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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013

Vol. 104 No. 81 • Established 1908

Revised Oakridge plan

14

MIDWEEK EDITION

THE VOICE OF VANCOUVER NEIGHBOURHOODS

NEWS: That’s Not News 5/ ARTS: Writers Fest 21

Budgetcalls for‘moderate’ propertytax hike COUNCIL FACING $43 MILLION IN ‘EXPENSE PRESSURES’ MIKE HOWELL Staff writer

N

photo Rebecca Blissett

IRISH RAMMED: Mt. Douglas wide receiver Marcus Davis powers forward as two Vancouver College tacklers

try to haul him to the ground Oct. 5 at O’Hagan Field. The Fighting Irish lost 42-21 to the Rams. See story page 23. Scan page with the Layar app to see a photo gallery.

Rogue centres mount fresh attack on park board DECISION PENDING ON FIRST INJUNCTION ATTEMPT SANDRA THOMAS Staff writer

H

astings, Riley Park-Hillcrest, Killarney, Kensington, Kerrisdale and Sunset community centre associations will be back in Supreme Court Oct. 22 asking a judge to stop the park board’s termination of their joint-operating agreements (JOA) until their lawsuit is fully heard in late November. Ainslie Kwan, president of the Killarney Community Centre Association, described the termination notices as a sure sign of a takeover. “We feel like the park board is moving full-steam ahead,” said Ainslie Kwan. “So we decided we

had to file an injunction to get the termination stopped.” Last month, the associations demanded the park board halt the Aug. 29 termination notice of their joint-operating agreements before 5 p.m. Sept. 13. As reported in the Courier at the time, association lawyer Dean Davison sent a seven-page document addressed to Ben Parkin, assistant director of general litigation for the City of Vancouver, saying the park board not only wants to terminate the jointoperating agreement between Kerrisdale, Killarney, Hastings, Hillcrest, Sunset and Riley Park/Hillcrest community centre associations but also wants to dictate the terms of the dissolution. The eviction is to take effect Dec. 31. See SIX on page 4

o matter which political party is ruling city hall, they all end up doing the one thing that hits taxpayers in their wallets: raise property taxes. And, as a City of Vancouver staff report pointed out this week, taxpayers can expect “a moderate” tax hike in 2014 once city council approves the operating and capital budgets in December. “I’m not going to give you a number because we’re trying to make it as low as possible,” said Coun. Geoff Meggs of the ruling Vision Vancouver party when asked how much more taxpayers can expect to pay. But, Meggs said, the increase will not be more than the rate of inflation. Statistics Canada reported the country’s rate of inflation at 1.1 per cent in August. The city’s finance department tends to average the inflation rate over the year, bringing it closer to two per cent. Last year, council approved a two per cent tax hike. This year, council is facing up to $43 million in “expense pressures,” including $12 million in increased wage and benefit costs to city employees. That calculation, however, doesn’t include an unknown increase for police officers and firefighters, whose collective agreements haven’t been ratified. Another big cost will be an $11 million increase in utility costs, which the staff report said will equate to a 4.5 per cent hike for taxpayers. Capital program costs such as fuel and leases amount to $9 million, the first year of an anticipated public bike share program will cost $2 million and $3 million will go toward the November 2014 civic election. Though $43 million seems like a lot of money to cut, that amount will be offset by $28 million in projected revenue collected in 2014. So the real exercise for council will be to sort out how to pay for $15 million in increased costs. Whatever the hike is, Meggs pointed out taxes have decreased under Vision Vancouver when compared to the previous NPA administration. Vision has ruled city hall since late 2008. See AFFLECK on page 9


E2

THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A3

news Loss of parking onW. 4th worries shop owners MORE THAN 20 PARKING SPOTS NEAR MACDONALD TO BECOME LEFT-TURN LANES MIKE HOWELL Staff writer

T

he City of Vancouver’s plan to remove more than 20 parking spots along a strip of West Fourth Avenue to create left-turn lanes at Macdonald Street is unnecessary and will only hurt business, say shop owners in the neighbourhood. The owners of Momento Coffee House, P.C. Galore, No Pirates Allowed and The Diving Locker told the Courier that an advanced green light turn signal would be just as effective at the intersection and not require the removal of parking spots. All the owners acknowledge they have parking spots behind their stores. But Rick Martin, who owns Momento Coffee House, said up to 25 customers park outside his store on Fourth Avenue each morning. “The people driving to work park their car, pop in, grab their coffee and off to work they go,” he said, noting he’s worried customers will seek out other coffee shops. His loss in business, he said, could be the difference in hiring another employee or renewing his lease. Using signs to direct customers to the five parking spots out the back of Momento is unrealistic, he said. Across the street at The Diving Locker, owner Greg Kocher said up to 50 per cent of his business comes from customers noticing his store from their vehicles. His concern is the drive-by

photo Dan Toulgoet

Fourth Avenue business owners Greg Baker (l) and Rick Martin, in front of soon-todisappear parking spots, believe an advanced green light would be as effective as leftturn lanes. The city disagrees. traffic will decrease when the parking spots are removed. City council approved the changes to the intersection this summer when it passed a series of staff recommendations to improve safety for cyclists and pedestrians along the CornwallPoint Grey corridor. The changes to the corridor call for road closures, which will result in more traffic diverted to West Fourth Avenue and Macdonald Street. City staff estimate an increase of 1,000 to 3,000 vehicles will travel

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along West Fourth and another 7,000 along Macdonald. The parking spots will be removed from all four corners of the intersection to allow engineers to redesign the streets to accommodate left-turn lanes with advanced green lights on West Fourth on both sides of Macdonald Street. Greg Baker, who owns P.C. Galore and the toy store No Pirates Allowed, said he has worked on the strip for 20 years. He said the intersection isn’t a problem for accidents and

it’s only during the afternoon rush when traffic gets heavy. Though city engineers told Baker he would lose four parking spots, his measurement of the current two-hour non-metered parking spots is closer to seven vehicles. During city staff’s presentation to city council about the changes to the Cornwall-Point Grey corridor, it was noted an increase in traffic along West Fourth Avenue would be good for business. “More traffic doesn’t necessarily mean more customers,” said Baker, who attended a meeting with city engineers last Thursday to express his frustration. “It’s not a reasonable argument.” Jerry Dobrovolny, the city’s director of transportation, said the left-turn lanes are necessary to avoid congestion at the intersection. When main routes get congested, motorists tend to use side streets, Dobrovolny said. “So that was an important piece of the plan and something we talked about quite a bit through the summer,” he said, noting the majority of crashes at that intersection involved pedestrians. He said the left-turn bays with an advanced green light are expected to reduce those accidents. Simply installing an advanced left-turn green light at the intersection wouldn’t accommodate the volumes of traffic and only lead to the intersection being clogged, Dobrovolny added. mhowell@vancourier.com twitter.com/Howellings

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A4

THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013

news

Six centres want judge to stop termination of JOA Continued from page 1 When the park board didn’t respond, the associations followed up with a letter Sept. 30 detailing their intention to file a notice of civil claim. “That being said,” Davison wrote in part to Parkin, “it appears the park board is seeking to take over assets and goodwill that is clearly partially our clients’ without authorization or agreement. Unless the park board agrees to immediately cease and desist terminating the current status quo between the park board and our clients prior to a court determination on the issues.” Kwan said of particular concern is the

fact the park board is working to publish the winter brochure for each of the six centres. The brochure is typically a shared project between the park board and the associations. “As long as we’ve been in business, we’ve completed the brochure together,” said Kwan. “There is no mention of the associations in the brochures and if the park board is successful in creating them alone, the damage to the associations will be irreparable.” She added the park board has approached contract workers and staff hired by the associations regarding their transition to city

employees. This is the third legal proceeding the six associations have launched against the park board. The first asked for an injunction of the controversial OneCard for use at those six centres. The six associations refused to accept the OneCard for their associationrun programs because it eliminates the need for individual community centre association memberships and could limit their ability to raise money. According to the provincial Society Act, the associations must have a membership list to qualify as a non-profit society. The associations say non-profit status is vital to

