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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014

Vol. 105 No.15 • Established 1908

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MIDWEEK EDITION

5)

THE VOICE OF VANCOUVER NEIGHBOURHOODS

NEWS: Brewing harm reduction 3 ARTS: A Tribe Called Red 17 /

photo Rebecca Blissett

TOP OF THE POP-UPS: (Left to right) Kim Sato, Natasha Gorrie and Dianna David broke out into their “Neighbourhood Watch” pop-up dance at Origins Coffee as part of the

ninth annual Winterruption festival on Granville Island this past weekend. See related story on page 13. Scan this page using the Layar app to see more photos.

Bike path opponent cites victory for democracy SANDRA THOMAS Staff writer

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longtime community activist is delighted with an unexpected decision by the park board to abandon plans to build a 12-foot wide, paved separated bike path through Kitsi-

lano and Hadden Beach parks. “This is a really good example of participatory democracy,” said Kits Point resident Megan Carvell Davis. “In the past when I’ve addressed the park board, they’d listen, thank me and then go on with whatever it was they were going to do.” On Oct. 7, 2013, the park board approved

the $2.2 million bike path as part of the overall Seaside Greenway plan connecting Canada Place to Stanley Park to False Creek and finally Jericho. The path was to be an extension of the Cornwall-Point Grey bike lane. At the time, residents accused the city and park board of burying the details within the Seaside Greenway report. As part of

the public consultation the park board surveyed almost 400 beach goers, but frequent visitors and nearby residents to the parks argued they knew nothing of the plan. In response, the ad hoc group Save Kits Beach Now Coalition was formed and protests were organized. See PARK BOARD on page 7

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news

W E DN E SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 9 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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Program offers mix of home brew and helping hand MIKE HOWELL Staff writer

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he non-profit society that made international news last week for setting up crack pipe vending machines in the Downtown Eastside has embarked on a program that includes severe alcoholics brewing their own beer and wine. The PHS Community Services Society has introduced an alcohol-making co-op at its drug resource centre on Cordova Street as part of a larger initiative aimed at alcoholics who normally drink rubbing alcohol, hand sanitizer and other high content alcohol-based products. “We give them something else so they can go out and have the same kind of feeling with it but it’s not going to destroy them as much,” said Tyler Bigchild, who oversees the centre’s co-op. “For me, really, it’s harm reduction.” Membership in the co-op requires a person to join the centre’s “drinkers lounge” club, which meets once a week with staff. Participants are taught CPR, discuss their health, legal issues and learn about treatment plans to reduce their alcohol intake. Each member contributes $10 towards the purchase of the brew kits and, in return, can make four to five litres of beer or wine. While the number of participants in the co-op varies each week, membership hovers around 30 people. Another 60 belong to the club but don’t participate in the co-op. Kailin See, the centre’s director, said the coop is one component of the society’s efforts to reduce the harm suffered by severe alcoholics,

photo Kevin Hill

Tyler Bigchild is a brewmaster of sorts in the Brew Coop at Drug Users Resource Centre. whether they belong to the co-op or not. On a case-by-case basis, the centre exchanges surplus homemade booze to club members not involved in the co-op. “I’m very strict about it,” See said. “There’s got to be a commitment on that person’s part — they’ve got to be thinking about reduction. It’s very much tailored to that person and their consumption and their goals.” Twice a day, teams from the centre also search outalcoholicsintheneighbouringOppenheimer Park and surrounding neighbourhood to check on their well-being and ensure they’re hydrated

with water, juice and other liquids. “It’s all a part of creating as many points of contact that we can with a population of people that often don’t make those points of contact,” said See, sitting at a table at the centre with Bigchild and Mark Townsend of the PHS. The program is an extension of what the PHS offers at two single-room-occupancy hotels it manages in the Downtown Eastside. But the hotel programs are strictly for residents of the hotels and involve store-bought booze. The centre’s program runs out of a building that operates a needle exchange and is open

from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Showers, toiletries and free hot breakfasts and lunches are also offered. “The overarching goal is to engage people, bring them off the street and try to mitigate bad things in the lives of people who are suffering,” Townsend said. The PHS’s venture into so-called harm reduction initiatives is not new for the society. It comanages the Insite supervised drug injection site and made international news last week after media, including the Courier, reported the society set up two crack pipe vending machines in the Downtown Eastside. The PHS has been in a battle with opponents of its harm reduction approach to substance abuse, with Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s government leading the criticism. The Harper government has fought unsuccessfully in the courts to have Insite closed, announced it will shut down a heroin maintenance program and criticized the PHS’s installation of the crack pipe vending machines, one of which is in the society’s centre on Cordova Street; the other is in the Shaldon Hotel on East Hastings. “People are using drugs, abusing alcohol and doing all these things across the country and all over the place,” said Townsend, noting the drug deaths of actors Cory Monteith in Vancouver and Philip Seymour Hoffman in New York. “You kind of have a choice — you can either let it go on, or you can try and make things better for people who are suffering and, by doing that, make things better for the wider community. That is the pragmatic approach.” mhowell@vancourier.com

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 9 , 2 0 1 4

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news

W E DN E SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 9 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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‘Illegal’ injection site seeks formal approval 12TH & CAMBIE with Mike Howell

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drug injection site is again making news in Vancouver. But it’s not the Insite facility on East Hastings. Vancouver Coastal Health and the Dr. Peter AIDS Foundation announced Feb.13 that they submitted a formal application to Health Canada for an exemption from federal drug laws to allow the Dr. Peter Centre to continue providing injection services for their clients. That’s right, “continue providing injection services.” As regular readers know, the three-stall injection room at the Dr. Peter Centre in the West End has operated since February 2002. The injection room is a small component of the centre, which houses a day health program and a 24-hour care residence. The facility caters to people with AIDS and those with mental illnesses and addictions. So to the question: Why the request for an exemption when the centre’s injection site has operated for more than a decade? The short answer: It’s a formality. Another short answer: The centre thought

photo Dan Toulgoet

The Dr. Peter Centre in the West End is currently operating without an official exemption from federal drug laws. it had already been exempted. Say what? Yep, there was a mix-up and it wasn’t until sometime in 2006 that the centre discovered Health Canada never granted the facility an exemption. So, effectively, the injection site at the centre has operated illegally for all these years. I say “illegal” because that’s the term a Health Canada spokesperson used when I asked in 2006 about the status of the Dr. Peter injection site. He also said it would be up to the local police force — in this case, the Vancouver Police Department — to decide whether it wanted to shut down the service. That, obviously, hasn’t happened.

