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WEDNESDAY

May 28 2014 Vol. 105 No. 43

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BEST IN SHOW East Van Show and Shine founder Erv Salvador with his 1965 Chinese military motorcycle. Salvador, who also owns The Whip Restaurant and Gallery, is often seen in the city riding the vintage bike with dog Beau in the sidecar. See story on page 13. See photo gallery at vancourier.com or scan this page with the Layar app. PHOTO REBECCA BLISSETT

Childcare spaces remain a luxury City surpasses three-year goal but costs still high

Mike Howell

mhowell@vancourier.com

It was a bittersweet moment forTerryTayler as she stood at a lectern lastThursday in a childcare centre that now bears her name. There she was with Mayor Gregor Robertson celebrating the news that the city had surpassed its three-year target for creating new childcare spaces by 99 for a total of 599 built or committed since 2012. But before Tayler showed up to the press conference, the 68-year-old great grandmother dropped off two of her granddaughter’s children at an in-house daycare, which she described as “not ideal.”

“It’s a home where they don’t go outside to play and they sit in front of the television all day,” said Tayler as children in an adjoining room participated in a yoga class before enjoying the facility’s enclosed playground. “And this breaks my heart when I see what is happening here.” Added Tayler: “It’s ironic, isn’t it? The place is named after me and my own family can’t afford to have their kids here.” Tayler is the founding president of the Collingwood Neighbourhood House, which operates the childcare centre on the former site of the Eldorado Hotel at Nanaimo and Kingsway.The centre, which has 37 spaces for children 18 months old to

five years old, was built with $4.6 million in community amenity contributions as part of the city’s agreement with the developer, who built highrises on the property. Fees are $1,255 a month for a toddler and $860 a month for three to five-yearolds. Depending on a parent or parents’ income, government subsidies are available to offset the cost. At least 71 children are on the waiting list. Collingwood Neighbourhood House has a total of 410 childcare spaces spread over 10 facilities, including six schools.Waiting lists range from 200 to more than 300 children, depending on time of year. “There is a huge demand in the neigh-

bourhood,” said Jennifer Gray-Grant, executive director of Collingwood Neighbourhood House. “We love opening new spaces but we always feel like it’s a drop in the bucket of this huge need. So it’s thrilling to hear the city is exceeding its target with new spaces.” Dr. John Carsley ofVancouver Coastal Health attended the press conference and stressed the need for more quality and affordable childcare. In Quebec, from where Carsley moved to Vancouver seven years ago, the government devised a subsidized childcare program where it spends more than $2 billion per year.The result is childcare costs are $7 per day. Continued on page 7


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W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A3

News

Dosanjh looks spiritual, election rules ‘clear’ 12TH AND CAMBIE Mike Howell

mhowell@vancourier.com

Things I did not know last week but now happy to report this week in a random dumping of scribblings from my notebook after attending Vision Vancouver’s “spring fling” May 21 at the Coast Plaza hotel in the West End: • Michael Graydon, the former head of the B.C. Lottery Corporation, is a member of Vision Vancouver.You’ve probably heard he now heads up a company tied to Paragon Gaming that will build a casino adjacent to B.C. Place Stadium. Graydon also attended the NPA’s May 7 fundraiser as a guest of Concord Pacific, whose staffers attended both events. • That bald guy in the grey suit with the familiar face sitting at a table in the hotel’s courtyard was none other than Bob McCammon, who once coached

Former NDP premier Ujjal Dosanjh let his hair way down at a May 21 Vision fundraiser. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

the Philadelphia Flyers and the Vancouver Canucks. (Thanks, Google Images). • Former NDP premier Ujjal Dosanjh has let his hair grow and grow … and grow.The man resembles someone the Beatles might have consulted in the ’60s for spiritual guidance. Looking good, Mr. D! Be warned, Jim Iker of the B.C.

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Teachers’ Federation, your impressive mane has some serious competition. • Driving to theWest End during afternoon rush hour is a very, very bad idea. Bike, bus, walk or cab next time. ••• In my last entry, I mentioned I was trying to get some answers from the provincial government on

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changed under the new legislation in that there is no cut-off period for recording contributions.” The staffer continued: “For example, if a candidate or elector organization received a campaign contribution in 2013 for the 2014 election, the required information must be recorded and disclosed.” Ah-ha, so that means parties and candidates have to disclose everything they collected from the day after the 2011 election until the big vote this year on Nov. 15. OK, got it. Now what about expenses? All election expenses must be recorded and disclosed during the campaign period, which runs from Jan. 1, 2014 to election day, Nov. 15, 2014.To sum up, that means parties only claim expenses for this year and claim all donations between elections and leading up to election day. Are we clear on this, people? Am I clear? Um, sure. twitter.com/Howellings

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in a sec. First, my question: How far back does a civic political party have to go when disclosing names of contributors and donations to their campaigns? I got hung up on this question after city clerk Janice MacKenzie issued a memo to council April 28 in which she acknowledged she didn’t know when the date kicks in to declare expenses. Expenses are, of course, different than contributions. Anyway, this is what MacKenzie wrote: “It should be noted that under the current and new tabled Local Elections Campaign Financing Act, the election expense period begins on Jan. 1 in the year of a local government election. It is unclear whether this will apply for the 2014 elections.” Now to what a communications staffer in Victoria sent me in reply to my question. “To answer your question about disclosure of campaign contributions, please note that the rules have not

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4

News

Hobbit house fate to be decided at hearing KERRISDALE LOCATION ONLY

DEVELOPING STORY Naoibh O’Connor

noconnor@vancourier.com

Kerrisdale location only: 604-263-7300

Kerrisdale, Vancouver 2126 West 41st Ave.

Want to keep up with the Courier online? It’s easy. Follow us on Twitter at @VanCourierNews

A rezoning application that would see the James Residence, the storybookstyle cottage at 587 West King Edward Ave., restored and given heritage protection goes before public hearing June 3. The 2,416-square-foot home is sometimes dubbed a hobbit house.The 50-by130 foot property sold for $2.25 million in October 2013, raising concerns from conservationists the house might be torn down. The rezoning proposal involves a total of four properties from 587 to 599 West King Edward. It envisions preserving the James Residence and building 20 three-storey townhouses, including five lane-facing lock-off units. Eighteen of the townhouses would be on three of the lots, while two would be lane-fronting townhouses at the back of the hobbit house property. Architect Ross Lort designed the James Residence. Lort also designed Casa Mia at 1920 Southwest Marine Dr. and the Maxine’s Beauty School in theWest End. The James Residence was built in 1942 for William H. James, a CNR foreman, and his family and constructed by builder Brenton Lea to create an “Ann Hathaway” house, according to the city report on the application. The design was first used to build a house at 3979 West Broadway known as the Lea Residence, which is now a protected heritage building.

The James Residence sold for $2.25 million in October, raising concerns from conservationists the house might be torn down. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

Following its sale, the plans were used by Lea to construct the James Residence, and later an identical house in West Vancouver, which still stands. Donald Luxton of Donald Luxton and Associates Inc. produced a detailed James Residence Conservation Plan, which explains its historical importance. “The James Residence, built in 1942, is valued for its ‘Storybook Cottage’ style; its association with architect Ross Anthony Lort; and its association with builder Brenton T. Lea,” the plan explains. “The ‘Storybook Cottage’ architecture of the James Residence is an illustration of enduring, traditional domestic ideals. The ‘Storybook Cottage’ style derived from period revival styles that were popular between the two World Wars.Throughout the interwar years, a variety of Storybook style homes were constructed across the westside neighbourhoods of Vancouver; the intact James Residence is one of the best, surviving examples.” Kent Munro, the city’s assistant director of planning,

has been dealing with the rezoning application. “[The house is] identified as having historical value and it’s listed B on the heritage inventory, but it has no protection, so through this rezoning — in exchange for the rezoning, we would be getting from the owner legal designation, which basically means that in perpetuity they can’t alter the exterior of the house.” Twenty-nine people showed up at an open house about the rezoning application in February. Six provided responses — four in support and two who didn’t indicate whether they supported it or not. “One general concern, and that’s not even about this particular project, was about what’s going to happen in the blocks behind that [we] haven’t done the planning for yet. But I guess in this particular case nobody specifically had a concern about the project itself,” Munro said, while adding people still may express concerns at the public hearing. The public hearing is at 6 p.m., June 3. twitter.com/naoibh

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W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A5

News

VSB puzzled over lockout legalities CLASS NOTES

lunchtime, and which activities would be covered by WorkSafeBC. “This is really an unprecedented kind of lockout in B.C. schools,” Bacchus said. “Even our senior people on staff with a lot of experience… are really left… trying to figure out what it all means.” It had appeared the B.C. Public Schools Employers’ Association was going to pressure the BCTF by having the union pay employee benefit premiums, to the tune of $5 million to $10 million a month, according to Bacchus. Instead, BCPSEA said if teachers started rotating strikes, their work hours were to be curtailed and their pay docked 10 per cent. The BCTF referred the salary reduction to the Labour Relations Board. Bacchus believes the LRB will consider the matter Thursday. Bacchus said the VSB wouldn’t share the legal opinion it receives with the public because bargaining

Cheryl Rossi

crossi@vancourier.com

Strike/Lockout

Parents should know by Thursday morning whether teachers’ rotating strikes will continue next week.The B.C.Teachers’ Federation is required to give 48 hours notice and that doesn’t include the weekend.The BCTF announced May 20 that four days of rotating strikes across the province would proceed May 26 to 29.Vancouver teachers picketed May 26. As of Monday afternoon, bargaining sessions remained scheduled for May 27 and 28. The Vancouver School Board has consulted a lawyer about the government’s lockout of teachers, announced May 21.VSB chairperson Patti Bacchus says the board, as employer, needed clarification about docking the pay of teachers who, for example, might be leading a field trip over

Teachers picket outside Charles Dickens elementary Monday morning. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

continues.Teachers want class size and composition and minimum levels of specialist teachers guarantees returned to their collective agreement, and wage and cost of living increases. BCTF president Jim Iker says compared to teacher salaries across the country,

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VSB trustees will hear from the public about its draft sexual orientation and gender identity policy for the third time this month, May 29. “We’ve never had this

kind of reaction to a policy revision before,” Bacchus said. “And from what I understand, even when the original policy came in and it was the first in the province, there was very little in terms of opposition.” Bacchus says the opposition appears well-coordinated, with Cheryl Chang,

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chairperson of the Lord Byng secondary parent advisory council referenced in much of the discussion. Chang wrote an open letter to trustees to voice her and other parents’ concerns about the policy and related process. Byng’s PAC was to meet Tuesday evening, after the Courier’s press deadline, to discuss the position taken by the PAC’s executive. Only Byng parents were permitted to attend. Bacchus says she has received emails from people wanting to change the leadership of the PAC. In the meantime, a B.C. Safer Schools Coalition has sprung up to support the new guidelines.The coalition includes theTrans Clinical Care Providers’ group, the Canadian Professional Association forTransgender Health and other groups and individuals that support the right of trans children to be safe in school. The meeting starts at 5 p.m. at 1580West Broadway. twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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A6

THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4

News

Train2Main tries commuter patience Christopher Cheung

chrischcheung@hotmail.com

Rebekka Regan has relied on the Main Street– Science World station to get to work for the past five years with no major complaints. Now she waits on an increasingly crowded platform watching trains pass by.The record number is nine. Regular SkyTrains no longer stop at the station due to construction. Since March 30, the only way to reach Main Street–Science World has been by Train2Main, a special two-car train that stops at all stations between Waterfront and Commercial–Broadway. TransLink recommends those using Train2Main to allow for 10 minutes of extra travel time, but Train2Main has faced unexpected lag times. “My boyfriend let me know about trying to come home on a Friday night,” said Regan. “The platform is full of people waiting beyond 30 minutes, fight-

A Train2Main pulls into Main Street–Science World every 10 to 12 minutes. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

ing for even a space to sit. [Transit] staff tend to congregate with one another almost trying to distance themselves from the frustration and chaos.” In late April, transit police caught a man attempt-

ing to walk on the track from Commercial–Broadway to Main Street–Science World during a delay. Rebekka called the case ridiculous, but admits having visions of doing the same. TransLink has attempted

to inform transit users of changes.Train2Main signs at stations are designed with hot pink to draw attention. Anna Li lives in the area and finds the signs unclear. She thought the signs were promoting Main

Street itself and its businesses. “It’s hard to know that Train2Main is a specific train rather than telling people to train to Main for a visit,” said Li. TransLink staff are always present at Main Street–Science World and occasionally visit other Train2Main stations. College student Angad Bailey is satisfied with their assistance but offers one tip that many seem to miss. “The only sign people really need to pay attention to is the electronic sign which shows where the oncoming train is headed.” TransLink said it understands the frustration of longer waits but wishes to maintain some form of transit service during construction rather than closing off the station entirely. TransLink spokesperson Jiana Ling says a shuttle train is the best option without sacrificing safety. She recommends commuters visit TransLink’s online channels and traffic media for updates. Construction at Main

Street–Science World began in the spring of 2013.The new east stationhouse was completed May 18 and commuters can only access the train platform there with a new set of stairs and a new elevator.The west stationhouse is now closed for construction. A secure bike parking area was opened May 26 to coincide with Bike to Work Week. The upgrades cost $30 million and are needed to accommodate the number of passengers as the station was not built to handle over 23,000 each day. Main Street–Science World is the oldest station on the city’s rapid transit system, built in 1982 in preparation for Expo 86. It will be a while before commuters visit a construction-free station as it isn’t due to be completed until next year. However, the glassy east stationhouse now in use offers a peek at a modern, completed station. “The system is inconvenient, but the station looks great,” said Li. twitter/chrischeungtogo

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W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A7

News Quebec childcare $7 a day Continued from page 1 “My jaw dropped practically to the ground when I found out what the situation was in British Columbia for early learning and childcare,” Carsley said. Though he described the childcare in B.C. as “wonderful” and believes the public licensing program is one of the best in the world, Carsley said there just aren’t enough spaces to meet the demand. And that fact, he said, is having an effect on the health benefits of children. “The evidence is clear that high quality, licensed, modern early learning care or childcare gives kids a boost,” Carsley said. “It makes them better ready for school. And we know that being better ready for school makes kids better ready for life.” In total, there are 3,200 city-facilitated licensed childcare spaces in Vancouver. Each year, the city contributes close to $2 million in grants that support childcare and early learning. City council went on

Terry Tayler spent last Thursday at a childcare centre that recently opened on the former site of the Eldorado Hotel at Nanaimo and Kingsway. The centre was named after Tayler. PHOTO MIKE HOWELL

record in 2011 of supporting a coalition’s campaign to lobby the provincial government to implement a $10-a-day childcare plan for B.C. “Unfortunately, we don’t see the type of support we’d

like to see from the provincial and federal governments for bigger childcare programs,” the mayor said. “So many cities and towns are left on our own to try and make the best of it.” twitter.com/Howellings

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4

News

Young couple points way to frugal living Critics say their savings goals are unrealistic Stanley Tromp

stromp@telus.net

Two young Vancouverites say advice offered in their new ebook can help readers beat the high cost of living in Vancouver. Celestian Rince, 25, and his girlfriend of five years Stephanie Williams, 27, say by stretching every dollar, they can cut grocery costs down to $230 for both, go on foreign vacations twice a year, and hope to retire by their late 30s. The couple have almost entirely stopped eating at restaurants and rarely drink coffee or alcohol.Their combined income is about $54,000 a year, and home ownership and becoming parents don’t interest them, with the decision to be child-free a lifestyle choice and not a financial one. They both work downtown, and live in a $732-permonth one-bedroom apartment in a Gastown housing co-op (which will rise to $800 soon) that allows them

Stephanie Williams and Celestian Rince hope to retire before the age of 40. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

to walk and cycle instead of using transit. Both authors are vegan but Rince said a meat diet would likely only add about 20 per cent to the grocery bill. The 40-page book is called Incoming Assets:A Guide to Affordable Living in Vancouver and Beyond, and

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fully planned savings would simply be wiped out. Speaking to the Courier, Rince countered that their co-op is for low and moderate income earners, and some critics had confused it with an entirely different sort of welfare-level social housing. “In fact, the co-op we live in now is the most costly housing we’ve ever been in,” he said, adding that it shouldn’t cost much more to live in downtown Vancouver than in Surrey, with “micro-suites” available downtown for $750 or less. They moved into their B.C. government-funded co-op in fall 2010, after luckily finding the ad on Craigslist. More than half of the couple’s income goes towards savings and “passive investments.”They favour indexed funds, which are mutual funds for the market as a whole, find that high interest GICs are best for the short term, and avoid individual stocks and bonds. For regular savings accounts

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they use a smallVancouver bank called People’sTrust — with a three percent interest rate, the highest they’ve seen in Canada — and also recommend President’s Choice Financial andTangerine Financial. “We think you should never be paying money for a basic bank account,” Rince said. Rince, who was born in Singapore and moved to Canada at age three, rebuts critics’ complaints that their frugal lifestyle would be too “boring” for most Vancouverites. “Not everyone wants to live by eating out and go to the theatre at full price,” he said. “We hike almost each weekend, and we buy many discounted tickets to concerts and theatres from box offices.The Vancouver Symphony Orchestra has $15 tickets for students, the library regularly has free film screenings and talks, and so on. It may be a cliché, but life is indeed what you make of it.”

chats

18,464 TONNES:

Coffee beans for that cup of java and good conversation.

A quality of life. portmetrovancouver.com


W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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News

Macdonald nixes NPA run Journalist Kirk LaPointe courted by party Mike Howell

mhowell@vancourier.com

Three weeks ago, developer Robert Macdonald was strongly considering a run as the NPA’s mayoral candidate in this year’s civic election campaign. He even gave a mayoral-like speech at a party fundraiser May 7 at the Vancouver Convention Centre, where he delivered a passionate address to about 400 guests on the need for change at city hall. But Macdonald’s recent visit to his doctor ended any thoughts of challenging Mayor Gregor Robertson for the top job at city hall. “My cardiologist doesn’t feel I’m healthy enough,” said Macdonald, who heads Macdonald Development Corp and is the NPA’s vice-president. “He said, ‘Do you want to have another stroke?’ When I had the first one, I tell you it wasn’t very pleasant.” Macdonald, 57, has had cancer, heart operations and a stroke.The stress of a campaign, which he believes would involve Vision Vancouver attempting to destroy his reputation, would be too much for him, he said. “I’ve tried to have a good reputation, I’ve tried to be a good man but it doesn’t mean that everybody agrees with the way I see life,” he told the Courier Monday. He didn’t specify what details might emerge during the campaign that would sully his reputation. But, he said, “there’s no

question in my mind that the Vision folks would put some complete all-out assault and turn every good thing I’ve done in my life to dust.” Macdonald has led the family-owned real estate development company since 1985.The company’s portfolio of properties includes apartments, hotels, shopping centres and office buildings in Canada and the United States. It also owns more than 10,000 acres of land for future development. Since the 2011 campaign, various Vision Vancouver politicians have criticized Macdonald for his unprecedented $960,000 donation to the NPA in the last race. Vision’s executive director Stepan Vdovine declined to comment on Macdonald’s statements regarding Vision Vancouver. The mayor said recently that Vision planned to run a “relentlessly positive” campaign. But Macdonald noted Robertson made that comment during the same speech in which he referred to the NPA as a party of “angry, old men.” The NPA is expected to name its mayoral candidate before the end of June. Another name that has surfaced as a possible leader is longtime journalist and teacher Kirk LaPointe, who is the publisher and editor-in-chief of Self-Counsel Press. Reached Tuesday, LaPointe said he was approached by the NPA but he wouldn’t say whether it was to become the party’s mayoral candidate. “I have to weigh whether

vancouver.ca

I have the capacity to do anything and they have to weigh whether they’re interested,” he said, noting the party is still evaluating possible candidates. “It’s premature for me or for anyone else, for that matter, to say that I’m a candidate.” But, he said, “quite a few people” are interested in his possible candidacy and he

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Thursday, May 29, 2014, 4 - 8 pm (drop in anytime) Pandora Park children’s playground 2325 Franklin (at Garden Drive) To learn more about this project visit vancouver.ca/pandora-park Open house materials and a questionnaire will be available online May 30 – June 13, 2014. FOR MORE INFORMATION: 604-718-5852 or debra.barnes@vancouver.ca

Developer Robert Macdonald, seen here delivering a speech at the NPA’s recent fundraiser, has decided not to become his party’s mayoral candidate. PHOTO MATTHEW DESOUZA

DO YOU KNOW THIS MAN?

