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THE VOICE of VANCOUVER NEIGHBOURHOODS

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MIDWEEK EDITION

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013 Vol. 104 No. 51 • Established 1908

OPINION: Election self-reflection 10 SPORTS: Our Prospects 27

BEAT GOES ON: Chief Bill Williams (centre) and the Eagle Song Dancers from Squamish Nation performed last Friday on National Aboriginal Day at Klahowya Village,

photo Dan Toulgoet

Stanley Park. See story on page 6. To view photo gallery, scan page with your smartphone or tablet using the Layar app.

Cityhallkills‘thinstreet’proposalforMarpole NAOIBH O’CONNOR

Staff writer

T

he city has abandoned a proposal to pilot a “thin street” in Marpole in the face of neighbourhood opposition. Residents learned about the prospect of a “thin street” being introduced on a stretch of Ash Street between 59th and 64th about two weeks ago after the city sent a letter to 20 affected homeowners. The Ash Street proposal was included in the recently released draft Marpole Community Plan.

Creating a thin street involves dividing a street in half and creating new building lots on one side and a narrower “thin street” on the other. The building lots could be used for affordable housing or park use, according to the city. The thin streets concept was one of the ideas submitted to the re-THINK HOUSING ideas competition in 2012, which was held as part of the mayor’s task force on affordable housing. Vision Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson said in October 2012 that thin streets wouldn’t go in without “community buyin.” Staff was directed, however, to explore

the possibility of thin streets in neighbourhoods whose community plans were being updated, such as Marpole, and to find out if there was interest and acceptance. Community opposition in Marpole was swift — residents organized a meeting last Friday that attracted about 300 people, according to Nizar Assanie, one of the Ash Street residents who received a letter from the city about the thin street proposal. “All the neighbours were taken aback,” he told the Courier Monday afternoon, adding the vast majority of residents he’d

spoken with weren’t even aware the Marpole Community Plan was being updated. Three hundred and twenty four residents signed a petition opposing thin streets in Marpole. Matt Shillito, assistant director of community planning, told the Courier the thin street idea had been raised in general during previous Marpole housing workshops, but a specific location hadn’t been identified until recently. Staff had to complete technical work before determining where it was feasible. See RESIDENTS on page 4


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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newsfront A4

THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

FROM FRONT PAGE

Residentswantconsultationextended “It’s clear from the reaction that it’s not something that Marpole residents want to see us pursue, so we’re just in the process now of notifying people that we aren’t pursing the idea in the plan,” Shillito said Monday afternoon. Tuesday morning, Assanie said residents were surprised how quickly the city dropped the proposal, but he wonders if the idea will be pitched elsewhere. “Citizens need to pay very close attention to what’s happening in this city so they don’t get surprised by ideas like [this],” he said. Residents remain concerned about the overall draft community plan — 190 signed a letter addressed to Mayor Robertson asking for further consultation due to neighbourhood worries about rezoning and densification. “This plan has been put together with almost no consultation and almost nobody in our neighbourhood is aware of this plan. I request that the city stop any planning on the Marpole Community Plan until the residents of our neighbourhood of approximately 24,000 are given a real opportunity to review and consult on the plan,” the letter states. City staff started working on the plan more than a year ago. It deals with subjects including transportation, land use and development, parks and open space, heritage and culture, sustainability and public amenities and facilities, and will guide change in Marpole over the next 30 years. Consultation has included workshops and open houses. Staff also collected feedback online. “We’ve had an awful lot of different kinds of events. There was widespread aware-

photo Dan Toulgoet

The city will no longer pursue a “thin street” pilot in Marpole due to neighbourhood opposition from residents, including Nizar Assanie (front). ness of the plan in Marpole,” Shillito said. It’s when you get to the draft plan stage that people perhaps pay more attention than they have up until this point.”

An open house on the draft plan is scheduled for June 26 between 5 and 8:30 p.m. at Marpole-Oakridge Community Centre. Staff will then analyze feedback and hope

to bring the plan to council for consideration in the fall. noconnor@vancourier.com twitter.com/naoibh

Councillor calls for big money out of city politics MIKE HOWELL Staff writer

A

city councillor whose party received millions of dollars of campaign contributions since its creation almost 10 years ago wants to get the big money out of civic politics. But to do that, Vision Vancouver Coun. Andrea Reimer said the provincial government has to allow city council to make its own rules on election campaign finance. “Elections are not as accessible as they need to be for people who want to run and get ideas out,” said Reimer, who is one of 27 elected officials in the city who belong to parties that rely heavily on donations from big business and unions to run election campaigns. Vancouver hasn’t had an independent city councillor since Carole Taylor won a seat in 1986. Since then, city politics in Vancouver has been dominated by wellfunded political parties. Reimer will introduce a motion this week at council to call for the Union of B.C. Mu-

nicipalities (UBCM) to support Vancouver’s request to change election finance rules. The city needs that support to convince the provincialgovernmenttoallowforamendments to the city’s Charter and draft new rules that could include fundraising and spending limits and a ban on corporate and union donations. Vision, the NPA and COPE, which spent more than $5 million combined in the 2011 campaign, are all previously on record supporting a tri-party agreement to call for electoral finance reforms. That agreement will likely mean Reimer’s motion will be unanimously accepted and see it go before the UBCM at its annual meeting in September. “We’re not asking [other municipalities] to make any changes to their election rules, we’re just saying, here in Vancouver, we obviously have a very significant and serious problem that’s not getting better and we need rules to be able to deal with it,” she said. If Vancouver gets support from other municipalities, that would give the provincial government at least one year to mull over

the resolution before the fall 2014 election. Coralee Oakes is the recently appointed provincial minister responsible for implementing electoral reform. Oakes, who is the minister of community, sport and cultural development, was unavailable for comment Monday. But Oakes’ ministry said in a statement the provincial government “is committed to implementing local government election changes in time for the November 2014 local government elections.” The statement didn’t specify what types of changes, although it pointed to recommendations made in the 2010 Local Government Elections Task Force. The recommendations, however, were panned by city council when they were released because none put limits on contributions or a ban union and corporate donations. In the 2011 election, Vision spent $2.2 million, the NPA shelled out $2.5 million and COPE, which ran a coordinated campaign with Vision, spent $360,969, according to documents filed at city hall. The totals don’t include money directed