their ability in obtaining government funding or grants. They argue the introduction of the pass is a demonstration of the park board’s plan to phase out the associations. The second, scheduled for late November, will deal with accusations by the associations that the park board has violated their respective joint operating agreements and the board’s “unwillingness to fairly resolve issues.” A Supreme Court decision on the first injunction request regarding the OneCard is expected any day. sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A5

news The latest development inThat’s Not News! 12TH & CAMBIE with Mike Howell

S

o I’m thinking of starting an ongoing column titled “That’s Not News!” Like the exclamation mark? I do! Anyway, the idea came to me after pointing out recently the police chief and mayor telling us the city is mired in a mental health crisis is old news. Shortly after that, I pointed out the Vancouver Police Department urging injection drug users to use the Insite supervised injection site is also old news. A simple Google search will tell you that. But here we go again, faithful readers, with another “story” that emerged last week and got plenty of play in the media — even a front page spread in a daily! My first thought: What the heck did I miss? What I missed was Concord Pacific holding a press conference last Wednesday to show media what the neighbourhood around B.C. Place Stadium is going to look like once the developer’s eight buildings are built. These are the same buildings that will be located in the neighbourhood where Paragon plans to build its casino resort adjacent to B.C. Place Stadium. (That announcement occurred

photo illustration courtesy Concord Pacific Developments

Other than the name False Creek Central, Concord Pacific’s latest plan that it showed the media last week is essentially the same as previous plans it has brought before council. last month and, yes, that was news). Concord has decided to call the neighbourhood False Creek Central. OK, you got me there with the name — that’s new. But as many city hall watchers will attest, the plan for the neighbourhood has been brought several times, in different versions, before council. If I had been notified of Concord’s press conference, I would have asked the com-

pany’s brass what was new about its plan. So why the heck wasn’t I invited? As some of you will recall, I’ve written stories over the years revealing how Concord has given lots of money and freebies to local politicians. I’ve also questioned why Concord hadn’t built a nine-acre park in Northeast False Creek it promised and why that property was assessed at an unbelievably low value ($192,000 at one

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point and now I understand it’s zero). I emailed a senior staffer at Concord and then received a phone call from a Concord rep. He assured me it was simply an oversight that the Courier wasn’t invited to the press conference. I’m not a conspiracy theorist, so I believe him. I also believe him when he said nothing was essentially new about Concord’s plans for the neighbourhood. Concord simply wanted to give the public an idea what the area will look like with renderings of the company’s buildings mixed in with Paragon’s casino/resort adjacent to B.C. Place Stadium. When Concord gets approval for all eight buildings, the company says there will be more than 1,300 homes in the neighbourhood and 90,000 square feet of commercial, retail and services. But Concord will have more neighbours than just Paragon. The neighbourhood will see significant changes once the Plaza of Nations site is redeveloped by Canadian Metropolitan Properties, which has plans for towers and an ice rink that will be used by the Vancouver Canucks for practices and shared with the community for public skating. The Aquilini family is involved in the ice rink development and has plans for more towers around Rogers Arena. And once the Georgia and Dunsmuir viaducts are demolished (c’mon, do you think they’re going to stay?) they’ll be more development in the neighbourhood. And when that all comes together, it will be worth a news story. mhowell@vancourier.com

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

E7

news VSB’s first student trustee keen on meetings something that I have to go through for this position,” Milum said. Pending board approval, the student trustee will receive a $2,400 honorarium

CHERYL ROSSI Staff writer

A

t 16, Nick Milum is keen to spend his evenings in meetings. He’s the Vancouver School Board’s first student trustee. “I like the fact that I have a say in my education other than just sitting in my classroom and listening to my teacher,” Milum said. “The action of going to meetings, sure it’s not the most exciting thing for a teenager but it’s something that has to be done and I’m willing to do it and I do want to do it because I’m able to voice my opinion in a way that’s heard.” Milum was the only member of the Vancouver District Student Council who ran for the position. The Grade 11 student lives near Tupper secondary but attends the accelerated “Challenge” program at Eric Hamber that will allow him to complete university courses in Grade 12. He represented students on the board’s education and student services committee last year. “The trustees on [the education and students services] committee and all the other committees do really appreciate the voice of students,” Milum said. “And it’s partly due to them, for sure, that we have this pilot project for this year.” The student trustee can’t vote, attend in camera meetings or move motions. But the student can suggest motions to be moved. He is expected to be sworn in at the Oct. 15 school board meeting. The position is Vancouver’s first such trial for 2013-14. The B.C. School Trustees Association narrowly voted at its annual general meeting last April against lobbying the provincial government to change the B.C. School Act to allow student trustee participation in board activities. The government of Ontario mandated in 1998 that each district must have one to three student trustees. The votes of student trustees are recorded but not counted, and student trustees can attend in camera meetings except those related to personnel. In New Brunswick, student trustee votes are counted but teen trustees can’t attend in camera meetings, according to trustee and board vice chair Mike Lombardi.

photo Dan Toulgoet

Eric Hamber student Nick Milum is interested in teachers better integrating technology into their instruction. He’s expected to be sworn in as a trustee at the Oct. 15 school board meeting.

Lombardi says Ontario student trustees have helped develop policy about the use of technology in classrooms, cyber bullying, curriculum and promoted studies on better teaching and learning strategies. Milum is interested in teachers moving away from lecturing while better integrating technology into their instruction and involving students in more hands-on experiences out of the classroom. He spearheaded a Passport to Play day at his school last May. “We had over 200 cognitively and physically disabled students come and it was an amazing day because they got to experience sport in so many different ways,” the Grade 11 student said. “That was definitely my proudest moment.” Milum plays soccer, baseball, basketball, volleyball, golfs and swims. “Sport is a really big motivator for me and so I wanted to be able to give that opportunity to as many kids as possible, especially to the kids who don’t have that opportunity,” he said. Milum will be given access to reports and training sessions provided to board members. “There’s some sort of media training that trustees go through so that they know what they can talk about and what they can’t talk about and so that’s

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A8

THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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news

Affleck questions tax hike if efficiencies found in city services Continued from page 1 Figures supplied to the Courier from the city’s communications department showed taxes increased 17.76 per cent from 2006 to 2008 for residents. That’s when the NPA was in power. When Vision won its first majority in November 2008, taxes increased 15.79 per cent from 2009 to 2011. The Vision council has argued, however, the 15.79 per cent number would have been closer to 13 per cent, had a city strike not occurred in 2007 and saved the city money in wages and benefits.

Year after year, the satisfaction with the quality of services is very high. We’ve got to maintain that and there’s a price to pay for that.

—Vision Coun. Geoff Meggs

“Services are delivered by people and those have to be funded,” Meggs said. “Other services are paid for by users and those are covered by user fees. Year after

year, the satisfaction with the quality of services is very high. We’ve got to maintain that and there’s a price to pay for that. It’s just the way it is.”

NPA Coun. George Affleck said Vision politicians continue to boast about efficiencies found in city services and keeping taxes to the rate of inflation. But, Affleck said, if savings are being made, then why do property taxes continue to increase while the city is again hiking utility fees, this year by 4.5 per cent. “Shouldn’t property taxes, in fact, be going down?” he said. “These are the questions I ask every year and I, of course, don’t get any answers.” Affleck said his latest reading of the inflation rate is 0.3 per cent.

