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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2013

Vol. 104 No. 85 • Established 1908

Steinbeck classic

22

MIDWEEK EDITION

THE VOICE OF VANCOUVER NEIGHBOURHOODS

NEWS: Kits bike path 4/ OPINION: Taxing pot shop questions 11

Federallaws governpotshops, sayscouncillor

THREE SHOPS ON EAST HASTINGS BLOCK WORRY RAY-CAM CENTRE MIKE HOWELL Staff writer

T

photo Dan Toulgoet

Brad Leith and his friends are putting the finishing touches on their final Halloween haunted house, which attracted more than 15,000 visitors in previous years. Scan page with Layar to see photos of this year’s displays and from previous years.

Last frights for haunted house

POPULAR ATTRACTION CALLING IT QUITS CHERYL ROSSI Staff writer

T

he two families that started the Dunbar Haunted House were still taking down their elaborate sets in the middle of December last year. A short time later, they started building their disturbing displays for 2013, the final year for the Vancouver Halloween institution. “We’ve basically become old farts,” said 47-year-old teacher Brad Leith who started the attraction with stylist, painter and filmmaker Gideon Flitt, nurse Annamaria Spanier and dentist Sakura Iwagami.

Leith can’t believe the haunted house that swelled from 100 visitors in 2005 to more than 15,000 in 2010 lasted in deepest Dunbar as long as it did, until it moved to a Marpole warehouse in 2011. When Leith and friends bought their Dunbar home near West 48th Avenue, he figured it was time to be a responsible adult, which meant shovelling snow, planting a garden and entertaining children at Halloween. He was disappointed with what he discovered. “Halloween had kind of gotten cutesy,” said Leith. “We grew up, you made your own costumes and the point of Halloween was to scare.” See EGYPTIAN on page 5

he complicated issue of why 29 illegal marijuana dispensaries are allowed to operate in Vancouver has become more complicated for residents and politicians now that three such shops set up almost side-by-side within a half-block of a community centre. The three storefront operations are located along a strip of East Hastings within 100 feet of the Ray-Cam Community Centre, which is a hub for neighbourhood children and has a childcare facility. So why haven’t they been shut down? The short answer is because the Vancouver Police Department is focused on targeting violent drug activity connected to the sale of cocaine, heroin and methamphetamines, as a VPD report outlined last week. In addition, as Vision Vancouver Coun. Kerry Jang told the Courier Monday, there is no city bylaw governing cannabis sales “as cannabis is legal and not legal at the same time under federal law.” Jang is referring to Health Canada’s rules that allow certain people to grow marijuana and sell it to people who are legally allowed to buy it for medicinal use. The recipient requires a prescription from a medical doctor. “Federal law trumps city bylaws,” said Jang, acknowledging the confusion the general public has about the sale and production of marijuana. “So, it’s not a simple problem. At the end of the day, the real issue is ensuring patients have access to their medication.” That confusion could be eradicated next April when the federal government plans to have all marijuana cultivated for medicinal purposes come from a government dispensary and delivered by mail. Any attempts by the city to create a new bylaw and enforce it would likely lead to legal battles in the courts, according to Jang. And, he added, such a bylaw would be irrelevant when the government adopts the new rules governing medicinal marijuana. That assessment, however, shouldn’t give the public the wrong impression that police and the city are simply allowing illegal pot dispensaries to proliferate without intervention by authorities, Jang said. “If any dispensary is not dispensing under Health Canada guidelines, then the city does investigate and shut down [the dispensary] and turn it over to VPD to pursue criminal charges on the operators,” he said. But until new legislation is adopted, Judy McGuire of the Inner City Safety Society and member of the Ray-Cam board of directors said such shops are hurting a neighbourhood that has its struggles with children and teenagers. McGuire said the city should have created a bylaw years ago to prevent pot shops operating near a community centre, childcare facility or school. “You don’t expose kids to this,” she said. “And we know, anecdotally, some of these shops are willing to deal with kids — kids wander in there instead of going to basketball practice. I’ve heard this from families and parents in the area.” See CUSTOMERS on page 4


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2013


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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news Lake saysVPD,mayor playing politics on mental health ROBERTSON, CHU CALLING FOR URGENT INVESTMENT TO EASE HEALTH PROBLEM MIKE HOWELL Staff writer

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he provincial government is reviewing its mental health plan in response to Mayor Gregor Robertson and Police Chief Jim Chu calling for urgent investments to help people with severe mental health problems in Vancouver. But Health Minister Terry Lake said he’s worried the topic has turned political at a time when the government, police department and City of Vancouver should work together to find solutions for what the mayor and chief call a crisis. “It feels political to me and I don’t think it should be political,” Lake told the Courier Monday. “We should be working together on this, not kind of working against each other. I don’t want that. I’ve never taken that approach. I’m someone who wants to be collaborative.” Lake’s comments come after the mayor and chief reiterated their positions last week that the city is in a mental health crisis, despite the health minister’s cautious assessment of the situation in Vancouver. Robertson urged Lake, whose constituency

file photo Jason Lang

Within the past three years, the emergency room at St. Paul’s Hospital saw a 43 per cent increase in patients with severe mental illness and/or addiction. Health Minister Terry Lake says the government is reviewing its mental health plan. office is in Kamloops, to spend time on Vancouver streets with police officers. The chief said his officers continue to respond to calls daily involving the mentally ill. “It’s difficult for our officers on the front lines because they’re dealing with very volatile, difficult situations and many of the people they deal with they dealt with the night before, the week before,” Chu said. Since January 2012, Vancouver police officers responded to more than 100 serious incidents ranging from suicides to random violent attacks against citizens. All were committed by people

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with severe mental health issues. Incidents included elderly women being stomped in the head, multiple stabbings and assaults on children as young as three years old. One man was eviscerated in front of a movie theatre. Within the past three years, the emergency room at St. Paul’s Hospital saw a 43 per cent increase in patients with severe mental illness and/or addiction. Mental illness is a factor in approximately 21 per cent of incidents handled by VPD officers and 25 per cent of the total time

spent on calls where a report is written. Lake said he doesn’t want to “downplay the significant challenge” of the number of mental health calls involving police. But, he said, he also doesn’t want to amend the government’s 10year mental health plan before his staff reviews the plan and analyzes the VPD’s latest report. “It’s appropriate to review this whole issue and determine if there are new strategies that we need to employ,” he said. “I just don’t want to jump to conclusions before we’ve done that process. It shouldn’t take long.” Themayorandchiefrecommended300longterm and secure mental health treatment beds be opened in Vancouver. But Lake said more research has to be done to determine whether the beds are needed. “To just rush out and build 300 beds without having the data behind it to know that that’s the right thing to do, I think would be amistake,”hesaid,notingtheprovincialgovernment spends more than $1.3 billion each year on mental health and addiction services in B.C. “We need to fully understand what the needs are before we say, yes, 300 is the right number.” Lake said he welcomes a meeting with Robertson, although neither the mayor nor any Vancouver city councillors requested time with him during the recent Union of B.C. Municipalities’ conference in Vancouver. City manager Penny Ballem was expected to deliver a presentation to council Tuesday on the mayor’s mental health and addictions task force. mhowell@vancourier.com twitter.com/Howellings


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2013

news

Kits bike path route not yet finalized COMMISSIONER SAYS PATH MIGHT BE TWEAKED NAOIBH O’CONNOR Staff writer

T

he route of the Kits and Hadden parks bike path might be “tweaked” but it’s still going to be built, according to park board commissioner Constance Barnes. Barnes spoke to the Courier Monday, a day after hundreds gathered at a “Save Kits Beach” rally to demand that the park board rethink the location of the planned 12-footwide paved path. The board approved the path Oct. 7 as part of the overall Seaside Greenway plan connecting Canada Place to Stanley Park to False Creek and finally Jericho. It’s an extension of the Cornwall-Point Grey bike lane. Budgeted at $2.2 million, the path will run from Hadden Park along Kits Beach and west to the outdoor pool. Some residents and sports and recreation organizations argued the park board conducted insufficient consultation. They insist the path will interfere with other activities at Kits Beach. In response, the park board issued a press release Friday Oct. 18 to say the final route hadn’t been determined and that the board had only approved a preliminary route. An external consultant team was to develop a specific route that accounted for park uses, as well as trees, benches and picnic areas.

photo Dan Toulgoet

Vision Vancouver park board commissioner Constance Barnes at Kits Beach where a controversial $2.2 million bike path will be built. The park board also promised to establish an advisory group of park users, including sports groups, seniors, youth and residents, to work with park staff and the consultant in the final design of the route. Barnes attended Sunday’s rally. “I heard a lot of good suggestions. My reasoning for going was to listen to the people,” she said, while stressing the park board is moving forward with the separated bike and

pedestrian path and that it’s still expected to be completed in 2014. “It’s a matter of tweaking. There is a path that’s laid out. I don’t see that we’re going to make huge changes at this point. I think what we’ll do is tweak the existing route,” she said. “I don’t see that there’s reason to be delaying when the money is there. We’re looking for safety. We want to make sure people are safe.”

