.Vickers moved proceedings up to the Chilcotin for several weeks early on to get a feel for the territory and hear testimony from elders. Some witnesses spoke in their original language, so translators were brought in. Pat accompanied him and the two would

go for walks during breaks. She recalled meeting children who were fascinated by all the buttons on the vest he wore under his judicial robes.

“My hope is that this judgement will shine new light on the path of reconciliation that lies ahead.’” —DavidVickers When arguments finally concluded, Vickers was desperate to get the job done, Pat recalled. So he sat down and reviewed tens of thousands of pages of testimony and wrote his judgment in a period of several months, much faster than it would normally take. “This is not a usual judgment but, rather, part of a larger process of reconciliation between Tsilhqot’in people and the broader Canadian society,” he noted in the verdict. “I have departed from the usual practice and expressed my views on some issues that might not have been addressed but for the nature of these proceedings.” He invited the parties to use the opinion “in the negotiations that must follow.” Note “must.” One of the thrusts of the decision, like others before, is that negotiations and compromises are the only way forward through the aboriginal title issue. “My hope is that this judgment will shine new light on the path of reconciliation that lies ahead.” Even the appeal court judge who reversed some of his findings paid tribute to the work he put into the case. “One is struck … by the incredible patience and conscientiousness shown by the trial judge,” said the judge. “It’s a tribute to [Vickers’] diligence and intellect that this case presents a suitable opportunity for this court to address the complex issues that go to the heart of aboriginal title.” Vickers retired soon after delivering his opus, and Pat recalled him half-jokingly predict that he’d probably be gone by the time it made its way to the Supreme Court. He died at age 75, two years after rendering the verdict of his career. But Pat Vickers assured me: “David’s spirit is soaring all over the place today.” twitter.com/leyneles

The week in num6ers...

490 50 90 The number of people in B.C. who have been bitten by police dogs between 2010 and 2012, according to the Pivot Legal Society.

The number of kilometres rollerbladed each day around the seawall by 77-year-old Norm Sharkey in order to raise money for a new home for recovering addicts.

The estimated percentage of adults with Attention Deficit Disorder who are undiagnosed.

Michael Geller Columnist michaelarthurgeller@gmail.com Tomorrow (July 3) is the deadline by which most Vancouver residents must pay their property taxes. I say most since many residents, me included, have chosen to participate in the provincial government’s low interest Property Tax Deferment Program. If you are aged 55 or over, or living in a household with children, you, too, may be eligible and should investigate the program. However, this column is not about people who defer their property taxes. It is about people who avoid paying taxes. But before proceeding, as my accountant often tells me, avoiding taxes is legal; evading taxes is not. One creative way to avoid property taxes is to convince the B.C. Assessment Authority to reclassify a property from “residential” or “business” to “recreational and non-profit” or “farm” categories. Although the assessed value may not change, the tax rates for both recreational and non-profit and farm classified properties are significantly lower. Properties with a farm classification also receive a 50 per cent reduction in school taxes.

As my accountant often tells me, avoiding taxes is legal; evading taxes is not. In my Southlands neighbourhood where most of the properties are in the Agricultural Land Reserve, it is no secret that many properties have sought and obtained farm tax status and consequently pay less in property taxes than some smaller, less valuable properties outside the neighbourhood. When these properties are actively engaged in agricultural activities, such as a garden nursery, the farm classification may be warranted. However, some grand estates of between two and 10 acres have been classified as farms because they generate $2,500 a year in income from incidental agricultural activities.This can be achieved with a few dozen chickens in a corner of the estate. Given the tens of thousands of dollars in tax savings that must be borne by other taxpayers, these are very expensive eggs. Not all Southlands estate owners have

sought farm classification. Many are proud of the fact that while they could easily qualify, they pay their fair share of taxes based on their residential classification. It is not just Southlands property owners who are playing this game. Earlier this year, Scott Bowden of Colliers, a recognized expert in the field of property taxation, presented a report to the Metro Vancouver Board of Directors. He noted tax-avoiding landowners are offering free pasture to cows and renting llamas in a bid to achieve farm status. In some instances, the property owners reduced their taxes by up to 90 per cent and more. Ironically there are some farmers who will not be able to achieve farm status, namely commercial medical marijuana growers. Recently the provincial government created a new business classification for these facilities given the potential loss in taxes. To appreciate the tax ramifications, if a $2.1-million, 25,000-square-foot warehouse on a one-acre industrial property in Richmond was allowed to get farm tax status for growing marijuana, it would pay just $395 in annual taxes — 99 per cent less than the $33,100 a comparable business would pay. While commercial marijuana growers will not get a tax break, owners of vacant sites such as the corner of Davie and Burrard will continue to obtain significant tax savings by allowing their properties to be used for agricultural purposes, namely community gardens. That is because under our property tax system, the province has agreed to reclassify these properties from “business” to “recreational and non-profit” as long as they are used for growing vegetables and similar purposes. Since the tax savings for the owner can be in the hundreds of thousands of dollars each year, property owners are eager to allow their land to be used as a temporary park or community garden. I would add the reason their taxes are so high is that vacant land zoned for commercial uses is often unfairly taxed. Since I and other taxpayers must make up the loss in taxes, I am not so enthusiastic about community gardens as an interim use in order to change the tax classification. I would prefer revisions to our property tax system to address its many inequities. Until that happens, community gardeners will continue to grow some very expensive tomatoes at the corner of Davie and Burrard. twitter.com/michaelgeller

11 655 500

The number of days remaining until the World Cup Final.