The fact is the VPD has known about the site for several years. Here’s what the VPD’s drug policy coordinator, Insp. Scott Thompson, told me in September 2006: “This is not something that has a big impact on public order in any way, shape or form, from what I can gather. When you look at our resources and the intent of what we’re trying to accomplish in relation to public disorder, it doesn’t seem to me that would be a huge priority.” I know, I know, he said that more than seven years ago. So the other day, I contacted Const. Brian Montague, a VPD media liaison officer, and reminded him of what Thompson told

me. Here’s what Montague had to say in an email response: “Our position has not changed,” he wrote. “What I would say is that the VPD has no public safety concerns regarding the Dr. Peter Centre application for exemption. Hope that answers your question.” Health Minister Terry Lake and Mayor Gregor Robertson are also on record of supporting the centre’s request for an exemption. That leaves the Harper government and Health Canada to give the application a yea or nay. Their decision will test the Harper government’s new Respect for Communities Act which sets out a long list of criteria an applicant must meet to get an exemption to operate an injection site. That includes the need for an applicant to provide information outlining the views of police, municipal leaders, public health officials and provincial health ministers. The applicant is also required to provide documentation that shows the site’s expected impact on crime rates, treatment options for drug users, the public health reasons for needing such a site and evidence there are resources to sustain the site’s operations. Any bets on what Harper will decide? As far as the VPD is concerned, it won’t seem to matter either way. mhowell@vancourier.com twitter.com/Howellings


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 9 , 2 0 1 4

Canada Post Town Hall

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Hosted by Libby Davies, MP and Don Davies, MP

Canada Post Ends Home Delivery: We want to hear from you! Saturday, February 22 11:30 am - 1:30 pm Trout Lake Community Centre Lakewood Room 3360 Victoria Dr. For more information please call 604-775-6263 or 604-775-5800

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The Seaforth Highlanders’ armoury is undergoing a major upgrade that will include the addition of a new four-storey building.

Seaforths hope for sturdy new home

PROPERTY WILL HOUSE BRIGADE HEADQUARTERS, SERVE AS DISASTER RESOURCE SANDRA THOMAS Staff writer

T Please join us at our first Open House for the Riverview Lands. Two Open Houses have been scheduled to serve as an introduction to BC Housing, the project team and the Vision Process. Identical information will be available on both dates.

Date:

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Time:

4:30pm - 7:30pm (drop-in)

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Burquest Jewish Community Centre 2860 Dewdney Trunk Road, Coquitlam

Date:

Saturday, March 1, 2014

Time:

10:00am - 2:00pm (drop-In)

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Centennial Pavilion, Centennial Room 620 Poirier Street, Coquitlam (Beside Dogwood Pavilion, entrance off Winslow Avenue)

If you cannot attend the open house in person, please visit our website, www.renewingriverview.com, where you can participate in our online open house starting February 28, 2014. You can also contact us at: t: 604.439.8577 | e: questions@renewingriverview.com

he Burrard Street armoury belonging to the Seaforth Highlanders of Canada is undergoing a massive construction project, which once completed will not only result in improvements to the iconic grey structure but also the addition of new four-storey building. Rod Hoffmeister, Seaforth honorary lieutenant colonel, said the new building will play headquarters to 39 Canadian Brigade Group. Hoffmeister said it makes sense for the armoury and headquarters building to share the same property. “When it comes to earthquake and emergency preparedness, the headquarters and armoury together will make an excellent command centre for resources and recovery,” said Hoffmeister. The new $31.2 million Canadian Armed Forces building will also house numerous support organizations, classrooms, locker rooms, a fitness centre, storage bays, medical and dental clinics, and a resource centre for military families. The complex will include a three-level parking garage for military vehicles. The Seaforth’s headquarters was moved in 2012 to the Jericho Garrison in West Point Grey. Hoffmeister said when the armoury was built in the 1930s, seismic concerns were not a priority. “In 1936, the armoury was built to the standard of the day,” said Hoffmeister. “So now we’re spending $9.3 million to bring it up to the correct seismic code.” The construction of the headquarters building, as well as seismic upgrades and a retrofit, is estimated to cost more than $40 million and take almost three years.

Hoffmeister said the officers and sergeants messes will not only be renovated but recreated to maintain their same look. In the case of the officers mess, that means the return of the dark wood panelling and antique fireplace. The armoury was completed in 1936 to mimic a “Scottish baronial castle,” complete with a turret that houses a curved bookcase and stained-glass window adorned with the regiment’s stag’s head logo and a list of many of the regiment’s battles from the First and Second World Wars. According to Seaforth history, the regiment was established Nov. 24, 1910 by a group of Vancouverites of Scottish descent. Before moving into the armoury, the regiment, which celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2010, was housed at various locations across the city, including the Vancouver Opera House on Granville Street, the Hoffmeister Brothers auto dealership on Pender, and the Beatty Street armoury. After the regiment had shown great heroics, including aggressive trench warfare in the First World War battles of Ypres, Passchendaele and Vimy Ridge, the Canadian government rewarded it with its own armoury. In 1936, the regiment left the Beatty Street Armoury and marched along Georgia Street and across the Burrard Street Bridge with its regimental colours to its new parade square. In September 2012, the Seaforth marched out of the armoury for the first time since the Second World War in preparation for the renovation project. As previously reported in the Courier, the renovation project was under discussion for more than a decade before the minister of defence finally gave the go ahead in 2012. sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10


news Park board decision surprises Continued from page 1 Carvell Davis filed a lawsuit against the city and park board in B.C. Supreme Court Nov. 4 in an attempt to halt the bike path. She also successfully petitioned for an injunction to postpone construction until a decision could be made regarding the path. Carvell Davis argued at the time the land was a donation made 85 years ago by millionaire land speculator Harvey Hadden under the condition the city “shall keep the property as near as possible in its present state of nature.” At a November press conference, Carvell Davis’s lawyer Rob Kasting said the decision by the city and park board to move the greenway bike lane from Ogden Street to the middle of Hadden Park was a violation of that deed. In response, the park board filed a motion of defence and the case was expected to be decided in March. But following a last-minute motion by Vision Vancouver commissioner Constance Barnes Monday night, the park board released a prepared statement that read in part: “We’ve heard clearly from the public that there is significant concern with any proposed changes to Hadden Park. Tonight, the park board gave direction to staff to discontinue proceeding with any options for a new path through Hadden Park, and to communicate that to the petitioner in the B.C.