So to approve a tax increase of anything more than that percentage would not reflect Vision Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson’s campaign promise to keep taxes at or below the rate of inflation, he said. “Basically, the rate of inflation is zero right now,” said Affleck, who was not a member of the NPA government when it raised taxes by 17.76 per cent from 2006 to 2008. Council is expected to vote on the budget Dec. 17. mhowell@vancourier.com twitter.com/Howellings

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013

THE VANCOUVER COURIER

1574 West Sixth Ave., Vancouver, BC V6J 1R2 604-738-1411 Twitter: @vancouriernews vancourier.com

Give B.C. its own Charter ofValues

I

t’s going over so beautifully in Quebec, we should try something similar here. It’s time to talk about a B.C. Charter of Values. The Parti Québécois has distinguished itself by proposing a law to limit public servants from wearing conspicuous religious symbols. It’s being construed in different ways. Some see it as a courageous attempt to shield impressionable taxpayers from seeing crucifixes or having to deal with someone wearing a hijab or niqab. Others see it as a cunning baby step toward curbing the rights of ethnic minorities who don’t view separatism with the same passion that the PQ does. One of the overlooked reasons it is so controversial is that it covers so many people. Quebec has public servants the way B.C. has trees. They include a broad swath of society, so hundreds of thousands of people will have to check themselves for obvious displays of religious symbols before they leave for work each morning. Hundreds more will be hired to administer the law. B.C. has fewer, but they work in an environment that is seething with sectarian strife. So an official requirement of neutrality would be for their own good. One false move in this province when it comes to spiritual issues, like oil pipelines, and you’re on the carpet before you can say “five conditions.” No area is safe. If you’re wearing a salmon logo, you better make sure it’s not a farmed salmon. People notice this kind of thing. The media are fixating on the Quebec requirement that people’s faces be visible. But it’s rare here to see a public employee wearing a veil. The only time B.C. civil servants cover their faces is on election day. Religious headgear of any sort is a touchy subject. Take Canuck ballcaps, for instance. Try asking someone to remove theirs and you get a quick lesson in how deeply their convictions run. But thousands of people in B.C. come from lands with different cultures and beliefs. There are even Toronto Maple Leaf fans trying to make lives for themselves here. Imagine how they feel — standing in a welfare line, say — when they get to the caseworker and find her wearing a Sedin jersey. They deserve to be treated with respect. Public servants should also be considerate of both sides in the age-old B.C. argument over Gore-Tex vs. Cowichan sweaters. Each side has valid points to make. It’s not for government to decide or promote one over the other. Too many people’s feelings have been hurt already. Public employees should refrain from wearing either while on duty. One of the most contentious parts of the Quebec bill is the exceptions. The restrictions won’t apply to elected politicians. This is wrong. If politicians are going to start writing secular dress codes, they should live by them, too. Any B.C. charter would have to include the MLAs. So all those Tommy Douglas icons the New Democrats wear and the W.A.C. Bennett bobbleheads common to the Liberal side would have to be shelved. Keeping officialdom neutral would allow the rest of us to pursue our own spiritual values without being offended by seeing a bureaucrat flaunting his or her own beliefs. Quebec Premier Pauline Marois said it’s all about bringing people together. I totally get that. People are shaking their heads together in unison right across the country. The best part of a charter is how it flushes the federal MPs into taking sides. A B.C. Charter of Values would secularize the public service on all the metaphysical issues that grip B.C. — Lululemon pants, old-growth forests, grow-ops, tattoos on the middle-aged, farmed salmon. MPs would flock to take sides and B.C. would edge Quebec out of the spotlight to take its rightful place as the centre of attention. Couldn’t happen soon enough. lleyne@timescolonist.com twitter.com/LeyneLes

LES LEYNE

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letters

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

WE WANT YOUR OPINION

Hate it or love it? We want to know... really, we do!

Reach us by email: letters@vancourier.com

History of‘states’ doesn’t go back far

O

ctober 3 marked the anniversary of the unification (or reunification) of the separate countries of East and West Germany. This Oct. 30 marks the anniversary of the most recent attempt by the Parti Québecois to secede from Canada by referendum. The idea of the country, of states, is so universal it’s hard to imagine them not existing. Every scrap of land, barring Antarctica, is claimed by one country or another. Some of those countries are so damaged by civil war or government collapse that they barely qualify as states at all. Does Syria or the Central African Republic really exist just because we can find them on maps? For the vast majority of human history, countries and nations as we know them didn’t exist. We tend to project our modern ideas about nations into the past. We picture the Wessex of Alfred the Great and imagine it as basically modern England, but with fewer paved roads and One Direction concerts. In fact, medieval Europe didn’t really have nation-states at all. People didn’t think of themselves as citizens of Wessex, or France, or Prussia. They identified themselves by their religion, by their village, by their language and culture, and by the person to whom they owed fealty. In place of citizenship, feudalism had systems of personal oaths and obligations. Miserable, dirt-scratching peasants gave their oaths to the local landowner, who gave his to the nearest lord, who was a subject of a greater lord or duke, and so on up to the king. And it didn’t necessarily stop there. Kings might owe their allegiance to other kings, at least in part. What we might call an empire was often less a single entity than a big central blob directly controlled by an emperor, plus a bunch of fringe areas ruled by their own kings, chiefs, nabobs, lords, grand dukes, governors and satraps, giving gifts, taxes, or military assistance to the emperor. But most people just worried about their local lords or village bigwigs. Borders were more fluid. Villages and arable lands were known quantities and belonged to one king or another, but land was seldom mapped out accurately enough to say who owned what out in the woods or mountains. There was nothing to prevent one person from holding multiple roles in a feudal structure. If the right people got married and/or died in the right order, a single individual could be, say, King of Scotland and England at the same time, or King of England and Elector of Hanover. Further, none of their possessions technically had to touch one another. Go and look at a map of Germany before Napoleon used gunpowder to smooth things out. There were hundreds of little principalities and micro-kingdoms. Parts of the India-Bangladesh border are like that to this day because the border tried to follow the boundaries of the old local petty kings, turning it into a crazy patchwork. Parts of Indian territory are inside Bangladeshi territory, which are themselves surrounded by India. Even once governments grew stronger and started creating something like a modern state with a bureaucracy, national symbols and firm borders, the people took a long time to catch up. Feudalism might have been pretty cruddy, but at least you could point to a particular person as your local lord. Modern states depersonalized that and it took a long time for the abstract concept of patriotism to catch on. The next time you see a national flag, hear an anthem being sung or look at those border lines on a map, remember that every single one of those things is barely older than the steam engine. mclaxton@langleyadvance.com

MATTHEW CLAXTON

For the vast majority of human history, countries and nations as we know them didn’t exist.

NEW PARK POSES PARKING PROBLEMS FOR POOL USERS To the editor:

Re: “There was a parking lot, not it’s all covered with plants,” Oct. 2. Yes, there was a parking lot, not paved as stated, but gravel. Gravel or paved, it did provide additional parking for patrons using the park and pool at New Brighton. Not an easy destination to access by foot or transit, the pool and park are nevertheless a popular and well used destination for East Side families. It is also the only waterfront and outdoor swimming facility remaining for residents in the northeast sector. While creating a new sanctuary for birds and wildlife, (given that the existing sanctuary at Hastings Park has been so sadly allowed to languish and be disrupted ) and daylighting a stream that had gone unnoticed for 100 years, is to be applauded, there are a few consequences to be considered. Through what was previously a well-used gravel parking lot for patrons of the park and pool unable to park in the woefully inadequate paved parking areas, there already existed a path for cyclists and pedestrians — in need of some upgrading to be sure. Also in need of some up-

grading would be the pool and existing waterfront park. Where will patrons of the pool be allowed to park next summer? While transit may be an option for some, enjoying a day at the park and pool with your kids, the gear that goes with them, the cooler for a picnic supper by the waterfront, a couple chairs for those that aren’t able to sit comfortably on the ground and the family pet, the bus just doesn’t work that well, nor do the bikes. Without access to that lot the parking situation, already pretty bad, just got a whole lot worse. I sincerely hope that the parking lots at Hastings Park will be made available free of charge for park and pool users, and the next $1.2 million being spent in that neighbourhood goes to existing park and pool upgrades.