Bill Hooker, a resident who took part in the rally and helped publicize it, said he has mixed feelings about the latest developments. “I have a hope [for the advisory committee] and a suspicion. My hope is that it actually convenes and works effectively and comes up with a practical result that satisfies all players,” he said. “But I suspect it might be just a diversionary tactic — it takes the heat off and lets the park board go ahead and do what they want to do anyway. My best result would be that it turns out it’s unnecessary and that there’s a revision of the plan.” Hooker, who estimated the rally attracted upwards of 300 people, questions how big a “tweak” to the route might be, but said it’s possible to make changes that would satisfy concerns. “One possibility is that they move the path onto the grass outside the trees immediately next to the sidewalk, so they’re moving closer to Arbutus Street,” he said. “Another is to put a path on Arbutus Street. There was some talk about even making Arbutus, as it parallels the park and swings around to Ogden [Avenue], to make those one-way streets — so, it should be one way and contain a bike lane.” Barnes said park board staff would work on the terms of reference for the advisory group this week. “This has all happened very quickly in response to the amount of concern we’ve heard. So we need to make sure the terms of reference are clear before we start putting people together and names together,” she said. “I know a lot of people have emailed in that they’d love to be on it.” noconnor@vancourier.com twitter.com/naoibh

Customers openly smoke behind dispensary

photo Dan Toulgoet

Marijuana dispensaries along one block of East Hastings close to the Ray-Cam Community Centre include Weeds, the Medicinal Cannabis Dispensary and the Vancouver Seed Bank.

Continued from page 1 Jim Harrison, manager of Weeds dispensary on the strip, said he sells his cannabis products only to customers who are 19 or older and have been given a prescription from a doctor. Harrison said he has a Health Canada licence for personal possession of marijuana and a grower’s licence. Weeds opened in May, joining two neighbouring dispensaries — The Medicinal Cannabis Dispensary and the Vancouver Seed Bank — that have operated on the strip for at least five years. Harrison, a 65-year-old military veteran, doesn’t have a business licence from the city but has a posted document on his wall that he obtained under the Society Act of B.C. to operate a compassion club. During the Courier’s visit, customers

purchased marijuana at a counter and smoked it outside the back entrance to the shop. “We’re part of the community and we want to be accepted by the community,” said Harrison, who said he has 300 members and another 895 on a waiting list. Harrison said his business donates money and empty pop cans to Ray-Cam every month. As a public service, he added, he “chases the hookers off the corners” so parents and their children aren’t exposed to prostitution. “I tell all parents who walk by with kids that if they’re ever in trouble, they can knock on the door,” he said, describing his business as safe and providing a service for people’s ailments that are best treated with cannabis products. mhowell@vancourier.com twitter.com/Howellings


news

Egyptian necropolis,the Plague, monster’s ball part of 2013 frights Continued from page 1 In 2006, Leith and his housemates spent several weeks decorating the front of their house with scrap materials, Halloween props, masks and costumes and at least three live spooks. They noticed that of the up to 600 people crowding their yard, few were children. Instead, it was mainly visitors aged 30 to 60. “As you get older and older it gets harder and harder to be emotionally spontaneous,” Leith said. “Part of being responsible is having your emotions in check. You can’t be freaking out and acting in distress all the time… So it’s really fun for adults to put themselves in a position where they’ll actually scream. They’re screaming at paint and latex… or they’re startled, something comes out, they know something’s going to come out, but they still end up screaming.” One of their visitors in 2006 suggested they establish a donation box and they easily collected $3,000 for the firefighters Burn Fund. Last year, they raised $63,000 for three charities. Visitors this year will tour the Terror of History. “When we started out, we would just do, like, werewolves, vampires, zombies and there’d be no rhyme or reason,” Leith said. This year’s haunted house progresses from horrific scenes in the ancient past to the future. Sets include an Egyptian necropolis, a Greek tragedy, the Crusades, the Spanish In-

quisition, sorcery, the Plague, piracy, a monster’s ball, an asylum and the Apocalypse. The monster’s ball has been a hit. “There are werewolves and vampires dressed up in regal Mozart-style clothing and they all have masquerade masks on,” Leith said. “They’re sitting around with glasses of blood and chatting.” The haunted house includes dummies mingled with live actors who play hide and seek with nighttime visitors. Weekend daytimes are actor-free to make the attraction more child-friendly. Leith is proud to have organized a low-priced, community-minded event for 10 years. He recalls more fundraising events hosted by regular people when he was younger, but says permits, regulations and expenses related to heightened safety concerns make planning such affairs unwieldy now. Leith remembers one woman thanked them for having a place in her neighbourhood where she could “burn two hours” with her kids for pocket change when the Haunted House ran by donation in Dunbar. “Now if you want to go to the Pumpkin Patch, Aquarium, it doesn’t really matter where you go, nothing’s free anymore, nothing’s really relatively inexpensive,” Leith said. For more information, see dunbarhauntedhouse.com. crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2013

news Police board meetings now online 12TH & CAMBIE with Mike Howell

(…Cue some upbeat music, heavy on the saxophone…bring in big dude with public address announcer voice…) From the Cambie Street headquarters of the Vancouver Police Department…it’s Tuesday afternoon live with….the Vancouver Police Board!.. (…Cue applause meter…) Yep, it’s true — the Vancouver Police Board is now on the air. The first episode was broadcast Oct.15 via the VPD’s website. “Welcome to all those who are watching online,” said Mayor Gregor Robertson at the beginning of the meeting. “We welcome the openness and transparency. This is a civilian board representing the citizens of Vancouver.” That it is. And if you’re wondering what Robertson was doing there, he’s the chairperson of the police board. It’s a position he inherited when he was elected mayor in November 2008. He leads a board of six civilians appointed by the provincial and municipal governments. The board is the governing body of the police department. So it has a pretty important role when it comes to finances, policy and complaints against officers. It’s also responsible for hiring and, if need be, firing the chief. Anybody remember the board not

photo Dan Toulgoet

Vancouver Police Chief Jim Chu (l) and Mayor Gregor Robertson, who both sit on the Vancouver Police Board, hope putting meetings online will help people better understand what the board does. renewing the contract of some guy named Bruce Chambers? If you tune in, you’ll see Police Chief Jim Chu and his three deputy chiefs — Warren Lemcke, Adam Palmer and Doug LePard — in attendance to answer questions from the board. Speaking from experience, not many citizens attend these meetings. In fact, media

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usually outnumber regular folk. Maybe it’s because board meetings are scheduled for 1 p.m., once a month on Tuesdays. Or maybe it’s because people can’t be bothered. Board members have long lamented the fact that the police board is essentially the Rodney Dangerfield of city agencies — getting no respect — and want the public to understand more about what they do.

The topics can be interesting. Tuesday’s meeting covered racism, marijuana, troubled kids and crime statistics. Chu also talked about his decision to join Twitter, which he used to advertise Tuesday’s meeting. Yes, the chief is on Twitter (@ChiefJimChu). Sadly, the handle @BigLeagueChu is already taken but that hasn’t stopped Chu from inflecting humour in his tweets. A sample from his recent night out with a downtown patrol team: • Working patrol shift Friday and will tweet calls. Last time, a guy was surprised it was me arresting him. I told him he was special. • Working tonight with officers that keep downtown safe. This is some of them at roll call. Yep, that’s a donut box (The chief attached a pic of officers at a table with a box of donuts.) • 4 Aussie tourists lit fireworks on beach in English Bay. Told this not OK, but shrimp on barbie is OK. • We checked 2 Lambos, white one had an N. Drivers were wondering when the mounted unit showed up as back-up. (The chief was referring to Lamborghinis and he tweeted out a photo with officers on horseback, who happened to be in the area, behind the luxury cars.) So there you go, faithful readers, you no longer have to take my word for what’s going on at police board or have me inform you what the chief is up to. Hashtag: #butifyouwantanalysiskeepreadingmystories mhowell@vancourier.com twitter.com/Howellings

Environmental Protection Notice

Application for a Permit Amendment under the provisions of the Environmental Management Act. We, Park Lane River District Developments Ltd. (Wesgroup), intend to submit this amendment application to the Director to amend Permit No. 100251, issued December 17, 2008 which authorizes the discharge from a groundwater pump and treat facility. The land upon which the facility is situated is located at Amended Lot 36 (see 55949L) Blocks 9, 10 and 16 to 19 District Lots 330 and 331 Plan 2593, Vancouver, British Columbia. Street address: 3450 East Kent Avenue South, Vancouver. The location of the discharge is offshore into the Fraser River, on the Portion of the Bed of the North Arm of the Fraser River District Lot 4977 Group 1 New Westminster District and Portion of the Bed of the North Arm of the Fraser River District Lot 3147 Group 1 New Westminster District. The source of the before-treatment water is site groundwater containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The type of treatment to be changed to activated carbon adsorption, with the intention of reducing chemical inputs and the area required to treat the pumped groundwater. The operating period for this facility will continue to be 24 hours/day, 7 days/week. Under this application, treated groundwater that is currently being discharge to the Fraser River via a drainage ditch will be discharged directly to the Fraser River via a submerged outfall. The treatment facility removes the harmful attributes of the site groundwater prior to the discharge. The amendments to which this application applies are: 1) a change in the method of treatment from an aeration lagoon and carbon adsorption system to a carbon adsorption treatment process followed by aeration; 2) a change in the discharge location from a drainage ditch discharging along the shore of the North Arm of the Fraser River to a submerged diffuser located in the North Arm of the Fraser River; 3) a decrease in the discharge volume from 650 m3/d to 450 m3/d; and 4) changes to the effluent permit limits from the British Columbia Water Quality Guidelines for Freshwater Aquatic Life to the permit limits shown in following table. Proposed Amended Proposed Amended Parameter Parameter Permit Limit Permit Limit Anthracene 1 µg/L Pyrene 0.2 µg/L Benzo(a)anthracene 1 µg/L Phenanthrene 3 µg/L Benzo(a)pyrene 0.1 µg/L Fluoranthene 2 µg/L Chrysene 1 µg/L Total Iron 40 mg/L Acridine 0.5 µg/L Turbidity Remove Acenaphthene 60 µg/L Total Suspended Solids 75 mg/L Fluorene 120 µg/L Rainbow Trout Bioassay 96h LC50 d 100% v/v Naphthalene 86 µg/L Any person who may be adversely affected by this proposed amendment and wishes to provide relevant information may, within 30 days after the last date of posting, publishing, service or display, send written comments to the contact person noted below, with a copy to the Manager, Environmental Protection, Ministry of Environment at the Lower Mainland Regional Office located at: 2nd Floor, 10470-152nd Street, Surrey, B.C., V3R 0Y3. Fax: (604) 584-9751. The identity of any respondents and the contents of anything submitted in relation to this application will become part of the public record. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. Contact Person: Lee Nikl, Telephone No. 604-297-2016