Open House: Children’s Water Spray Park in Pandora Park Join us at an open house to review and comment on concept plan options for a children’s water spray park.

is “keenly interested in the future of the city.” Added LaPointe: “I have spent my career observing, reporting on the political process and helping to define issues in communities. And the opportunity to consider how I can give back to my community strikes a chord at my age and stage.” twitter.com/Howellings

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4

Opinion The victory lap’s over for the B.C. Liberals Les Leyne Columnist lleyne@timescolonist.com The B.C. Liberals’ long victory lap after last year’s upset win may have finally come to an end at this weekend’s convention. In a speech on Saturday, Premier Christy Clark fondly reminisced about the “Comeback Kid” win that virtually no one saw coming. She credited everyone in the room for pulling it off and congratulated them for overcoming the worst odds the party ever faced. She also revealed that party strategists briefly considered matching former NDP Leader Adrian Dix’s flip-flop on the Kinder Morgan pipeline, because the NDP actually gained in the polls after he got off the fence and came out against turning Vancouver into an oil port. But she nixed the idea. “I said ‘No.’ We will not change our position [it was, and is, non-committal, pending review] … We will not let our beliefs be determined by pollsters.” While the celebration of the win continued inside the convention, the problems are piling up outside. The education system will start sputtering to a halt this week with teacher walkouts. Various groups are deeply unhappy with the ALR changes. There’s still nothing definitive to show the promised LNG bonanza will materialize. And a number of specific moves — such as the upcoming closure of the Victoria Youth Custody Centre — have drawn fire. The party was determined to ignore most of those problems, and anything else that got in the way of a good time. Although Clark insisted she likes to see Liberals arguing important public issues, a number of potentially contentious resolutions — on issues such as grizzly-bear hunting, ferry fares, addressing poverty strategy — were ditched. Only 18 made it to debate stage and most of them were motherhood calls for things such as balancing the budget or writing a northern economic strategy. Some of them were so mundane no one even bothered to speak against them. They found a few minutes to spend on housing affordability, mental health and child care. And all the ideas put forth as resolutions on those topics were rejected. B.C. Liberals are a lot more interested in keeping taxes down than on hiking spending on social needs.

[Clark] also revealed that party strategists briefly considered matching former NDP Leader Adrian Dix’s flip-flop on the Kinder Morgan pipeline. “We are not the party of tax more, spend more,” she said later. “We premise all of our beliefs on the fact we need to grow the economy, keep our fiscal house in order and keep taxes low in order to look after people. “Once we’ve grown the economy, landed some LNG jobs … that’s going to mean we’re able to act on some of the aspirational things people are talking about at this convention.” Off the policy stage, work is getting underway on political strategy. The next election is only three years away and a number of campaigners within the party are starting to look forward, rather than back. There was talk of a big new socialmedia push and a briefing from a U.S. strategist on the science of getting out the vote. Prominent Vancouver realtor Bob Rennie was introduced as the new fundraising chairman. And Clark reverted to campaign mode in taking some shots at the NDP for always thinking they know how to spend people’s money better than they do. “They don’t understand B.C. I think they still don’t understand why they lost: They want to get stuck on No. People want a government that will get to Yes.” Liberals will tell and retell themselves the story of the 2013 win privately until the end of time. But they don’t have a lot of time to keep dwelling on it in public. This week, the endgame begins in another typically bitter struggle with teachers. Clark revealed no strategy on how it will be dealt with, other than more talk at the negotiating table. And there are other challenges ahead. The victory lap is over. twitter.com/leyneles

The week in num6ers...

99

The number by which the city has surpassed its three-year target for creating new childcare spaces for a total of 599 built or committed since 2012.

71

The number of children on the waiting list for the childcare centre at Collingwood Neighbourhood House.

2

Number of gold medals won by UBC sprinter Devan Wiebe at the NAIA championships in Alabama. The T-Birds women’s team came in third overall.

Green with envy for Europe’s sustainability Michael Geller Columnist geller@sfu.ca

It is a noble goal. It would be nice to achieve it. But it is so unrealistic I have to smile every time I think about it. I refer to the mayor’s proposal to make Vancouver the greenest city in the world by 2020. I have been smiling a lot about the Greenest City initiative while travelling around France over the past two weeks. I thought about it as I shifted the gears of a small rental car whose GPS system provided relative fuel economy for different routes. I thought about it while looking at local real estate listings and cooling some wine in my apartment’s small under counter fridge. To be fair, a transformation is taking place in both Europe and North America. It seems they want to be more like us, and we want to be more like them. But by 2020 we are not going to be living the kind of sustainable or durable lifestyle the French and other Europeans live today. It is not in our DNA. On the other hand, they are not going to be living a typical North American lifestyle. Indeed, while we implement new measures to reduce energy and resource consumption, they are adding solar panels to their roofs.

To be more sustainable than the Europeans, Vancouverites would have to cut their energy consumption by about half.

Look at real estate listings in shop windows in France and you will notice something quite interesting. Every listing is accompanied by a small coloured bar chart, which indicates the heating/cooling energy consumption of the property for sale. This is now the law throughout Europe. Before selling a property, the owner must retain an independent firm to conduct an energy audit and include the measurement with the listing. Property ratings range from “A” Green that use less than 50kWh for heating and

13

The number of homes in the Grandview-Woodland neighbourhood hosting events as part of the 11th annual In the House Festival running June 6 to 8.

cooling, to “G” Red that use more than 451kWh. On average, the French use about half the energy we use in our homes. Can you imagine a similar law in Vancouver? While I would support it, most would not. Just think about the battle over smart meters or all the strata councils who have voted not to prepare depreciation reports on the condition of their property. To be more sustainable than the Europeans,Vancouverites would have to cut their energy consumption by about half. Many of us would need to subdivide our houses into smaller suites and possibly construct infill units on the front lawns. (To make new units more acceptable to neighbours, they could be designed to look like large hedges!) We would have to give up our large multi-door refrigerators and trade in older washers and dryers for energy efficient models.While most of us like European appliances, we want North American sizes. On a recent tour of laneway houses I noticed many refrigerators seemed larger than the bathrooms. When it comes to our cars, to achieve the fuel economy of the average French motorist, we would have to give up our automatic SUVs for smaller manual transmission vehicles, or hybrid or electric models. While some of us are making this shift (pun intended), the vast majority is not. If anything we are buying larger cars to feel safer on the road since so many others are driving larger cars. It is a vicious circle. Fortunately, new transit-oriented developments will make it easier to live without a car. But not all of us want to live in a highdensity apartment above a supermarket on a busy street. Moreover, it will be a long time before Vancouver has a comprehensive public transit system like those found in most European cities such as Montpellier where colourful trams quietly glide along dedicated lanes around the region. To conclude, we should all try to live more sustainable lifestyles.We should cycle and recycle.We should start converting the remaining garbage to energy, rather than truck it hundreds of kilometres away. But let us not kid ourselves.Vancouver will not be the most sustainable city in the world by 2020.We probably will not achieve that distinction by 2120. More importantly, let us not make decisions in an effort to be the Greenest City that might compromise the economic health of our city and province. That will not be sustainable. twitter.com/michaelgeller

2

The number of Galaxy Tab Pro gadgets up for grabs in a Courier contest. Simply email blink@ vancourier.com and answering the question: What do you use your tablet for?

1

The number of operas written by Can Lit icon Margaret Atwood. Pauline, about the halfMohawk poet and performer Pauline Johnson, runs at the York Theatre until Saturday.


W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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Mailbox Restore, renovate and re-inhabit old homes To the editor: Re: “Developing Story: Rally to support heritage homes,” May 21. Call me simple, but I just don’t know how to teach children to green-bin their food waste when a developer sends all the mature landscaping on a property to the landfill. Call me simple, but I just don’t know how to teach children not to be wasteful when they see perfectly good houses smashed and taken to the landfill. Call me simple, but isn’t the city government that issues all the demolition permits complicit in contributing to the non-affordability of housing in Vancouver. I wish someone would tell me how to respond when the kids ask: “Why is that house going down?” Virtually every For Sale sign on a West Side property that is not a newbuild (regardless of condition or size) is a guarantee the surveyor pickets and orange netting will soon follow.The waste is astounding and should not be allowed

to continue. Remember the 3 Rs for consumer goods? The landfill is no place for homes. Why not Restore, Renovate and Re-inhabit homes. It is done, you know, just not in Vancouver — a city that claims to be well on the way to becoming the Greenest City in the world. Alison Bealy, Vancouver

Sports story made ultimate mistake

To the editor: Re: “Contenders rise in a crowded field,” May 23. I enjoyed reading your article about high school ultimate. However I would like to point out one small correction.The 2011 provincial champion was Kitsilano and not St. George’s/York House as you listed. The past results from the British Columbia Ultimate Society can be found here: bcultimate.ca. Erin Broatch, Vancouver

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VA N C O U V E R T H I S W E E K I N H I S TO RY

TraderVic’s closes in Coal Harbour

May 28, 1999: A popular waterfront Tiki bar and restaurant closes its doors in order to make way for a new public park. Featuring bamboo walls, a thatched roof ceiling, totem poles, skull-shaped cups, tiki lights and outrigger canoes, Trader Vic’s operated for decades next to the Bayshore Hotel (now the Westin Bayshore) but closed due to rezoning regulations that require developers to set aside park space for large projects. Rather than be demolished, the kitchy building was moved by barge to a private vineyard near Butchart Gardens on Vancouver Island.

Fonyo completes cross-Canada run

May 29, 1985: Steve Fonyo, a 19-year-old who lost his left leg to cancer as a child, completes his 7,924 km cross-Canada marathon by dipping his artificial left leg into the Pacific at Mile Zero of the Trans-Canada Highway in Victoria. Inspired by the late Terry Fox’s Marathon of Hope, Fonyo’s Journey for Lives raised $14 million in donations for cancer research and he became the youngest person named an Officer of the Order of Canada the same year. He later had numerous brushes with the law, including convictions for assault with a weapon and fraud, and was stripped of the award in 2009.

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COURIER COLUMN: “VisionVancouver’s big tent shelters notable names,” May 23. Jim Quail @jim_quail: Apparently I’m just @allevatoc’s arm candy, according to @vancouriernews! I take it as a compliment. Carmela Allevato @allevatoc: “Main squeeze” as I recall. COURIER STORY: “City slow to tell its Sochi story,” May 23. 21Reality_Bites: Anyone that thinks that this trip was planned for anything other than some photo ops for us mouth-breathers back at home watching the Winter Games from our La-Z-Boys is truly living in LaLaLand. As per former IOC VP Dick Pound’s prediction, no one gives a flying fig about meeting with small town, small time politicians during the event.The fact that Stevenson and this city council weren’t on this Russian issue BEFORE the Oly’s just shows how publicity driven and wholly politically opportunistic they are.The fact that a tax-payer PR contractor had to accompany him, ridiculous. And, as usual, sickening. COURIER STORY: “School aims for accessible playground,” May 23. Play for EveryBody @play4everybody:Thank you for your support. So happy to bring universally accessible play toVancouver! Chris Chanter @chrischanter: Long overdue for Carnarvon. Much deserved! COURIER STORY: “Rally to support heritage homes,” May 21. Sarah: Apparently the Legg house most recently had eight apartments, and the tower that will replace it will only have 23 (and luxury units at that). It doesn’t seem worth it for the loss of what few heritage buildings we have left in this city. Amazed100: The new condo will have 23 units that will likely be owned by overseas investors (Vancouverites with normal jobs can’t afford the new luxury condos). Like Coal Harbour, many of them will be left empty. So as far as Vancouver residents are concerned this is simply the loss of eight rental apartments, rare West End green space and the appalling loss of a Class A Heritage building. All to the cause of developer profit.There will be no community benefit, none, zero, zip.This is a microcosm of what is happening all over Vancouver under Vision Vancouver. If you are not angry about this you aren’t paying attention. It is urgent that Vision, the NPA and their developer friends be sent a undeniable message in the next election. Encourage your friends, neighbours, coworkers to get out and vote. KUDOS & KVETCHES: “You won’t believe what K&K’s griping about now,” May 23. Vancouver Shogi Club: Remain cheeky. :)