at individual campaigns or money raised by organizations such as the Vancouver Elementary Teachers’ Association, which spent $100,869 to support COPE and Vision. Historically, the majority of money given to Vision and the NPA has come from big business, including developers who regularly go before city council with development proposals. Although unions are COPE’s biggest contributors, they also contribute big dollars to Vision. Since the 2011 election, all three mainstream parties have held fundraisers to collect more money to fund their 2014 campaigns. Vision is having another one Thursday. Under current rules, the parties don’t have to disclose how much they’ve raised or where the money came from until four months after the next election. Former provincial ministers Bill Bennett and Ida Chong told the Courier in previous interviews the Liberals planned to bring in sweeping reforms for civic elections. But neither did. mhowell@vancourier.com twitter.com/Howellings


news

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Taking ticket totals to task 12TH & CAMBIE with Mike Howell

Y

es, this is another entry about cycling. I know, I know — give us some other news, you say. But when I discover Spencer Chandra Herbert, the NDP MLA for Vancouver-West End, decides to take on Police Chief Jim Chu over policing priorities, it’s worth a few sentences, don’t you think? I think so. So here we go… On my desk is a letter from Herbert addressed to Chu. Here’s the first paragraph: “Last year, I wrote to you urging increased enforcement of the law prohibiting cyclists using sidewalks as a way to increase safety for pedestrians in the West End. Vancouver Police Department statistics from 2012 show 12 citations for this offence in District One. Those same stats show 1,452 similar offences in District Two. Can you explain the huge discrepancy?” Wow, that is a huge discrepancy. But when I spoke to the VPD, they couldn’t explain the huge discrepancy. That’s because there isn’t one. My reading of the stats posted on the VPD’s website titled “bike ticketing stats for 2012” show there were 23 tickets issued in District One (the West End) to cyclists for riding on the sidewalk. Another 76 were issued in District Two (the Downtown Eastside) — not 1,452, as Herbert suggested in his letter to the chief. So to understand where that 1,452 number came from, I called Herbert on Friday but he was in an NDP caucus meeting. His assistant told me he’d get a question to him. You should know Herbert contacted me via email earlier in the week about the stories I wrote about tickets issued to cyclists for failing to wear a helmet. He was interested in stats for riding on a

sidewalk. I told Herbert stats related to bike infractions were posted on the VPD’s website and I sent him the link. Monday morning came and still no response from Herbert. So I called up his assistant again, who acknowledged they made a mistake and were correcting the letter. Turns out the 1,452 number came from a set of traffic and street bylaw stats posted on the VPD’s website, which cover all types of infractions, including fighting in public. Herbert and his office corrected the mistake and planned Monday to send another version of the letter to Chu. Here’s the sentence in question, as it now reads: “Vancouver Police Department statistics for bikes on sidewalks from 2012 indicate one third the citations in District One as compared to District Two. Can you explain this discrepancy?” This time, the VPD can offer some explanation. Sgt. Randy Fincham, a VPD media relations officer, said there are more police working in District Two, fewer designated bike paths and public disorder is greater along the Hastings corridor than in the West End. “Sowithmorepolicedownthere,theywillsee more infractions and they will issue more bylaw tickets at the end of the day,” Fincham said. Police also see more tourists in the West End and have talked with them and bike rental companies to ensure customers know the rules of the road. So, he said, it’s up to the officer witnessing someone riding on a sidewalk whether a ticket is warranted or whether educating the cyclist about the rules is a more useful approach. “Not all encounters between a person who is riding a bicycle on a sidewalk or not wearing a helmet or doing another bike-related infraction ends up in a ticket,” he said. “More often than not, it would be a warning and educating them about not riding on a sidewalk.” As for Herbert’s initial misinterpretation of the stats, well we all know what happened May 14 when the NDP got the numbers wrong. mhowell@vancourier.com twitter.com/Howellings

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

news

to two, with the park board’s NPA commissioners voting against it.

CENTRAL PARK

BRIDGE DÉJÀ VU

with Sandra Thomas

VILLAGE PEOPLE I had an opportunity to visit Klahowya Village in Stanley Park last Friday for National Aboriginal Day celebrations and the season launch of the attraction, which remains open now through Sept. 2. A highlight of the celebration was the singing, drumming and dancing performed by the Eagle Song Dancers, all members of Squamish Nation. I rode the Spirit Catcher Train for the first time and was taken by its environmental message. After disembarking from the train, I overheard a British tourist declare the ride “brilliant.” The word Klahowya means “welcome,” and each summer First Nations people from across B.C. come together to build the village in partnership with the Aboriginal Tourism Association of B.C. to welcome visitors from around the world and share their experiences, traditions and culture. General admission to Klahowya Village is free and includes the Artisan Marketplace, storytelling and weekend performances. The Spirit Catcher miniature train ride is $5 per person, while toddlers under the age of two ride for free. For more information, visit aboriginalbc.com.

photo Dan Toulgoet

This year’s Spirit Catcher Train ride at Klahowya Village in Stanley Park has an environmental message.

CAUSEWAY SAFETY

At Monday night’s park board meeting, Vision Vancouver commissioner Constance Barnes brought forward a motion asking staff to work with the Ministry of Transportation and the city’s engineering services to find ways to make the Stanley Park Causeway safer for cyclists and pedestrians. Barnes’ brought the motion forward as the result of the tragic death of a 61-yearold North Vancouver woman who died in May. She veered off the sidewalk on the

causeway into the path of a bus after being bumped by a pedestrian. Since then Barnes has been determined to see barriers installed between the pedestrian/bike sidewalks and the busy commuter road through Stanley Park. In Barnes’ motion, she notes the province appears to have neglected the causeway, which falls under the ministry’s care. Barnes wants temporary barriers installed as soon as possible while a permanent solution is being decided. Her motion was passed four