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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news Matthew Begbie pupils giveWe Day thumbs up have fun and that anything is possible. Tan likes the requirement for students to earn their entrance with meaningful work. “It makes me feel really, really proud,” the 12-year-old said. Others wonder how Moran can fit extra activities in with the curriculum.“It is the curriculum,” she said. “There’s no separating this from social studies and science and language. The novels we read have to do with this kind of work and the math we do, it is textbook math, but it’s connected to how we raise money and how other people live and science is like that as well.” Since 2007, youth involved with We Day have raised $37 million for more than 1,000 local and global causes.

CLASS NOTES

with Cheryl Rossi

A

mong the estimated 20,000 students and teachers at We Day Vancouver Oct. 18 were 22 Grade 6 and 7 students from Sir Matthew Begbie elementary in Hastings-Sunrise. True to the event’s spirit, they’ve given 50 microloans to projects around the world over the past five years to help alleviate poverty. We Day is an event and a movement of young people leading local and global change. Participants must earn their entrance with local and global service. Teacher M.J. Moran’s Grade 6 and 7 students have donated to B.C. Children’s Hospital, the food bank and the Downtown Eastside. They jog in the Terry Fox Run and raise money for the Stephen Lewis Foundation, UNICEF and micro-loans for the San Francisco-based nonprofit Kiva. The students sell blank greeting cards with their art on the front on parent-teacher night to raise money for Kiva. Pairs of students choose which project will receive their $25 micro-loan. Photos of the people connected to the projects they’ve chosen

photo Dan Toulgoet

Begbie elementary grade 7 students Mursal Amani (l-r), teacher M.J. Moran, Kaylin Chan and Krystal Tam all attended last Friday’s annual We Day Vancouver. and an explanation about their choice are posted at the school. “I like global [work] because you get to learn about different lives and how they live,” said 12-year-old Kaylin Chan. “[Students] can relate to having a single mom trying to get a job or somebody trying to open a farm business in different places around the world,” added Moran. “I have learned that if we keep on doing this we can make a difference, far more lives would be saved and with hard work we can do any-

Are you ready for the

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thing,” said Grade 7 student Mursal Amani. “Awesome,” was how the students described We Day Vancouver, which included Kofi Annan, former secretary-general of the United Nations and Nobel peace laureate, Avril Lavigne, pop star and founder and president of the Avril Lavigne Foundation, and the honourable Roméo Dallaire, lieutenant-general and author. The event was held at Rogers Arena. Krystal Tan was most taken with Martin Luther King III, who told students to let go,

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Ask at the pharmacy to learn how you can receive your flu shot! Talk to your healthcare professional, including your Safeway Pharmacist, about having your own immunization record reviewed to determine your individual needs. Vaccines may not be suitable for everyone and do not protect all individuals against development of disease. Some vaccines may require a prescription. Vaccines may not be available in all locations. Age restrictions may apply. Check with our pharmacist for further information.

Prices effective at all British Columbia Safeway stores Friday, Oct. 25 through Sunday, Oct. 27, 2013 only. We reserve the right to limit sales to retail quantities. Some items may not be available at all stores. All items while stocks last. Actual items may vary slightly from illustrations. Some illustrations are serving suggestions only. Advertised prices do not include GST. ®™ Trademarks of AIR MILES International Trading B.V. Used under license by LoyaltyOne, Inc. and Canada Safeway Limited. Extreme Specials are prices that are so low they are limited to a one time purchase to Safeway Club Card Members within a household. Each household can purchase the limited items one time during the effective dates. A household is defined by all Safeway Club Cards that are linked by the same address and phone number. Each household can purchase the EXTREME SPECIALS during the specified advertisement dates. For purchases over the household limits, regular pricing applies to overlimit purchases. On BUY ONE GET ONE FREE items, both items must be purchased. Lowest priced item is then free. Online and in-store prices, discounts, and offers may differ.

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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news Unmarked Jewish graves identified at MountainView

150 FORMERLY UNMARKED GRAVES IN JEWISH SECTION OF CEMETERY HONOURED JENNIFER THUNCHER Contributing writer

L

arry Shapiro carefully lifted a small black cloth to reveal a square grave marker engraved with the words “Anne Rosen 20 — Aug. 1918.” Shapiro was one of the approximately 75 people who attended an unveiling ceremony Oct. 20 in the Jewish section of Mountain View Cemetery to honour and identify 150 formerly unmarked graves. The project is part of the Jewish Cemetery at Mountain View Restoration Project under the auspices of the Schara Tzedeck Cemetery Board. Its goals over the final two years of the effort include publicizing the cemetery, researching and documenting the 450 burials at the site, physical restoration including the cleaning and repair of gravestones, creating a pathway through the site, developing tours, and installing benches, a washing station and new fencing. The Jewish Cemetery revitalization is the brainchild of Shirley Barnett who said her appreciation of the site started as a child when she came to visit her grandfather’s grave. “I liked the setting and I have done a lot of projects in the Jewish community and I thought I would like to do this,” she said, adding that after several acts of vandalism in the Jewish Cemetery, including the tipping of headstones in July 2012, it was easier to get volunteers to help with the project. Shapiro said he was touched by the fact incidents of vandalism led to the revitalization. He said such a reaction is a common aspect of Jewish culture by turning sadness into triumph. “I felt personally very special unveiling them [the markers]. It’s almost like a rebirth of the death. It is something very strange. You don’t get a chance to do that every day,” he said. According to Barnett, discovering the names of the men women, children, and infants, sometimes buried two or three to a grave, took extensive research. The unmarked graves so far have dated between 1892 and 2000, but Barnett said they are still finding graves, including several found under hedges last week, so the final tally and dates aren’t known.

The wooden markers unveiled at the ceremony will remain unless family members come forward to purchase larger headstones. While no one can say for sure why some graves were not given a marker originally, Barnett said reasons might include poverty, the practice of not marking the graves of babies who died within a week of birth, or because a family moved away or didn’t remain Jewish. Regardless of the reason, Barnett and her volunteers believe it is important to name and honour those who died. Rabbi Andrew Rosenblatt, who officiated the ceremony, said burials are a function of Jewish tradition. “Cemeteries are a preservation of our historical consciousness, our legacy,” he

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Isidore Levine’s grave was one of the 150 formerly unmarked graves in the Jewish section of Mountain View Cemetery that was recently given a gravestone.

said. “I think this project has such a beautiful character because it embodies both of these elements: the elements of kindness which are so prevalent in our tradition, but also these ideas of preserving history.” The restoration project is funded by grants from several sources including the Schara Tzedeck Cemetery Board, the Heritage Legacy Fund of B.C., the Jewish Community Foundation and Jewish Federation of Greater Vancouver, as well as from contributions of family foundations and individual donors. For more information, contact Myra Adirim at myra.mvc@ gmail.com thuncher@shaw.ca twitter.com/@Thuncher