Gwen Giesbrecht, Vancouver

PARK BOARD FEARS COMMUNITY CENTRE POWER To the editor: Re: “Rebel community centres mount fresh legal attack on park board,” Oct. 3 (online) It’s time for the voting public to speak out loudly and demand that Mayor Gregor Robertson and elected city council members step up and denounce the forced eviction of the six com-

munities suing the Park Board. Our volunteer-run community associations should be celebrated; without them many community centres across the city wouldn’t even exist. Now they are being vilified and terminated simply because they are brave enough to hold this aggressive park board to task. If we allow them to vanish, as the park board clearly wants, critical subsidized programming for seniors, young families and youth will be in danger too. Associations increase community engagement better than any “engaged city task force.” They have real decision-making power and ensure residents have a direct say in the programs and services offered close to home and in their neighbourhood. City hall and the park board fear that power and want to snuff it out. This issue is about power and money plain and simple. Our current elected officials — who this week announced a projected $13 million shortfall despite planned tax hike, higher utilities and user fees — want to take community funds out of the communities and centralize all the power with Penny Ballem. We can’t let that happen. Now is the time to exercise our collective power and fight back too. Trevor Boudreau, Vancouver

ON YOUR MIND ONLINE COURIER COLUMN: “Cycling: It’s time for women in the Tour de France,” Oct. 2 Steve: “...but without the media attention or sponsorship lavished on the men’s event, it could not survive and folded five years later.” What makes you think it would be any different today? Cycling in its current structure is already facing a sponsorship crisis where the best men’s teams struggle to get enough sponsorship money to survive. Further, media attention is directly tied to TV ratings. If nobody is interested enough to watch, the value of the sponsorships decreases, making it even harder to generate enough revenue to make it viable. It’s not a knock on the athletes, they are capable of doing the race, and I’m sure it would be exciting to the very few fans who exist. There’s just not enough interest to make it viable at this point. Andrew: I’m afraid that Steve hit the nail on the head.... Men’s cycling is struggling at the moment, and women’s cycling is currently viewed as being ‘second tier’ racing compared to the men. I think if you ever want to see a women’s version of the tour succeed: A) The teams need to create a new revenue sharing structure between teams, race organizers, and producers of TV coverage. Only then will the men’s teams be assured of their survival...and hopefully then the existing women’s teams could expand and new ones could be formed. B) Women’s racing needs to be brought up a tier....bring the race distances closer to parity for difficulty with the men, or somehow change the format to make it more exciting or interesting for spectators. The depth of the pro female field needs to be increased, which is easier said than done because why would more women get into cycling if there is very little chance for success even in the ‘upper echelon’ of the sport? As you can see there is a bit of a ‘chicken and the egg’ conundrum with women’s cycling at the moment! Follow us on Facebook: The VancouverCourierNewspaper and Twitter: @VanCourierNews

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Letters may be edited by the Courier for reasons of legality, taste, brevity and clarity. To be considered for publication, they must be less than 300 words, signed and include the writer’s full name (no

A11

initials), home address, and telephone number (neither of which will be published), so authorship may be verified. Send to: 1574 West Sixth Ave., Vancouver BC V6J 1R2 or email letters@vancourier.com


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013

news

Park board approves Kits/Hadden bike path CENTRAL PARK

with Sandra Thomas

D

espite reports of an extensive public consultation, at least one Kitsilano resident took to Twitter to express her surprise and displeasure about a park board plan to build a 12-foot wide separated bike path through Kits Beach and Hadden parks. In response to a story I wrote last week about the proposal @teririch wrote, “@ParkBoard will vote to destroy the natural, rustic beauty of Kits Beach with separated bike lanes and pavement,” a comment she also addressed to Vision Vancouver vice-chair Aaron Jasper. The Seaside Greenway Improvements report, approved by the park board Monday night, includes a recommendation to begin phase one of a $2 million project that will see the separated bike lane constructed as part of the Point GreyCornwall Active Transportation Corridor. According to the park board, the report identifiedupgradestoHaddenandKitsBeachparksas a priority because during busy times the shared pathway along that route can be dangerous and conflicts between pedestrians and cyclists take place frequently. NPAcommissionerJohnCouparquestionsthe

photo Dan Toulgoet

NPA park board commissioner John Coupar says the separated bike paths through the Kits beach area is too wide at 12 feet. public consultation and adds there’s one stretch along the route where cyclists aren’t supposed to be on the pathway. “If cyclists followed the rules, there’d be fewer problems,” says Coupar. Coupar adds he only received the detailed report and had a briefing on the project last Thursday. He also questions what he thought might be a disparity in the results of a survey completed over several days at Kits Beach. In re-

sponse to the question, “How do you get around the park?” 351 or 90 per cent of respondents said they walk, while another 118 (32 per cent) said they jogged or ran. Meanwhile, 153 respondents, or 42 per cent, said they cycled. Coupar says when questioned the numbers he was told that if a person said they walked to the park, they were also asked if they cycled, which meant they responded twice.

The proposal also includes removing 23 parking stalls from the small lot off Arbutus at the west end of McNicoll Avenue, which Coupar says will push more traffic onto the crowded streets near Kist Beach. Jasper says Coupar’s concern about the eliminatedparkingstallsshowssomeconfusionwhen itcomestogreenspaceversuspavedspace. “Our priority is green space and that’s what this is all about,” says Jasper. “During peak season there’s a higher demand for parking there, but for nine months out of the year that lot is empty.” Jasper adds making the new bike path 12-feet width is standard along the seawall. According to the survey, 93 per cent of the 341 people polled said they thought the idea of separated bike and pedestrian paths were a good idea. Another 133 also believe there’s a need for more lighting along the route, but because another 106 disagreed, that decision was postponed. Jasper says this is the second time Coupar and his fellow NPA commissioner Melissa De Genova have spoken out against improved pedestrian safety. Jasper says when he moved a motion recently regarding strategies and opportunities to improve cycling and pedestrian safety, Coupar and De Genova voted against it. “I have trouble squaring away why they’d be against these tried and tested strategies that have been in place for 20 years,” says Jasper. sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10

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community

Ribbons of gratitude

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A13

Tune into our

WEEKLY NEWS RECAP WOWtv and the VANCOUVER COURIER bring you 15 minutes of local community news, lifestyle, culture and entertainment. Thursdays 10am–10.30am, reruns Saturdays 10am–10.30am Telus TV Channel 2828 and YouTube @wow1tv

COMMUNITY CALENDAR with Sandra Thomas

DUNBAR A Dunbar exercise studio wants to encourage Vancouverites to practise a little gratitude this week leading up to Thanksgiving. Vancouver Dailey Method owners Jey and Karen Wyder were inspired by the Gratitude Graffiti Project, an initiative of Dunbar mother and life coach Lucila McElroy and community health nurse Candice Davenport. The interactive project is a simple one. Businesses leave out markers asking passersby to stop, consider what they’re grateful for, and then write those messages onto ribbons or storefront windows as inspiration for others. In the case of the Dailey Method, participants can attach a ribbon with their message of gratitude and add it to an ever-growing “vine” adoring the front of the studio. “We hope this installation becomes an inspiration for people across the city to practise gratitude and experience its enormous benefits,” says Karen Wyder, who also recognizes gratitude as a link to happiness as found in recent Harvard University studies. To that end the sisters want to know whatyou’regratefulfor?Family?Friends? Health? Work? The Dailey Method is located at 3586 West 41st Ave.

Lonely seniors die sooner.

WEST END

You know the old saying, “Every time a bell rings an angel gets his wings?” Well, every time a publicist or government official uses the word “dialoguing,” a journalist gets another grey hair. Which is why I suspect every journalist in town is applauding the International Plain Language Day conference, taking place from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 13 at the Coast Plaza Hotel, 1763 Comox St. The free event promises art and comic displays, a comedy performance by Assaulted Fish, live music featuring “Plain Language” songs, products and refreshments. This is the first time the global event will take place in Vancouver. Visit iplday.org.

photo Dan Toulgoet

Sisters Jey (left) and Karen Wyder of Dunbar’s The Dailey Method are encouraging people to show their gratitude this Thanksgiving.