The number of games Ryan Kesler played wearing a Vancouver Canucks jersey after being picked by the team in the first round of the 2003 NHL Entry Draft.

In metres, the length of a new section of the Baden Powell Trail in Deep Cove built by volunteers in memorial to a young hiker who killed himself.


W E DN E SDAY, J U LY 2 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A11

Mailbox Trashing the desk jockeys To the editor: Re: “Vancouver needs to clean up its act,” June 25. It’s not just the park board that needs to clean up its act, it’s the whole bunch of ‘em that sit around desks and never get out and about in the city. I have repeatedly contacted the city help line and transit in regard to an open damaged garbage container on the southeast corner of Granville and King Edward, that it has been left five months now. Imagine what passengers must think? As for ticket barriers, what a joke if they can’t even fix a garbage can. Frank Shorrock, Vancouver ••• Here’s a standout fail to add to Michael Geller’s take on Vancouver’s trashiest city inaction plan. One year ago (three-plus years after Norquay Plan adoption), this resident evaluated the City of Vancouver’s delivery of street [amenities]. Litter bins: three in place, 12 not in place. Even worse, city mapping shows 10 litter bins existing in Norquay, but they

have all disappeared!

Joseph Jones, Vancouver

AGM got lost in translation

To the editor: Re: “Shut up and start shovelling,” June 25. I attended the South Vancouver Seniors’ Arts and Cultural Society’s AGM held recently and was very disturbed by the conduct of Vision councillors Tony Tang and Raymond Louie. Political grandstanding aside,Tang insisted on translating all of Louie’s remarks in Cantonese. Perhaps a third of the members at the meeting were Chinese, however there was also a large contingent of Punjabi seniors present. Why was no translation was provided for them? Tang and Louie obviously were pandering to their supporters and their disregard for other large groups of the audience that had English as a second language smacks of political opportunism or something worse. Rod Raglin, Vancouver

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Letters may be edited by the Courier for reasons of legality, taste, brevity and clarity. Send to: 1574West Sixth Ave.,VancouverV6J 1R2 or email letters@vancourier.com

VA N C O U V E R T H I S W E E K I N H I S TO RY

Chief Dan George laments Confederation July 1, 1967: A celebration at Empire Stadium to mark Canada’s 100th birthday turns awkward when keynote speaker Chief Dan George points out that Confederation hasn’t exactly been an unqualified success story. George, an author, Oscarnominated actor and former chief of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation, begins his scathing speech “Lament for Confederation” with the words: “Today, when you celebrate your hundred years, oh Canada, I am sad for all the Indian people throughout the land.” The soliloquy is widely credited for helping start the first wave of First Nations political activism and waking up non-aboriginal Canadians to their plight.

Simon Fraser reaches mouth of the Fraser

July 2, 1808: Thirty-five arduous days after departing from Prince George by canoe, North West Company explorer Simon Fraser reaches the mouth of the B.C. river that now bares his name. Reaching the end of the 840-km journey turned out to be a bit of a disappointment for him. Not only was it not the mouth of the Columbia, the river he thought he was descending, but he also met a hostile reception from Musqueam warriors, who promptly chased Fraser and his party back upstream all the way to what is now the town of Hope.

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COURIER COLUMN: “Winning slate had technological Vision,” June 27. Elvira Lount: So they have a great organization, but what exactly is their platform? I don’t have a clue from any of their promo as to what they plan to do for our parks and green spaces in Vancouver. And what I really dislike about this whole emphasis on “youth” by Vision is their ageism and lack of respect for the older generation, many of whom have worked hard to preserve this city from high-rises, freeways and overdevelopment as well as to preserve our green spaces only to see the so-called young “Vision” try and destroy it all while pretending to be “green.” Sorry, I haven’t drunk the Kool-Aid. I won’t be voting for this slate. pwlg: I wonder what voters will think when they hear Mayor Robertson will turn 50 next year or that Councillor Tim Stevenson will be 70 next year or what about Geoff Meggs? Bunch of old men indeed! COURIER STORY: “Historic Hastings-Sunrise footbridge coming down,” June 27. D. Zaster: IfVision could run a bike lane over it, there would be no discussion of tearing down this bridge. It has always annoyed me how public access to the port has been cut off in recent years. It used to be possible to drive along the port road. Harbour seals could be found in abundance, sunning themselves on the old wharves.Among other businesses, the Cannery restaurant was there, probably the best seafood place in the city.The MarineView Cafe was right down on the docks not far fromWest Coast Reduction — probably the coolest greasy spoon inVancouver, and the food was terrific. My girlfriend and I used to drive across town for their crab and shrimp sandwiches. Film crews used to shootTV shows and movie scenes there all the time.All gone now.Why?They used 9/11 as an excuse to create more security along the waterfront, and kick the public out of the area.This was nonsense — it’s very doubtful that public traffic posed any security problem whatsoever. DSM: Between this, the art gallery fountain closure and the mandatory price hikes for “happy hour,” I’m starting to feel likeVancouver is really losing the little charm it has left. Joe U:This is why it’s so important to make sure historic sites aren’t “a bit of a neighbourhood secret.” but are identified and evaluated for inclusion on heritage registrars, so more tools are available to help prevent demolition. DirtyOldTown:This is only a “neighbourhood secret” for the new wave of residents who have moved into the area in the last five years and think they’re like Christopher Columbus discovering America. COURIER COLUMN: “Shut up and start shovelling,” June 25. Eric Lau: As a resident inVancouver, I’d like to see all levels of governments working together to get the shovel on the ground for the southeast senior centre asap. Seniors like my parents deserve a senior centre to mingle and socialize, which help them to age well in the community.