Supreme Court application. The park board will not be pursuing a new separated path through Hadden Park or at Kits Beach…” Whether Carvell Davis will continue with the lawsuit has yet to be decided. “It’s fine for now, but there’s an election coming and what if Vision doesn’t get reelected and another park board decides it wants to do something else with Hadden Park,” said Carvell Davis, who credits Barnes with the surprise decision. But Barnes said while it was her motion, she was simply part of a collaborative effort. “I thought, do we really want to go to court to battle this,” said Barnes. “I know we could have done a better job with the public consultation, but going forward we’ve learned something.” Barnes said what’s vital now is changes to the way cyclists and pedestrians interact along that stretch of beach and parkland. She noted, if safety measures aren’t quickly implemented, it’s only a matter of time before a serious accident takes place. “It’s unacceptable to leave the existing path as is, so staff will be working on that,” said Barnes. “Whether that means new signs or we ask cyclists to dismount hasn’t been decided.” sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10

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news A8

THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 9 , 2 0 1 4

E-books a page-turner at Vancouver libraries CHERYL ROSSI Staff writer

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-readers are flying off the shelves of the Vancouver Public Library.

“The interest in e-books is really rising, it continues to rise, and so we’re responding to that need,” said Ross Bliss, manager of lending services.

He notes libraries provide free access to materials that are available to people if they can afford them. “It’s just another option,” he said.

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Patrons borrowed e-books 244,144 times last year, up from 133,452 the previous year. In one recent month the library added 460 ebook titles to its catalogue. It started lending e-books in 2010. The library started loaning 60 Sony T3s last month. Readers place them on hold and pick them up at the most convenient library location. Ten of the e-readers are dedicated to the library’s outreach program for people who are homebound with disabilities or have vision impairments. The readers can be delivered to their homes. Like other materials, ereaders can be borrowed for three weeks. Anyone who doesn’t return one would have to pay for it, Bliss said. He says they retail for $130. Bliss wasn’t an early adopter of e-readers but he now understands their appeal. “For people who like to read while they eat, it’s hands-free,” Bliss said. “You

photo Dan Toulgoet

Ross Bliss says e-readers are growing in popularity with library users. don’t have to put the salt shaker on one page to keep it open, none of that stuff. It just lays there and [you] turn the pages with one finger.” The library purchases ebooks on a subscription basis rather than title-by-title, Bliss said. The price of an e-book is typically less than the cost of an book print on paper because it requires fewer materials and no shipping. The library buys bestsellers in physical and digital form. Bliss says no one knows whether libraries will see fewer books on their shelves

in the future. “I don’t see this happening as any sort of rapid displacement,” he said. “We won’t know for 10, 20 years what the real outcome’s going to be and we also don’t know what kind of technology is going to be available.” The library offers introductory e-reader classes and drop-in tech cafes on a regular basis. The library’s website includes a comprehensive online guide on how to get started. For more information, see vpl.ca. crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi


Cops to pool criminal data

MIKE HOWELL Staff writer

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so-called “real time intelligence centre” that will cost $5.8 million per year to operate is expected to open in May and promises to help police officers in Metro Vancouver quickly identify and locate dangerous criminals. The centre will replace the Provincial Intelligence Centre, which was set up in 2010 with 22 staff and operated 14 hours per day primarily to fight gang violence in Metro Vancouver but served as a resource for all agencies in B.C. “Its mandate is violent gangs and it does not have the capacity to offer real-time operational support to frontline officers,” said a Vancouver Police Department report that goes before the Vancouver Police Board Thursday. “Due to recent technological advancements, police agencies now have the ability to store, search, retrieve and analyze vast amounts of data and link seemingly unconnected criminal events. However, in B.C. there is only limited interoperability between various law enforcement databases.” For example, the report said, the RCMP, VPD, federal and provincial corrections and the B.C. Sheriffs each have their own “human source” intelligence databases. The new multi-agency centre will assist police in “overcoming challenges associated with jurisdictional boundaries, fiscal restraint and limited resources,” the report said. The centre will have 43 officers and civilian staff, operate around the clock and serve police forces in Metro Vancouver, including the VPD which will devote five staff to the centre. It will provide immediate analytical support for such crimes as homicides, sex assaults, armed robberies, hostage takings, terrorism, “high-risk” missing persons, gang violence and active shooter incidents, the report said. “Analysts working within [the new centre] will have a far greater breadth and depth of access to police and law enforcement databases that dispatchers, police officers and municipal police analysts simply do not have,” the report said. The report noted the Missing Women Commission of Inquiry, which revealed jurisdictional problems between police forces in the hunt for a serial killer, recommended the creation of a regional “real time crime centre,” which the B.C. Ministry of Justice incorporated into last year’s B.C. Policing and Safety Plan. Municipalities will fund 50 per cent of the annual operating cost, with the provincial and federal governments covering the balance. Each municipality’s share was calculated on a formula that combined a five-year average of Criminal Code offences and population. In future years, the centre is expected to expand to include the Victoria Capital Regional District and the rest of the province. The VPD declined to elaborate on the report or disclose the location of the centre until police present the report to the police board Thursday. The meeting begins at 1 p.m. at the Cambie Street headquarters. mhowell@vancourier.com twitter.com/Howellings

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A9

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W E DN E SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 9 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 9 , 2 0 1 4