DOWNTOWN As part of Homelessness Action Week 2013, social justice film-screening group Reel Causes has teamed up with the City of Vancouver to present Invisible Night: An evening of art, film and dialogue about youth homelessness. The event takes place Oct. 17, with a reception from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Vancouver Community College down-

town campus, 250 West Pender, followed by the film and panel discussion at Djavad Mowafaghian Cinema at the SFU Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings. Proceeds from the evening will help support Raincity Housing and Support Society’s LGBTQ+ Shelter for youth. For more information, visit raincityhousing.org. sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10

Do something about it. Methanex and United Way are preventing senior isolation. Join us. uwlm.ca/preventisolation

Stories and photos from your

community

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A14

THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013

news

Scale questioned for Oakridge redevelopment DEVELOPING STORY with Naoibh O’Connor

T

ower heights and density topped the concerns of people the Courier spoke to Oct. 3 at the first of two open houses revealing revised plans for the proposed Oakridge Centre redevelopment. Henriquez Partners Architects and Stantec applied to amend the site’s zoning on behalf of OakridgeCentreownerIvanhoeCambridgeand Westbank Development in November 2012. Last June, council endorsed heights up to 45 storeys, as well as the general level of density. The updated proposal expands the size of the civic centre, which has a community centre, library, seniors’ centre and childcare space, to 70,000 square feet. It still features 13 towers, although the positions of some have shifted. Overall, the redevelopment would produce more than 2,900 residential units, including 280 social housing units and new office space. A nineacre open space is planned for the mall’s roof. With the introduction of Canada Line and considering it’s located in the centre of Vancouver on main transportation routes, the 28-acre site is regarded as ideal for densification. But the degree of densification being considered doesn’t sit well with Narv Gill, who’s lived in the neighbourhood for 10 years. He has two

photo Dan Toulgoet

A new model for the proposed Oakridge Centre redevelopment was revealed last week. children aged two and five. Gill and his wife are worried about the project. “We’re a little concerned about the potential for this [number of] people, this large a development,” he said, speculating it might push the limits of transit and schools to handle the increased population. Darlene Goldie, who’s lived near Oakridge for 12 years, called the proposal “overwhelming.” “We expect change, we embrace change, but this is an extreme change for this part of the city,” she said. “How will [they] move people on the roadways or on transit. It’s a big ‘how’ question.” She’s not convinced the Canada Line can ab-

sorb a jump in passenger numbers. Goldie takes the train daily but avoids rush-hour travel due to what she calls sardine-like conditions. “The amenities are great. The redesign concept — making it a village — is fantastic,” she added. “My main issue is with the capacity.” Robert Martin, who’s lived two blocks from Oakridge for almost 50 years, worries about shadows cast by the towers during different times of the year. He insists proposed heights are out of proportion with the neighbourhood and should be capped at 12 to 18 storeys. “It’s like a mini Chicago right in the middle

of a residential area. I’m not against redevelopment, I’m against the excessive redevelopment they’re proposing. I think it’s all about money.” Anne Diano, a resident of the Oakridge area for 45 years, was more uncertain about the project’s impact. “I think it’s massive and I think it’s going to change the whole area — whether it’s for the better or worse, I don’t know,” she said, while echoing the concerns about the Canada Line’s ability to handle more travellers. TransLink, in consultation with the city, is completing an assessment of Canada Line’s capacity to handle increased growth along the corridor. An initial review, according to information provided at the open house, indicates potential to increase the Canada Line capacity from 6,500 persons per hour per direction today to 15,000 persons per hour per direction. Gregory Henriquez, managing partner at Henriquez Partners Architects, told the Courier “the density is really important... We only have one chance to redo Oakridge. It has to be future-proof.” Henriquez believes a vocal minority opposes the project, while many others “are excited about the rebirth of Oakridge,” particularly due to community amenities offered, the opportunity to age in place and potential new services. “Change is hardest on neighbourhoods where there’s been little change,” he said. “I’ve heard people [at the open house] say very positive things. I’m very proud of this. I think we’ve worked hard to create something really beautiful.” noconnor@vancourier.com

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seniors

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Experience our

STROKE OF GENIUS: KNOWING RISK OF CLOTS AIDS IN PREVENTION

Grand

Renovations.

I

n Canada, more than 50,000 people suffer a stroke each year. In fact, stroke is the third leading cause of death. However despite this reality, many of us feel that suffering a stroke is just “luck of the draw” and don’t realize there are things they can do to help reduce their risk. The following are answers to some common questions:

What is it? Stroke is a sudden loss of

brain function. It can either be caused by the interruption of the flow of blood to the brain (ischemic stroke), or the rupture of blood vessels in the brain (hemorrhagic stroke) – both of which can cause brain cells in the affected area to die, which can lead to physical disability or death.

What increases your risk? There are

a number of factors that can increase a person’s risk of stroke, including: gender, age, ethnicity, family history, obesity, diet, diabetes, smoking, high blood pressure and high blood cholesterol.

Atrial Fibrillation (AF), a common, irregular heartbeat, affects 350,000 Canadians and is also known to cause stroke. AF can increase a person’s risk of stroke by three to five times. AF occurs when blood pools and gets stuck in the

chambers of the heart, which can result in the formation of a blood clot. A blood clot formed this way can be transported to the brain where it can cause a stroke. Because symptoms can go unnoticed, it is important that those most at risk – people aged 55 years and older – speak with their doctor.

Can it be prevented? While research shows 95 per cent of Canadians believe that stroke can happen to anyone, the good news is that you can take steps to reduce your risk. Speak to your doctor to determine your risk and what you can do to lower your risk. Info. courtesy newscanada.com.

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“I’ve always counted on my neighbourhood grocer to have just what I need.” At Tapestry at Wesbrook Village, convenient shops and services are right outside your door. Whether you are looking to stock up on a few groceries or indulge your craving for sushi, everything is located within the Wesbrook neighbourhood. The greater UBC campus is home to a host of recreational, cultural and convenience amenities. And when you want to adventure to other West side districts, just step on board the Tapestry shuttle bus and we’ll take you there. Experience our neighbourhood. Plan to visit us soon and see for yourself how convenient it is.

Sylvia McDougal good neighbour, blue ribbon pie maker, shopaholic

www.DiscoverTapestry.com Tapestry at Wesbrook Village 3338 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver BC 604.225.5000

A15


A16

THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013

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ARTHRITIS

UPCOMING EDUCATION EVENTS IN VANCOUVER 1 Chronic Pain Management Workshop

seniors

JOINT EFFORT

Our monthly column looks to help seniors deal with various types of arthritis.

BY CARRIE GADSBY, CONTRIBUTOR

How to avoid falls – learn how!

doing a load of laundry are all ways to keep your body moving! For fall prevention, Cyr has the proactive approach of taking away risks. “Take away scatter rugs, think about the placement of furniture, and be aware of pets underfoot,” says Cyr. “Make sure you install handrails on stairways, and provide for plenty of lighting everywhere in the home. A nightlight in the bathroom for night-time visits, and ensuring that the pathway is clear before retiring for bed can help to reduce the chance of falls.

Most of us have experienced the shock of a fall, and wondered how it happened. Was it something we tripped over, or a loss of balance? Could be any number of reasons, and we may have contemplated some as we picked ourselves up and dusted ourselves off. For someone living with arthritis, however, getting up may not be so straightforward, and the fall in itself can have complications. Lori Cyr, Occupational Therapist, and Greg Noonan, Physiotherapist – both with the Mary Pack Arthritis Centre - work with people who have arthritis and are at risk for falls. Both of them have some very helpful tips. There are many ways to reduce the risk of a fall, and good balance can go a long way in preventing a spill. “Both Tai Chi and Yoga have been identified by the American College of Sports Medicine as useful elements of a comprehensive exercise program for older persons, especially to improve balance, agility, muscle strength and reduce the risk of falls,” says Noonan, “and other forms of exercise can also help.” Both Noonan and Cyr emphasize that it is important that you do something that can easily become

part of your daily routine, upping the chances that you will continue doing it over a longer period of time. “Any kind of exercise is going to provide a benefit and can help with balance, and even functional activities can make a difference. This can mean participating to the best of your ability in smaller chunks of time. Ten minutes is a good amount of time for people with sore joints, and is more achievable than a longer duration and can take place with more frequency,” suggests Noonan. Mowing the lawn, gardening,

Think about wearing supportive non-slip footwear both outdoors and indoors. For people on medication, Lori also asks them to think carefully about when they take their medication, what side effects it may have, and whether it could potentially affect their balance. For anyone who is identified as being at risk for falls, their GP can refer them to one of the Falls Prevention Clinics available at Vancouver General Hospital, St. Paul’s Hospital or Mount St. Joseph. Need more information about arthritis? Contact The Arthritis Society at arthritis.ca or call 1-800321-1433 to speak to a trained volunteer.