A12

THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, J U LY 2 , 2 0 1 4

Community

1

2

1. Performers from the Vaudevillians troupe visited with seniors in attendance for the South Granville Seniors Centre’s annual Strawberry Tea last Friday afternoon. 2. The Vaudevillians musical director is Alice McAuley, who accompanied the vaudeville troupe’s numbers on the piano for the event. McAuley also works with various choirs in the Lower Mainland. See photo gallery at vancourier.com or scan this page with the Layar app. PHOTOS REBECCA BLISSETT

Vaudevillians pull out stops for Strawberry Tea CITY LIVING

Rebecca Blissett

rvblissett@gmail.com

When Jim Trimble introduced himself to the Courier, one of the can-can girls leaned over to say that, actually, he was better known as Diamond Jim. That was Trimble’s cue to fish a fake diamond ring big enough to impress anyVegas performer out of his white tuxedo pocket and slip it on his pinky finger. He doesn’t wear rings anymore, he lamented — it’s too difficult with the arthritis in his hands. Creaks, aches and arthri-

tis aside, the show must go on and the Vaudevillians, “B.C.’s #1 Senior Vaudeville Troupe” as pointed out on performers’ business cards, rotated through speedy costume changes and tapped, sang, and can-can danced its way through old numbers this past Friday afternoon at the South Granville Seniors Centre. The audience at three long tables were seniors themselves, mostly around the same 61 to 93-year-old age group of the vaudeville troupe they came to see. In their pressed blouses and carefully coiffed hair — some with elaborate sparkling barrettes — they were a refreshing reminder

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that people did once dress up for any reason, even for a Friday afternoon strawberry tea held in a multi-purpose room. “It’s the look in their eyes, the smile, it’s just a delight to perform,” said Marilyn Remus, artistic director for theVaudevillians. “We’re not total professionals but we give it our best shot, even with the can-can dance, which is pretty hard to do. Somebody once asked me, ‘Don’t the can-can girls do the splits?’ And I said, ‘Well, they might go down but we might have some trouble getting them back up!’” The tea has been a tradition for two decades at the centre.The straw-

berry shortcake is made in the kitchen by volunteers (with organic strawberries, according to centre executive director Clemencia Gomez), entertainment is hired, and the afternoon wraps up with a raffle of donated gifts from city businesses. “Oh, the raffle — we look forward to that,” said centre past president Dolores O’Leary Shafik. “There’s a gambler in every one of us.” The tradition of tea marks the generational divide in Vancouver. Take a look at a calendar of any seniors centre and there will be a tea-related event along with the usual offerings of tai chi, Nordic walking and

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of the women out there at this age are widowed. And also, men like to have men things, like play pool,” said O’Leary Shafik. “But men are also harder to get out, some of them are shy and they used to have a woman in their lives who took them out.” Meanwhile, the Vaudevillians packed up yet another show, pocketing their pay to donate to Douglas College’s fine arts department for student financial assistance. “I always say we look like a bunch of gypsies, dragging around our gear and costumes,” said Remus. “But after we pack everything up, we go to the pub. It’s a motivational thing.”

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gentle yoga. “When I first came here years ago, I was blown away by how many British accents I heard,” said O’Leary Shafik. “Vancouver, with its British heritage, means tea is a big thing with seniors, the older ones especially.” Added Gomez: “Now everybody does coffee but tea is the thing everybody used to do in the afternoon.” The centre’s Strawberry Tea was well-attended by women, sparsely attended by men. Both O’Leary Shafik and Gomez attribute this to two reasons — one biological and one behavioral. “First of all, women live longer than men — a lot

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W E DN E SDAY, J U LY 2 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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Focusing with ADHD

Education and therapy can overcome stigma of misunderstood disorder crossi@vancourier.com

What is it? ADHD is defined as: • a mental health condition • a neurological condition • a “highly genetic condition,” according to psychiatrist and ADHD specialist Margaret Weis. • ADD is ADHD without the hyperactivity component, and Quily says most people use the terms interchangeably. Symptoms include: • Problems with attention, for example with attending

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Pete Quily was shocked when a park board commissioner shamed another for spending park board money on coaching to help her with Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder. “As someone who has ADHD, has coached adults with ADHD for a decade, runs the Vancouver Adult ADD Support group and has a large website and blog on ADHD, I know the harm of stigmatizing people with ADHD,” Quily told the Courier in an email. “Some ADDers refuse to get diagnosed or treated because of stigma, many hide in the ADHD closet, many self-medicate with drugs and alcohol,” he continued, adding that studies have shown teens and adults with ADHD think about and attempt suicide more often than those without the disorder and have higher rates of depression, anxiety and eating disorders. The Canadian Taxpayers Federation questioned untendered contracts received by a consultant, including a $4,480 business-coaching fee in 2012 for then park board chair Sarah Blyth. The queries were echoed in tweets by elected NPA representatives. Blyth wrote on her Facebook page about feeling stigmatized after being accused by NPA park board commissioner Melissa De Genova of “playing the poor me card, the disability card.”The issue garnered the attention of activist Jamie Lee Hamilton and other Vision Vancouver park board commissioners, and the post was shared by the B.C. Coalition of People with Disabilities.The Centre for ADHD Awareness, Canada also blogged about the incident.