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2013

THE VANCOUVER COURIER

1574 West Sixth Ave., Vancouver, BC V6J 1R2 604-738-1411 Twitter: @vancouriernews vancourier.com

NDP victory won’t come from a computer

T

he thinking in some B.C. New Democrat circles now goes something like this: If only there was a software package the party could buy to win an election. Download BeatChristy 1.0 (for Mac and PC) from Amazon, say, and install it at headquarters. The program would analyze voter information, format the right micro-targeted messages and “devise a data-driven action program,” to quote from the experts. Follow the prompts and the program would deliver an NDP government as smoothly as Google delivers search results. There’snosuchthing,butsomeNDPmembers on Monday unveiled what looks like an attempt to build something similar. I don’t think it’s going to do the trick, but you can’t fault the enthusiasm of the backers of the Winch Institute, which opened its online doors for business this week. It’s going to sponsor research in “the science of voter contact and data management” by gathering like-minded statisticians and mathematicians to model systems that pull the vote and win elections. Andrew Mercier, a young former candidate who lost his race in May, said the concept sprang from admiration for the data management and outreach done by the Democratic Party in winning the U.S. 2012 presidential election. NDP MLA Bruce Ralston talked with others about modelling that work and the Winch Institute, named after former NDP leader Harold Winch, was hatched. The Democratic Party’s effort has become the stuff of legend. After John Kerry’s defeat in 2008, the party made over its backshop voter analysis and get-outthe-vote operations. The Winch Institute has a vision of “serving as the analytics department for the progressive movement” in Canada. “Through rigorous application of the most current techniques in analytics, the Winch Data Initiative will give the progressive movement a decisive advantage in future elections.” There’s a lot of emphasis on the success of the Democratic Party model. But that discounts another key factor — Barack Obama. He had at least as much to do with their two wins as the backshop did. And one of the big differences between the Kerry loss and Obama’s wins wasn’t just a computer-program upgrade — they came up with a better candidate, as well. Another point about the new analytics shop is that the NDP’s opponents are doing exactly the same thing. A B.C. Liberal strategist wouldn’t go into details but left the impression the Liberals will not be left behind when it comes to staying current with political data analysis. He said the topic has a certain allure as it is viewed as a mysterious black box that can work miracles. But it’s not that complicated. The NDP lost in May because people didn’t like their policies, he said. They can tinker with the mechanical works, but they were driving the wrong car in the wrong direction, “with probably the wrong driver, as well.” The NDP already has a similar operation established within the party. Former campaignmanagerBrianToppdescribeditinhispost-mortemofthelossreleased last month. He said they implemented a number of interesting new campaign tools in 2012, “including a micro-targeting system that helped us predict, quite accurately, which voters might tell us they supported us and would contribute financially to our campaign. “This micro-targeting system was part of a larger data-management system that allowed us to track, record and preserve substantially all of our local and central voter identification work, for the first time.” But Topp concluded it didn’t work. “It is more than a little depressing to compare the ‘marks’ we recorded in target ridings through these well-designed and impressive systems with the actual turnout,” he wrote. Maybe that’s an argument for the Winch Institute to step in and design a better system. But maybe it shows there’s too much emphasis on analytic projections that can’t be trusted. Just So You Know: The party executive is now recommending May 25, 2014, as the date to pick a new leader. The idea has to be approved by the provincial council. Thirty-six of the 133 council members are on the executive, so the vote will indicate how restive the party is when it comes to taking direction. lleyne@timescolonist.com twitter.com/LeyneLes

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

WE WANT YOUR OPINION Hate it or love it? We want to know... really, we do! Reach us by email: letters@vancourier.com

Illegal pot shops raise taxing questions

H

ere I go again writing about marijuana. Apparently, I just can’t stop myself. In case you missed it, my colleague Mike Howell wrote a story in last Friday’s paper about the Vancouver Police Department’s laissez-faire attitude toward 29 illegal marijuana dispensaries in the city. According to the VPD, none are licensed by Health Canada, endorsed by any medical body or associated with any legitimate health service provider. I can understand the police not getting too bothered if only half a dozen of these dispensaries were operating in the city, but 29 (at last count) is a whopping number. Clearly there are profits to be made. The VPD, as Howell reported, is not making these shops a priority, preferring to focus their resources on violent drug activity. Fair enough, but surely the police have considered that some of these “dispensaries” could be gang-owned with profits used to purchase harder drugs like heroin and cocaine or to purchase weapons. But I find comfort at least in the fact that the police are keeping track of how many are opening. The VPD’s current attitude is a far cry from how it once dealt with similar shops. Do you remember the 2004 brouhaha over the Dutch-style Da Kine café on Commercial Drive? Dozens of undercover cops, weapons drawn and clad in balaclavas, raided the popular pot shop and arrested owner Carol Gwilt and seven employees on charges of possessing marijuana for the purpose of trafficking. Gwilt was also charged with possessing proceeds from a crime. Talk about overkill. Fastforward nine years and the VPD has had a seismic shift in attitude. The police report Howell cited in his Friday story included this statement: “criminal enforcement could be very damaging to employees of the dispensaries, who are generally young, entry-level employees who could face criminal charges and the possible impact that would have on other future employment or their ability to travel.” Sensible words. But I’m not really bothered that these places are operating — as long as they’re being good neighbours, are filing tax returns, and deducting CPP, EI and income tax from their employees paycheques like my employer does on my mine? Forget the police. It’s the tax man I’d be worried about. If these businesses are allowed to operate, as the VPD and city are allowing them to, I hope the CRA is paying close attention to these illegal businesses to ensure they are complying with the federal laws requiring them to file income tax returns. But apparently it’s a very hazy area at the moment. But back to the city’s involvement. What I find odd is why the city can’t answer a simple question as to whether these shops obtained a business license in order to operate. Instead of replying to Howell’s straightforward question he asked last week, the city emailed a prepared statement about these dispensaries being a “larger Health Canada issue” with “a lack of clarity around the regulations.” We all know that massage parlours pay the city to obtain a business license to operate so what was with the city’s fecklessness in answering Howell’s question on pot dispensaries? According to Howell’s story on page 1 in today’s issue, a pot shop on East Hastings called Weeds doesn’t have a business licence and has never been visited by a city inspector. Heck, the owner has a sandwich board outside advertising marijuana for $5 a gram. If the police and city are going to allow these shops to operate as if pot were legal, then they should be required to follow the same rules and regulations as every other business in town. Or are they just letting rules slide until April 1 when Health Canada introduces its new policies on medical marijuana? Whatever the reason, the city is ragging the puck on answering certain questions. At the moment, it appears some illegal pot dispensaries are given a free pass while legal businesses must jump through hoops to comply with stringent city regulations, especially concerning window fronts. Take for example the storefronts of WestCoast Medcann at 2931 Cambie St. or Medpotnow at 4170 Fraser St. (See photos online.) Frosted pane windows cover more than half the windowfronts of these dispensaries making it impossible to see activity inside. Why is that allowed when a friend who recently opened a small café/eatery on the West Side was told in no uncertain terms that she couldn’t put anything on the windows that would obscure the view inside? I’m all for the clear window policy as per C1-C2 zoning regulations given it’s about creating a friendly street atmosphere. I’d just like to see the rule applied fairly. The city says it will investigate — but only if it gets a complaint. So dear citizens, call 311 if you question any business in your neighbourhood commercial zone whose windows are covered preventing you from seeing inside. But I surmise the city is fully aware of the pot shops’ window coverings. There are 29 of them after all. Fhughes@vancourier.com Twitter.com/HughesFiona

FIONA HUGHES

BARRIERS A COST-EFFECTIVE COMPROMISE

To the editor: Re: “Kits Beach bike path a done deal,” Oct. 16. The park board would be wise to reconsider its “done deal” approach to the separated paved bike path through the picnic area at Kits beach. Even if only two tables need to be moved, the public reaction is loud and clear on the matter and in stark contrast to the “solid process” staff undertook when they spoke to a small number of beach goers. I’m sure many will write letters screaming about the lack of public consultation, cost, poor design and removal of green space. All are valid arguments. So today I offer a reasonable compromise that should satisfy nearly everyone: install barriers on the existing shared path like at Third Beach. Require bike riders to dismount and skateboarders/ in-line skaters to slow down to a walking pace. I frequent Third Beach a lot in the summer. It’s busy, but everyone abides by the direction and gets along. Barriers offer a cost effective measure that achieves the park board’s stated safety goals. And if it doesn’t work, in two years, the next park board — whatever that looks like — can reconsider a separated path. Trevor Boudreau, Vancouver

ASSISTANCE, NOT PUNISHMENT, BEST FOR TEENAGE POT USERS To the editor:

Re: “It’s time to really talk about pot, say educators,” Oct. 16. I appreciated reading Fiona Hughes’ column. As a drug policy reform researcher and the director of Educators for Sensible Drug Policy along with Dr. Rodney Skager, we have proposed fundamental changes in drug prevention education for the past decade in Canada and the U.S. First and foremost most drug education should be moved up into secondary schools. Currently there is very little drug education for teenagers and what there is merely repeats earlier messages that often are no longer credible to high school students. Continued widespread use by teenagers of alcohol and other drugs suggests that “inoculating” most children against experimentation and use later on as teenagers has failed. Our public schools whenever possible under the law should emphasize assistance rather than punishment. Effective assistance strategies will reduce negative statistics on low achievement, poor attendance and dropping out of school.

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Educators for Sensible Drug Policy (EFSDP) and our respected consultants have found: 1. Substance use remains common among high school students. 2. The goal of inoculating children against later alcohol and drug experimentation has been unrealistic. 3. School punishment policies have not deterred widespread use of alcohol and other drugs among high school students . 4. Youth has a voice and it deserves to be heard. 5. Drug education for teenagers must be genuinely interactive. 6. Student assistance offers an appropriate structure Examples of these findings are readily available through EFSDP. Student assistance programs have proved effective and very successful. These findings suggest that working with young people to facilitate self-examination and development for self and others is highly recommended by educators who want to work with health care professionals and drug educators in our public schools. Our goal is to provide ideas over ideology, compassion over coercion and rehabilitation over punishment. Judith Renaud, Executive Director Educators for Sensible Drug Policy, Gibsons, B.C.