Fraser River historian Terry Slack called last week to say news about the May collapse of the Skagit River Bridge in Washington State, which reopened just days ago, reminded him of a similar accident on the north arm of the Fraser River, June 23, 1966. Slack had just started his shift as a crewman on a river patrol boat that day when he noted how high the river was, making it difficult for even smaller boats to navigate their way under the Fraser Street Bridge, the only link at the time between Richmond and Vancouver. Not long after an empty tug chip barge hit the bridge, knocking out a complete span. Slack says a high-level code emergency call for assistance went out over the emergency channel of the marine radio in their River Harbour Police boat. “As we approached the bridge, which was now just an opening in the river,” Slack wrote in an email, “I could see rafts of debris and an empty chip barge all drifting downstream.” Slack says quick work by nearby tugs and a fishing boat resulted in the rescue of seven people. Six were youths riding bikes over the bridge on their way to pick strawberries in Richmond and had stopped to watch the tug go by. Slack adds eight Vancouver Fire Department divers went into the churning river to search for possible victims in cars and only one empty truck was found. sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10

Everyone has a story, what’s yours? The Vancouver Courier is calling on all filmmakers—young, old, students, hobbyists, talented or otherwise. Following on the success of our neighbourhood series, Vancouver Special, we’re launching Vancouver Minute—a contest giving city residents the opportunity to share thoughts and stories about your neighbourhoods in the form of a sixty second video. Your “minute” can be shot in any style or genre—documentary, mockumentary, drama, comedy, an animated story, even a music video. There are three categories of prizes—first, a Juried Prize of $1500, second, a People’s Choice Prize of $1000 and finally, two Voters’ Prizes of $250 each drawn randomly from those of you who’ve voted. All prizes are in the form of gift coupons courtesy of London Drugs. To submit a video and to browse the small print, go to contest.vancourier.com. Final date for entries is July 17, 2013. Everyone has a story, let’s see yours.

For contest rules, terms, conditions and uploading instructions go to contest.vancourier.com


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

news

18-month

‘Amazing educator’ to retire TEACHER DEVELOPED PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN AND TEENS WITH BRAIN INJURIES CHERYL ROSSI Staff writer

E

ileen Fogarty-Ellis is retiring from the Vancouver School Board after 42 years as a teacher, the last 24 of those spent at Sunny Hill Health Centre for Children. Fogarty-Ellis is a provincial resource teacher in acute rehabilitation at Sunny Hill. She works largely one-on-one with students. She develops new education programs for children and teenagers who’ve suffered brain injuries, and with children who need to get back up to speed with their studies. They might need help after a stroke, or a brain tumour, or hip surgery related to cerebral palsy. Val Bancroft, a student support worker who has toiled alongside Fogarty-Ellis for six years, calls her colleague an “amazing educator.” “She has a high school teaching background but here we work with the kids from five-years-old to 19,” Bancroft said, adding “She’s not only been a teacher to the kids, but she’s been an amazing teacher to me.” Fogarty-Ellis started her career teaching high school theatre and English. When she returned

to work after having three daughters, she was called in to substitute at Sunny Hill, located at Slocan and 20th Avenue. Not long after, the rehabilitation hospital for children called her back, despite her lack of a background in special education. She was a natural fit. Fogarty-Ellis began upgrading and 24 years later, she’s attended conferences about brain injuries in Copenhagen, Denmark and in Melbourne, Australia, where she was a presenter. Fogarty-Ellis works with occupational therapists, physiotherapists, speech therapists and most intensely with neuropsychologists to help children with skills such as reading and math. She works with each student who has a brain injury for six weeks to six months and gets their home school ready to receive them. The humanities teacher turned near health worker says curiosity kept her at Sunny Hill for so long. “The learning curve with brain injury, it’s fascinating,” Fogarty-Ellis said. “And I work with fascinating people. I work with really, really smart people. People who I have learned so much from.” Fogarty-Ellis wants to travel and will continue to help her husband with his book business and to volunteer with Sunny Hill’s project setting up a mini Sunny Hill in India. But Jericho Beach resident says it’s time to retire. “As a generation it’s our responsibility to turn over our good jobs to the next generation,” she said. “We have a lot of energy. We’re the boomers, you know, we’re going to live forever, right, and we can work forever, but it’s not fair.” crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

news Common sense required as boating season gets into full swing DREW MCLACHLAN Contributing writer

W

ith summer here and Canada Day weekend only a few days away, many Vancouver boaters will soon be hitting the water. Increased water traffic means more collisions, which makes now the ideal time to brush up on boating safety. Cameron Taylor, president of BoatSmart, a boating course provider that is accredited by Transport Canada, said that most safety issues boil down to common sense. “Always wearing [an approved] life jacket is a big one,” Taylor said. “Eighty per cent of boating accidents could have been prevented by wearing a proper life jacket. Deciding to keep alcohol on shore is important as well. Not everybody

knows this, but alcohol can have four times the effect on water as it does on land, and it’s a factor in 40 per cent of boating fatalities. You should also bring lots of water with you as well to prevent dehydration, especially during the summer.” Another important measure is checking your safety equipment. All equipment should be stored together in an accessible place and should be checked at the beginning of each season to make sure everything is in working order. This includes inspecting life rafts for leaks and replacing batteries in flashlights and other electronics. “The big thing is to get equipment, learn how to use it, and make sure your passengers know where it is and know how to use it,” Taylor said. Pleasure Craft Operator Cards became mandatory across most of Canada in 2009 and failure to present one can

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result in a $250 fine. Yet out of the 10.5 million boaters across the country, only 3.5 million hold a licence. Taylor said that there are multiple reasons for such a staggering discrepancy. “They might be occasional boaters or be boating on lakes and waterways that aren’t enforced,” Taylor said. “They might have been boating for decades and are confident, but even for seasoned boaters it’s still a good idea. You might learn something new or notice a bad habit that you’re picked up.” According to Transport Canada, national boating fatalities have drastically fallen since 1991, from 220 annually to just 108 in 2006. However, recreational boating is now the source of 88 per cent of boating deaths, whereas it was the source of only 83 per cent of boating deaths in 1991. Taylor believes that this can be attributed to a lack of education for some pleasure craft operators, as commercial and rescue boat operators are more likely to have received proper training prior to going out on the water, and that a further decline in recreational boating fatalities has taken place since Pleasure Craft Operator Cards became mandatory in 2009. “Boating is a safe activity as long as you know what you’re doing,” Taylor said. Pleasure Craft Operator Cards require an exam that covers navigation, boating laws, marker buoys and other basic subjects. Exams can be taken online at boatsmartexam.com or in person at Canadian Tire, Granville Island Boat Rentals, Vancouver Rowing Centre or Westcan Inflatables. Licences are valid for life. Drew_McLachlan@hotmail.com twitter.com/LachedAndLoaded