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to final details of a project or remembering appointments and obligations. • Impulsivity, including talking too much in social situations, interrupting others or finishing their sentences. • Hyperactivity, including being restless, fidgety and having difficulty unwinding. •With multiple responsibilities, information overload and multiple distractions, it can seem difficult to determine what’s part of a busy lifestyle and what’s a disorder. “Everybody has some of the symptoms of ADD some of the time,” Quily said. But a diagnosis is based on the prevalence of symptoms in the three different areas over time.

Who has it?

Quily recommends completing an online ADHD screening test. He links to a test created by Harvard University on his website. • Five to nine per cent of children have ADHD, according to Weis. • Between four and five per cent of adults have ADHD, according to Weis. • 90 per cent of adults with ADD are undiagnosed, according to Quily. • Other disorders that include depression and anxiety often accompany ADHD.

Getting help

Screening test results may indicate you should seek a proper diagnosis. Quily emphasizes you should see someone who’s actually trained in the field of ADHD. But he says in B.C. this can be difficult to achieve. Quily maintains a list of Vancouver area doctors, psychiatrists and psychologists who diagnose

and treat ADHD. He emails the list out, on request. Weis runs an ADHD clinic inWestVancouver and formerly worked at an ADHD clinic at B.C. Children’s Hospital that for five years welcomed adults, who composed half the client list. Despite a year-long waiting list for adults, Quily says it was eventually decided treating them there fell outside the clinic’s mandate. Quily says 15 peer-reviewed studies reveal 21 to 45 per cent of prisoners have ADHD, so the provincial government should fund treatment. “Even if you don’t care about us as humans, it’s tremendously expensive to ignore us,” Quily said. Quily says medication can help balance brain chemistry.Therapy can help individuals heal past experiences and better face the future, and coaching in time management, prioritizing and, in some cases, social skills, can help adults with ADHD flourish.

The upside

Despite its drawbacks, Quily notes ADHD can give those who experience it a competitive edge. “If we’re interested, we can focus more than anybody else in the room,” he said. “We have a fast processing brain. Because we don’t filter so much, we’re more creative,” he continued. “We can see solutions that other people can’t see.We have more energy.” Quily “self-medicates” with research and he’s compiled a comprehensive website and blog about ADHD. For more information, see addcoach4u.com. twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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A14

THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, J U LY 2 , 2 0 1 4

Will you answer your calling today? HEALTHWISE

Davidicus Wong, MD

davidicuswong.wordpress.com.

In his classic bookThe Hero with aThousand Faces, Joseph Campbell describes the refusal of the call: “Often in actual life, and not infrequently in the myths and popular tales, we encounter the dull case of the call unanswered; for it is always possible to turn the ear to other interests. Refusal of the summons converts the adventure into its negative.Walled in by boredom, hard work, or ‘culture,’ the subject loses the power of significant affirmative action and becomes a victim to be saved.” I tell my children and patients that one’s calling is the intersection of four circles: 1. your talents (what you do better than everyone

You may have more than one calling in life, says Davidicus Wong.

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and our path in life has an almost universal resonance. I’ve encouraged my children to read widely, explore new experiences and nurture their talents in the lifelong adventure of discovering their calling — their positive potential in life. We can sometimes get stuck thinking that we have but one calling in life.There are precious few who discover the one great thing they

were meant to do early in life. For most, it is a process of trial and error with many being sidelined and stuck by circumstances and settling for a life not quite complete. Sometimes we may start with great dreams and ambitions but later realize that the life we had imagined is not for us. I have seen classmates and colleagues leave medicine in medical school, residency and even

after entering practice. It takes courage to give up old dreams that we have outgrown or never really suited us in the first place. Joseph Campbell said, “You must give up the life you planned in order to have the life that is waiting for you.” My mother’s early childhood was full of promise. She was intelligent and caring. Born and raised in Vancouver, she was wellread, speaking and writing perfect English. I imagined that she would have attended UBC and become a teacher or a writer. But the trajectory of my mom’s life changed at age 9 when her mother died, leaving her and her siblings orphaned.Their priority was to survive and with love, they chose to do this together.The older kids sacrificed their personal dreams to ensure the wellbeing of the younger ones. But by answering the call to keep the family together, they created an enduring legacy of love, and all of my cousins and our children ap-

preciate the value of family. We are called many times in life. If you listen carefully, you may hear the call each day. In his Serenity Prayer, Reinhold Niebuhr wrote, “God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.” With these words, I do not hear resignation or surrender. They remind me to see the good, the bad and the positive potential — to recognize opportunities and accept my own responsibility to be an agent of positive change. Will you answer your calling today? In what special way can you help another in need, change the trajectory of a life and help others achieve their positive potential? Dr. DavidicusWong is a family physician at PrimeCare Medical. His Healthwise column appears regularly in the Courier.You can read more about achieving your positive potential in health at davidicuswong.wordpress.com.