THE VANCOUVER COURIER

1574 West Sixth Ave., Vancouver, BC V6J 1R2 604-738-1411 Twitter: @vancouriernews vancourier.com

Liberals panicking over court decision

D

ay by day, there’s a growing sense of the enormity of the government’s loss in the B.C. Supreme Court decision over the teachers’ contract. Liberals were tight-lipped the day it came down on Jan. 27, preferring to focus on the present and future in the education world. Premier Christy Clark opened up a bit later, declaring her fundamental disagreement with the court’s decision. Then her government filed notice to appeal and tried to hide behind that when the legislature resumed sitting this week. Attorney General Suzanne Anton refused a dozen times to answer questions because the tangled mess is before the court — again. The next day, Education Minister Peter Fassbender dropped that gambit and tried to justify the government’s position. Then the premier opened up again, saying what actually happened during the 2011-12 school year is far different from the judge’s interpretations. The decision stated that the government tried to goad the B.C. Teachers’ Federation into a full-scale strike, to further the government’s political interest in winning public support for legislation ending any job action. Clark pointed out that the full strike never happened. Whatever the motivations or gambits involved in that year-long set of talks, it never came to a strike. A mediator was appointed and a settlement reached. But the judge was fully aware of that. It didn’t seem to impress her, because she fined the government $2 million for bad-faith bargaining. There were more revealing developments Friday. The government applied for a stay, pending the appeal. And it tried to claw back some control over cabinet documents that would shed more light on the case. The application for a stay includes numerous affidavits from school officials explaining what they have to do to comply with the judgment, which orders B.C.’s education system to back up 12 years and operate under all the class-size restrictions, special-needs provisions and specialized-teacher requirements of the day. The overall effect is portrayed as the fiscal equivalent of an earthquake, a tsunami and an asteroid strike all hitting the school system at once. “Extraordinary disruption ... vast and abrupt diversion of resources ... irreparable harm to the public interest of an unprecedented magnitude.” Hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of teachers and classrooms have to be found, hired or built immediately, if the system abides by the decision as it stands. Asking for a stay amounts to the government saying it simply can’t afford to obey the law. So its only option is to ask for a waiver while it tries to get the law changed, by getting the Supreme Court ruling overturned by the Court of Appeal. The government could still pull out of this loss. But it’s starting from a long way back. It’s even further back on the second part of the stay that’s requested. One of the sidebar issues in the case was whether the cabinet documents relevant to the negotiating strategy should be publicly released. Justice Susan Griffin ruled they could be, in a certain fashion. She allowed the BCTF to release its 250-page final argument — which cites some of the documents — to its 44,000 members at some point. Now the government wants that plan quashed. The argument is that if it wins the appeal, the release of the cabinet documents would be cancelled. But if they are released beforehand, the victory would be moot. So just when public interest intensifies in what exactly the Liberal cabinet was considering that would lead a judge to land on them so heavily, the government wants to lock it all up under the doctrine of cabinet confidentiality. The last aspect of Friday’s application is a forlorn gesture concerning the $2 million it was ordered to hand over to the union. The government isn’t asking to stay that award. It doesn’t have to, because it would recoup the funds if it wins the appeal. In the meantime, “the BCTF thus takes the interim benefit of a substantial damage award.” In other words, the union can earn interest on the fine, while the government desperately tries to find a way around that obligation, and all the others. lleyne@timescolonist.com

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letters

W E DN E SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 9 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

WE WANT YOUR OPINION Hate it or love it? We want to know... really, we do!

Reach us by email: letters@vancourier.com

The day Purina blew up Louisville

D

epending on where you saw it from, the early morning eruptions in Louisville looked pretty impressive. Some described the blasts as giant balls of fire that resembled flying saucers. A nearby police helicopter pilot described it as a bombing run. One man thought it felt like an earthquake, but it went on and on and on. Friday, Feb. 13, 1981, was a particularly unlucky day for those living along several miles of sewer lines in the older districts of Louisville, Ky. The ground underneath them was exploding. The spark that ignited the blasts came from a car driving under a railroad bridge, or so a subsequent investigation determined. The blasts travelled through the sewer lines, sending manhole covers flying, converting streets into craters and trenches, and sending fountains of sewage up through the streets or straight up through the destroyed toilets of area residents. Two miles of sewer lines were blown to bits, thousands of people lost access to both sewer and water, and much of Hill Street collapsed into the hole left by the 12-foot sewer main. As always, fate had chosen to be cruel, and the worst damage was inflicted on a relatively poor working-class neighbourhood. Amazingly, no one was killed, not even the two women who were driving to work at a nearby hospital when their car was flipped on its side by the first explosion. The damage was so bad that many residents announced they were simply leaving. They packed their remaining belongings as fast as they could, desperate to get away from the rising sewage as rain fell over the following days. What caused the entire mess? It was an industrial accident, of course. A nearby Ralston-Purina plant was using the explosive chemical hexane to extract oils from soybeans. The hexane was meant to be recycled, but instead leaked straight into the sewer system, where it built up in a sizeable quantity, spreading into the lines under the adjacent homes. The hexane evaporated into an explosive gas, and the spark from the car apparently set it off. The problems left behind by this king-sized industrial accident lasted for years. In the immediate aftermath, there was disruption to water and sewage for about 23,000 people, another 1,800-plus had to be evacuated, the National Guard was called in, and the stench was so bad, giant blocks of bathroom air freshener were set up near the holes. They didn’t do much. The total damage was $30 million, of which Ralston-Purina would eventually pay about $18 million after a court settlement. The firm was also sued by various government agencies and private landowners and paid out millions more. Ralston-Purina fixed up the plant that caused the mess, then sold it off to another firm in 1984. It’s amazing how many ways humans can find for industrial accidents to prove fatal or massively destructive. Whether it’s the Bhopal disaster or the annihilation of much of the Aral Sea, we can turn any process into something dangerous and lethal. London had its famous beer flood (1814, eight dead) and Boston its molasses disaster (1919, 21 dead, 150 injured). I fully expect that if I live long enough, I will see destructive floods of maple syrup, diet pop, and taffy. The Louisville sewer explosions could have been worse. A very similar case took place in Guadalajara, Mexico. Gasoline leaked into sewer pipes and vapours built up for weeks. When they ignited, the blasts killed 252 people and levelled much of the downtown. mclaxtonlangleyadvance.com

MATTHEW CLAXTON

I fully expect that if I live long enough, I will see destructive floods of maple syrup, diet pop and taffy.

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MUSEUMS WOULD BE GOOD FIT FOR GRANVILLE ISLAND

To the editor: Re: “Granville Island looks to future,” Feb. 14. While you have mentioned ideas for Emily Carr College building, there is another idea that was also discussed at a meeting I attended last fall. It was recognized a new revitalization for Granville Island would need to attract more visitors. The idea of one or more museums, with an educational aspect, could be that centre piece and was strongly supported by those stakeholders at the meeting.