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4

News Fire chief the city’s top earner

Fire Chief John McKearney was the top earner at City of Vancouver in 2013, bringing in $347,762, according to the Statement of Financial Information (SOFI) released May 22. McKearney was also reimbursed for the most expenses at $10,654. At city hall, city manager Penny Ballem was paid $339,219 and she expensed $5,513, almost $3,000 less than Mayor Gregor Robertson’s chief of staff, Mike Magee. Magee charged $8,414 and was

paid $128,004. Among the dozen officials paid in excess of $200,000, the top earners included city solicitor Francie Connell ($301,117), chief financial officer Patrice Impey ($271,708) and deputy city manager Sadhu Johnston ($263,329). Police Chief Jim Chu’s salary ($313,653 in 2012 plus $12,276 expenses) is reported elsewhere. Overall, 2,000 people were paid $75,000 or more by Vancouver taxpayers. According to a data analysis by CityHallWatch, the number of staffers earning $100,000

or more for the period ending Dec. 31, 2013 was 588. Robertson was the highest-paid elected official at $148,849 plus $20,982 in expenses.The expenses included $7,175 for a transportation allowance, even though he prefers to use a bicycle. The city brought in $1.488 billion and spent $1.3 billion, leaving a $180.6 million surplus.The accumulated surplus increased to $6.13 billion.The city also reported $789.1 million in long-term debt. Vancouver Economic Commission received

$4,014,735 in transfers.The 22 area business associations were paid $9,429,274, of which Downtown Vancouver Business Improvement Association received the biggest slice ($2,410,733). The report attached to the SOFI from financial services general manager Esther Lee was dated April 25 — three days before Robertson announced Aquilini Investment Group paid $91 million to take over the city’s interest as secured creditor of Southeast False Creek Properties, the company that developed

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the Olympic Village.The Aquilini deal included the 67 remaining units in the waterfront Canada House section of what is now branded the Village on False Creek. The report refers to the deal, but the numbers are not included. “The estimated net proceeds are expected to exceed the value of the assets sold and along with the cash proceeds from prior sales will completely repay the city’s borrowing for the market project,” said the SOFI. The financial report said that at the end of 2013, the city had $79.4 million in cash “set aside in a reserve for the repayment of the $150 million debenture due June 2014.” Robertson claimed on April 28 that the city would end up with a $70 million surplus, but later admitted that didn’t include the $170 million that developer Millennium failed to pay for the land. — Bob Mackin

Legal ice storm

The ice and snow that rained down on drivers crossing the Port Mann Bridge shortly after it opened nearly two years ago have resulted in a pair of lawsuits. According to a notice of civil claim filed in Vancouver Supreme Court, CarylLee Obrecht is suing the Transportation Investment Corp. (TI Corp.), the company that operates the Port Mann/Highway 1 project, over an incident on Dec. 19, 2012 that shut the bridge down for several hours. Court documents state Obrecht was a passenger in a car travelling across the bridge when large sheets of ice falling from support cables struck the vehicle. The suit claims Obrecht suffered injuries including a concussion, laceration to the scalp, headaches, injuries to the neck and shoulder, posttraumatic stress disorder and nightmares. The suit claims the incident and resulting injuries were caused solely by the negligence of TI Corp. Obrecht is seeking general and special damages, and reimbursement for all past and future health-care costs. A second and separate notice of claim was filed by Roberta Lessard, who is suing TI Corp. as well as three other companies involved in the construction or operation of the bridge — Kiewit/Flatiron General Partnership, Flatiron Constructors Canada and Peter Kiewit Infrastructure

— over a similar incident the same day. Court documents, also filed last week, state Lessard was injured when ice and snow plummeted onto the roof of her car. The incident caused the car’s windshield to shatter and Lessard to slam on her brakes, resulting in injury.The suit claims Lessard, an employee of the Vancouver Police Department, suffered physical injuries and shock, as well as trauma and nervousness. None of the allegations have been proven in court and the other parties have yet to file a response. — Jeremy Deutsch

Design awards

The City of Vancouver invites nominations for its inaugural Urban Design Awards which will celebrate design excellence in Vancouver. Submissions are now being accepted in the following categories for designs that reflect the highest standards in architecture and urban design and contribute to Vancouver’s vibrancy and livability: residential buildings (small, medium or large scale), commercial buildings, government and institutional buildings, urban elements, innovation, outstanding sustainable design, landscape, public space and infrastructure. There will also be a Special Jury Award. To be eligible, projects must have received an occupancy permit after Jan. 1, 2012 and be located in Vancouver. Entry details are available at vancouver.ca Deadline for applications is July 14.

On the beach

Sunset Beach matters to Vancouverites and visitors alike. Its historical importance was to be honoured with a Vancouver Heritage Foundation Places that Matter plaque May 27. Sunset Beach Park, established in 1959, completed the dream of a continuous strip of public waterfront between Stanley Park and the head of False Creek. Cottages and apartment buildings had lined the water edge of Beach Avenue since the city’s early years. In 1941, businessman George C. Reifel traded a crucial strip of property at the foot of Bute Street to the city for property elsewhere, enabling the beach development plan to proceed. Reifel’s Spanish Colonial Revival home, Casa Mia, will be open on the heritage foundation’s 2014 Heritage House Tour, June 1.


W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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Cityliving

Sunday’s rain didn’t keep all interested passersby away from the vintage cars on display for the seventh annual East Van Show and Shine. See photo gallery at vancourier.com or scan this page with the Layar app. PHOTOS REBECCA BLISSETT

Car enthusiasts shine in the rain Swells of rainwater ran down chrome and the perfect paintjobs of the few cars and bikes parked for Sunday’s EastVan Show and Shine.The row of tires on East Sixth Avenue ended with a 1947 Chrysler with a wooden frame that looked like a termite vacation resort. The soaking likely had the car going home a few pounds heavier than at its arrival. Erv Salvador, the event organizer and owner of The Whip Restaurant and Gallery, said having his own car show is something he’s

always wanted to do and the fun of doing so hasn’t worn off after seven years. “Ever since taking over The Whip, I’ve wanted to do this. I’m a car guy.We don’t do a lot of special events but we wanted to do something every year to get people from the neighbourhood out,” he said. “Last year, by far, was the biggest one yet.This year, well, it’s the rain…” But where there’s a vintage car, there’s a tale and thin crowds just meant more time for story-telling which, as any show and shine regular will tell you, is an essential part of car culture.

Ron Woywitka stood by his 1966 Dodge Charger with towel in hand to mop up water every 15 minutes “more just to pass the time” as hopes for dry skies faded by the minute. The greyness of the sky and pavement made the Charger’s sunset orange paint seem all the brighter as Woywitka explained how he found the muscle car four years ago in Los Angeles after a long hunt. “It’s a true California muscle car, hard to find. It had been in the family for almost 40 years,” he said. “I go to car shows now and then but this one is

where I find the people to be knowledgeable. It’s East Van, right? Still blue-collar. Even still.” Next to Woywitka’s Charger was Gerry Gramek’s 1952 Chrysler Windsor Deluxe which just reached 35,000 original miles the Saturday before the show and shine. Part of the secret to the car’s preservation was its being kept in the Pettit Brothers Chrysler Museum in Virginia from 1969 to 1991, where a whole seven miles was logged on the odometer. One of the bikes — a soft yellow 1965 Chang Jiang — is owned by Salvador

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who bought it from a military junkyard during a motorcycle trip in China that took him from Bejing to Tibet five years ago. “We stopped in at the old military base and all the stuff was there from the People’s Liberation Army. These bikes were built in the ’60s, crated and sent to warehouses,” said Salvador, who is often seen riding along with Beau, his gogglewearing dog, in the sidecar. “When the war ended the bikes, jeeps, everything — it had not been used so when I got it, it was all original, all in the box.” Parked next to the Chang

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Jiang was arguably one of the most-recognized hotrods styles in pop culture — a Ford T-bucket.This 1923 model is owned by Johnny Lopez, who usually shows up to the annual event with one of his chopper motorcycles, if you don’t count that year his Econoline work van was the crowd favourite. “These kinds of shows, they happen once in a blue moon so I like them because it brings out all the people I would normally see in the hotrod scene,” Lopez said. “It’s the only time we really get to see each other.” twitter.com/rebeccablissett

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4

Darlene Dranfield is the store manager at Clothes and Collectibles, a West End thrift store that relies on donations and gives its proceeds to the West End Seniors’ Network. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

Friendly thrift store offers rare finds Clothes and Collectibles fundsWest End seniors programs Wanyee Li

li.wanyee@gmail.com

Every day 72-year-old Gary Malo walks into his favourite thrift shop and looks around to see if anything catches his eye. He’s looking for Buddha statues. “I like Buddha statues, that’s what I look for first,” he said. “They only come in once in a while.” But the main reason why he goes to the store every day is because of the people who work there. “They find my inner soul,” he said, chuckling. Clothes and Collectibles first opened 14 years ago and has been providing the West End community with affordable and unique

items ever since. All of its proceeds go toward the West End Seniors’ Network, which runs programs including at-home care, support for LGBT seniors and language classes. Clothes and Collectibles is run by three managers and about 20 volunteers. It accepts donations, which works well because of the neighbourhood. Many West End residents are mobile, according to store manager Darlene Dranfield.When they move apartments, they often give items that don’t fit in their new home to Clothes and Collectibles. Dranfield also cites rising rent as a cause of downsizing, which tends to result in donations to the

thrift store. “Ninety-nine per cent of our stuff is from local people, mobile families, and through family members passing on,” said Dranfield. Veronica Cranstonsmith visits the store at least once a day whether she needs to buy something or not. “I need the exercise, otherwise my knees will lock up. I’ve got terrible arthritis,” she said. Like many seniors, she enjoys the social aspect of going out to shop. “I always enjoy going to the mall because I’ve met so many of my friends there, and so many of them are at the store.” The thrift store makes sense to her from a practical standpoint, too. She explained that she can afford

to not try the clothes on — if she doesn’t like it she can simply donate it back to the store. Besides the exercise and practicality of Clothes and Collectibles, Cranstonsmith has a soft spot for the store. “I try to support them as much as possible.The store does a very good job of greeting everyone and making them feel good. Quite often it’s jammed with people because it’s social exercise for them,” said the 83-year-old pancreatic cancer survivor. For seniors who may live alone and have limited mobility, socializing with others is extremely important, according to Dranfield. “Part of the philosophy of

the store is that yes we are a business and we’re trying to make money to support our seniors. But we’re also a support system for the community.We have people who come in just to have a chat.We have people who come in for a hug.They get a smile.We remember their names.We remember their children,” Dranfield said. The store is so well known in the community that receiving enough donations to keep the store running is not a problem, according to Dranfield. Even items that the store uses for packaging like wrapping paper and shopping bags are donated. In fact, Clothes and Collectibles receive so many donations that it

cannot sell all of the items at the store. Some items are transferred to other thrift stores or to auctions if the item is a high-value antique or collectable. Dranfield noted amazing items have been brought in, including 100-year-old dish sets from France and penny banks from American banks in the early 1920s. The penny banks are worth thousands of dollars now, according to Dranfield. For Malo, the store is full of unexpected treasures. “I like surprises,” he said. “You never know what you’re going to find.” So far he has 12 Buddha statues at home, all found at Clothes and Collectibles. twitter.com/wanyeelii