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2 0 1 3


news Province continues to push 10-year deal with teachers DREW MCLACHLAN Contributing writer

N

ewly appointed Education Minister Peter Fassbender says the provincial government will continue pursuing a 10-year agreement with B.C. teachers, noting stability as the ultimate goal. But the province’s teachers continue to oppose the idea. Fassbender met with reporters June 20, following a meeting with the B.C. Teachers’ Federation (BCTF), the B.C. School Trustees Association and the B.C. Public School Employers Association. Fassbender was adamant that a 10-year agreement with teachers would bring stability to B.C.’s school system and cure the often-volatile relationship between the provincial government and public school instructors. “I think anything is feasible if we lay out the road map and goals,” Fassbender said. “I’m a person who is optimistic. If we can respect each other without name-calling and keep our eye on the goal — which is the education of young people — we can work together to find a solution.” BCTF president Susan Lambert dis-

I’m afraid the “ rhetoric around

stability is simply a euphemism for removing our rights and silencing teachers. — Susan Lambert

agreed that a 10-year agreement will solve any ongoing issues. The BCTF put out a press release following the morning meeting with Fassbender in which Lambert said: “We don’t need a new bargaining structure since all the relevant parties, including government, are now at the table. What we really need is for government to come to the table with the resources and political will to reach a negotiated agreement, one that will guarantee support for all students when they need it.” Fassbender said that he had asked the three parties to conclude any un-

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substantiated issues so that they can “discuss what a new road map is and what the new relationships will look like” beginning next week. Fassbender said that to him, stability means that “someone in Grade 2 today would have the reassurance that they can graduate without any restraints.” The term carried a darker connotation for Lambert. “I’m afraid the rhetoric around stability is simply a euphemism for removing our rights and silencing teachers,” Lambert said in the press release. “Stability really means locking in deteriorating conditions in classrooms for another decade.” The BCTF noted that according to Statistics Canada, B.C.’s per-student funding is $1,000 below the national average and that B.C. has the lowest teacher to student ratio in the country. Fassbender refused to comment on the current situation with CUPE or the Francophone School Board and stated that he was “not ready to put a deadline on discussions at this point.” Drew_McLachlan@hotmail.com twitter.com/LachedAndLoaded

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

THE VANCOUVER COURIER

1574 West Sixth Ave., Vancouver, BC V6J 1R2 604-738-1411 Twitter: @vancouriernews vancourier.com

Lessons in being wrong

T

he New Democratic Party provincial council met in Vancouver last week to conduct a grim post-mortem, looking for cause of death of their election hopes. There’s been five weeks of media analysis, so they have a lot to wade through. It’s an amusing body of work, since many of the explanations of what happened during the campaign are coming from people who had no idea it was happening at the time. For example, a consensus has emerged that Premier Christy Clark changed the contest with an outstanding performance during the TV debate. But the prevailing view in the few days of coverage after the debate — mine included — was that three of the four leaders did well and there was no clear winner. Giddy B.C. Liberals, from a much-happier perspective, have also been analyzing how they managed to pull off the historic upset. So there’s room for review of how we media pundits blew the call and were as startled as everyone else by the result. It would normally be mortifying to realize that after paying close attention to the political scene for a long time, most of what I thought I knew about the 2013 election was dead wrong. Oddly enough, it’s been an amazing, rejuvenating learning experience to look back and reflect on how off-base I was. Much of the awkwardness is eased by the fact it’s shared so widely. So here are an assortment of lessons learned: • Never trust opinion polls, especially if they confirm your impressions. All the public polls were wrong about nearly everything. I’ve always thought there was a certain amount of black magic and witchcraft involved in their analysis of their data. But I’ve never been able to fully resist letting them influence my views. If you spend your days wondering what people are thinking about politics and someone presents you with a scientific study that says “this is what they think,” it’s hard to avoid buying into the conclusions. Not any more. • Victoria is not B.C. The capital and the Island skew by and large to the NDP. So their thinking tends to dominate the small political world around the legislature. I absorbed some of their certainty that Election 2013 was in the bag, and discounted the fact B.C. is four or five political regions with different things going on in each one. We all share one licence plate, but there’s a world of differences in our outlooks. • Everybody thinking the same thing doesn’t mean everybody is right. Groupthink is a comfortable way to reinforce your assumptions — right up to that point where you find out everybody is wrong. There was room for a contrarian position in the pre-election guessing game, but it went mostly unoccupied. • It turns out jobs and families are important. The B.C. Liberal message got discounted a bit in this corner. It sounded motherhood. There weren’t a lot of sophisticated angles to dwell on. But who needs them? The emphasis on jobs, families and a future for kids was enormously appealing. That’s what people really care about. B.C. Liberals stressed it day in and day out, and people liked what they heard. • Elections are more about the future than the past. The B.C. Liberals had an insipid track record over four years, preoccupied by the harmonized-sales-tax debacle. I thought the mistrust and suspicion over the HST would run right up to May 14. But it seems to have ended on April 1, when the tax was abandoned. People got what they wanted and moved on to other issues. Dix will recount his lessons learned. They’re probably a lot more painful and profound than mine are. But whether they’ll cost him his job is probably still up to him to decide at this point. There is no one in the party who has the high ground from which to say: “I told you so.” (Just So You Know: The above is adapted from a speech (“Learning to Love the Margin of Error”) I was invited to give to the Canadian Club of Victoria this week. They are an engaging group of people who have meeting for more than 100 years.

LES LEYNE

WEB POLL NATION

City hall’s ‘thin streets’ proposal will: A) add unwelcome density to single-family neighbourhoods B) create more affordable housing and park space

Last week’s poll question: Will a fourth civic party improve voter turnout in Vancouver? YES – 36 per cent NO – 64 per cent This is not a scientific poll.