Dale Laird, President, Transit Museum Society, Vancouver

LIGHT RAIL HAS HEAVY IMPACT

To the editor: Re: “Letter: B.C. Government shouldn’t cover tracks,” Feb. 14. Building a tram system in a city street is just as disruptive as the Cambie cut. I was in Bordeaux (France) in 2003 by the end of the construction of three

photo Kevin Hill

Dale Laird would like to see museums move into space on Granville Island that will be vacated by Emily Carr University. separate tram lines downtown. While the trenches weren’t as deep as on Cambie, they had to be deep enough to relocate all the utilities. Streets were totally closed for months at a time.

Jean-Louis Brussac, Coquitlam

FINISHING LITTLE MOUNTAIN SHOULD COME FIRST

To the editor: Re: “Heather Place plans moving forward,” Feb. 14. I think it would be unwise

for the City to approve of the Heather Place redevelopment prior to seeing the completion of promised social housing in the Little Mountain area. Little Mountain residents evicted years ago to make way for improved social housing can still find vacant land on the site they once called home. Is the same fate going to befall the residents of Heather Place? Let’s replenish some of the affordable housing stock we once had in the Little Mountain before more residents are displaced.

June Jamison, Vancouver

ON YOUR MIND ONLINE COURIER STORY: “Lawsuit alleges mayor in conflict of interest over HootSuite lease,” online only. Tanya Hill: The Cedar Party sure has an axe to grind. Seems like they are trying to create a controversy where there is none. Steve Wilson: Axe to grind? Tanya, it’s called corruption. Maybe OK with you but not with taxpayers and other decent people. CityHallWatchVAN @CityHallWchVAN : Of course proving an alleged conflict of interest is a matter for the courts. Will be another case to follow #vanpoli VAN MAN BLOG: “Gluten-free beer causing a buzz,” online only. Chris McLish: While true that there are people who just want to go on a gluten-free diet but more importantly, some people who don’t have Celiacs can still have a strong reaction to gluten, such as joint pain, headaches, fatigue, etc. and not test positive for Celiac. The “so-called gluten intolerance” is a real thing for many people — not just people looking for a diet craze. COURIER VIDEO: “Fairview: Courier Confidential,” online only Killwrathi: I liked the part about the job postings put up in the lunchroom. Also, the music is awesome. Smilinfool: I liked that hands at keyboard shot with a mouse click, followed by man talking on phone. Nice. COURIER COLUMN: “We need to talk about TED,” Feb. 14. David Gurtner: Oh great, let’s bash Ted a little more. Be happy that Ted is coming to your city. It has a great economic impact and is a great way to make contact with highly successful people! COURIER STORY: “Luongo weighs in on transit referendum,” Feb. 14. Ryan McLaughlin: I’m so torn. On the one hand, I want to referendum to be delayed because it’s surely doomed to fail. On the other hand, I’m so sick of transit improvements being endlessly delayed. Here’s a suggestion: don’t do a referendum, just go ahead and implement the taxes you need, and build the Broadway Subway. Like, the 99 B Line is just totally infeasible for me. I loathe riding that bus.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 9 , 2 0 1 4

EVENT OR COMMUNITY NEWS WE SHOULD KNOW ABOUT? 604-738-1411 | sthomas@vancourier.com

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

with Sandra Thomas

UNIVERSITY OF B.C. The Coastal First Nations Dance Festival takes place March 4 to 9 at the University of B.C.’s Museum of Anthropology. This seventh annual festival features the Dancers of Damelahamid, who will present the diverse stories, songs, and dances of the indigenous peoples of the Northwest Coast and beyond. The festival offers a selection of traditional and contemporary performances through school workshops, evening performances and afternoon festival stage shows presenting internationally renowned artists from across the province, Alaska, the Yukon and Washington State. This year’s festival also welcomes South American dancer Adriana Arrunategui in her Canadian debut. Arrunategui, who has trained extensively in traditional, classical and contemporary dance, will share community dances connected to agriculture and the time of harvest from the Cusco region of Peru. For a complete schedule and ticket information visit damelahamid.ca.

DOWNTOWN

submitted photo

The Coastal First Nations Dance Festival takes place March 4 to 9 at the University of B.C.’s Museum of Anthropology.

The Vancouver Public Library is offering numerous workshops now through March, including Digital Tattoo: Protecting Your Online Identity — Part Two. Learn how to protect your online identity and use social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter. Workshops take place March 8 from 2 to 3:30 p.m., March 16 from 3 to 4:30 p.m. and March 31 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Classes take place in the computer training room on level seven of the Central Library, 350 West Georgia St. Workshops are free but registration is required by calling 604-331-3603. Also at the Central Library is a workshop called

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VARIOUS LOCATIONS The Vancouver Heritage Foundation is celebrating Heritage Week 2014 with several special events this coming weekend, including a walking tour of the city’s downtown waterfront between Burrard and Main streets dubbed Up the Coast and Overseas with historian John Atkin. The tour takes place Sunday, Feb. 22 from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. On Feb. 23, history lovers can participate in Sunday Mornings at Hinge Park, a newly-designed public space that combines a century of industrial heritage with the creation of a naturalized wetland in Southeast False Creek. Hinge Park, which has not yet been officially named, is located at 215 West First Avenue. For a complete schedule of History Week events visit vancouverheritagefoundation.org. sthomas@vancourier.com Twitter.com/sthomas10

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The Affiliation of Multicultural Societies and Service Agencies of B.C. is hosting the 10th Annual Vancouver Diversity Health Fair at the Croatian Cultural Centre on March 1. The theme of this year’s multicultural fair is dedicated to family health and promoting wellness. The AMSSA is an affiliation of more than 80 member agencies, which provide immigrant settlement and multicultural services in more than two dozen communities across the province. This free fair takes place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 3520 Commercial Dr.

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How to File Your 2013 Tax Return, which will be conducted in Cantonese. Learn more about Canada’s personal income tax system, how to file personal income tax, what’s new for 2013, and how to report foreign assets. The workshop takes place March 8 from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the Peter Kaye Room. The workshop is free but you must preregister by calling SUCCESS at 604-684-628. For a complete schedule of events, visit vpl.ca/events.