ON YOUR MIND ONLINE COURIER STORY: “Senior wants safer East Vancouver intersection,” Oct. 16 DirtyOldTown: I drive that route every day and the comment about parked cars blocking visibility on the crosswalk is spot on. It is absolutely impossible to see someone approaching the crosswalk when there is a car or van parked right next to it. Sidewalk bulges might prevent people from parking right next to the crosswalk, or possibly increased ticketing (city regulations require parking at least six metres from the nearest edge of the closest sidewalk on an intersecting street). Obviously, drivers have a duty to slow down when visibility at the crosswalk is blocked, but unfortunately, relying solely on driver caution at that intersection is bound to lead to another tragedy. It’s completely negligent for the city to allow this to continue. COURIER STORY: “Illegal pot shops not a VPD priority,” Oct. 17 Patrick: “VPD’s focus should be on disrupting violent drug activity, saying that’s where “the precious dollars” need to be spent. Drug dealers who sell cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine receive greater priority than enforcement of marijuana, the report said. Except that grow-ops producing illegal BC grown marijuana may fund the purchase of cocaine from down south. COURIER STORY: “LBGT youth make up chunk of ‘invisible’ homeless numbers,” Oct. 11 Janet Hudgins: To parents who kick their kids out: Ignorance is a terrible thing. All it does is destroy and it particularly destroys minds. Follow us on Facebook: The VancouverCourierNewspaper and Twitter: @VanCourierNews

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Letters may be edited by the Courier for reasons of legality, taste, brevity and clarity. To be considered for publication, they must be less than 300 words, signed and include the writer’s full name (no

initials), home address, and telephone number (neither of which will be published), so authorship may be verified. Send to: 1574 West Sixth Ave., Vancouver BC V6J 1R2 or email letters@vancourier.com


community E12

THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2013

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hockey. Tickets are $32, available in advance at ticketmaster.ca. It runs 8 p.m. at 6265 Crescent Rd. The lecture will air on CBC Radio’s Ideas in early November.

bthulthu Vancouver Airport Authority president and CEO Craig Richmond touches down at the Four Seasons Hotel Oct. 23 to talk about how much Vancouver International Airport matters to the province and, presumably, why it is a bad idea for people to fly out of nearby Bellingham or Seattle at a fraction of the cost. Find out more about Canada’s second busiest airport, which last year saw nearly 300,000 planes land and handled 228,000 tonnes of cargo at this two-hour Vancouver Board of Trade event titled YVR: Connections, scheduled to begin at 11:45 a.m. inside the Park Ballroom at 791 W. Georgia. Ticket prices start at $79 or $158 for non-members. More info is available at boardoftrade.com.

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There will be blood discussed at the Chan Centre for the Performing Arts Oct. 23 when Blood: The Stuff of Life author Lawrence Hill gives a presentation as part of the CBC Massey Lecture series. Hill, best known for his bestseller The Book of Negroes, will discuss the scientific history of the nutrient-rich red liquid that keeps us all going and, in the same vein, explore the many different social impacts the substance famously thicker than water has had on human history, ranging from ideas on blood purity regarding race and religious ramifications to the popularity of the Twilight franchise and the always topical question of violence in

The Hastings Street Band will lead a procession of art enthusiasts from Oppenheimer Park tomorrow (Oct. 24) to nearby Gastown as part of the sixth annual Oppenheimer Park Community Art Show starting at 5 p.m. Park-a-Palooza debuts at Gallery Gachet (88 East Cordova St.) and showcases the work of 35 different artists from the surrounding community, including the special exhibit Birds That Play of birds painted through a series of art workshops curated by Carrie Campbell. The exhibition runs until Dec. 1. For more information, call 604-253-8830 or email oppparkartshow@gmail.com. afleming@vancourier.com

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Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese Garden will be haunted by Seven Tyrants Theatre beginning Oct. 24 as the troupe performs stories about the intrepid Judge Dee, a semi-fictional sleuth based on 18th century magistrate Di Renjie — who has become a bit like China’s version of Sherlock Holmes. Billing itself as Vancouver’s only haunted house not suitable for children, Judge Dee’s Chinatown Haunted House features more than 12 actors, dancers and musicians telling a typically terrifying tale. Entry is every 10 minutes starting at 7 until 10 p.m. Tickets are 12 bones and $10 for students, available at the door, over the phone at 604-6623207 or online from ticketstonight.ca. More information available at seventyrants.com.

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WEEKLY NEWS RECAP

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You know it’s a thriller, thriller afternoon Oct. 26 beginning at 4 p.m. outside the Roundhouse Community Centre (181 Roundhouse Mews) as Vancouver Improv Anywhere hosts its annual zombie dance to Michael Jackson’s “Thriller.” Hundreds of costumed dancers are expected to turn out to recreate the dance moves from the classic 1983 music video as part of a fundraiser for the Greater Vancouver Food Bank. Spectators and participants are asked to bring nonperishable food or cash donations. Prizes include doublepasses to Fright Night and the new Fly Over Canada flight simulator at Canada Place, improv shows at the Rio Theatre, and a prize pack from the Storm Crow Tavern. Makeup artists will be on-hand beginning at noon for last-minute participants, and a impromptu rehearsal will be held Friday night at the Roundhouse beginning at 7 p.m. Check out improvanywhere.com to find out more.

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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Small Business equals big results BY HELEN PETERSON

We’re all familiar with the business cliché – “we try harder.” Well, never has this been more realized than when a small business is out to serve you, the customer.

OCT 20-26

B

ecause small businesses generally stem from entrepreneurship – whether it’s a micro-brewery, a boutique, a tech start-up or a bookkeeping service – the visionaries behind them tend to be devoted to their craft. After all, it’s their baby, and they probably went through hoops (and a lot of late nights and start-up cash) to make their business grow successfully.

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business success here and beyond our provincial border.” Yamamoto said the B.C. Government is committed to making B.C. the most small-business friendly jurisdiction in Canada, “and we are working hard to ensure that small businesses have the support they need to grow and succeed. We have been working closely with the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB) to grow our small-business sector.

It’s Small Business Week in Canada (Oct. 20 to 26), and here in B.C., Minister of State for Tourism and Small Business, Naomi Yamamoto, recently said, “Small businesses are the heart and soul of communities, and this recognition week gives us an opportunity to celebrate small

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BIA’s - a bridge from seller to buyer Business Improvement Areas (BIAs) are specially funded business districts. The City of Vancouver helps local business groups to form the BIAs. Once a BIA is formed, it is managed by a volunteer board elected by property owners and tenants within its boundary.

“As part of Small Business Day celebrations, CFIB is promoting Shop Small Business Day on Oct. 25,” says Yamamoto. I encourage [everyone] to celebrate small businesses in their communities by getting out and shopping local this Friday!”

The districts are managed by nonprofit groups of property owners and business tenants, whose goal is to promote and improve their area. Vancouver has 22 BIAs, which are active in their communities, promoting business, tourism, safety and street beautification. Whenever you see a street/shopping festival, the BIA is generally the driving force behind it.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2013

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Pre-registeronline @ sohosme.soho.ca | Enterpromocode: courier-invite Limited time offer includes access to the SOHO Super Meetup & Main Conference & Tradeshow. Special 30% OFF to attend The SOHOSME After Party. Visit the website for complete event details. SIGNATURE PARTNERS:

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Correct at the time of printing.

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

seniors SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE

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October 2013

No bones about it

OSTEOPOROSIS TREATMENTS SUPPLEMENT HEALTHY LIVING

O

steoporosis is a disease that affects the bones, weakening them, and making them more likely to break. Osteoporosis is often called the “silent thief” because bone loss can occur without you even knowing it or feeling anything.

However, sometimes this is not enough to ward off the bone-weakening effects of osteoporosis. “For some women with osteoporosis, particularly those at higher risk of breaking a bone, prescription medication is needed to build bones and keep them strong,” said Dr. David Kendler, director of the Prohealth Clinical Research Centre and the Osteoporosis Program at Providence Health Care in Vancouver.

This bone loss does not occur overnight but over the course of several years. Sometimes the first sign anything is wrong is a broken bone. These breaks can have serious side effects, including loss of mobility and independence, as well as shortened life spans. Women over the age of 55 are at an increased risk for osteoporosis, and so are advised to incorporate healthy lifestyle choices to build bone strength. These include daily weight-bearing exercise, such as brisk walking or dancing, and consuming at least 1,200 mg of calcium and 800 to 2,000 IU of vitamin D per day.

Calcium can be found in milk products as well as kale, sesame seeds, tofu, and almonds. Fish, eggs, orange juice, and sunshine are excellent sources of Vitamin D.

  

people taking oral bisphosphonate treatment are estimated to discontinue within a year, putting their bones at risk of breaking. “Other treatment options with different dosing options, such as a twice-yearly injection, are available for women aged over 55 who are at high risk of breaking a bone,” said Dr. Kendler.

Treatments taken less frequently may be a better option for some patients.

In a recent survey of women over the age of 55, 80 per cent knew it was important to take the medication as prescribed by their doctor. Nearly all of the respondents – 90 per cent – said that they always took their medication at the recommended time and dose, and only 17 per cent thought it was okay to occasionally miss a dose because their bones would still be protected from breaking.

Your doctor can help you decide what treatment option is right for you. More information about osteoporosis is available online at healthandbone.ca.

Despite this, studies show that half of

Information courtesy newscanada.com.

MOVIN’ ON UP (with a little less) A FREE DOWNSIZING SEMINAR

THURSDAY, OCT 24TH 1:00 - 3:00 PM ~ CENTRE COURT

October 28, 2pm – 3pm

Entertainment followed by Bingo and Exercises by Cavell Gardens

You’re seasoned at Spring Cleaning, but have you ever been Autumn Downsizing? Tapestry at Arbutus Walk presents Movin’ On Up (with a little less), an informative seminar to help you tackle your downsizing [SR] ]VY]ab NR[S XabfWVbXVg

Corner of East Broadway @ Kingsway

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This is a free seminar open to seniors and their families.

Space is limited. Please RSVP to 604.736.1640 to ensure your spot.