Based on the Arthritis Self-Management Program, our workshop will teach you effective arthritis self-management skills and the principles of pain management. DATE: SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2013 TIME: 1:00pm to 3:00pm VENUE: HILLCREST COMMUNITY CENTRE COST:

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seniors

GENTLY USED BOOKS TURN THE PAGE

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eeling generous? The organization - Friends of the Vancouver Public Library - needs your bookshelf cast-offs for its annual Fall Super Sale. Downsizing or de-cluttering? The Friends are looking for books, CDs, DVDs, and LPs too, (no textbooks or encyclopedias.) The event takes place in the The Moat, Lower Level, Central Library at 350 W. Georgia St. on Oct. 24 from 10am – 9pm and Oct, 25, 26 from 10am – 6pm. Proceeds from the sale support special library projects and programs.

Drop off locations • Books etc. can be donated up until Oct, 16 at Dunbar, Oakridge and Renfrew branches during library hours. • Small donations of books (in a bag marked ‘Friends’) may be left at book’mark, The Library Store at the Central Library. Plus, membership in Friends is only $5 and can be purchased at any VPL branch. For more information, leave a message at 604-331-4049 or email friends@ friendsofthevpl.ca.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A17

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A18

THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013

EVERY SAT & SUN 10AM-8PM

ALL CHECKOUT

Spend $250 and receive a Starting Wednesday October 9

LANES

OPEN

FREE 25 $

one time use cash card

With this coupon and a purchase of $250 or more before applicable taxes at any Real Canadian Superstore location (excludes purchase of tobacco, alcohol products, prescriptions, gift cards, phone cards, lottery tickets, all third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners, etc.) and any other products which are provincially regulated) and we will give you a one timee use $25 Real Canadian Superstore cash card. Cash card is not a gift card and can only be redeemed at Real Canadian Superstore within the specified effective dates. See cash card for complete redemption details. Limit one coupon per family and/or customer account. No cash value. No copies. Coupon must be presented to the cashier at time of purchase. Cannot be combined with any other coupons or promotional offers. Coupon valid from Wednesday, October 9th until closing Thursday, October 17th, 2013. 10000 03864 2 4 924433 u

GUARANTEED† unless we are unable due to unforseen technical difficulties

Farmer’s Market™ pumpkin pie

Johnsonville breakfast sausage

960 g

4

98

2

ea

2

ea

LIMIT 4

AFTER LIMIT

2.67

PC® ground coffee selected varieties, 875-930 g

469438 6038372039

7

litre**

LIMIT 6

AFTER LIMIT

3.98

47

ea

LIMIT 4

AFTER LIMIT

11.99

in Superbucks® value when you pay with your

96

100-225 g or Toppables, 454 g, selected varieties 518137 6672100220

1

ea

LIMIT 3

AFTER LIMIT

5.99

87

ea

LIMIT 4

AFTER LIMIT

2.97

no name® seasoned stuffing mix

Tassimo T55 brewer

120 g

456559 82522690193

assorted colours

.88

98

00

LIMIT 4

AFTER LIMIT

1.18

ea

Christie crackers

123619 6038399329

77

¢ per

1

ea

100717 5877913320

97

9

98

selected varieties, 1.66 L

233907 46038302245

Fuel up at our gas bar and earn

722103 4029

Breyer’s family classic frozen dessert

white or whole wheat, pkg. of 12

1

product of Costa Rica

441600 7778200657

Bakeshop dinner tray buns

in-store

fresh pineapple

assorted varieties, 375 g

389554 20708074

baked fresh

u

ea

ea

LIMIT 1

AFTER LIMIT

129.00

in Superbucks value using Or, get 3.5¢per litre** any other purchase method ®

®

Redeem Superbucks towards purchases made in-store.**

**Redeem your earned Superbucks® value towards the purchase of Merchandise at participating stores (excluding tobacco, alcohol, lottery tickets, gas and prescriptions). With each fuel purchase when you use your President’s Choice Financial® MasterCard® or President’s Choice Financial® debit card as payment, you will receive 7 cents per litre in Superbucks® value. When you use any other method of payment, you will receive 3.5 cents per litre in Superbucks® value. Superbucks® value expires 60 days after date of issue. Superbucks® value are not redeemable at third party businesses within participating stores, the gas bar, or on the purchase of tobacco, alcohol, lottery tickets and prescriptions. Superbucks® value has no cash value and no cash will be returned for any unused portion. Identification may be required at the time of redemption. See Superbucks® receipt for more details. ® Trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. ©2013. † MasterCard is a registered trademark of MasterCard International Incorporated. President’s Choice Bank a licensee of the mark. President’s Choice Financial MasterCard is provided by President’s Choice Bank. President’s Choice Financial personal banking products are provided by the direct banking division of CIBC.

Prices are in effect until Monday, October 14, 2013 or while stock lasts. Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. No rainchecks. No substitutions on clearance items or where quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised pricing and product selection (flavour, colour, patterns, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the right to limit quantities to reasonable family requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography. Coupons must be presented and redeemed at time of purchase. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets. Some items may have “plus deposit and environmental charge” where applicable. ®/™ The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this flyer are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All rights reserved. © 2013 Loblaws Inc. * we match prices! Applies only to our major supermarket competitors’ flyer items. Major supermarket competitors are determined solely by us based on a number of factors which can vary by store location. We will match the competitor’s advertised price only during the effective date of the competitor’s flyer advertisement. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES (note that our major supermarket competitors may not). Due to the fact that product is ordered prior to the time of our Ad Match checks, quantities may be limited. We match identical items (defined as same brand, size, and attributes) and in the case of fresh produce, meat, seafood and bakery, we match a comparable item (as determined solely by us). We will not match competitors’ “multi-buys” (eg. 2 for $4), “spend x get x”, “Free”, “clearance”, discounts obtained through loyalty programs, or offers related to our third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners etc.). We reserve the right to cancel or change the terms of this program at any time. Customer Relations: 1-866-999-9890.

superstore.ca


A19

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

GOT ARTS? 604-738-1411 | events@vancourier.com

1 2 3

4

OUR

1

Mike Lerner and Maxim Pozdorovkin’s provocative documentary PUSSY RIOT: A PUNK PRAYER provides some timely food for thought as Russia prepares to host the upcoming Olympics. Feminist art-rock collective PUSSY RIOT’s satirical punk protest “Mother of God Drive Putin Away” only lasted 40 seconds on the steps of Moscow’s Cathedral of Christ the Saviour in February 2012, but it landed three band members in jail, facing lengthy prison sentences for blasphemy and “disrupting the social order.” Both an indictment of the growing authoritarianism under Putin, who has somehow been nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize, and a revealing look at the women behind the balaclavas, PUSSY RIOT: A PUNK PRAYER screens Oct. 10, 9:30 p.m. at the Rio Theatre as part of the VANCOUVER INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL. More info at viff.org.

PICKS 2 OCT. 9 - 11

For video and web content, scan page using the Layar app.

3 4

Legendary Japanese garage rock band GUITAR WOLF brings its jet fuel-laced concoction of sweat, leather, distortion and punk rock to the Rickshaw Theatre Oct. 9, 9 p.m. in support of its latest awesomely named release, Beast Vibrator. The Coathangers and Coward open. Tickets at Red Cat, Zulu, Highlife Records and ticketweb.ca.

Dammit Janet, Fighting Chance Productions does the time warp and brings everyone’s favourite kitschy rock ‘n’ roll sci fi musical THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW to the Jericho Arts Centre. Complete with sass, sweet transvestites, cascading toilet paper and an array of audience participation props, it runs until Oct. 26. For tickets, go to ticketstonight.ca. More details at fightingchanceproductions.ca. If “sweet-haunting indie folk” with “gently driving rhythms, ethereal vocals, intricately-woven harmonies and lush, orchestral arrangements” is your bag, then you’d be wise and check out West Coast singer-songwriter (and violinist) MELISSA BANDURA’s new musical project FAMILIAR WILD. Hear what all the fuss is about Oct. 10 at the Railway Club.