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W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A15

Spring bazaar, fashion show and roses Wanyee Li

craft workshop for seniors, as well as face painting and a bouncy castle for kids. Strawberry shortcake will be served in biodegradable dishware for $5.There will be live music throughout the afternoon provided by Black Gardenia andWESN’s Heritage Harmonies Choir.

li.wanyee@gmail.com

Spring Bazaar

Saturday, May 31 10 a.m.-2 p.m. The South Granville Seniors Centre is putting on its annual Spring Bazaar. This market is perfect for bargain hunters, collectors and bookworms. People can find bargains for everything from vintage purses to small kitchen appliances. Lunch is available 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and will feature homemade jam and fresh baking for $7. All proceeds go toward programs and services at the South Granville Seniors Centre.

Computer basics with Vancouver Public Library

Rose Show and Rose Care Clinics The Vancouver Rose Society is hosting its annual rose show at Van Dusen Garden June 2.2.

Admission is free, registration required, call 604331-3603.

Car Free Day Fashion Show

Wednesday, June 11 & Thursday, June 26 10:15 a.m.-11:45 a.m. Classes are held at the Central Library in the training rooms on level 7. Registrants will learn how to use the mouse, computer keyboard and get an overview of basic computer functions. No computer experience is required.

Sunday, June 15 1 p.m. Back by popular demand, the Car Free Day Fashion Show by Clothes and Collectibles is happening June 15 outside the Denman Mall entrance. All the models will be customers of the West End thrift store, Clothes and Collectibles, or volunteers who work there. See the potential of thrift

fashion for yourself at this popular neighbourhood event. Clothes modelled will be for sale after the show. Proceeds from Clothes and Collectibles go toward the West End Seniors Network.

Strawberry Festival

Saturday, June 21 1-4 p.m. TheWest End Seniors’ Network is hosting its 24th annual Strawberry Festival at the Barclay Manor.There will be a bazaar with thrift items as well as supplies for craft lovers.There will be a

Sunday, June 22 1 p.m.-4:30 p.m. TheVancouver Rose Society is hosting its annual rose show atVan Dusen Garden June 22. Contestants will be competing for one of six trophies.The public can see all the arrangements starting at 1 p.m. Rose care clinics will be held at 1, 2 and 3 p.m., where people can pick up essential skills like pruning and learn more about the rose species native to the Lower Mainland. Roses judged in the show will be sold individually for 50 cents a stem at 4:30 p.m. If you feel inspired, you can also buy a rose plant and start your own rose garden. Admission is free. twitter.com/wanyeelii

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4

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Support was key to Hooper’s comeback Martha Perkins

mperkins@glaciermedia.ca

Jackie Hooper was “lost in a dark place” when she was admitted to the psychiatric ward of UBC Hospital. But her time there was so beneficial that she emerged committed to the idea of bringing light into the world of other people living with mental illness. In her quest to create the same sort of supportive environment that she found at Ward One West, she was able to convince politicians at all levels of government to draft legislation for and dedicate funds to co-housing initiatives.The first building welcomed formerly hospitalized residents in 1974. In Vancouver, there are now close to 1,000 residents in supportive housing, with staff on hand to help them when and if they need it. One of those buildings in the West End now bears her name as a sign of gratitude. “Was it courage that has kept me going for the past 40 years,” she asked in her acceptance speech for Coast Mental Health’s Courage To Come Back Award in the mental health category. “Certainly not the only

Retired social worker and author Jackie Hooper won a Courage to Come Back Award this month. PHOTO DEBRA STRINGFELLOW.

thing because if I had been alone, I would have been gone and mostly forgotten so long ago. “I am here only because every time I fell, someone was there to catch me....That support gave me strength through the dark days, and weeks, and months, to keep going, to stay with the living. It also gave me the wonderful opportunity to seize my manic moments, to listen to those annoying voices in my head and use some of their really great ideas.” After suffering from de-

pression after a series of severe challenges, Hooper was later diagnosed with bipolar disorder. She went back to school and got her master’s of social work, working as a social worker long past retirement age. She selfpublished books and wrote newspaper columns, including in the Courier. She made special mention of the Mental Health Patients Association. “These were real people for me, a growing backstop, in an unread time in my life.” twitter.com/MarthaJPerkins


W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A17

News

New book explores Sikh weddings Wanyee Li

li.wanyee@gmail.com

If you visit a Sikh temple you may be lucky enough to attend a wedding while you’re there. Families who host Sikh weddings must be ready to feed more people than they actually invite because Sikh temples are open to the public and it is not uncommon for strangers to join the celebration. This is just one of many customs that non-Sikhs may be unaware of. Arvinder Grewal’s book, Weddings Around TheWorld: SikhWeddings, is a guidebook inspired by her own experiences with weddings growing up in Vancouver. She wrote the book for the Sikh-Canadian community when she realized that some customs were being lost. “I intended it for the generation who have lost this information, who don’t have this information passed down to them,” said Grewal. But she added that the book is for anyone who is interested in Punjab culture or the Sikh religion. “I hope that it gives people an idea of the beauty of a

Sikh wedding, the richness, the culture,” she said. She noted a distinction must be made between Sikhism and Punjab. Sikhism is a religion, whereas Punjab is a region in northern India that extends into eastern Pakistan. According to a 2011 Statistics Canada report, 11 per cent of Vancouverites self-identify as South Asian, 10 per cent speak Punjabi at home and 6.5 per cent follow the Sikh religion. Grewal commented that the newer generations of Indo-Canadians may actually know more about Indian culture than she did as a kid because the community is much bigger than before. “Growing up, there wasn’t a lot of Indian people here,” she said. But weddings always brought the family together and reminded everyone of the ties they shared. It was what inspired Grewal to write this book. “The wedding is a standard thing in my life. Whether it’s my sister or niece getting married, there’s always a wedding. I know that it’s always going

to be there. It’s something that brings a community together,” said Grewal. Colourful Punjabi wedding festivities that stretch for an entire city block are a common sight in Vancouver. However, even though weddings are such iconic celebrations in Punjabi culture, most people don’t question the traditions, nor do they understand the meaning behind all of the customs. “When I was doing my research and I asked people

why they did certain rituals, they would say ‘we just do it.’ So I wanted to write down the meaning of some of these customs,” said Grewal. Things can get even more confusing when people from different cultures marry each other. The good news is “you can mix western influences with the pre and post marriage celebrations,” according to Grewal. But the ceremony itself is set

and there are certain prayers that need to be recited. The Sikh wedding ceremony itself only takes about 20 minutes, but the weeklong Punjabi-based wedding festivities can easily incorporate Western influences. For example, bridal showers and receptions are staples in most South Asian weddings now, according to Grewal. Grewal wrote Weddings Around The World: Sikh Weddings while work-

ing full time as a clinical youth counsellor at B.C. Children’s Hospital. She also provides pre-marital counselling for South Asian couples. Grewal was raised in Vancouver by parents who emigrated here from Punjab, India. More similar themed books are in the works, according to Grewal. Currently she is researching Hindi and Greek weddings. twitter.com/wanyeelii

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A20

THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4

Google plays, Xbox lives and a prize We’re giving away two Samsung tablets! PRACTICAL GEEK Barry Link

blink@vancourier.com

It’s hard being Canadian, thanks to cold winters, Stephen Harper speeches and a lone domestic team in the NHL playoffs. It also means poorer digital entertainment compared to our American cousins, who are fat with online fun. So when something happens in Canada on the digital entertainment front, it’s either big news or strangely ignored because, frankly, we’re not used to customer service. That might explain why two recent announcements from Google and Microsoft fell under the radar.

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This month, Google introduced its cumbersomely named Google Play Music

All Access service in Canada. Offering both a monthly subscription streaming service and direct purchase of individual songs and albums, it joins digital movies, books and magazines Google already offers here. So why is a music service from Google important? Because we need the competition. Microsoft has an excellent music service, with both streaming and purchases, and a reasonable video store. CinemaNow offers video and Slacker and Deezer offer streaming music. Individually some of these services are really good, but in Canada only iTunes offers the depth and breadth to be a one-stop shop for music, video and digital reading entertainment.With the entry of its music store, Google is moving closer to becoming a viable option to the Canadian iTunes juggernaut. Continued on next page


W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

25TH

A21

CUSTOMER APPRECIATION DAY

YEAR

LIVE IN STORE Courtesy O.W.L. 11.00 a.m. - 3.00 p.m.

Saturday May 31st, 2014 One Day Only

SALE

Jessie The Barred Owl

Without the Live Gold fee, the Xbox 360 looks interesting again.

Xbox 360 is revitalized Continued from previous page Add its expanding online services to the increasing market share of Googlecentric Android phones and tablets, especially among young people, and the arrival of Google’s odd but ultra cheap Chromecast TV dongle to compete with the more expensive Apple TV, and you can have a digital ecosystem that doesn’t require anything Apple. That increasing competition and more choice for consumers are welcome in a country where everyone I know turns to iTunes by default as the online company store. And it’s Google. Big, rich, voracious. Expect it to offer more as time goes on.