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Colleen Smart from Daybreak Moving Solution for Seniors will discuss the basics of downsizing. Most importantly, what should stay YbW NSY[ ]SaPdW Tag \M [SV [RcV QaddVVb`] WabVZ MaP`dd UVVd XabfWVb[ YbW _VYWM [a [YXedV MaP_ SacV Ua_ ^P[Pcb OaNb]RLRbTg

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2013

Amica VITALIS™ Assisted Living Suites and Services with a Hospitality-Plus Attitude! When daily living activities such as bathing or dressing take a little more energy or agility than you once had, or if you would enjoy life a little easier knowing that a friendly face and helping hand is just outside your door, then it's time to consider the VITALIS™ way of life. Our VITALIS™ Assisted Living Suites are pleased to offer customized care throughout each day for assistance with activities of daily living. Call or visit today to learn more about our Independent Rental Retirement Living and our VITALIS™ Assisted Living Suites & Services. ~ Open House Week ~ Wednesday, October 23rd to Tuesday, October 29th, 2013 10:00 am to 4:00 pm daily Call today for a tour and stay for lunch compliments of our Chef de Cuisine Robert!

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A16


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A17

seniors

Living to 120: Exposing medical myths to health professionals and consumers about the rational use of medications. His focus is shared/informed decision-making, using evidence based information and rational therapeutic principles by analyzing scientific

T

reports, the methods used and the conclusions. Johanna Trimble has spoken extensively on her personal experience, with “Is your Mom on Drugs? Ours Was and Here’s What We Did About It.” She is a member of the

Community Engagement Advisory Network (Vancouver Coastal Health.) The primary focus of Trimble’s work is improving medical prescribing practices and care of the frail elderly. This groundbreaking

symposium offers free admission and parking, and advance registration is advised. For further information, visit the JSAGV website at jsalliance.org, and to register contact Karon Shear at 604 732-1555.

YOU CAN’T AFFORD NOT TO HEAR.

he Jewish Seniors Alliance of Greater Vancouver is presenting its annual Fall Symposium from 2 to 4:30 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 3, and this year’s event, held at Peretz Centre, 6184 Ash St. is a must-attend for those who care about seniors’ health issues.

on medical myths, and it’s time to expose these before it’s too late. Featured speakers include Dr, Margaret McGregor; a family physician and clinical associate professor and a director of community geriatrics with the UBC Department of Family practice.

Live to 120: Thriving: Is the Medical System Failing the Elderly? – will explore various topics, for example… are medications, without regard, used as a cure all? When are pills really

She promotes quality of life, supporting patients to self manage disease effectively, and researches the topic of chronic disease related to aging and health services for the frail and elderly.

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FREE needed and when are they promoted? Is medication always the answer or are there other concepts of medical care? The JSAGV says the public and media thrive

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A18

THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2013

seniors

’ What’s On’ for November compiled by Helen Peterson

From Basic to Beauty WE DO IT ALL!

• “Invisalign” Invisible Orthodontics • Digital Imaging • Dental Implants • One Appointment Porcelain Crowns • Oral Conscious Sedation Dentistry

Dr. Y. Vincent Yoshida, Inc. Family & Cosmetic Dentistry Accepting New Patients

207-1750 East 10th Avenue, Vancouver Phone: 604-874-1221 or www.dryoshida.com

F

rom Nov. 10 to 17, visit the “Nature Vancouver Photography Exhibit” in the Discovery Room, Visitor Centre at VanDusen Botanical Garden. Each year the Vancouver Natural History Society (Nature Vancouver) holds a nature photography competition for its members. Some 400 excellent works are submitted to the competition and this year a jury has selected 57 of the best for display at VanDusen Botanical Garden. Open during regular Garden hours, with free admission. For more on what’s happening at VanDusen next month, check out the new and improved website at vandusengarden.org. Sweep! Meet new people, get active, get healthy and get involved at Hill Crest Centre Senior Men’s Curling Club. Recreational curling

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Getting better with age

TERRACES ON SEVENTH PRIVATE DINING ROOM

is starting up soon, and is open to men aged 55-plus. (Senior women’s league is also available.) Learn the basics of deliver, sweeping and scoring, and have a great deal of fun while doing it. Games take place Tuesdays or Thursdays from 12:45 to 3:30 pm, and the 45-game season runs from October through to Apr. 10. Plus, they offer free curling instruction, before or after games. To join, contact John Reid at 604-224-1127 or visit vancurl. com/leagues/senior-men. Watch for our exciting Nov. 13 edition of Seniors. We’ll take a visit through the newly refurbished areas (as if it could get any more beautiful,) and functional upgrades, at Terraces on Seventh retirement residence, located on West 7th, just off Fir. All that, and more, for our golden-agers!

QA@dYIF]J a\@X]\Fd@ XFXdXITTP A\Tc^dIFd dE participate, are thrilled to discover how energized IF] CE@XdXb\ dY\P H\ZXF dE [\\TJ `Y\P A\CEAd XGCAEb\] blood circulation, sharper G\FdIT I^cXdP IF] @EG\ even become less reliant cCEF dY\XA SITV\A@J NdD@ \I@P dE T\d HIAAX\A@ Z\d XF dY\ SIPJ ecd dY\ V\P X@ dE QF] I CTI^\ dYId E[[\A@ @\FXEAK[AX\F]TP \BcXCG\Fd SXdY CT\FdP E[ ^YEX^\J NF]\C\F]\Fd TXbXFZ retirement residences are I [IFdI@dX^ SIP [EA @\FXEA@ to gain unlimited access dE QdF\@@ IF] S\TTF\@@ XF I @I[\L O\RXHT\ IF] @cCCEAdXb\ \FbXAEFG\FdJ Need a question answered about independent living? Contact Earl Bergen, GM, Cedar Springs Retirement XUGRVULWU N YNWRQW HIMK[I Community at 604.986. 3633 earl@cedarspringsresidence.ca

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Pat Fornelli, volunteer for the Vancouver/Kerrisdale Branch of the Canadian Osteoporosis Society reminds us they will be hosting an important lecture: “Height Loss may be a Warning Sign of a Spinal Fracture” and Stand Tall Canada Clinic. (Following the talk, attendees will be offered a measurement of their height.) It’s presented by Jacek Kobza, MPT, Director, Bentall Medicentre Physiotherapy Clinic, on Tuesday, Oct. 29 at 7 p.m., at the Seniors Centre, Kerrisdale Community Centre, 5851 West Boulevard. Admission is free, and no registration required. For more info., call 604-7314755 or 604-224-5063.

Do something about it.

Earl Bergen, General Manager Cedar Springs Retirement Residence

At age 80, 85 or more, how much health and wellness can one expect to have? Believe it or not, this can be the perfect time to get Qd IF] \FWEP GEA\ S\TTF\@@ dYIF PEcDb\ YI] XF P\IA@J Wellness is attained in GIFP SIP@U dYAEcZY emotional, spiritual, intellectual, social and CYP@X^IT ^EFF\^dXEF@J N TXV\ dE ^ITT dY\G dY\ Qb\ AcFZ@ EF dY\ S\TTF\@@ TI]]\AJ ecd dY\P ^IF H\ ^YITT\FZXFZ for a senior to achieve if dY\PDA\ X@ETId\] Id YEG\ EA YIb\ TXGXd\] GEHXTXdPJ An independent retirement ^EGGcFXdP CAEbX]\@ \I@P I^^\@@ dE dYE@\ ^EFF\^dXEF@J _Y\dY\A XdD@ I @\Id\] QdF\@@ ^TI@@L CET\K I@@X@d\] SITVXFZ EA HAIXF games, there are countless SIP@ dE Z\d PEcA HE]P moving, heart pounding IF] HAIXF dYXFVXFZL FE GIdd\A PEcA IZ\J Here at our retirement A\@X]\F^\L N YIb\ SXdF\@@\] the positive results

Mark your calendar

Costco Wholesale and United Way are preventing child poverty. Join us. uwlm.ca/preventpoverty

Children are poor in this city.

Give. Volunteer. Act.


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A19

GOT ARTS? 604-738-1411 | events@vancourier.com

2

11

3

OUR

PICKS OCT. 23 - 25

For video and web content, scan page using the Layar app.

1 2 3 4

4

Music, art, theatre, film, dance, processions, spoken word, forums, workshops, discussions, mixed media and history walks, oh my. THE DOWNTOWN EASTSIDE HEART OF THE CITY FESTIVAL celebrates its 10th year with all the aforementioned razzmatazz and a whole lot more Oct. 23 to Nov. 3. For info on the more than 80, mostly free, events throughout the Downtown Eastside, go to heartofthecityfestival.com. Three icons for the price of one. American acting icon ELIZABETH PARRISH and Canadian dance icon MARGIE GILLIS join forces to liberate agoraphobic American literary icon Emily Dickinson in BULLETINS FROM IMMORTALITY... FREEING EMILY DICKINSON Oct. 23 to 26 at the Cultch. For tickets and more details, go to thecultch.com.

Award-winning journalist, novelist and playwright GEORGE PACKER, wait for it, packs a punch at the VANCOUVER WRITERS FEST. The staff writer for the New Yorker and author of The Assassins’ Gate: America in Iraq will be at Frederic Wood Theatre, Oct. 24, 8 p.m. to read from and discuss his latest book THE UNWINDING: AN INNER HISTORY OF THE NEW AMERICA. For tickets and more information on the festival, which runs until Oct. 27, go to writersfest.bc.ca. Enjoyably off-kilter and extremely funny standup comedian MARIA BAMFORD will be at Vancouver FanClub, Oct. 24, along with local talents Graham Clark and Dino Archie, to help kick off and announce the lineup for the NORTHWEST COMEDY FEST, which takes place in February. The “exclusive early show” starts at 6:30 p.m. with the “less exclusive late show” beginning at 9 p.m. Tickets at ticketfly.com. More details at northwestcomedyfest.com.