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letters

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

WE WANT YOUR OPINION

Hate it or love it? We want to know... really, we do!

Reach us by email: editor@vancourier.com

Where did my attention span go?

M

y overall mental health got a boost recently while I was on vacation. I moved, which meant that for six days, I had neither cable television nor Internet or email access of any kind. You would think that this situation might lead to some serious withdrawal symptoms, like twitching, night terrors, hallucinations of giant bug-headed babies (or baby-headed bugs), random yelping, and spontaneous limb self-removal. Nope. Moving will keep you busy, of course, and after I’d unpacked a sufficient number of boxes, I would lie down with a book. I finished Anathem by Neal Stephenson, a book which is the exact opposite of the click-click-click short attention span style of modern wired life. Anathem is 900 pages long. Then it has three appendices. It’s a science fiction novel in which characters can debate the Platonic nature of the multiverse for six or seven pages at a stretch. Then there might be a kung fu fight or a volcanic eruption. It’s that kind of a book. I love reading novels, probably the quintessential long-attention-span activity. Before the move, I told a couple of people that I had finished packing my books, which meant I was around 70 or 80 per cent done all of my packing. Friends, especially those who have seen my place, just nodded. More casual acquaintances gave me strange looks. Unfortunately, I feel like the world is conspiring to chip away at my attention span. As I write this, the little email icon on my desktop is bouncing up and down as frantically as a toddler sitting on an anthill. New messages, junkmail, whatever. Nine tenths of it gets tossed straight into the trash. I have RSS readers to check for news, there are Google alerts flying, and I’m always keeping an eye on Twitter and Facebook. Yes, around here, messing around with social media is part of the job description, not something to do when the boss isn’t looking. Also, sometimes people call me for a form of voice communication on something called a “landline telephone.” Essentially, it means I’m seldom doing anything for more than about 10 minutes at a time. Beyond work, I’m perfectly capable of distracting myself with my toys. Ever sat down, clicked on an Internet browser, and realized three hours later that only your mouse-hand has moved? Every stray thought that runs through my head can now be answered. When was cheese invented? Who fought the last judicial duel in England? Has anyone built a house entirely out of Lego? Does Coke ever go bad? How many Top 40 hits did Meat Loaf have? I love having the ability to get at any of this information at any time of the day or night. But while it satisfies my curiosity, it’s doing nothing to get me any exercise or help me do anything productive — at least until I get that slot on Jeopardy! Too much time on the Internet can leave me twitchy, jerky, feeling strange and out of sorts. It’s after too much of this time spent online that I really need to decompress. My six-day Internet-free zone did a really good job of smoothing out the rough, scratchy parts of my brain. Now, I’m plotting ways to help support my reading habit instead of feeding my Internet trivia binging habit. In particular, I’m thinking of getting a nice deck chair for the summer, next to which I can place a tall cold drink, and a taller stack of books. mclaxton@langleyadvance.com

MATTHEW CLAXTON

Ever sat down, clicked on an Internet browser, and realized three hours later that only your mousehand has moved?

TICKETING JAYWALKERS NOT ABOUT SAFETY

To the editor: Re: “City installs mid-block crosswalk on East Hastings,” June 21. It’s very frustrating that the VPD continue to mouth the line that the discriminatory and targeted ticketing of poor people in the Downtown Eastside for jaywalking is to “educate the public about the danger of jaywalking.” Can the VPD cite any evidence (from Vancouver or anywhere else) that ticketing for jaywalking decreases incidence of jaywalking or improves safety? If this is a public safety campaign, why are 75 per cent of all tickets being handed out in the Downtown Eastside while other neighbourhoods are ignored? Why was ticketing for jaywalking not among the 20 short, medium and long-term recommendations to improve pedestrian safety in the “We’re All Pedestrians” report, funded by the City of Vancouver and presented by the city at the International Conference on Urban Health in New York in 2010? This ticketing isn’t about public safety — it is about justifying inflated police budgets by criminalizing and over-policing the poorest neighbourhood in our city.

Aiyanas Ormond, VANDU Community Organizer

OLSON PREACHING TO THE CONVERTED

To the editor: Re: “God’s grace not in the details of catastrophe,” June 21. As someone who expresses the opinion that God is irrelevant in this modern post-Christian world, Mr. Olson seems to spend a disproportionate amount of time dwelling on the subject. Like a schoolyard bully, Mr. Olson throws out insult after insult with the apparent purpose of striking a chord with one of his readers. Judging by the lack of negative response to his opinion pieces, however, it would appear that Mr. Olson is preaching to the converted and is in danger of becoming irrelevant and even (gasp) boring.

pears, he says, to be threatening so-called community values shared by many. Garr infers that Westside is American, and that proselytizing is wrong. Westside is, however, a Canadian Mennonite Brethren church. Calling it a sect, too, is incorrect; Westside preaches the gospel. And climate change, animal rights, gay rights, racism and feminism supporters proselytize freely; why shouldn’t Christians be able to do so? Garr contends that “business for evangelicals is booming here.” Perhaps it is. A vibrant Christian presence in downtown Vancouver may help alleviate the homelessness, poverty, loneliness, addiction and lawlessness many people see in our city.

Greg Olson (no relation), Vancouver

Mary Schappert, Vancouver

CHURCH PRESENCE GOOD FOR DOWNTOWN

STRATHCONA HARDLY POOR

To the editor:

Re: “Church’s beliefs worse than loss of theatre space,” May 31. Columnist Allen Garr expresses concern about the purchase of The Centre in Vancouver for the Performing Arts by Westside Church, not because of the loss of a theatre, but because what he calls a growing evangelical sect ap-

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To the editor:

Re: “Neighbourhood at a glance — Strathcona,” June 21. I found it mildly amusing reading your article on Strathcona and its long and rich history of grinding poverty. I can’t say that I notice too much of that today when looking at the real estate prices for that part of town.