Free the Xbox

Xbox One sales are going well, but not nearly as well as Sony’s rival Playstation 4, which might explain a couple of recent moves by Microsoft.The most widely reported was the decision to offer a cheaper version of the Xbox One without automatically bundling in the Kinect motion sensing camera. The other move is more far reaching, especially for those with the older but still

viable Xbox 360: Microsoft removed the requirement to have an Xbox Live Gold subscription, for $60 a year, to use the console’s entertainment apps like Netflix andYouTube. Xbox Live Gold made sense as a requirement for multiplayer online games on Xbox, but it gouged the many people who use their Xbox largely for entertainment. The Gold requirement was a big reason in addition to price why the Apple TV and Roku devices were better choices for non-gamers and cordcutters. But without the Live Gold fee, suddenly the Xbox 360 looks interesting again. It’s an excellent gaming machine, fully supported by Microsoft, with a pretty good (by Canadian standards) stable of entertainment apps including Netflix, CinemaNow, YouTube, 8tracks, Crackle, Dailymotion,TMZ,Twitch, Hockey Night in Canada, the NHL and MLB and Microsoft’s own video and music services. The cheapest version of the Xbox 360 goes for $199, which while a lot less than the Xbox One is pricier than the Apple TV

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at $109 or the various Roku versions. If you want to play a few non-multiplayer games or want some of the apps, it might be a better value. Or look out for sales to make the purchase more palatable. Tip: If you have bought Gold subscription solely to use the entertainment apps, Microsoft will offer you a pro-rated refund if you request a cancellation by Aug. 31.

Win a tablet

Did I say life in Canada involved sacrifice? Not for Practical Geek readers, who have a chance to win a tablet courtesy of Samsung Canada, who’ve graciously offered two 10-inch Galaxy Tab Pro devices as free giveaways. To enter, send me an email at blink@vancourier. com with the subject line TABLET CONTEST and answer the following question:What do you use your tablet for. It’s that simple, and keep your answers short.The two winners will be randomly drawn from all entries on June 6. I’ll announce the results in the next column. twitter.com/trueblinkit

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A22

THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4

Aphids likely behind mysterious powder Anne Marrison

amarrison@shaw.ca

Q. Our camellia is developing a black powdery substance on its leaves.This rubs off but is even discolouring the side of the house and the neighbouring rhododendron.The plant doesn’t seem to be suffering too much — but it’s really become unsightly. Any suggestions? John Barbisan,Vancouver A. Sooty Mold is very common with camellias. The two most likely causes are aphids or scale insects. All these are sap-suckers that excrete a sweet substance which coats the leaves and attracts ants which eat this “honeydew.” Fungi are also attracted and that’s what gives the honeydew its sooty colour. You’ll need to check whether ants are crawling up the trunk of your camellia and your rhhododendron. If they are, it’s important to stop them. As long as the ants can get up

there, your problems will continue. Garden centres sell insect-trapping substances such as “Tanglefoot.”These sticky products should be smeared on a plastic or cloth band that can be fastened around the trunks of both shrubs. It should be put on so that it can be removed and discarded when necessary. All sap-sucking insects seek out shrubs with lots of tender green growth. Highnitrogen fertilizers encourage this. Balanced, slow-release fertilizers or compost is a better choice. Checking for eggs on the underside of the leaves is also helpful in case you have scale insects, not aphids. Or you could have both. If sunlight and air circulation are blocked, sooty mold is more likely to attack. Sometimes the camellia has very dense growth, or perhaps surrounding trees have grown and are hogging the light. Anyway, it helps to prune off the worst infected branches. Spraying will penetrate

woman in the nursery told me they don’t have it as a perennial because it’s not hardy. I’m getting conflicting information because Botanus says in their catalog that the plant is hardy from zone 3 - 9. So who’s right? Pat, Langley

All sap-sucking insects seek shrubs with lots of tender green growth. High-nitrogen fertilzers encourage this.

better and so will air and sunlight. If the bush is quite small, you could pick off the most badly infected leaves. Blasts of water can dislodge many of the aphids. For generally cleaning the bush somewhat, a tablespoon of Neem oil in a gallon of water is useful.

To cut off the next generation of scale, try dormant oil sprays.These can smother scale eggs. The underside of both shrubs should always be kept clear of fallen leaves or prunings because these harbor fungus spores that re-infect the bush in spring.

This debris shouldn’t be composted. It should go to green waste. Q. I tried to get some asclepias (butterfly weed) from a nursery because I want to plant things that will encourage the bees and butterflies. But the

A. Botanus is right. There are loads of different asclepias species. Some are tender, but most would be hardy here.Two of the toughest and most popular ones are Asclepias tuberosa and Asclepias incarnata, both hardy to zone 3 and listed by Botanus. Asclepias tuberosa is very drought-tolerant, but its deep taproots make it hard to transplant once it’s established. It’s also slow to emerge in spring. Later it gives a full three months of flowers from summer into fall.The bright orange forms are especially spectacular. Anne Marrison is happy to answer garden questions. Send them to her via amarrison@ shaw.ca. It helps if you add the name of your city or region.


W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4

Travel

A great museum recalls the Great War John Keye

MeridianWriters’ Group

At the Musée de la Grande Guerre in Meaux, near Paris, life-sized figures from the First World War march out of the historical mist, through the glass between the display cases and the public space. PHOTO JOHN KEYE/MERIDIAN WRITERS’ GROUP

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MEAUX, France— Great museums are more than simply big buildings housing large collections of rare exhibits.The best ones employ ingenious interior design and thoughtful wayfinding to present visitors with a compelling narrative that enhances the material on display. La Musée de la Grande Guerre is one such museum. Located at Meaux, a half-hour by express train east of Paris, it has as its overarching subject the sprawling, horrific, multiheaded beast known as the Great War, a topic not easy to encapsulate. But the MGG views this theme through the prism of the Battle of the Marne — two battles, actually, the first in 1914 and the second in 1918, which involved American troops and turned the tide of the war. The museum is built on the site of the first battle, the closest the German line got to the City of Light. Historians of every stripe can thank a Frenchman named Jean-Pierre Verney for it. He was a war buff who privately amassed some 50,000 artifacts, which were acquired in 2005 by the Meaux regional government on the condition that they be properly displayed as an educational opportunity for future generations. Only one-third of the collection is on view at any given time. Verney’s vision has been brilliantly fulfilled.Visitors enter a low-slung, modernistic silver slab of a building overlooking Meaux and are immersed in a windowless labyrinth that painstakingly reconstructs the war to, supposedly, end all wars. The self-guided tour starts with a zigzag exhibit recalling the military ethos instilled in young French boys in the 19th century, segues into the political crises that triggered the First World War, then opens into

a series of galleries that tell a story of mass suffering and dubious glory.There are uniforms representing the 35 nations that fought in the war, dioramas of French and German trenches, a collection of vintage propaganda and innumerable armaments ranging from pistols to bombs dropped by hand from primitive aircraft. Two things stand out. One is a gallery that recalls the life of those in the trenches. Between spasms of terror and death were days and weeks of crushing boredom, and this gallery’s 18 casements and wall units contain examples of how the soldiers’ irrepressible creativity was expressed during those tedious hours. There are writing implements fashioned from bayonets, cigarette lighters from grenades and cartridges, mandolins and banjos from helmets and gourds, intricately carved canes and walking sticks, erotic artwork, religious talismans, homemade board games and playing cards. Meanwhile, video screens show authentic silent newsreel footage, both candid and posed, of life at the front. And throughout the museum, platoons of lifesized figures march out of the historical mist.There are 62 of them, plus three officers on horseback, and they come right through the glass between their display cases and the public space. Rendered in white polyester and resin, these statues are a ghostly presence, as if the museum is haunted by the some of the nearly six million French military dead or wounded. Their impact is both profound and eerie. For more information on the Musée de la Grande Guerre, visit museedelagrandeguerre.eu. For information on travel in France, visit the French Government Tourist Office website atfranceguide. com. More travel stories can be found at culturelocker.com.


W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Arts&Entertainment

A25

GOT ARTS? 604.738.1411 or events@vancourier.com

1 May 28-30, 2014 1. The insanely popular Broadway musical Wicked takes its broomstick on the road as part of a cross-Canada tour, which lands at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre this week.The Grammy and Tony award winning “untold story of the witches of Oz” runs May 28 to June 29. For tickets and details, go to BroadwayAcrossCanada.ca. 2. As far as band names goes, East Van Morrison is a pretty good one. It’s no East Van Halen or East Vanderhoof, mind you, but if you’re an East Vancouver group comprised of Dalannah Gail Bowen, Karen Graves, Paul Bergman and Simon Kendall and put “a soulful twist to the timeless Van Morrison songbook,” then it just makes sense.The group celebrates the release of its new CD Old OldWoodstock with a show at Pyatt Hall May 29. Partial proceeds go to the Downtown Eastside Centre for the Arts. Tickets at northerntickets.com. 3. American singer-songwriter Pete Yorn’s star might not shine as bright as it did when his 2001 debut musicforthemorningafter went gold and Rolling Stone named him one of its “10 artists to watch” that year. But like a well-worn pair of jeans, the dude keeps on keeping on. Catch the New Jersey native play an acoustic show at the Imperial May 29.Tickets at Red Cat Records and all Ticketmaster outlets. 4. Elfin thieves and dwarf fighters be damned. The Critical Hit Show: A Live Dungeons and Dragons Comedy Experience brings its chain-metal vests, 20-sided dice and agility points to the Rio Theatre May 28, 8 p.m. for its monthly improvised quest for glory, laughs and snacks. Details at riotheatre.ca.

For video and web content, scan page using the Layar app.

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A26

THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4

Notice of Development Permit Application - DP14013

Public Open House

Somerville House Renovation + Change of Use You are invited to attend an Open House on Wednesday, June 4 to view and comment on proposed renovations to convert the residential building for academic office, education and assembly uses to Somerville House.

Date: Wednesday, June 4, 2014 Time: 4:00 - 6:00 PM Place: St. Andrew`s Hall, 6040 Iona Drive Representatives from the project team and Campus + Community Planning will be available to provide information and respond to inquiries about this project. The public is also invited to attend the Development Permit Board Meeting for this project on June 11. Check link below for details.

For further information: Please direct questions to Karen Russell, Manager Development Services karen.russell@ubc.ca 604-822-1586 For more information on this project, please visit: www.planning.ubc.ca This event is wheelchair accessible.

2

.15

Arts&Entertainment KUDOS & KVETCHES Claws for the cause

There was a fascinating story in the Province on Tuesday — even more fascinating than the fact that it qualified as the front page story with no mention of the province-wide teacher’s strike until five pages in. Apparently a B.C. cat shelter is offering a firstof-its-kind program that pairs up felines with kids who struggle with reading. According to the story, children who are uncomfortable reading out loud because of shyness or embarrassment tend to be more comfortable reading to “a patient cat.” Or as the story’s headline states: “Felines get to spend time with children, who aren’t judged on how they read their books.” We’re not so sure of that. It’s been our experience that cats do nothing but judge. Often from afar — aloof and passively aggressively ignoring you, yet always watching, thinking their silent, disapproving thoughts before rolling on their back and inviting you to rub their irresistible belly of fur and

then in an instant clawing the crap out of your hand when you fall for their trap. Oh, cute and cuddly cats, why do you mock us so? If anything, kids would be better served by reading to an iguana. Speaking from personal experience, those things are truly accepting — never judging or ridiculing you for skimming the last 300 pages of The Brothers Karamazov, never looking at you in disappointment while transmitting secret messages to Bastet, the ancient Egyptian cat-goddess of war, barely moving, in fact, to the point that you think they might be dead until you discover they’re merely transfixed by the sound of your voice reading to them the latest Dean Koontz novel about danger and intrigue or something like that.