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W E DN E SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 9 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

CITY LIVING

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GOT AN EVENT WE CAN SHOOT? LET US KNOW! 604-738-1411 | events@vancourier.com

Dancers, face-painting helped Winterruption pop REBECCA BLISSETT Contributing writer

T

here’s no better place for a pop-up dance tour than the nooks and crannies of Granville Island, and no better person to lead the way than Kat Single-Dain. Better known to the bundled-up audience as Barbara, the jazzercise expert who looked like she just stepped out of a time machine dialed to an L.A. Gear window display circa 1986, Single-Dain propped a boombox on her shoulder and rolled over park benches and bike racks to lead the crowd into Origins Coffee where she hustled them inside. “Nice work parkouring! Nice work!” she called out to the audience, none of whom actually attempted any parkouring. But that’s okay as it was all part of the fun of Granville Island’s Winterruption festival held this past weekend. It was the ninth annual version of the festival which included many different cultural elements where participants could learn how to glass-blow at New-Small Sterling, check out the evening’s music with We Are the City and Wake Owl at Performance Works, feel European by watching one of the Francophone Film Fest offerings as part of its 20th anniversary, eat a Winterruption donut at Lee’s or get their faces painted. “People lose their minds over the face-painting. In almost any weather, there seems to be a line-up for face-painting,” said Granville Island marketing’s Scott Fraser through chat-

tering teeth. “I actually tweeted out a picture a little while ago to say, oh my God, there’s no line-up for face-painting right now, move fast!” The first clue Granville Island gets packed for Winterruption was the line-up of cars that extended to West Fourth Avenue. Thus, no shortage of people for no shortage of events. So the beauty of pop-up dance is the audience was already there. “I think with the way we set it up, it’s based on audience participation so we’re already including them when we’re creating,” said Dianna David after the end of the first of the day’s four shows in the coffee shop with fellow street dancers Natasha Gorrie and Kim Sato. “Everybody interacts because they’re excited, they’ve already come on a walk to watch which means we can be ourselves and really engage.” “Well, there was that one man who started moving back up the stairs,” added Gorrie, laughing. “He knew we were going to call him to come down.” Which may or may not have had something to do with the trio, called the Emergency Neighbourhood Watch, laying down the law which included telling the fellow to “remember to close the blinds when he’s getting jiggy with it” before breaking out into dance to Gramatik’s “Hit that Jive.” Single-Dain moved the growing crowd to a large woodworking shop on Railspur Alley for the last dance station, featuring her and fellow dancer from the Dusty Flowerpot

Cabaret Aaron Malkin, aka, Sven. There, the two showed off their acrobatic skills amid planks of wood and saws. “Granville Island is one of those places you’ll walk around and discover something,” said Fraser. “As I was walking around this morning I turned a corner and there was a woman doing Japanese flower arranging in a store window. “In February it’s usually quieter here but it’s a long ways from Christmas and still a fair ways from spring so a lot of people like to have something to do that’s celebratory.” rblissett@telus.net ®

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Development Permit Board Meeting: February 24 The Development Permit Board and Advisory Panel will meet: Monday, February 24, 2014 at 3 pm Vancouver City Hall, 453 West 12th Avenue Ground Floor, Town Hall Meeting Room to consider these development permit applications: 1328 West Pender Street: To add a mezzanine of approximately 1,346 square feet to the existing office at 1378 West Pender Street by way of heritage transfer in this existing mixeduse building on this site from properties at 431 Helmcken Street (providing 1,231 square feet) and 435 Helmcken Street (providing 115 square feet). 179 Main Street: To develop the site with a nine-storey, mixed-use building consisting of ground floor retail uses, nine social housing units on the second floor, and 47 residential units on the third to ninth floors.

photo Rebecca Blissett

Pop-up dances were part of the ninth annual Winterruption festival on Granville Island this past weekend. The first stop on the tour was at Origins Coffee where, from left to right, Natasha Gorrie, Dianna David and Kim Sato, broke out into their ‘Neighbourhood Watch’ dance. Scan this page with the Layar app to see more photos.

Please contact City Hall Security (1st floor) if your vehicle may be parked at City Hall for more than two hours. TO SPEAK ON AN ITEM: 604-873-7469 or lorna.harvey@vancouver.ca


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 9 , 2 0 1 4

health

Allergy sufferers face little reprieve this year TABLETS OFFER ALTERNATIVE THERAPY TO SHOTS CHERYL ROSSI Staff writer

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ising temperatures appear to be boosting seasonal aller-

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ing,” said Dr. Amin Kanani. “There are a lot of studies that have shown that there’s more budding and more growth of some of these allergenic trees and grasses and plants.” Kanani, who sees allergy sufferers at his South Granville office, serves as a consultant to St. Paul’s Hospital’s division of allergy and immunology and is also as a clinical associate professor at the University of B.C. He has already seen patients suffering the effects of tree pollen this year. The season of the mainly alder and birch tree scourge stretches into May. Spring offers little reprieve for seasonal allergy sufferers. Grass pollen invades the environment from May to early August. “There’s also a mould, which can be a perennial allergen if you’ve got indoor mould issues and it can also be an outdoor allergen because it does tend to grow on dead grass, dead leaves at the end of summer and through the fall,” Kanani said. Other common allergens are dust mites and dander from cats and dogs. Kanani said research indicates there’s no such thing as a hypoallergenic dog. Those sensitive to dust mites should keep their windows closed, eschew hanging their clothes outside to dry, invest in a mattress cover and ensure their bedding is washable and not stuffed with feathers, which collect dust mites. Hard surface flooring is best. Non-sedating antihistamines can provide symptom relief, as can saline rinses

photo Allan Foster/Flickr

Rising global temperatures are making life more difficult for seasonal allergy sufferers. for mild nasal congestion. Prescription nasal spray and eye drops are better than over-the-counter varieties. Allergy shots have long been an alternative for sufferers and a new option has sprouted up in the past year for those tormented by grass. Health Canada has approved a tablet that those allergic to grass slip under their tongue for six months of the year. “Europe has been a bit ahead of us in this field and they do have other allergens available there,” Kanani said. “We’re waiting for Health Canada approval for these products.” Kanani said studies show that taking the tablets for three consecutive years can increase relief for at least