A20

THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013

arts&entertainment KUDOS& KVETCHES TWO MINUTES FOR SOUNDING SO GOOD

Natural gas. Good for easy warmth. With a simple flick of a switch, you can enjoy easy warmth and ambience with a natural gas fireplace. And save yourself the hassle of hauling firewood or cleaning ashes. Rebates are available. Discover the benefits and cost savings of a natural gas fireplace at fortisbc.com/naturalgasfireplace. FortisBC uses the FortisBC name and logo under license from Fortis Inc. (13-342.15 08/13)

As many of you know, CBC lost the rights to its original Hockey Night in Canada theme in 2008 after failing to pony up the necessary costs to secure the stirring, brass-friendly tune. Subsequently, CTV and TSN opened their wallets and scooped up what some people consider Canada’s other national anthem. Personally, our vote goes to Mitsou’s “Bye Bye Mon Cowboy” and Crowbar’s “Oh, What a Feeling,” but they’re tied for a close third at least. Losing the HNIC theme was yet another short-sighted failing by the Mother Corp., right up there with putting the Friendly Giant out to pasture, letting PJ Stock go anywhere near a microphone and rejecting K&K’s pitch for a made-for-TV biopic called Inside the Tickle Trunk, starring Gordon Pinsent as Mr. Dressup, Megan Follows as Aunt Bird, some dude from Heartland as Casey, Don Cherry as the voice of mute dog Finnegan and George Stroumboulopoulos reprising his role as Alligator Al. And like any television network desperately trying to seem hip and engaged with its dwindling viewers, CBC held a contest to pick the next HNIC theme. In the end, they chose a song by an Alberta music teacher called “Canadian Gold.” And as one might expect from a song penned by an Alberta music teacher

called “Canadian Gold,” the song was completely inoffensive and unmemorable, sounding like a mash-up of pickup truck commercials. We couldn’t even hum you a few bars. Which is probably why, unfortunately, CBC has decided to launch another song contest. According to a recent press release, “Hockey Night in Canada alongside CBCMusic.ca are looking for inspirational, energetic songs that will excite hockey fans from coast to coast to coast and get the nation’s heart pounding in this year’s edition of Song Quest.” Judges for the contest include Juno and Grammy Awardnominated Sara Quin of Tegan and Sara fame, former NHLer Theo Fleury, Nova Scotia rocker Joel Plaskett, singer-songwriter Chantal Kreviazuk and, sigh, CBC Hockey Night in Canada analyst and adult diaper spokesman PJ Stock. Not only that, the winning song will be produced by Plaskett and “featured in a video montage for an opening sequence of a Hockey Night in Canada broadcast.” The winner “will also travel to Lloydminster, AB/SK to perform their song at the Scotiabank Hockey Day in Canada concert on Jan. 18, 2014,” and likely get to party alongside Ron MacLean and give Kelley Hrudey and his fantastic hair a noogie. In case you’re wondering, we’ve already started working on a few possible songs to enter in the contest: a bare-bones piano ballad called “Rick Tochhet’s Lament,” a sexy R. Kelly-style R&B groove called “When in Aaron Rome” and an X-rated hip hop party jam called “Lower Body Injury” in which we come up with some creative rhymes for PJ Stock. You’ve been warned, CBC. twitter.com/KudosKvetches

Get Active, Have Fun with Skating Lessons!

Our friendly and professional skating instructors will help you develop fundamental skating skills through specialized games and activities, in a fun and positive environment. Affordable classes are offered for all ages at eight Vancouver ice rinks! Britannia 1661 Napier Street 604-718-5800

Kerrisdale 5670 East Boulevard 604-257-8121

Kitsilano 2690 Larch Street 604-257-6976

Trout Lake 3360 Victoria Drive 604-257-6955

Hillcrest 4575 Clancy Loranger Way 604-257-8680

Killarney 6260 Killarney Street 604-718-5865

Sunset 390 East 51st Avenue 604-718-6517

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arts&entertainment

Local author’s next setting isWriters Fest

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A21

@VanCourierNews all you need to know in 140 characters!

STATE OF THE ARTS with Cheryl Rossi

T

héodora Armstrong can’t write about a character until she knows where they are. Her first collection of short stories released earlier this year, Clear Skies, No Wind, 100% Visibility, focuses on relationships set in locations throughout B.C. such as Quadra Island and Lynn Canyon. “There’s this polarity that goes on where [B.C. has] an incredibly beautiful landscape quite often but there’s also this danger underneath,” said the former Courier contributor Armstrong doesn’t indulge in flowery descriptions but uses natural elements to reflect inner turmoil. “It became this way of creating tension in the stories and revealing more about the characters,” she said. Armstrong will appear alongside Brian Fawcett and D.W. Wilson at the Vancouver Writers Fest on Granville Island, Oct. 22 to 27, at an event called “This Place We Call Home.” The 34-year-old resident of Vancouver felt the impulse to tell stories at age seven, wrote poetry as a teenager and undergraduate student and then wrote much of her short story collection during her Master of Fine Arts degree in creative writing at the University of B.C.

photo Dan Toulgoet

Vancouver author Théodora Armstrong appears at this year’s Vancouver Writers Fest. Armstrong often explores relationships between family members,friendsandcouples. “I like to push boundaries and go to places that are uncomfortable,” she said, adding her father used to read her Roald Dahl’s dark children’s books and she relished the sinister and gruesome tales. Armstrong considers the opening story in her collection, “Rabbit,” to be her first successful short story. It’s told from the point of view of a young girl in a town where another girl has beenmurdered.Itwasinspired by the actual rape and murder of 19-year-old Breann Voth of Port Coquitlam. “It was a very tragic story and what I found even more tragic about the story is that... a lot of people had heard her [cries] and no one had called anyone for help,” Armstrong said. The second story, “Fishtail,” is told from the point of view of a father who goes away for a weekend with his teenaged and college-aged daughters and realizes how out of touch he is with them.

While waitressing, Armstrong witnessed family dynamics and was inspired to write this story. “[The father] kepthavingconversationswith someoneonthisBluetoothand sort of ignoring his family and his two teenaged girls were looking at him like they just despised him,” she said. Armstrong likes the intense intimacy she can build with a reader with a short story. She also likes to leave room for interpretation. She’s currently working on a novel set abroad. The writer and photographer will appear at two other events at the festival, one where she’ll discuss what the inclusion of her short story in the Journey Prize Stories anthology has meant for her career and why she likes the short story form, and another celebrating the 50th anniversary of the birth of UBC’s creative writing program. This year’s Writers Festival features its largest lineup to date with more than 80 events featuring dozens of authors, including Margaret At-

wood, Joseph Boyden, Anne Carson, Douglas Coupland, Michael Crummey, Wayne Johnston, Lisa Moore, Michel Tremblay, Michael Winter Booker-prize nominated British author Will Self. Following the festival, humourist David Sedaris will appear at the Chan Centre, Nov. 12. For more information, see writersfest.bc.c. crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

On Now at The Brick! For more details go instore or online @thebrick.com.

Expires Oct 31, 2013.

Expires Oct 31, 2013.