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W E DN E SDAY, J U LY 2 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Arts&Entertainment

A15

GOT ARTS? 604.738.1411 or events@vancourier.com

1

July 2 to 4, 2014 1. Canada’s longest running contemporary dance festival Dancing on the Edge is back for its 26th year of confounding audiences and lowly entertainment listing writers alike.This year’s edition features more than 30 different choreographies from more than 70 dance artists July 3 to 12 at various venues. Details at dancingonthedge.org. 2. Get your fill of old school soul as recently rediscovered R&B legend Lee Fields and the Expressions class up the Imperial July 3, 8 p.m.The Ballantynes and DJ Jonny Was from East Van Soul Club open the show.Tickets at Red Cat, Zulu, Highlife and Beatstreet. 3.VancouverTheatreSports League’s latest improv-a-ganza takes audiences on a trip throughVancouver and the world of online review sites.VTSL artistic director Denise Jones describes TripImproviser as “a light-hearted comedy perfect for visitors toVancouver or locals with a travel story to share. Each night we’ll spoof the pitfalls and joys that happen to us all when we travel.” So expect plenty of knife fights. It runs July 3 to Aug. 30 at the Improv Centre on Granville Island. Details at vtsl.com. 4. Written by playwright and Pulitzer Prize nominee Rajiv Joseph and directed by Chelsea Haberlin, Gruesome Playground Injuries is described as “a heavy-hitting play documenting the decades-spanning relationship of an accident-prone daredevil and a corrosive masochist that navigates friendship, love, and the wounds created in between.”The Stone’sThrow production runs July 3 to 12 as part of PacificTheatre’s Playground Series, showcasing works produced by and starring the best and brightest up-and-coming talent from their company apprenticeship program. Details at pacifictheatre.org. For video and web content, scan page using the Layar app.

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3

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A16

THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, J U LY 2 , 2 0 1 4

Arts&Entertainment

These abs are made for walking KUDOS & KVETCHES

Countless Vancouverites felt a cold, numbing pain in their loins this week after it was announced that Canucks feisty forward and underwear model Ryan Kesler had been traded to the Anaheim Ducks. In re-

turn for Kesler and a 2015 third-round pick,Vancouver received centre Nick Bonino, defenceman Luca Sbisa and the 24th and 85th picks in last weekend’s NHL draft. And while there is much optimism surrounding the acquisition of young Bonino and Sbisa, we’re not sure what either

Going through a

player looks like with their shirts off, so we’re reserving judgment. In addition to toughness and speed, Kesler’s washboard abs and a rugged treasure trail were an imposing force in the locker room, regularly humbling and shaming the likes of Kevin Bieksa’s pecs, Chris

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Higgins’ dimpled derriere and the Sedins’ creepy ginger pubes. But most of all, we feel sorry for Pam in our accounts payable, whose dedication and love of Kesler is only matched by her love of a clean balance sheet. Rumour has it she hasn’t stopped weeping for the past two days, but we’re afraid to go upstairs to check on her out of fear we may feel obligated to take our shirts off in an attempt to comfort her. And nobody needs to see that.

West Coasteros

According to a press release we received Monday morning that filled our sullen lives with just enough of a distraction to keep ourselves from falling into the abyss,W Network and Great Pacific Television are looking for local competi-

Talk about a cruel summer. Ryan Kesler’s washboard abs are sixpacking it up for California.

tors “who need a step up in the real estate market and are willing to put all of their renovation skills to the test” as part of an eight-part reno competition event series “with an exciting twist.” What impressed us the most, however — besides our ability to quell the urge

to repeatedly bash our forehead against our computer monitor while reading the press release — was the name of the new TV series: Game of Homes. Nicely played. Sure, it’s not the boldest move to name your show after one of the most popular television and novel series of the past few years, but the creators likely had to make a tough decision akin to Ned Stark accepting the job of Hand of the King when they opted for Game of Homes over the more nuanced (and our personal favourite) The Caulking Dead. On the bright side, there’s a good chance the “exciting twist” at the end of Game of Homes will be the sudden, violent death of the show’s favourite competitors. And you won’t see it coming. twitter.com/KudosKvetches


A18

THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, J U LY 2 , 2 0 1 4

Arts&Entertainment Nostalgic Diner plotlessly rocks around the clock THEATRE REVIEW Jo Ledingham joled@telus.net

“Goodness, gracious, great balls of fire.” Nostalgia being what it is, Red Rock Diner will be a winner for the Arts Club. Director/choreographer Valerie Easton keeps the ensemble rockin’ and a-rollin’; the choreography leaves you out of breath just watching it. But honestly, I don’t remember life being that much fun back in the ’50s. And I was there.Yes, I rushed home from Point

Grey — a junior high school back in the day — to listen to Red Robinson on CKWX 1130. I was actually on his show to advertise “Point Potlatch, March 5,” a fundraiser (I think) for the school.The music we listened to was just about to shift from “How Much Is That Doggie In The Window” (my grandchildren can’t believe we listened to drivel like that) to “Rock Around The Clock.”Teenagers were just about to become a target for marketing — and to mistake their new status for freedom. Written by Dean Regan in 1997, Red Rock Diner is less a musical than it is a

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musical revue.Twenty minutes into it, there’s still no plot. Red Robinson, played by Neil Minor, doesn’t age and his career doesn’t change; there’s no conflict, no resolution.There are no romantic entanglements although there appears to be the possibility. Robyn Wallis is a Marilyn Monroeish Venus in skintight capris and low cut top — what the “goodie-goodies” would have called a “cheapie” back then — while Anna Kuman is good-girl Connie in poodle skirt and cardigan. Given the set up, one almost expects an Archie, Reggie, Betty and Veronica situation. But no. The whole show is a tribute to Red Robinson and the music of the time. But the script for Robinson is flat (“Love is grand. Divorce is 10 grand” is about as interesting as it gets). As the central character, Robinson is not very charismatic so there’s not much to invest in. And it’s not talented Minor’s fault.The script is lackluster. The singing and dancing, however, are terrific. And, if