John Clench, Vancouver

SOCIAL MEDIA COURIER POLL RESULT: “Is incorporating rental units into new fire hall buildings a good idea? No: 52% Yes: 48%” Hollyburn Properties @HollyburnPpty: Noise concerns of renters would definitely be a tough hurdle to overcome for this proposed mixed redevelopment. COURIER STORY: “12th & Cambie: Will Anton’s council quips on justice occupy her thoughts?,” June 10 Nathan Allen @nathaneallen: Is right to protest threatened by new AG?”@VanCourierNews: Anton’s positions on justice in Vancouver. COURIER STORY: “City of Vancouver approves more separated bike lanes, June 13,” Facebook question: Despite some pushback from residents, city council agreed Wednesday to a major $700,000 upgrade for cyclists along a stretch of a popular bike route on the edge of Chinatown. Do you agree with the decision? Leona Rothney: no and I think that money should go towards our outdoor pool that we lost in Mt. Pleasant several years ago. COURIER STORY: “Make Music hits the streets,” June 20 Kozai Modern: Gastown was a blast last year with Cuban dancing in the streets! We will definitely go again this year! Follow us on Facebook: The VancouverCourierNewspaper and Twitter: @VanCourierNews

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Letters may be edited by the Courier for reasons of legality, taste, brevity and clarity. To be considered for publication, they must be typed, signed and include the writer’s full name (no initials), home

address, and telephone number (neither of which will be published), so authorship may be verified. Send to: 1574 West Sixth Ave., Vancouver V6J 1R2 or email editor@vancourier.com


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

The Friendliest Dealers and Best Deals in Town

news Summer camp gets chivalrous SANDRA THOMAS Staff writer

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he director and co-founder of Academie Duello has been surprised by the children who’ve attended the school’s annual Knight Camp summer programs, which launched seven years ago. “Sure the kids come for the swords and swordplay and everything they’ve read about in books,” said Devon Boorman. “But then they start to connect to the knightly virtues and begin to identify them in each other. The Virtue Circle has turned out to be one of the most popular parts of Knight Camp.” Boorman said in the past there were some violent knights but the majority were noble and embraced virtues such as mercy, integrity, mutual respect, courage and fair play. It’s these virtues Boorman tries to instill in children attending Knight Camp. They also enjoy learning how to make armour, create their own battle-ready shields and paint them with their own coat of arms, sword play, how to command a siege and courtly dancing. Knight Camps run weekly throughout July and August beginning next week and are open to boys and girls aged eight to 14. For more information, visit academieduello.com. There are dozens of summer day camps available across the city this summer, including at most of the city’s community centres. Check with your local centre for more information. For children with a talent or passion for gymnastics, Jump Gymnastics is offering day and weeklong summer camps. Director Jennifer Hood says summer is an ideal time to get children involved in physical activities. “The concept of a fair weather fan is no different for kids,” said Hood. “The best

time to learn to enjoy sport is under blue skies and warm sunshine.” Hood said summer is a time to find out what your child is naturally good at, whether that’s team sports, ball sports or solo activities like biking or running. For more information visit jumpgymnastics.ca The YMCA also offers summer day camps that offer fun physical activities through which campers learn about themselves, increase self-confidence and make new friends and memories in a safe and caring environment. Registration for 2013 summer camps is open at MyYMCA.ca, 604-939-9622 or vanymca.org. Meanwhile, Atlantis Programs and Pedalheads offer swimming and cycling programs that safely promote kids’ health and development. During the last 25 years, the groups have taught more than 140,000 children to ride and swim using specialized teaching methods combined with small classes. Visit alt.atlantisprograms.com. For children with an interest in the environment, FUN Camps offer a hands-on environmental leadership program. The goal is to teach children that caring for the environment and exploring natural areas can be fun and interactive. In Vancouver, camp members meet at the Graduate Student Centre at the University of B.C. Visit funsociety.ca. The Vancouver Aquarium is offering AquaCamps this summer with fun educational experiences for children. The camps are filled with hands-on activities, animal observations and crafts, as well as time to run around outside. Children will learn about local and exotic animals, life cycles, food webs, adaptations, ecosystems and sustainability. Visit vanaqua.org. sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10

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community

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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EVENT OR COMMUNITY NEWS WE SHOULD KNOW ABOUT? 604-738-1411 | sthomas@vancourier.com

CanadaDayfestivitiesget‘eh’foreffort COMMUNITY CALENDAR with Sandra Thomas

GRANVILLE ISLAND

Canada Day festivities begin on Granville Island at 8 a.m., but a highlight is the free bikedecorating workshop at 10 a.m. in the park east of False Creek Community Centre. Supplies will be provided and once all of the participants’ bikes, strollers, trikes, wheels and helmets are appropriately bedazzled, they can join the annual parade at 1:30 p.m., which begins at Ocean Concrete. (Children must be accompanied by an adult.) Other activities during the day include a free Canada Day celebration at False Creek Community Centre, the Little Paws Agility Show, a disco party at Railspur Alley and free temporary tattoos and face painting. Watch for roving performers and pick up free flags and pins from Granville Island merchants. The celebrations continues until 11 p.m.

COAL HARBOUR Join the gang at Canada Place July 1 for the biggest birthday celebration outside of Ottawa. The free 13-hour celebration, presented by Coast Capital Savings, begins with the Waterfront Party, which starts at 10 a.m. and continues through the day with 25 music and dance performances, extreme sports displays, a celebration of great Canadian inventions, a citizenship ceremony, the Canadian Armed Forces and the Port Metro Vancouver Zone. A Canada Day parade, which begins at 7 p.m. at the corner of Georgia and Broughton streets, includes more than 60 entries recognizing this country’s diversity and multicultural citizens. Following the parade is the annual fireworks show at 10:30 p.m. Fireworks-lovers have an opportunity to

Granville Island’s Canada Day celebrations include a parade beginning at 1:30 p.m., stilt walkers, face painting, a bike decorating workshop and disco party. For added web content including websites to events, scan page using the Layar app. watch the action from De Dutch’s Burrard Landing location at the Vancouver Convention Centre. De Dutch restaurant is celebrating Canada Day with Front Row at the Fireworks, a fundraising initiative benefiting the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation’s B.C. and Yukon Chapter. The fundraiser includes nine waterfront tables being auctioned off with starting bids of $200 for a table for two or $400 for a table of four. Winning bidders will enjoy the best seats on the water for the Canada Day Burrard Inlet Fireworks show from 9 to 11 p.m., with a $20 food and beverage voucher from De Dutch included in the bid price. Proceeds from the auction will help fund vital research and community health grants to further progress breast cancer prevention, diagnosis, treatment and care. Bidding closes at 12 p.m. June 28. For more information, visit dedutch.com/bestseats.