A20

THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2013

BEST BUY - CORRECTION NOTICE NEWSPAPER RETRACTION FOR THE BEST BUY OCTOBER 18 CORPORATE FLYER

In the October 18 flyer, page 8, the Samsung 60” / 65” 1080p 240Hz 3D Slim LED TVs (Web Code: 10243916 / 10243917) were advertised with an incorrect price. The CORRECT prices are as follows: $2399.99, save $400 for the 60” and $2999.99, save $400 for the 65”. As well, the Dell Laptop with Intel® Core™ i5-4200U Processor (WebCode: 10268761) advertised on page 12 is English ONLY. Also, shipments to select stores have been delayed. Customers may request a raincheck if this product is not available for purchase. Please see a Product Specialist for details. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused our valued customers.

TIPS,TRICKS & TOOLS TO MANAGE

ARTHRITIS Featuring Morag Crocker, Occupational Therapist, learn about the many tools and gadgets available to help make daily tasks easier. Get some tips and tricks to help manage arthritis symptoms and take the pressure off your joints.

DATE: TIME: VENUE: COST:

Wednesday, October 30, 2013 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm Community Hall 480 Broughton Street, Vancouver FREE

To register please call 604.714.5550

www.arthritis.ca

arts&entertainment KUDOS& KVETCHES TAKING TWO-WHEELED DEMONS AND THE HELLIONS WHO RIDE THEM TO TASK As opposition to the city’s plans for a paved bike path through Kits Beach Park grows louder and more shrill, even going so far as to draw self-comparisons to icons of the civil rights movement, K&K has decided to take a closer look at this two-wheeled demon commonly known as the bicycle. What makes it tick? Why doesn’t it have four wheels like a proper vehicle? Just who are the hellions who insist on riding these death machines across Vancouver’s charred landscape like the spandex-wearing Horsemen of the Apocalypse? Why do bikes want to assault defenseless children and families as they take part in Vancouver’s oldest pastime… picnicking? How many more basic rules of grammar, punctuation and capitalization will have to die on comment boards, Facebook sites and online petitions before enough is enough? Here’s what we’ve discovered: • Bicycles travel at alarmingly fast speeds with no regard for the lives of their innocent victims. Fuelled by wind, blood and the cries of children, they drive on roads made of pavement,

broken bones and crushed dreams. • Even though Mayor Gregor Robertson and his Vision council were elected twice in a row with a mandate that presumably included increasing Vancouver bike routes, putting a bike path through a recreation area is sheer insanity. Everyone knows recreation areas are for kicking balls, throwing Frisbees and enjoyment by families who can’t prevent their children from walking in front of moving objects. That’s it. There’s no sharing of space in a recreation area — just good old fashioned spreading out and hunkering down. The way our ancestors intended. • The mayor’s aim to make Vancouver the greenest city? More like “meanest city.” Trademark. • We’ve already witnessed the devastation that rampant cycling has inflicted upon once pristine Xanadus such as Stanley Park, English Bay, Sunset Beach, Coal Harbour, False Creek, Jericho Beach, Spanish Banks and Locarno Beach. Drive down there in your SUV and you’ll see what we’re talking about. It’s practically like a scene from Mad Max — a lawless wasteland filled with strangely dressed marauders except happier, more fit and in search of the nearest Starbucks. • You know where else a lot of bikes are found? Communist China. You know who plans to visit China next month? Comrade Mayor Gregor Robertson. • You know who didn’t ride a bike, at least on one important day in history? Rosa Parks.

FACE OFF Once again technology has proven to be a cruel mistress. Earlier this month, Rogers Wireless went down for nearly TWO HOURS preventing voice and text messages on what will forever be known as “Black LOL-less Wednesday.” Now we’ve learned that Facebook experienced a short-lived outage Monday morning that prevented users from sending messages, posting photos, status updates and comments — particularly those that would have expressed impotent rage over the inability to send messages, post photos, status updates and comments. The real tragedy, however, is that we will never know all the important information we lost Monday morning until our friends pick themselves off the floor and repost all those unfiltered thoughts, casual observations and never ending content to the web. So until then, we eagerly await Dave’s Instagram photo of the tofu scramble he was about to scarf down, Tanya’s cryptic status update that she’s “having the worst morning ever,” Ethan’s video post of the Bangles’ “Manic Monday,” Debra’s “like” of Ethan’s video post, Dylan’s “totally know what that’s like LOL” comment and repost of Ethan’s video post, Lara’s “hmmm” comment under Dave’s tofu scramble photo, Tammy’s birthdaywishestoherone-year-olddaughterwho probably doesn’t possess the manual dexterity to access Facebook yet and our mom’s score on her most recent game of Candy Crush. You’re really “crushing it,” Mom!

Highbury Interceptor Air Management Facility

PUBLIC OPEN HOUSE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013 6:30 - 8:00 pm Marineview Chapel 4000 West 41st Avenue, Vancouver, BC The Highbury Interceptor is a large sewer that conveys the majority of Vancouver’s wastewater to the Iona Island Wastewater Treatment Plant for treatment. During recent years, odour complaints related to the sewer have been increasing. To address long-term odour management needs, Metro Vancouver is planning to construct an air management facility near the interceptor within Musqueam Park. Construction is expected to begin in summer 2014 and be completed in spring 2015. You are invited to this open house to learn more about the project and to provide feedback on the design and appearance of the facility. Staff will be available to answer questions and receive your feedback.

For more information, please call the Metro Vancouver Information Centre at 604-432-6200 or email icentre@metrovancouver.org. Project information can also be found online at www.metrovancouver.org by searching “Highbury Interceptor Air Management”

Natural gas. Good for toasty mornings. Natural gas heating provides the even, reliable warmth your family depends on. Cosy and efficient, you can enjoy toasty mornings and save on your heating costs. Discover the benefits and cost savings of natural gas heating at fortisbc.com/naturalgasheating.


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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arts&entertainment

A new approach to bringing classical music to‘the rest of us’ STATE OF THE ARTS

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with Cheryl Rossi

ark Haney wants to strip new Canadian music of its pretension, so he’s re-launching the Little Chamber Music Series That Could on Oct. 26 with a Halloween dance party. The double-bassist, composer and artist in residence at the field house in Renfrew’s Falaise Park is re-launching the beloved chamber music series after nearly a decade to commission and produce new works by Canadian composers and introduce new audiences to “new classical” music. “When I went on a tour last fall across Western Canada, I talked to the audience every night about how I felt the classical performing arts, of which I am a practitioner, owed the general audience an apology for three or four decades of sort of thrusting them away, pretensions and snobbery and elitism,” Haney said. “And it really, really struck a chord, far more than I thought it would.”

The event at the Roundhouse, called Back on Track, features Montreal composer Nicole Lizée, who first gained attention more than a decade ago when she developed techniques to include a turntable in orchestra pieces. “She was a heavy metal drummer as a teenager and she does a lot of stuff with electronics now,” Haney said. As Montreal’s SaskPower, Lizée controls the electronics and video alongside guitarist Steve Raegele and percussionist Ben Reimer, who will be joined by Little Chamber Strings, which is Haney on double bass, Cam Wilson on violin and Marcus Takizawa on viola. “It’s a performance meant to emulate a rave,” Haney said. “It’s constant pulsing rhythms that shift and morph with a visual display and it’s meant to take the audience on a journey.” Admission will be $10 for adults in costume, students, artists and seniors. It’s $20 for “adults dressed like adults.” “We want to produce work at the highest level,” Haney said. “We want to work with people at the highest level and we want everyone to love it and have a good time. It’s not just for a small group.” The series is also presenting the

photo submitted

Mark Haney relaunches the Little Chamber Music Series That Could, Oct. 26 at the Roundhouse, with a Halloween dance party. world premiere of Lizée’s piece “Ouijist” at a free, community event on Halloween, at All Souls at Mountain View Cemetery. This summer on Friday evenings at Falaise Park near Grandview Highway and Boundary Road, Haney performed what he called “Sunset Sounds,” 90 minutes of mellow, improvised bass looping on the front porch of the field house just before the sun lowered in the sky. “And the last one, there were about

a hundred people there,” he said. “It’s simply the reality that there are tons of people and tons of families living in these areas not near Commercial [Drive] or Main [Street] or downtown, or whatever… Maybe it’s time to start finding ways to bring artists to these other areas.” Haney has been composing new music with elementary school children for the East Side Animals Project that will culminate with a community performance in Feb-

ruary. The name of the work is inspired by a stone mosaic in Falaise Park that includes animals. “We have Sir Chubby the Bear, Cranium the Crane,” Haney said. “These are names by democracy, which is how we ended up with Justin Beaver.” Government grants Haney applied for didn’t come through so he’s been fundraising for the series online. “It’s nice to know I can actually put on East Side Animals,” he said. Haney wrote in an August blog post there are two Vancouvers. “There’s the Vancouver for the people with money (bonus points if you’re a property developer),” he said. “And then there’s the Vancouver for the rest of us.” “It’s time for those of us who create and live on the ‘have-not’ side of the fence to start creating for and with the audience on the same side of that line,” he suggested. Haney, who last year premiered a piece called “3339” that celebrates his hero Terry Fox, hopes to premiere the piece he’s been working on for more than a year based on the graphic novel George Sprott by Seth in June, “funding dependent.” Details at littlechambermusic.com. crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

“I’ve always been curious.” They say we never stop learning. At Tapestry Retirement Communities, we support that belief through limitless opportunities to continue learning and stimulate your imagination. Whether it’s attending interesting seminars or university classes, discovering new hobbies, or pursuing cultural activities, Tapestry at Wesbrook Village provides you with endless options to quench your thirst for knowledge. If you are curious, call us today and see for yourself.