hot. And individual performances are great: energetic, charismatic Zachary Stevenson who blew us all away with his Buddy inThe Buddy Holly Story, RobynWallis and Anna Kuman as the two girls who, back in the ’50s, wouldn’t have been caught dead in each other’s company, Colin Sheen as slightly nerdy soda jerk Johnny B andTafari Anthony making his Arts Club debut. I was there for all that music. Perhaps it was that stuff that drove me to Dave Brubeck, Oscar Peterson, Lionel Hampton, Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald and Pearl Bailey. Red Rock Diner needs a plot — the music alone just doesn’t provide enough glue. But try as I could I couldn’t stop the old body from getting into “Tequila” on the way out. Remember it? Ta-QUI-la. Now there was a tune. For more reviews, go to joledingham.ca. Red Rock Diner runs until Aug. 2 at the Arts Club Granville Island Stage. For tickets, call 604-687-1644 or go to artsclub.com.

Despite a lack of conflict or discernible plot, Red Rock Diner delivers heaps of ’50s nostalgia, catchy tunes and good times.

you’re over 70, you’ll know all the words. “Why Must I Be aTeenager in Love?” “Where the Boys Are.” “Let’s Go Little Darlin’.” “WhoWrote the Book of Love?” And, of course, Elvis: “Blue Suede Shoes,” “Don’t Be Cruel,” “AreYou LonesomeTonight?,” “Hound Dog” and much more. You might even remember the moves to “Do the Hucklebuck” (“Wiggle like a snake/waddle like a duck/ That’s what you do/when you do the Hucklebuck”).

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Act 2 is set on grad night, 1957, at King Edward High and a talent show hosted by Robinson. Minor sings (as Robinson never did or not that I recall) and he does a dynamite job of “Rockin’ Robin.” And then there are more songs: “Stupid Cupid,” “At the Hop,” “Shaboom, Shaboom.” The band — Mathew Baker (bass),Todd Biffard (drums), Jeff Gladstone (guitar), Steven Greenfield (keyboard) and especially Brett Ziegler (on sax) — is

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W E DN E SDAY, J U LY 2 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A19

Sports&Recreation

GOT SPORTS? 604.630.3549 or mstewart@vancourier.com

Family goes the extra mile on Baden Powell Trail extension New section of Deep Cove trail is a memorial to son who committed suicide

Volunteer work on the Baden Powell Memorial Connector began June 14. See photo gallery at vancourier.com or scan this page with the Layar app. PHOTO MIKE HANAFIN

Eastern End of Baden Powell Trail

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Powell Trail in 1971 (in honour of B.C.’s centennial), and they are part of the current volunteering crew at over 20 strong.When it’s

Quarry Rock

INDIAN ARM

Baden Powell Trail Other Trails Current Path on Road Proposed BPMC

DEEP COVE

trailbuilders by not using the trail until construction is completed this fall. Boy Scout troops helped build the original Baden

Creek Francis

It may just be 500 metres of hiking trail, but this section of the Baden Powell Trail means the world to David Boyer Sr. Work is underway deep in the rainforest north of Deep Cove to build a new section of the popular trail in memorial to Boyer’s late son.When finished this fall, the extension will provide long-needed relief from a 500-metre stretch that hikers have been forced to share with cars and trucks along Indian River Drive. Volunteer work on the Baden Powell Memorial Connector started June 14, but the desire to improve the stretch of trail dates back to early 2013 when David Boyer’s son David Jr. killed himself after suffering at length from mental health issues and depression.The Boyer family proposed the connector trail to the District of NorthVancouver in October 2013 in memory of David Jr., who enjoyed the outdoors, and has raised more than $50,000 for the project. Most of that money will go towards building bridges, including a 15-metre span over Francis Creek at the eastern end of the connector. Professional design work on the bridge was donated by Boyer Sr.’s brother-in-law, and the drawings were approved by the District before the project (and funding) was given the go-ahead. The connector trail starts from the west at a crosswalk to the south side of Indian River Drive, then dives downhill into the forest before joining the remnants of an old moss-covered logging road. A recent look at the early trail-building work showed the challenges faced by volunteers: they had to clear dozens of fallen trees from portions of the trail, plus clearing the trail route near Francis Creek for the bridge approaches. But when it’s finished, it will be an esthetically pleasing and infinitely safer way to get to

EN

Mike Hanafin

mhanafin@shaw.ca

most people’s main destination: Quarry Rock. The traditional way to get to “The Rock” has always been from Deep Cove’s Panorama Dr. at the extreme eastern end of the Baden PowellTrail. It is one of the highest traffic areas on the entire BP trail system and a daily workout (or after-work) routine for hundreds of people living in the area. The payoff for reaching Quarry Rock from either direction is spectacular views of Deep Cove, Indian Arm, Belcarra, Eagle Peak and even Mt. Baker’s peak, which can be seen sneaking over a ridge to the east on a clear day. Another highlight along the busy trail is a huge oldgrowth Douglas Fir (well over two metres in diameter and approximately 600 years old) at the half-way mark between Panorama Drive and Quarry Rock. However, most people seem to zoom past the giant tree, which has been catalogued in North Vancouver’s heritage tree registry. The Deep Cove to Quarry Rock section of the BP trail has also undergone major improvements recently, including new bridges and staircases replacing rapidly eroding trails on some steep inclines around creeks.The staircases take away from the natural aspect of the hike, but they were needed due to the sheer volume of foot traffic on the trail. The new connector trail is a great reason to explore the relatively quiet area to the west of Quarry Rock. Park at the Baden Powell crossing on the Mt. Seymour Provincial Park Road, then walk east, traversing a gentle downhill trail through the rainforest.The BP trail through this section crosses numerous creeks before reaching Indian River Drive. Currently, hikers are directed along the narrow road for a half-kilometre during which they must constantly look over their shoulder for vehicular traffic before the trail resumes after Francis Creek. The Memorial Connector Trail will take hikers back into the forest where we belong. Please respect

BAD

TAKE A HIKE

finished, take a walk on the Memorial Connector and enjoy the Boyer family’s fitting tribute to their son. You can also donate

money or time by visiting bpmemorialconnector.com. Mike Hanafin is an avid backcountry hiker who can see the forest and the trees.