DOWNTOWN EASTSIDE The annual Canada Day Crab Park Festival

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takes place July 1 starting at 1 p.m. with the Buddy Holics followed by Butch Murphy & the Greasy Kings, and the Rez Warriors. The party, hosted by Ian Tiles, is being presented by Crab-Water for Life Society, Radio Bandcouver and Northern Electric, and is sponsored by Vancouver Cultural Affairs, Heritage Canada, Port Metro Vancouver, Vancity Credit Union and the Ray-Cam Community Centre. Crab Park is located at the north end of Main Street.

PNE GROUNDS Hastings Race Track is hosting its annual Canada Day party July 1 with first post at 1:50 p.m. Real Housewives of Vancouver alum Mary Zilba and Robin Richmond Reichman will be performing and presenting. The friends will be at the track to witness the debut of Pine Walk, a three-yearold filly from California. The Family Zone will be open from noon to 5 p.m. and several of the city’s popular food trucks will be open for business.

JULY 6 –7, 2013

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epicfest.ca ENTER TO WIN! 2 tickets to EPIC SUSTAINABLE LIVING FESTIVAL Email your entry to: contest@vancourier.com (Subject line: EPIC). Include your name, email address and phone number for a chance to WIN! Name: _______________________________ Email: _______________________________ Phone: _______________________________ Contest Deadline: Wed. July 3 by noon. Winners will be contacted by phone.

There’s also a chance to win a barbecue grill while listening to live music and enjoying food and drink specials.

KENSINGTON The Kensington Community Centre is hosting a Canada Day celebration July 1, from noon to 3 p.m. with live entertainment, music, a bouncy castle, community information tables and kid-friendly activities. Hot dogs and drinks will be available to purchase, but there will also be free cake. The centre is located at 5175 Dumfries St.

SUNSET The Sunset Community Centre Association is hosting a Canada Day party July 1, from noon to 4 p.m. The celebration will include carnival games, a barbecue, community displays and inflatables. Don’t forget to bring a non-perishable item for the food bank. Sunset Community Centre is located at 6810 Main St. sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10

vancouver.ca

Development Permit Board Meeting: July 2 The Development Permit Board and Advisory Panel will meet: Tuesday, July 2 at 3 pm City Hall, 453 West 12th Avenue First Floor, Town Hall Meeting Room to consider this development permit application: 1365 Burnaby Street: To construct a six-storey building with 21 rental units and two levels of underground parking accessed from Burnaby Street using a Heritage Density Transfer from donor site at 439 Helmcken Street on this site. Please contact City Hall Security (1st floor) if your vehicle may be parked at City Hall for more than two hours. TO SPEAK ON AN ITEM: 604-873-7469 or lorna.harvey@vancouver.ca


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

news

Culinary arts teacher hangs up her apron MANY YOUNG CHEFS TRACE CAREERS TO INNOVATIVE TEMPLETON PROGRAM CLASS NOTES

with Cheryl Rossi

O

nly 12 students studied culinary arts when Margo Murphy started teaching at Templeton secondary in 1989. Now 10 times that number enrol in culinary arts there each year. That’s because Murphy directs her passion into taking the program far beyond prepping food for the cafeteria, says principal Aaron Davis. Murphy gets teenagers working in restaurant kitchens, competing in provincial and national skills competitions and serving gourmet food to homeless people in Oppenheimer Park. “To see students come back and thank her, from 15 years ago, is a pretty special thing,” he said. Davis and former students aren’t alone in their veneration of Murphy. This year the park board recognized her as an important contributor to Vancouver’s food community with its remarkable women poster series. Murphy hangs up her chef’s smock Friday after 24 years teaching culinary arts on Templeton Drive near Nanaimo Street and 40 years as a teacher. A department head for applied skills,

photo Dan Toulgoet

Margo Murphy’s culinary arts program at Templeton secondary has helped many students land jobs in the restaurant industry. Scan this page with Layar for more info. she’ll miss her colleagues and bonding with students over a hands-on activity. “It’s a very different thing than doing math with them,” she said. Murphy and her colleagues want to start a Templeton chefs alumni. “So that when they’re in different places of the world they can be in touch and say hey, we’re hiring, anybody interested? And they’ll know whether or not the kids have the skills,” she said. An industrial catering program for special needs kids operated when Murphy started at Templeton. She slowly got more students

into more challenging kitchens including at Cactus Club. “I could really see the difference once the students started going out there,” Murphy said. “They were really proud of themselves. There was this professional air about them that hadn’t been there before… The other kids wanted to be the same. Every time we sent people out it raised the bar a little bit higher. And now, this last year, we sent out 60 students.” Murphy said all of her Accelerated Credit Enrolment In Industry Training, or ACE-IT, students who complete work experience and gain credits from Vancouver Commu-

Hurry! Deadline Thursday

nity College secure apprenticeships. Her former student who works as executive sous chef at the Vancouver Club welcomes Templeton culinary students into his kitchen every year where students get to work with lobster, crab and molecular gastronomy. Thirty-five Templeton students worked there last Christmas. Murphy started Templeton’s Iron Chef Competition in 2004 so that students who worked on a cafeteria production line could create a meal from start to finish. She tells students the not-so-secret ingredient in November. Students prepare for the competition in teams in and out of class, preparing an appetizer, a main course and dessert that all include the ingredient. Chefs that include Rob Feenie judge the competition. “Where else do you have an Iron Chef Competition where a real Iron Chef comes and judges?” Davis said. The funny thing is, Murphy only studied home economics to placate her parents. Her mother was the Vancouver School Board’s home economics coordinator. “I failed first year university and I thought my parents were going to kill me so I thought I was going to go into home ec,” Murphy said. It wasn’t a love, believe me. It was saving my rear end.” But Murphy has loved her career. “It’s a real honour to be able to be a teacher,” she said. crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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A15

June 2013

Join the club

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As our name implies, we are set up as a club, and our participants are members, not clients