Brenda White Nana, book club member, science geek

www.DiscoverTapestry.com Tapestry at Wesbrook Village 3338 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver BC 604.225.5000


E22

THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2013

arts&entertainment

Of Mice and Men still wields power but feels dated OF MICE AND MEN

At Little Mountain Gallery until Oct. 26 Tickets: brownpapertickets.com ohn Steinbeck’s stage adaptation of his classic novella Of Mice and Men is a surprising choice for young director Genevieve Fleming. The play is so early 20th century American and so masculine it smells of dust and sweat: nine men, one woman. The story doesn’t exactly deal with a universal human experience: a migrant field worker with a dream of owning his own spread is prevented from achieving this because he has taken under his protection a big, strong, mentally challenged sidekick. Wherever this hulking, simple-minded guy goes, things die: mice, puppies and who knows what else as George

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(Sean Harris Oliver) and childlike Lennie (Sebastian Kroon) drift from farm to farm. Probably what hooked Fleming is the beauty of George’s concern for Lennie in spite of the endless frustration and trouble Lennie causes him. The painful last act of kindness to which George is driven is one of those moments in the theatre that Tennessee Williams described as an audience united in a “universal sob.” WhatisuniversalisGeorgeandLennie’sdream of owning their own farm; that desire is as strong todayasitwasbackinCaliforniaduringtheGreat Depression when Steinbeck sets his play. Sean Harris Oliver, as George, is dynamic; he moves quickly and reacts sharply with an air of desperation. Although we know there is softness in this character, we only see it when Lennie persuades him to tell — again and again — how life

will be on their own farm where there will be, George promises, rabbits; Lennie’s compulsion, which leads to the tragedy, is to stroke soft things. Kroon’s Lennie is problematic. Kroon’s lumberingphysicalityisrightonbutthedecisiontomake Lennie sound like a baby doesn’t feel right. Here’s the challenge: how do you make a tall, strapping, articulate actor sound mentally deficient without reducing him to baby talk. I don’t know and I expect Fleming and Kroon agonized over it. What Kroon does get right is Lennie’s bursts of happiness when he and George talk about “living off the fat of the land” on their own farm. Kroon lights up the whole place in those moments. IfAlecWillowswereapieceofmachinery,you’d oil him. His gravel-voiced, derelict take on Candy makes him almost endearing but you’d have to clean him up before you took him home. Jesse

Martyn is so natural as clean-cut, decent Slim that you’d think Martyn had just ridden his horse in from Ashcroft. Robert Olguin makes his character, Carlson, as dangerous as the barbed wire around the place. The trampy but lonely boss’s daughterin-law is played by Christine Quintana, who gets some sympathy for her character by revealing the poor young wife’s unhappiness and loneliness. There is power in this play and in this production but it feels like a piece of early 20th century Americana now. Its greatest contribution is the introduction to audiences not raised on Steinbeck, to a major work by a major American writer. That’s justification enough for Hardline Productions to mount this 1937 American classic. —reviewed by Jo Ledingham A longer version of this story can be found at vancourier.com/entertainment.

AU GAM AR CTIO BAD FR E EX N IT O! OM EM EM TA PT S X


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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GOT SPORTS? 604-738-1411 | mstewart@vancourier.com

ChurchillandLordByngrisetoplayforfirst MEGAN STEWART Staff writer

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eague play has been so close this year that the city senior boys soccer championship will be claimed by a team that came in either fourth or sixth place. Three points separated the top four teams in the senior boys soccer league, and the tables were so tight all but one of top four was knocked out of the playoffs. Coaches say they can’t remember a season with a tighter field. “Really, any of the five teams that go through to the next phase of the Lower Mainland championships could beat one another on a given day,” said Andy Johnston, the head coach of the Lord Byng Grey Ghosts, who competed Tuesday in the city final. Kitsilano and Point Grey tied for first with parallel 4-1-1 records and 13 points apiece. In their one meeting, there was no score after 90 minutes and a shootout gave Point Grey the win, which had repercussions at the end of the season and put the Grey Hounds into top place

heading into the playoffs. Hamber (4-2) followed with 12 points and Churchill (3-2-1) was next with 10 points. Lord Byng’s losing record of 1-41 and four points didn’t stop the upstart from surging ahead. Lord Byng played Churchill Tuesday for the city championship. Results weren’t known before the Courier’s print deadline. Go to vancourier.com/sports for results and photos. Churchill’s route though the playoffs started against Van Tech (1-4-1) and the Bulldogs won 2-0. They advanced to the semi-finals against Kitsilano and the game was scoreless after regulation time. Churchill won in a shootout, knocking the 2012 defending city championship from the final. In the post-season, the Lord Byng Grey Ghosts defeated Eric Hamber 4-1 Oct. 15 thentwodayslaterupsetNo.1PointGrey 1-0 on the Grey Hounds’ own turf. The Hamber Griffins were justifiably highly ranked, said Byng’s Johnston. “Hamber had outplayed us, defeating us 2-0 during league play. In the playoff game at their park, again they looked the better team in the early going but we

scored and suddenly we took back a lot of the play.” In an email to the Courier, Johnston outlined the four key factors for Byng’s late-season surge. This timely “soccer renaissance” comes from dedication to team play and “a commitment to play at the level that we know we can play at having been at the B.C. Championships last year.” The return of Ben Houtman was also fine timing as well as tightening up the back end while managing to score goals at the offensive end. “Despite having some talented returning Grade 11s from last year, we struggled to score goals which I thought would be one of our strengths this year as last year’s graduating players were my stronger defensive players. However, we only scored four goals in six regular season games and three of those were against Churchill,” said Johnston.” The top five Vancouver teams advance to the zone tournament where they meet two Richmond teams and a Vancouver private school team. mstewart@vancourier.com twitter.com/MHStewart

photo Dan Toulgoet

Magee’s Dallin Akune (in foreground) fights for position against George Brand-McFarland of Van Tech.

Cross-country rezoning debated MEGAN STEWART Staff writer

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photo Dan Toulgoet

HEAVY HITTER: David Thompson’s Kevin Chau (No. 2)

places a spike past Killarney blockers Peter Pham (No. 8) and Jakob Stamatakis (No. 9). DT won 3-0 at Killarney Oct. 21, adding another perfect game to their season. They have not lost a set in Vancouver league play and enter the senior boys city championship at the top of the tables. The tournament begins this week at Magee.

lignment changes proposed for cross-country in Vancouver could be a backdoor attempt to change zoning in the more politically fraught sport of basketball, said the president of the city’s public school sports association. Mike Allina, who leads the Vancouver Secondary School AthleticAssociation,metwithfellowpublicschoolathleticdirectors and said their concern is that a zoning change in one sport will open the door for similar changes in other sports, specifically basketball. “We all agreed — why all this is happening is because of basically two schools and basically basketball. We feel they are trying to go through other sports and say, look, they’re doing it in cross-country. Why can’t we do it in basketball?” Rezoning was also proposed in the spring for badminton and track and field. Both proposals were defeated, said Allina. He does not believe the cross-country amalgamation proposal will pass at the sport’s annual general meeting Nov. 1. The proposal is to merge three different zones into a larger Lower Mainland zone. Vancouver public and private schools compete in separate leagues. They would join a zone including Richmond, Burnaby and New Westminster. Each zone holds its own regional championship and each sends a number of its fastest athletes reflective of the overall zone population. An amalgamated zone would send 30 athletes — 25 fewer individual racers than the total number sent now by the three separate zones. Zones are aligned differently depending on the sport, but Allina said all berthing is based on numbers and this mandate underpins high school sports in the province. B.C. School Sports is putting additional emphasis on geographic representation and the cross-country commissioner, who is from a public Surrey school, is urging all Van-

couver schools to merge. Allina said the prominence of geographical alignment arrived with the new BCSS executive director Christine Bradstock. He resists any pressure for the VSSAA to change its seasonal leagues and asserted that merging with private schools is not an option because they are ultimately businesses that operate differently than public schools. “They run under different rules than we do and we cannot accept [merging],” he said in a phone interview Monday. “They run half-page adds recruiting athletes, they run on their own budgets, they’re not limited by elected trustees.” Sean Dawson, a teacher at West Point Grey Academy and the independent zone commissioner for cross-country, said public and private school coaches in the sport have the fundamentals in common. “That’s the beautiful thing about running,” he said. Whereas a football team may be dependent on more resources, cross-country requires relatively little infrastructure beyond time, transportation and leadership. He does not think cross-country amalgamation would unduly favour independent schools but does support a larger Lower Mainland zone because it would elevate the level of competition and reward performance. He could not say if issues affecting other sports were influencing the amalgamation proposal. “I think cross-country has to do what’s right for its sport,” he said. “I’d like to see it go through because it’s good for this sport and it’s good for the kids having bigger, more competitive meets. More coaches involved can only be a good thing with an organization. Who knows, it could be the spark that could bring public and private together.” The independent cross-country final was Tuesday at Jericho. The public final is today at Fraserview. Visit vancourier.com/sports for results and pictures. mstewart@vancourier.com twitter.com/MHStewart


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