Uneasy riders

In case you weren’t aware, May 26 to June 1 is Bike to WorkWeek inVancouver. And with that comes an influx of novice, newbie, casual and first-time cyclists to the road — something that fills of with both joy and a little bit of fear. Joy because biking is good for us, more environmentally friendly

than cars and makes people look more attractive (it’s a scientific fact). And fear because we’ve seen some pretty scary cycling behaviour in the last few days — texting while cycling, shuffling songs on an iPhone while cycling, running stop signs without looking for oncoming traffic, weaving between traffic, weaving for no reason at all, failing to signal, riding dangerously close to parked cars, and we’re pretty sure we saw two attractive Mount Pleasant hipsters making love on a single speed bicycle while riding. Or maybe that was just a dream of ours after drinking too much craft beer. It happens. The point is cyclists need to wise up. So do vehicle drivers, mind you. But drivers at least have rubber, metal, seatbelts, airbags and way more volume protecting them, whereas cyclists have clothing, a helmet and perhaps a beard serving as protection. So let’s be careful and courteous out there. And for God’s sake, put down that cellphone and use it later for what it was meant for — playing Candy Crush at work and taking pictures of what you’re having for lunch. twitter.com/KudosKvetches

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W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A27

Arts&Entertainment

Elvis is In the House

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STATE OF THE ARTS Cheryl Rossi

crossi@vancourier.com

The tunnel scene in Men in Black got a teenaged Eli “Tigerman”Williams fixed on Elvis. ActorWill Smith pushed a button that propelled their vehicle onto the ceiling of a congested tunnel,Tommy Lee Jones slid an eight-track of Elvis Presley singing “Promised Land” into the player and Surrey teenWilliams left the theatre, got himself a pompadour hairdo, picked up some retro clothes and embarked upon his Elvis odyssey. Now Williams, 26, will slip on a bedazzled jumpsuit and smooth down his sideburns to perform at the Invitation to an Imitation show at the 11th annual In the House Festival, which runs June 6 to 8 across 13 Grandview-Woodland homes and backyards. Williams’ grandmother was “a huge Elvis fan” so he grew up listening to the King of Rock ’n’ Roll. Williams first performed as Elvis at a high school talent show and then a decade later took “Elvis 101” from four-time international Elvis Grand Champion Brian “Elvis” Simpson, and another tribute act was born. Williams (“Tigerman” because Elvis liked to be called Mr.Tiger when he studied karate, andWilliams has studied karate too) has since won the Professional Grand Champion crown at the 2012 Pacific Northwest Elvis Festival, finished top 15 in the King of theWorld competition in Memphis, finished in the top 29 in the world in the Ultimate Elvis Tribute Artist Contest and in 2013 won the first Ultimate

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Eli “Tigerman” Williams will perform at the 11th annual In the House Festival PHOTO NORM LEE

Elvis Contest in Hawaii. Williams performs in basements and casinos and spends 40 per cent of his time performing in Elvis competitions.The graphic designer’s ultimate goal is to perform as Elvis full time, perhaps with the Legends in Concert outfit that mounted the 2013 Ultimate Elvis Contest. ButWilliams can’t explain why he’s such a massive Elvis fan. “Maybe it’s charisma or the attitude, the vocals and so forth, but it’s just one of those things I can’t directly pinpoint,” he said. In addition to Elvis tributes, In the House features music, dance, magic, comedy, burlesque and always closes with a backyard circus act. Myriam Steinberg, artistic director of In the House, is most excited about the festival’s “Planetarium” backyard show.Visitors will lie back and look up at a white screen suspended from a third-floor balcony and watch Mind of a Snail Puppet Co. improvise a shadow puppet show to music by Jocelyn Pettit Band and Four on the Flour String Quartet. Silk performers and contortionists will execute acts with a new twist in this year’s grand finale. Performers will be forced to match their choreography to a random selection of music.

They’ll vie for the prize of best adaptation, best adaptation to the worst music and a people’s choice award. “Picture the cheesiest most horrible pop song you possibly could,” Steinberg said. “So you’ll have a beautiful silk piece that’s set to ABBA or something like that.” Members of the Underground Circus will present an excerpt from one of their full-length shows while the votes are tallied. From cheesy pop toThe King of Rock, In the House strives to offer something for everyone in laidback, family friendly settings. From jazz to gospel with a detour through beatboxing, theVoice of A’Capella concert will explore the possibilities of the human voice. Other shows feature rock ’n’ roll burlesque, comics that include Charlie Demers and Graham Clark, and spoken word. Adding Elvis alongside FranklyYours, a Frank Sinatra act, to the In the House family might seem an odd pick, but Steinberg says it makes sense. “I don’t think Elvis ever dies,” she said. “Everybody knows the songs.When you see the outfits, you’re like holy sh**.That’s really awesome. It just brings a lot of joy.” Details at inthehousefestival.com. twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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A28

THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4

TWILIGHT MASS at 9 PM

An experience of Catholic worship to gather & renew the hearts, souls & minds of all who come!

Sunday, June 1st

Immaculate Conception Church 3778 West 28th Avenue, Vancouver

www.icvancouver.ca

Arts&Entertainment

Poetic Pauline pleases

Atwood opera hits all the right notes THEATRE REVIEW Jo Ledingham joled@telus.net

I don’t like opera: it’s a personal failing. And I have no credibility as an opera critic. So what was I doing at the world premiere of Pauline, presented by City Opera Vancouver? Three good reasons: the libretto was written by Margaret Atwood, stage direction is by Norman Armour, artistic and executive director of the PuSh Festival, and the titular Pauline is Pauline Johnson (1861-1913), part Mohawk, part English and whose ashes are buried near Siwash Rock. As a girl, I read Flint and Feather from cover to cover many times, always imagining war-painted braves, the thundering hooves of horses and strong Indian women prepared to kill rather than be taken as slaves. I pulled it off my shelf and read it again before going to see Pauline: “By right, by birth, we Indians own these lands/ Though starved, crushed, plundered, lies our nation low/Perhaps the white man’s God has willed it so.” Passionate, still relevant stuff. If I were an opera buff, I’d probably see Pauline because the music was written by

City Opera’s Pauline runs until May 31 at the York Theatre.

Tobin Stokes, former composer in residence for the Victoria Symphony and a much sought after composer on the international scene. So how did I like it? I loved it. Even though Pauline is in English, the words are projected stage left and stage right.That’s a plus. Some of the libretto is straightahead Atwood and, therefore, sometimes very witty. When Pauline’s doctor asks her — in song, of course — “How are we today” you can hear Atwood’s sharp tongue through Pauline’s response: “One of us is fine.” The other “one,” of course, is Pauline who is dying of cancer. Also projected are parts of Johnson’s poems and some wonderfully lyrical passages by Atwood.The language — Atwood and Johnson’s — is glorious.

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We know from the start that Pauline is dying. RoseEllen Nichols, proudly Coast Salish, sings the role of the poetess and appears languishing in an elaborate white-on-white, lacy gown. Pauline is attended by her doctor (Adam Fisher) whom she sometimes fantasizes as her former manager as well as imagining him as Drayton, a much younger man to whom she was once engaged.Through the morphine haze induced her doctor, Pauline sifts through letters, re-imagined performances and “sees” her deceased Grandfather Smoke (John Minágro) who beckons her to join him in the land of the dead. A chirpy trio of women (Cathleen Gingrich, Eleonora Higginson and Diane Speirs), beautifully costumed in taffeta gowns with bustles, long sleeves and high necklines created by Mara Gottler, visit Pauline (“We’ve come to cheer you up,” they warble) to gush over her poetry and commiserate over her failing health. Pauline’s sister Eva

(Sarah Vardy) arrives, convinced Pauline is just being dramatic and is not dying at all; she shoos the doctor and nurse away. It’s a thankless role and Vardy has us all intensely disliking Eva. The music, for those of us whose ears are not attuned to contemporary opera, is difficult but the singing is grand. Nichols and Adam Fisher (as the phantom exfiancé) sing “Miss Johnson, I Have”; it’s a heartbreaker. The set, co-designed by Marianne Nicolson and John Webber (who also designed the superb lighting) is elegant with two long panels stage left and right on whichTim Matheson projects images of Johnson as a child and as a performer; letters and various historical documents are also projected there. Charles Barber is the music director and conductor of the seven-piece orchestra. Pauline makes for a rich and wonderful evening at the theatre. A bonus, for me, was discovering, finally after all these years, that the name Johnson took for herself — Tekahionwake — is pronounced “degaeeon-wageh.” It translates as “double-stranded,” which, indeed, Johnson — in a buckskin vest worn over a Victorian gown — was. Atwood adds librettist to her long and impressive list of accomplishments. Is there no end to what this Canadian icon can do? For more reviews, go to joledingham.ca. Pauline runs until May 31 at theYork Theatre. For tickets, call 604-251-1363 or go to thecultch.com.


W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Sports&Recreation

GOT SPORTS? 604.630.3549 or mstewart@vancourier.com

Siobhan Finan, a York House player for the co-ed team Tight, gets low and makes a diving catch in a 1514 loss to Southerland in the B.C. ultimate championship at UBC May 26.

Stratford Hall’s Khalid Alibhai, with the disk, made key contributions in the junior championship, which the Sabres won 11-10. See photo gallery at vancourier.com.