two years. Tablets are taken at home and boast a lower risk of causing a reaction than allergy shots. Doctors administer shots, and patients must wait at a physician’s office 30 minutes afterward in case they have a bad reaction. Doctors initially administer allergy shots weekly and eventually, in most cases, monthly, for up to five years. Studies suggest a lack of vitamin E in a woman’s diet during pregnancy and a lack of vitamin D could be contributing to increasing allergy rates. Kanani said omega-3 fatty acids from oily fish including salmon, mackerel and sardines have shown to be beneficial to people with allergies, but supplements

are not as effective. Kanani books new patients six to 12 months in advance and he says lengthy waiting lists are common. “Attracting allergists to B.C. has been difficult,” he said. “Part of the reason is that, unfortunately, remuneration is better in many of the other provinces.” An allergist-training program started at UBC two years ago to help lessen the shortage. For more information, Kanani recommended the websites of the Allergy/Asthma Information Association, Anaphylaxis Canada, the World Allergy Organization and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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W E DN E SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 9 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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GOT ARTS? 604-738-1411 | events@vancourier.com

2

1

3

4

OUR

PICKS FEB. 19 - 21, 2014

For video and web content, scan page using the Layar app.

1 2 3 4

If the dreads didn’t already tip you off, hip-hop influenced Australian bluesman ASH GRUNWALD is big with the B.C. backcountry snowboard crowd. Expect the bro hugs to be flowing when he plays the Media Club Feb. 20. Arbutus Collective opens. Advance tickets at northerntickets.com.

BALLET B.C. teams up with THE TURNING POINT ENSEMBLE for GRACE SYMMETRY at the Queen Elizabeth Feb. 20 to 22. Featuring live music by TURNING POINT ENSEMBLE, GRACE SYMMETRY includes world premieres by Kevin O’Day and Medhi Walerski, plus the return of In Motion by Wen Wei Wang, an audience favourite from the 2010/11 dance season. Tickets at ticketmaster.ca. Details at balletbc.com.

SFU SCA Theatre presents THE COLD WAR, part of Michael Hollingsworth’s play cycle THE HISTORY OF THE VILLAGE OF THE SMALL HUTS, comprised of 21 plays in total that dramatize and satirize Canadian history. The comedy, which roughly spans the years 1945 to 1963, features 11 actors playing more than 70 characters in 130 scenes. THE COLD WAR runs Feb. 19 to March 1 at the Fei & Milton Wong Experimental Theatre, Goldcorp Centre for the Arts. Details at sfuwoodwards.ca. The Arts Club takes the Pulitzer Prize–winning DRIVING MISS DAISY out for a leisurely cruise. The “charming adventures” of a Southern matriarch (NICOLA LIPMAN) and her chauffeur (JOHN CAMPBELL) over a 25-year friendship runs until March 25 at the Granville Island Stage. Tickets and details at artsclub.com.


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 9 , 2 0 1 4

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arts&entertainment

n case you didn’t hear the bansheelike cries of “Freeeeeedom! from kilted Kitsilano warriors with urine and ashsoaked hair as they raised their spears, shields and other crude weaponry in the air Monday night, the Vancouver park board has decided not to proceed with a separated bike path through Hadden Park, also known as Kits Beach Park, the Freedom Trail, the Holy Land, Splendour in the Grass and Mr. Robertson, Tear Down that Wall. As previously mentioned in Kudos and Kvetches, protectors of Hadden Park bravely took a stand against city plans to bisect the sacred green space that would force law-abiding picnickers and Frisbee-playing families to share the park with two-wheeled death machines and the spandex-wearing hellions who so brazenly ride them. Protesters humbly compared their plight to that of civil rights figure Rosa Parks and went so far as to launch a legal action in B.C. Supreme Court against the proposed bike path, because ... you know ... bikes. In case you’re wondering how the freedom fighters of the Save Kits Beach Now Coalition feel about their hard-fought victory,

they’ll be raising their cups of mead in the air and comparing battle wounds at a press conference Feb. 19, 11:15 a.m. at Hadden Park.

HOME GAME Sad news, fans of high-fiving strangers. Turns out if the Canadian men’s hockey team makes it to the gold medal round of the Olympics, you won’t be able to gather in your favourite pub, bar, tavern or mead hall to watch the game, which begins 4 a.m. Pacific time on Feb. 23. According to the CBC, the provincial government says it won’t relax liquor laws to allow bars and pubs to stay open for the crack-of-dawn face off. “I have to balance things like public safety, public health, and also community interest,” said B.C. Justice Minister and official Buzzkill Ambassador Suzanne Anton, who, if you ask us, should really worry about more important public safety concerns, such as people who don’t wait a full half-hour after meals before swimming, jaywalkers and online daters who use outdated photos of themselves in their dating profiles. If there is one bright side to the bars remaining closed, it’s that it harkens back to a simpler, more innocent time when Canadians used to get drunk and walk around shirtless in nothing but a thin layer of grease paint the old fashion way. In the comfort of their own home. twitter.com/KudosKvetches


W E DN E SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 9 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

arts&entertainment

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ATribe Called Red perform atTalking Stick Festival STATE OF THE ARTS

with Cheryl Rossi

A

Tribe Called Red has become so popular that a second date was added to their sold-out Feb. 22 Commodore Ballroom show. The Ottawa-based aboriginal production/DJ crew will not only play the Salish Coast Live event of the 13th annual Talking Stick Festival Saturday, but also a Friday night show. “I was already excited enough to be coming out to play at the Commodore,” DJ Bear Witness said. “We weren’t expecting to sell it out.” A Tribe Called Red started with Electric Pow Wow parties in Ottawa in 2007. Witness, DJ NDN and others would mash up electronic and other beats with traditional powwow vocals and drums.