A20

THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, J U LY 2 , 2 0 1 4

Sports&Recreation

GROUP Brazil*

Super Deutschland olé! Germany fans consume beer and currywurst at theVancouver Alpen Club WORLD CUP

Croatia Cameroon CMR

b 9 6 3 0

GROUP netherlands* chile spain ESP australia

GROUPS . FIXTURES . RESULTS Updated 12:00 p.m. Monday June 30

c GROUP e GROUP 9 france 7 germany greece* 4 switzerland SUI * 6 usa ivory coast CIV 3 ecuador 4 portugal japan 1 honduras 0 ghana

g 7 4 4 1

GROUP

Christopher Cheung

colombia*

chrischcheung@hotmail.com

The Courier introduces Vancouverites who are devoted to theWorld Cup and following their team from afar in coffee shops on Commercial Drive, pubs in Strathcona and convenience stores on Robson Street. The accompanying schedule is set toVancouver time. ••• On game days, theWorld Cup viewings at theVancouver Alpen Club is a sea of black, red and yellow. German football fans carry flags, wear face paint and even match socks with national colours. “Everyone knows the Alpen Club is a German home,” said Patrick Buehrmann, the assistant club manager. “It’s more fun than sitting separately in living rooms or in little pubs. It’s not the same atmosphere. We can sing with all the fans together.” The club was founded in 1935 by a group of immigrants from the Alpine regions of Germany and Austria to uphold and foster the diversity of their culture, which is continued today during the World Cup by a passion for football and love for the German team. The club hosts viewings for Germany games upstairs on a 17-foot screen with a high definition projector and surround sound. Four hundred fans cheer on the team over German beer, currywurst and schnitzel buns.The club serves coffee

mexico

A 7 7 3 0

GROUP costa rica* CRC uruguay italy england

f GROUP d GROUP 9 belgium 7 argentina 6 nigeria NGA 4 algeria 3 bosnia-herz BIH 3 russia 1 south korea 1 iran IRN

7

6

h 6 3 1 1

2 8

1

Patrick Buehrmann, assistant manager at the Vancouver Alpen Club, expects the place to be packed for Germany’s game against Algeria June 30. PHOTO ROB NEWELL

and tea to energize attendees during morning games. The Deutsches Haus restaurant and another banquet hall downstairs welcome families with children. When Germany scores, fans leap, blow vuvuzelas and cry, “Super Deutschland olé! Einer geht noch, einer geht noch rein!” “It basically means there’s always room for one more goal,” explained Buehrmann. Buehrmann is from Paderborn, Germany, whose home team got promoted to the second division of the Bundesliga this past season. “I grew up with the sport,” said Buehrmann. “I used to play myself when I was little. It’s my life.” Buehrmann shared how seriously Germans take football.

What do typical German fan drink? PB: Beer. Usually a cool Krombacher beer. What do they eat? PB: Currywurst. A typical soccer stadium food. What’s the atmosphere in Germany like during the World Cup? PB: People get off from work, employers tell their workers to come a bit later and people go later to school. They change hours just for this. It shows soccer is a very big thing. Some games are starting now at midnight and for the first time they allow public viewings outside. What makes you excited about the team this year? PB:The coach this year

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created a team that is very young and very enthusiastic. I think maybe that’s a little secret to help win this year. What’s the best World Cup moment so far? PB: Portugal versus Germany. Best starting group of games I’ve ever seen in my life. Four to nothing. Not a chance for Portugal. Favourite player? PB: Mueller. I think he’s the best and strongest player. If not Germany, who do you think will win? PB: In the final there might be Brazil and Germany. But of course as a German, I hope my team will win. twitter.com/chrischeungtogo

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SÃO PAULO Arena de São Paulo

4

1

NATAL Arena das Dunas SALVADOR Arena Fonte Nova

9

BRASILIA Estádio Nacional

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PORTO ALEGRE Estádio Beira-Rio

FORTALEZA Estádio Castelão

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RIO DE JANIERO Estádio do Maracanã