Tight comes close to B.C. title ULTIMATE

SUTHERLAND 15 ST. GEORGE’S/YORK HOUSE 14 Megan Stewart

mstewart@vancourier.com

Kitsilano’s Conner Clarke snags the disk in a consolation game at the B.C. ultimate championships. The Demons lost one game and finished fifth overall. PHOTOS REBECCA BLISSETT

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Its components running smoothly at full-throttle, Tight returned to the B.C. ultimate championship for the first time in three years. The co-ed team drawn from athletes at St. George’s and York House won three consecutive titles from 2008 to 2010. And at the 2014 final, played May 26 at UBC, Tight held the lead in the closing minutes before it hit a snag by the name of Sutherland secondary. Tight led 13-14 but in the closing minutes of the game conceded two points and the championship. Sutherland, a North Shore team coached by longtime ultimate builder

and athlete Carla Keffer, wasn’t a contender before this year but has been an entertaining and promising force for more than a decade. “Sutherland’s emergence comes as no surprise to anyone who has played for years,” said Tight head coach Jon Hayduk. “When I first started 12 years ago, there was a group of kids organized by Carla Keffer that were a crowd favorite for halftime shows during any tournament or championship in Vancouver. Called Vertically Challenged, this group of five- to 10-year-olds would run around and play any chance they had.” This group of kids are now seniors in Grades 11 and 12 who play for the Sutherland Sabres. “Their lifelong friendship and experience is evident when you see them play,” said Hayduk, who competes in Major League

Ultimate with the Vancouver Nighthawks. The final between Tight and the Sabres was a backand-forth thriller, with big momentum swings and even bigger plays. “People tell me it was one of the best finals they’ve seen at a B.C. championship,” said Hayduk. “It certainly was exciting, and as a coach, very stressful.” The relentless seesaw action and more experienced Sutherland players put Tight to the test. “Our team, still a young one, played very, very well. The loss hurt, but I couldn’t be more proud,” said Hayduk. Kitsilano and Prince of Wales, the defending 2013 champions, both fell to Sutherland on the Sabers’ ascent to the final. St. George’s / York House eliminated Stratford Hall in the quarterfinal. twitter.com/MHStewart

Sabres edge Ghosts STRATFORD HALL POINT GREY

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Thesharp-edgedSabresfrom StratfordHalldispatchedthe PointGreyGhoststowintheB.C. juniorultimatechampionship, thefirstprovincialtitleintheir school’s history. KhalidAlibhaiandDaniel McGuirecameonstrongforthe Sabresinthefinal,playedatUBC onMay25. StratfordHalltooka 7-3leadbeforePointGreywent onascoringstreaktotiethe finalateightpointsapiece. The Sabres coach Chris Brogan called a time out and settled the team, and Stratford Hallcameoffthebreaktoscore twoquickpoints.SophieLesjak and Kiera Lee Pii made clutch contributions for the win. PointGrey,who’d comeofa gruellingovertimesemifinalwin againstKwantlenPark,managed toputuponlyonemorepoint. Stratford Hall defeated Prince ofWales 12-8 in the quarter final and then eliminated St. George’s/York House 12-9 to reach the final. — Megan Stewart

T-Birds defend as national relay champions

Devan Wiebe wins 800m at NAIA championship ATHLETICS

Megan Stewart

mstewart@vancourier.com

UBC Thunderbird sprinter Devan Wiebe claimed two gold medals at the NAIA championships last weekend in Alabama. The Point Grey alum is the national champion in the women’s 800m and shares the 4x400m title with teammates Tamara Harris, Rhiannon Evans and Cath-

arine Farish. The women successfully defended their 2013 win in the relay, which Wiebe anchored. Harris put theT-Birds in the lead while Evans and Farish widened the gap, saidWiebe. “By the time I got the baton, I knew if I could keep the momentum going we could repeat our last year’s win,” she wrote in an email. “That said, you never know what can happen in a relay. Batons drop, other teams can close seemingly impos-

sible gaps, so I made sure I was the first runner across the finish line before I even though about celebrating.” In the individual 800m, Wiebe won bronze two years in a row and this year would not be denied the top tier of the podium. The third-year runner came through with a time of two minutes and 8.17 seconds. She was 0.68 seconds ahead of her closest competitor from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. (UBC

is the only Canadian school competing in the predominantly U.S. National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics.) She trained for this distance alongside Harris, who finished fourth in 2:10.16. “[We] have been working towards all year, so it was super exciting to qualify for the final together,” said Wiebe.“I knew I had the win in me, but with so many talented athletes in the race I knew I was going to have

to work for it.” The race didn’t progress as she and her coach had expected. “We anticipated a fast opening lap but it ended up being a tactical slower starting race. I felt strong coming into the last 200 metres, but you never know what can happen in an 800m so I tried to run patiently and kicked it into the last gear with about 60 metres to go,” she said. “To feel strong this year and come away with the win

was super rewarding.” The UBC women’s team finished third overall, their best-ever showing at the NAIA championships, held May 22 to 24 at the Mickey Miller Blackwell Stadium in Gulf Shores, Ala. Their team score of 95 was seven points behind the winners from Indiana Tech. The men finished fifth with 34 points in a field dominated by Indiana Tech, which won with 105 points. twitter.com.MHStewart


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4

Sports&Recreation Walesmen dispatch Trojans SOFTBALL PRINCE OF WALES THOMPSON

16 03

Megan Stewart

mstewart@vancourier.com

It may have been a surprise to see the David Thompson Trojans in the senior girls city softball final, but it would have been an even greater one had they upset Prince of Wales for the title. The Walesmen handily defeated the Trojans 16-3 at Memorial South Park on May 22. Prince of Wales made the most of their strong batting and baserunning to score.The Tro-

Miko Kato slides in safe at third base as Thompson’s Letitia Kwong closes in with the ball. See photo gallery at vancourier.com. PHOTOS DAN TOULGOET

jans, many who play only on their school team, knocked in three runs but struggled on defence. In 2013, Prince ofWales

lost to the Churchill Bulldogs but the Dogs were eliminated this year in a 9-8 semi-final loss toThompson. twitter.com/MHStewart

Martin Lorayes of Vancouver College competes in a singles match at the B.C. tennis championships on May 23 at UBC. He lost 6-3 to his Semiahmoo opponent. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

Tandem team wins bronze

Crofton House and St. George’s finish third at provincials

TENNIS

Pitcher Sarah Bourlet (left) is greeted on the mound as the Prince of Wales Walesmen celebrate their senior girls softball championship over the Thompson Trojans at Memorial Park South on May 22.

Two teams from four Vancouver schools competed at the B.C. tennis championships May 22 to 24 at locations in Vancouver, Richmond and North Vancouver. The tandem tennis team from Crofton House and St. George’s won bronze

by defeating Semihamoo in the consolation final.They won their pool and knocked out Terry Fox but lost their only game in the semi-final 6-5 to Heritage Woods on May 23. Heritage Woods lost the championship title to Sentinel, which has a specialized sport education program that caters to tennis players from around the region,

much like SpArts at Magee secondary. “Overall, it was a good result for a very young team. We will have everyone returning except for one,” said Sherman Kwok, a Crofton House teacher and coach. The second pairing of Little Flower Academy and Vancouver College finished seventh overall. — Megan Stewart

FUTURE SHOP - CORRECTION NOTICE

NEWSPAPER RETRACTION FOR THE FUTURE SHOP MAY 23 CORPORATE FLYER In the May 23 flyer, page 16, the Canon EOS 70D 20.2MP DSLR Camera Bundle With 18-135mm IS STM Lens, Extra Battery, Bag And Strap (WebID: 10246850 / 10186516) was advertised with an incorrect price. Please be advised that the CORRECT price is $1509.99 save $170 NOT $1449.99 save $230, as previously advertised. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused our valued customers.

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W E DN E SDAY, M AY 2 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Sports&Recreation

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Give your budding soccer star a chance to kick it with the ‘Caps this summer. Work with Whitecaps FC coaching staff, meet ’Caps players, get a camp t-shirt and club poster. For boys and girls U-6 to U-13 July 7 – 11, 1-3 p.m., Trafalgar July 28 – Aug. 1, 1-3 p.m., Trafalgar August 11 – 15, 9-11 a.m., Clinton August 25 – 29, 9-11 a.m., Trafalgar

Register now, space is limited. whitecapsfc.com/camps Toll free: 1.855.932.1932

David Schultz plays for Prince of Wales and also coaches at the Vancouver Racquets Club where he helps train school teammates. The Walesmen compete this week at the B.C. badminton championships.

PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

Club players serve school teams major hits BADMINTON

Wanyee Li

li.wanyee@gmail.com

All three Vancouver schools contending for the B.C. badminton championships this week in Richmond feature players who train at elite badminton clubs and training centres in the Lower Mainland. The tournament runs from May 29 to 31 and features the best high school badminton teams in the province, including Killarney, Prince of Wales and the defending champions, a combined team from private schools St. George’s and Crofton House. The club players give their teams an advantage with leadership and court skills, and it is undeniable that the St. George’s/Crofton team benefits from the fact that a large number of athletes also compete on the national circuit. In fact, 16-year-old Alexa Wu competed in the badminton World Junior Championships, held last month in Malaysia. Her schoolmate, Emma Lin, competed in the 2011 Junior Pan American Games. Benny Lin, no relation to Emma, was the strongest player for St. George’s last year when they won the high school provincial title. He finished second in U23 national men’s singles this year and competed at the 2012 Junior Pan Am Games. Benny has since graduated and passed the torch to his young brother, 15-year-old Jack. His mixed doubles teammate at the Pan Am Games was Christie Choy, who competes for Crofton House and plays

girls doubles with Wu. These players benefit from specialized sport training at places like the Vancouver Lawn,Tennis and Badminton Club, Vancouver Racquets Club, ClearOne Badminton Centre, and ACE Badminton. With privileged access and a growing list of credentials, it is no surprise a tandem team build from the Saints and Ivy dominate at school tournaments. Crofton coach Benjamin Leung put it simply: “Practise makes perfect they say, and by training and playing lots outside of just the school team, our players are able to fine tune their skills that require more than just a few hours a week of school practise.” Prince of Wales benefits from the club system but also finds a strong alumni culture bolsters their success and sense of school pride. Carmen Tang is one of many coaches that have contributed to the Walesmen badminton dynasty — one that has seen the school qualify for provincials the past seven years. “Alumni usually come back to help out the senior team, and students on the senior team coach the PW junior teams,” she said. “Our constant appearance in provincials wouldn’t be possible without students giving back to the community.” Walesmen senior Daniel Schultz trains at Vancouver Racquets Club and coaches younger players. “I’ve tried to transfer some of that experience into helping my [school] teammates improve as best I can,” he said. Schultz’s club doubles partner is also his high school rival, and Felix Law added that coaching can

reward the instructor as well. Law, of the city champion Killarney Cougars, explained that teaching the sport to beginners at VRC gave him a deeper understanding of on-court positioning, which has helped in his own game. Not all students make the cut on school teams at Prince of Wales, DavidThompson and Killarney, which are all known for their competitive badminton programs.To give themselves an advantage in a crowded field, some students take lessons at badminton centres specifically to earn a spot on the school team. “I’ve seen an influx of avid badminton players come to the centre, trying to make their school team,” said DarrylYung, CEO and head coach at ClearOne Badminton Centre. But most importantly,Yung said training at a badminton centre gives players confidence. “When they feel like they’ve had some training with our provincial and national players, it gives them this feeling that, ‘Geez I’m doing some good training here and I can be better,’” he said. Jack Lin, the up-and-coming badminton star from St. George’s, has played at four junior national championships and will compete in this year’s Canada Open in July. However, he already understands what school badminton is all about. “High school badminton isn’t really about the title or the banner. It is about respect, responsibility, resilience, empathy, humility and integrity,” he said. No doubt it’s nice to win the high school provincial title, too. twitter.com/wanyeelii

Run, cheer or volunteer! Run for the charity of your choice in the Scotiabank Charity Challnege!

June 22, 2014

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