A Tribe Called Red perform two nights at the Commodore as part of the Talking Stick Festival. Witness said they wanted to create an event that celebrated the music of the indigenous communityintheveinofdance hall and bhangra shindigs. After two-time DMC Champion DJ and producer DJ Shub joined the crew in late 2008, they started recording their own tracks and gained a legion of diverse fans. “We started a party to be inclusive of indigenous people,” Witness said, “and everybody showed up.” Their self-titled album released in March 2012 was short-listed for the Polaris

Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Music Prize and included in the Washington Post’s top 10 albums of the year. Witness, 36, has deejayed for more than 18 years, favouring dub step, dance hall, jungle and reggae. DJ NDN drummed in a Montrealbased punk band and prefers heavy electronic music while Shub was a scratch battle DJ who produced hip-hop, so their music appeals to a broad audience. Witness has also worked as an experimental video artist for a decade and produced A Tribe Called Red’s videos that include can-

Citoyenneté et Immigration Canada

nily used historical snippets. A Tribe Called Red released their second full-length album, Nation II Nation, in May. Musqueam artist Ostwelve will host Salish Coast Live, which will include acts Mat the Alien, Lido Pimienta, Self Evidence, VJs Kinotropy and Heidrogen and Tsleil Waututh artists. Coast Salish Live is an initiative of W2 Media and the Tsleil Waututh Nation Sacred Trust, which is dedicated to protecting the Salish Sea and connecting artists and audiences. The Talking Stick Festival, which runs until March 2, includes national and international artists in theatre, dance, drumming, multimedia performances, spoken word and music. Crystal Shawanda is another award-winning musician performing at the Talking Stick Festival. The country songstress performed at the presidential inauguration in Washington, D.C. in January 2013 and won her first Juno Award for Aboriginal Album of the Year for Just Like You. She plays

the York Theatre March 1. “She’s cool,” Witness said. “Seeing indigenous artists starting to get attention beyond just indigenous music, that’s always exciting.” Witness says the best praise A Tribe Called Red received came from an introduction by Cree hip-hop photographer Ernie Paniccioli, who grew up in Brooklyn, at Toronto’s Manifesto festival. “He started talking about how he’d been involved in music for over 30 years, he

had always had a dream that one day somebody would come from our community and represent us in a way that only we can do, and said ‘well that dream is now standing right behind me,’” Witness said. “We all got pretty misty on stage. It was kind of one of those moments [where it was like] OK, what do we do now? Somebody press play. Somebody start the track.” Details at fullcircle.ca. crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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W E DN E SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 9 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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GOT SPORTS? 604-738-1411 | sportsandrec@vancourier.com

Volleyball star ponders life beyond the court UBC’S KENT NEARS END OF FINAL SEASON JENNIFER THUNCHER Contributing writer

U

niversity of British Columbia volleyball phenom Briana Liau Kent is soaring into her final UBC tournaments as a T-bird. This is Kent’s fifth and final season as libero on the No. 1-ranked Thunderbirds (18-4) and by all accounts it has been a successful run for the five-foot-six defensive specialist. She has racked up three Final Four championship gold medals and has four national championship titles under her belt. She also has a teamleading 271 digs with the T-birds this season. Her final regular season now over, Kent is focused on lacing up her court shoes for the Canada West Final Four championship tournament this weekend at UBC’s War Memorial Gym. The top three teams from this tournament, of which UBC is sure to be included, will advance to the Canadian Interuniversity Sport Womens volleyball championship. For Kent, the ultimate would be to leave UBC with its seventh — and national record breaking, — CIS championship in a row. “Nationals is the big thing we are all gunning for. That is going to be really, really big,” Kent said. But once that competition is behind her and she’s donned her cap and gown to receive her degree in kinesiology in May, she isn’t sure if competitive volleyball will play a role in her future. Kent, 22, said she has toyed with the idea of quitting volleyball for years. Back when she graduated from Eric Hamber secondary, she planned to quit but then got the offer she couldn’t refuse to play for UBC.

photo Rich Lam

Briana Liau Kent hopes to lead the UBC T-birds to their seventh national volleyball championship title in a row. For the last couple of years the thought of quitting entered her mind at the end of every season, but each time coaches and teammates talked her out of it. They are trying to talk her out of it still. If she does continue on the court after grad, one option — and the option her supporters are pushing for — is to try out for the national team again. Kent tried out for Canada’s Women’s National Volleyball team last year in Manitoba but fell short. “They are still pushing me to try again this year, they think it will be good for me,” she said. She is definitely considering it. Her roommate and T-bird teammate Lisa

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Barclay has played on the national team the last three summers and is encouraging Kent to go for it. “I think she is definitely one of the strongest liberos in Canada and she has a really good shot at making the national team and it would be a really good opportunity for her,” she said. Kent said she recognizes the connections and opportunities the sport brought her and could bring her. Her closest friends and best memories are from volleyball, she said. But volleyball has also cost her a lot of time and other opportunities, too. “I was always scared to play other sports or do other things, just in case I got injured,” she said.

“Being done in volleyball, I can go back to playing other sports — I love snowboarding, too — so I would try those things again. And have a lot more time to maybe travel as well … With volleyball you have to commit a fair amount of time and be around practicing and stuff so if I was done with volleyball, I could explore a lot of other things.” she said. Kent said she will make up her mind about her future after the national championship. In the meantime she is focused on tallying a few more wins at her final Final Four. For more info go to: gothunderbirds.ca/ volleyballfinalfour thuncher@shaw.ca twitter.com/thuncher

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sports&recreation

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 9 , 2 0 1 4

FRANSON LIFTS GIANTS TO BIG WIN OVER BLAZERS

Cain Franson had two goals and two assists and Joel Hamilton scored once and set up three more as the Vancouver Giants crushed the visiting Kamloops Blazers 7-2 on Sunday in Western Hockey League action. Jackson Houck added a goal and two assists for the Giants (28-23-10), who halted a five-game slide, while Tyler Morrison, Mason Geertsen and Dominik Volek each scored once. Matt Bellerive scored both goals for the Blazers (12-43-5), who are 1-9-0 in their

last 10 outings. Vancouver’s Jared Rathjen made 19 saves for the win as Cole Kehler turned aside 44-of-51 shots for Kamloops. The Giants went three for four on the power play while the Blazers failed to score on three separate chances with the man advantage. The Giants play tonight in Alberta against the Lethbridge Hurricanes, who they crushed 10-0 the only other time they faced them this season. The Giants’ next home game is March 1 against the Kelowna Rockets.

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photo Rebecca Blissett

TIGERS TRIUMPH: The Britannia Bruins tried to close the gap in the fourth quarter

against the Charles Tupper Tigers to no avail during Friday’s senior boys AAA basketball championship game at John Oliver secondary school. Tupper took the 68-52 win over the Bruins for its third city championship in the last five years

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER W E DN E SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 9 , 2 0 1 4

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Vancouver Courier February 19 2014