MANAUS Arena da Amazônia

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CURITIBA Arena da Baixada

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CAPACITY: 62,000

GROUP MATCHES DATE GROUP

CAPACITY: 67,000

VENUE

GROUP MATCHES cont. DATE GROUP

VENUE

24.6 9am D CRC 0 v 0 ENG 3

13.6 9am A MEX 1 v 0 CMR 2

9am D ITA 0 v 1 URU 2

12pm B ESP 1 v 5 NED 4

1pm C JPN 1 v 4 COL 4

3pm B CHI 3 v 1 AUS 12

1pm C GRE 2 v 1 CIV 12

14.6 9am C COL 3 v 0 GRE 3

25.6 9am F NGA 2 v 3 ARG 3

12pm D URU 1 v 3 CRC 2

9am F BIH 3 v 1 IRN 2

3pm D ENG 1 v 2 ITA 4

1pm E HON 0 v 3 SUI 4

6pm C CIV 2 v 1 JPN 12

1pm E ECU 0 v 0 FRA 12

15.6 9am E SUI 2 v 1 ECU 3

26.6 9am G USA 0 v 1 GER 3

12pm E FRA 3 v 0 HON 2

9am G POR 2 v 1 GHA 2

3pm F ARG 2 v 1 BIH 4

1pm H KOR 0 v 1 BEL 4

16.6 9am G GER 4 v 0 POR 12

1pm H ALG 1 v 1 RUS 12

12pm F IRN 0 v 0 NGA 3 3pm G GHA 1 v 2 USA 2 12pm A BRA 0 v 0 MEX 12

SECOND STAGE ROUND of 16 DATE GAME

3pm H RUS 1 v 1 KOR 3

28.6 9am 1 BRA 1 v 1 CHI 5

17.6 9am H BEL 2 v 1 ALG 4

VENUE

18.6 9am B AUS 2 v 3 NED 2

1pm 2 COL 2 v 0 URU 11

12pm B ESP 0 v 2 CHI 4

29.6 9am 3 NED 2 v 1 MEX 6

3pm A CMR 0 v 4 CRO 12

1pm 4 CRC 1 v 1 GRE 8

19.6 9am C COL 2 v 1 CIV 3

30.6 9am 5 FRA 2 v 0 NGA 9

12pm D URU 2 v 1 ENG 2 3pm C JPN 0 v 0 GRE 4 20.6 9am D ITA 0 v 1 CRC 12

1pm 6 GER - v - ALG 10 01.7 9am 7 ARG 1pm 8 BEL

12pm E SUI 2 v 5 FRA 3

QUARTER FINALS

3pm E HON 1 v 2 ECU 2

04.7 9am 1 w5

21.6 9am F ARG 1 v 0 IRN 4 12pm G GER 2 v 2 GHA 12 3pm F NGA 1 v 0 BIH 3 22.6 9am H BEL 1 v 0 RUS 2

1pm 2 BRA 05.7 9am 3 w7 1pm 4 NED

v

SUI 1

v

USA 3

v

w6 11

v

COL 6

v

w8 9

v

CRC 3

SEMI FINALS

12pm H KOR 2 v 4 ALG 4

08.7 1pm 1 w1

v

w2 5

3pm G USA 2 v 2 POR 12

09.7 1pm 2 w3

v

w4 1

23.6 9am B NED 2 v 0 CHI 3

Register now, space is limited. whitecapsfc.com/camps Toll free: 1.855.932.1932

CAPACITY: 44,000

12.6 1pm A BRA 3 v 1 CRO 3

July 28 – Aug. 1, 1-3 p.m., Trafalgar

August 25 – 29, 9-11 a.m., Trafalgar

CAPACITY: 79,000

CAPACITY: 46,000

July 7 – 11, 1-3 p.m., Trafalgar

August 11 – 15, 9-11 a.m., Clinton

CAPACITY: 73,000

CAPACITY: 55,000

4

RECIFE Arena Pernambuco CAPACITY: 46,000

11

12

CAPACITY: 45,000

3

8

5

CAPACITY: 62,000 2

3

9

THIRD/FOURTH PLAY-OFF

9am B AUS 0 v 3 ESP 2

12.7 1pm

1pm A CMR 1 v 4 BRA 4

WORLD CUP FINAL

1pm A CRO 1 v 3 MEX 12

13.7 12pm

**means team advances to Quarter Finals

L1

w1

v

L2 9

v

w2 11


A24

THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, J U LY 2 , 2 0 1 4

Prices effective: July 2nd to July 6th, 2014 While Quantities Last *While Sweet & Juicy

Ha

Seedless Watermelon

49¢ /lb

! y r a s r e v i n n A ppy

California Grown

Sweet & Juicy

Large Yellow Nectarines

$1.19/lb California Grown

Join us to celebrate our anniversary!

INCLUDING:

Saturday July 5th, 2014 10am to 3pm

Free balloons Cake ceremony @ 1pm Gift basket lucky draw Fruit sampling Spin the wheel, win a prize

NIC A ORG

Fresh & Nutritious

Organic Gold Beets

$1.99/bunch

California Grown

And more!

at all Kin's Vancouver locations

Fresh & Nutritious

Fresh local Blueberries now available!

Green Kale

99¢ ea

Fresh & Juicy, California Grown

Locally Grown

Large Cantaloupe

$1.00

/each with any purchase

Fresh & Crispy

Green/Red Leaf Lettuce Romaine Lettuce

*Reg Price $2.99 Valid with coupon only at

69¢ ea

all Kin's Vancouver Stores

Locally Grown

Valid July 2nd to July 6th, 2014

Limit One Per Family - While Quantities Last - 5522

Davie Street

Between Bute St. & Thurlow St. 604.687.8081 OPEN 10am to 9pm everyday

Champlain Square Kerr St. & 54th Ave. 604.451.1329 OPEN 9am to 8pm everyday

West 10th

4516 West 10th Ave. 604.221.1330 OPEN 9am to 8pm everyday

Oakridge Centre

City Square

Across from Starbucks Beside Public Library 604.873.6491 604.264.6800 *1 HR PARKING VALIDATION* Visit our website OPEN 9am to 8pm everyday for store hours

w w w.KinsFarmMarket.com

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