A22

THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

E23

GOT SPORTS? 604-738-1411 | mstewart@vancourier.com

RamsflattenFightingIrishas coachcallsforbetterfocus MEGAN STEWART Staff writer

T

he Mt. Douglas Rams immediately made their presence felt at O’Hagan Field Saturday when they picked off the first pass out of the hands of Fighting Irish quarterback Giordy Belfiore. Visiting Vancouver College Oct. 5 for the Fighting Irish homecoming game, the Rams took over deep in Irish territory and two running plays later covered 90 yards and scored their first touchdown on the way to a 42-21 victory. The Rams rushed for more than 400 yards but it was twoway standout Marcus Davis who lit a spark for the visitors when he picked off Belfiore on the first play of the game. The packed, purple-clad bleachers were momentarily hushed. “It was tough,” said the Vancouver College quarterback. “I wasn’t really expecting it because all the teams we’ve played, there’s never been a player like him that we’ve had to face. Their d-line really beat us up. With a slow start to the game like that, we got behind and it was tough.” The Rams scored on a second short run by Julian Luis and off a 20-yard pass from Ashton MacKinnon to Seye Farinu before Vancouver College got on the board in the second quarter. With the loss, the Fighting Irish (2-0, 1-2) rack up their second loss in as many weeks. Belfiore, who is only in Grade 10, connected with wide receiver Manny Khun-Khun for a 14-yard touchdown pass. The receiver out-stepped the Rams close coverage with a hard, inside cut to

photos Rebecca Blissett

Rammed: Vancouver College defensive back Avery Zacarias tackled Mt. Doug Ram Ollie McKenzie Oct. 5 at O’Hagan Field. At right, Vancouver College fans showed their support for their team. The Fighting Irish lost 42-21. make Vancouver College the first team to score against Mt. Doug in the regular season. “I saw the corner was pressing me so I knew could take one step to the outside and fake him,” said Khun-Khun. “He stepped out, I went straight in — caught the ball. I saw three guys collapsing on me so I put my head down and trucked through them.” Khun-Khun combined with Belfiore on six passes for 118 yards. The Fighting Irish gained 168 yards in the air and 239 yards rushing. Although the Rams had outpaced the Fighting Irish 35-7 by

YOUNG GUN BELFIORE From Grade 9 one season to starting quarterback on the Vancouver College varsity football team the next, Giordy Belfiore was promoted to one of the most high-profile positions in B.C. high school sports. The six-foot-three pivot should have three years to grow into the position and on Saturday against the Mt. Douglas Rams, he showed off a powerful arm despite a few stumbles against the defending provincial champions. Visiting varsity head coach Mark Townsend said Belfiore’s junior varsity age was “astonishing.” “I wouldn’t have guessed [he’s in Grade 10] because he

halftime, the crowd’s vuvuzelas and thumping drum beats didn’t relent. Without their record-setting running back Robbie Welch who has missed two games with mono, the Irish turned to Clyde Caisip and Ovie Odjegba who had 105 and 97 yards, respectively. Vancouver College head coach Todd Bernett said he expects more from his varsity roster. They may have lost roughly half of last year’s players to graduation, but they’ve “lost more than half the focus,” he said. “If they can respond better dur-

ing the week in practice, we’ll clean that up and we’ll play better. It’s a focus issue during the week of practice,” said Bernett, now in his 13th season and the winningest coach in Vancouver College football history. “What happened here is going to create some change. They’re either going to get down and feel sorry for themselves or they’re going to believe that we have faith in them and they’ll give us their focus and they’ll give us their best.” Khun-Khun said meeting the defending AAA provincial champions wasn’t a distraction and

looks like, certainly, a seasoned veteran, varsity quarterback,” said Townsend after the Rams defeated the Irish 42-21 at O’Hagan Field. “He’s very calm out there, threw the ball extremely well. That’s very impressive and certainly Vancouver College with him being in Grade 10, their future is extremely bright.” In a losing effort, Belfiore threw for 143 yards and two touchdowns. He was picked off twice, fumbled once and connected nine times on 22 attempts. “He’s the best we have right now and that’s why he’s starting,” said Vancouver College head coach Todd Bernett. “He’s very courageous and he doesn’t get rattled. He keeps his composure and he can take a hit, he showed that today. That’s why he’s doing what he’s doing.”

anticipated what his coaches will be promoting during next week’s practice. “We’re going to come out stronger every other week now,” he said. “We usually bring our energy up each and every game and not just have some games that are up, but we have to have every game and we have to be energized all game, not just through the first quarter, but all four quarters. “There’s no one to blame. All of us, we have to all bring it up next week in practice and continue from there.” mstewart@vancourier.com twitter.com/MHStewart

Vancouver College went to the B.C. championship final last year (and lost to the Rams) with graduating quarterback Hunter Robinson, who set a record for passing more yards in his career than any previous quarterback in the school’s history. If Belfiore stays healthy and holds on to the position, he could write his own name in the record books. “He’s good and we all know he’s good, too,” said wide receiver Manny Khun-Khun. “He brings a young energy to our team and knowing that we have a younger quarterback than every other school out there, it makes us play that much better. He brings lots of respect and he’s also confident in his play.” — Megan Stewart


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013

sports&recreation

Donors asked to prop up girls basketball JIM MORRIS Contributing writer

F

or some people $500 isn’t a lot of money. For Angie Banh, it helped make the difference in her being able to continue her education. In January last year, Banh received one of the 10 scholarships awarded annually at the Vancouver Girls Basketball Association Challenge, a tournament that attracts high school teams from across the city. Without that $500 bursary, there’s a chance Banh might not be studying social sciences at Langara College this year. “Five hundred dollars may not be a lot for some families,” said Banh, who attended high school at Britannia Secondary School. “Coming from a single working household, my dad is the only one that works. With that [money] I didn’t have to put any financial stress on my dad to try and pay for my tuition. I was able to go to school.” For the last six years, the VGBA has hosted its tournament at Langara College. For the last three years, Telus donated $5,000 to fund the scholarships awarded to Grade 12 students for post-secondary education. Langara alsoawardedtwo$1,000scholarships for students to attend the college.

photo Dan Toulgoet

Marinel Santiago, 17, plays women’s basketball for the Langara Falcons. A $1,000 scholarship from the college helped make her education possible. This year Telus decided not to participate in the VGBA tournament although the company will sponsor the boys’ AAA provincial championship. The company’s withdrawal has left the VGBA searching for money to continue the scholarships. “We could run the tournament [without the scholarships] but I think it would lose a lot,” said Mike Evans, the VGBA president and basketball coach at Britannia.

At a recent VGBA board meeting, it was decided this year’s scholarships would be funded out of the pockets of board members or individuals willing to make a contribution. Moving forward, the VGBA will continue with individuals funding the scholarships. One person can contribute the whole amount, or several people can pool their resources. Eventually, Evans would like to see the scholarships grow from $500 to $750 or $1,000.

Russel Black, another VGBA board member and one of the tournament’s chairs, likes the idea of individuals filling the void left by Telus. “They are stepping forward because of an individual commitment,” said Black, who co-founded RBL Basketball in 1997, a program that operates basketball leagues and camps across the city. “It makes it special. It shows support. It makes it personal.” Evans said the idea reverts to the original concept of the VGBA. “It fits the original philosophy of overcoming barriers,” he said. “The original idea was to develop skills among the players at a younger age and overcome some barriers for these kids. We looked at it as more than a simple basketball thing, to try to build confidence.” During the tournament, a threemember committee decides which graduating players receive the scholarships. Basketball skill, marks and community involvement are all part of the criteria. Wendy Lin was manager of the Britannia team when she received a scholarship in 2012. She is now attending the UBC Sauder School of Business. The money made a difference to her. “UBC tuition is pretty expensive and it’s only getting even more expen-

sive,” said Lin. “It helped me buy five books.” Kindi Do, another Britannia student who received a scholarship in 2013, said not having the money would impact other young women. “What if they depend on this scholarship to go to school?” she said. “It’s a loss of opportunity.” Marinel Santiago said the $1,000 scholarship she received from Langara didn’t just benefit her. “Itliftedalotofweightoffmyshoulders and my parents’ shoulders,” said Santiago, who attended Churchill Secondary. “That money that would have been used to pay off my tuition, it helped my younger brothers pursue their athletic goals as well.” Many of the players in the VGBA tournament come from low-income families. Banh believes having an individual, maybe even someone from the same neighbourhood, step up with money for a scholarship means more than the cash coming from a corporation. “That is pretty cool,” she said. “A corporation is like a name. If it’s an individual, that one person actually took the time to think about these kids using this bursary to go to school.” Jim Morris is a veteran reporter who has covered sports for 30 years. Reach him at morrisejim@gmail.com

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013

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