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or those over age 55, heading towards seniordom, or who are the children of seniors, the topic of dementia is a sensitive one. Aside from dealing with the progression, adults can feel ‘left out’ of things along the way. Fortunately, there is a local club that’s mandate is to create inclusiveness for affected people. “Paul’s Club is a social and recreational day program that caters specifically to the needs and interests of people who are living with Early Onset Dementia (diagnosed before age 65,)” says Nita Levy, a retired RN and executive director of Paul’s Club. “The club, opened on Sept. 4 of last year, is the only one of its kind in Vancouver. Currently we are open three days a week from 10 am to 4 pm. mfipck dpie hfpqrot jlrm

We are led by our program director, Chelsea Redburn, who has a degree in Recreational Therapy from Douglas College,” says Levy. “The impetus for starting Paul’s Club came from our experience of looking for help for my brother-in-law (Paul), who lives in England. He was diagnosed with Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease at the age of 62. We found that many of the programmes for people with dementia were oriented towards older people,” she says. “The needs of people like Paul are different. After much searching, we found a social and recreational day program that had been developed to cater to younger people,” says Levy.

“Paul’s Club members are physically fit, active and other than their dementia are healthy. They are on average 20 or even 30 years younger than the age group of other Adult Day Programs.”

Levy and her husband were advised that there were no such programs in B.C. due to an absence of available public funding, not an absence of need.

“As our name implies, we are set up as a club, and our participants are members, not clients,” says Levy. “Paul’s Club recognizes and draws on each member’s individuality, their interests, hobbies and life experiences. An essential element of Paul’s Club, that differentiates it from other Adult Day Programs, is that the members help determine what activities they want to pursue.”

“We decided we had to start one,” she says, adding that a grant from VanCity made it feasible.

So far this has included weekly yoga; drumming; singing; some line dancing; daily ping pong; foosball; working

“This program enabled my brotherin-law to remain socially engaged, stimulated, and physically active.”

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“…and always stopping to sit down and have an ice cream before our very social walks are concluded!” Levy advises. “We have even made a foray into gardening.” To find out more about joining Paul’s Club (a non-government-funded club), contact Nita Levy at nita@paulsclub. ca, call 778 558-1894 or visit the site at paulsclub.ca.

Scooting seniors 10:00 - 1:00pm - UPPER PARKING LOT

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out on exercise equipment; visits to the Aquarium; Science World; the Art Gallery; the Library specifically to access music CD’s; daily newspaper based discussions on current affairs; socializing over coffee and muffins at the beginning of the day and socializing over lunch; walking in the afternoons…

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

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A16


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

seniors

Healthy aging

SUPERFOODS A TASTY PART OF YOUR ANTI-AGING DIET STRATEGY

I

n 2001, one in eight Canadians were 65 years of age or older. By 2026, one in five Canadians will have reached that golden age. Healthy aging is the key to optimizing the years we have without disease or chronic conditions that may keep us from enjoying life to the fullest.

Eating a variety of nutritious foods that are low fat, high fiber and rich in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, is one good strategy for lowering our risk of disease and disease-related disabilities. Also, it keeps our brains and

bodies in tip-top shape as the years pass by. Remember, healthy aging also requires daily physical activity along with activities that exercise the brain. In general, energy/calorie needs do get lower with aging because we have less muscle, more body fat and many of us tend to be less active. Keep in mind that we still need about the same amount of other important nutrients, including carbohydrate, protein, fat, vitamins and minerals to stay healthy, and don’t forget the fluids. Here’s how mushrooms can be a tasty part of your anti-aging diet strategy:

Adding antioxidants Fresh mushrooms contain significant levels of l-ergothioneine, a naturally occurring antioxidant that may also help protect the body against disease. Ergothioneine is found in both raw and cooked mushrooms.

“The Giving Hearts Awards Program recognizes outstanding individuals and organizations who exemplify the true spirit of philanthropy.”

A17

Fabulous fibre

Fresh mushrooms contain both soluble and insoluble fibre. Insoluble fibre promotes regularity. Soluble fibre may help regulate blood sugar fluctuations and lower cholesterol levels.

Controlling blood pressure Fresh mushrooms, naturally very low in sodium, are a great way to boost flavor without adding a lot of salt. A diet low in sodium can help prevent and control high blood pressure.

PROTEIN-RICH MEALS PACK A PUNCH

Some foods have definite immune-boosting properties. Adding such foods to the diet is particularly important for seniors, because the ability to fight infections naturally decreases as we age. Try incorporating some of the following items in your summer dishes:

Legumes—Legumes

are full of iron, zinc and Vitamin B6—all of which support the immune system. A colourful bean salad with a touch of oil and vinegar can be a great starter at your summer gatherings.

Lean Beef—Packed with iron, zinc, and the

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antioxidant selenium, lean beef helps power and rebuild your immune system. Be sure to limit your portions to three ounces per serving —and beware the buffet table.

Fresh mushrooms are perfect for low fat diets as they have high water content, are low in fat and contain some fibre which helps keep you feeling full.

Wild Salmon—Wild Salmon offers a natural source of Vitamin D, which is vital to your immune system’s ability to fight bacteria and other viruses. Try including this fish in your diet at least twice a week—on salads or as an entrée.

For more nutritional information, tips and delicious recipes, visit Mushrooms Canada at:mushrooms.ca. Courtesy newscanada.com

Adhering to good eating habits can and will improve the quality and longevity of life.

The Association of Fundraising Professionals, Vancouver Chapter, recognizes there are many individuals, families and groups that make outstanding contributions of time, leadership and financial support to countless organizations. The Giving Hearts Award Program was created to acknowledge the true expression of philanthropy. This is your opportunity to recognize and celebrate the individuals and organizations (volunteers, leaders, fundraisers, philanthropists, youth) that make a difference to your organization and the non-profit community. The awards will be presented at the National Philanthropy Day Luncheon on November 15, 2013 Submissions are currently being accepted; DEADLINE: Post-marked no later than June 30, 2013 If you have any questions please contact: Chair Ms. Cary Gaymond - cgaymond@shaw.ca

For guidelines, nomination forms, and more information please visit the Giving Hearts Award page at:

www.afpvancouver.org


A18

THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

seniors

Dr. Y. Vincent Yoshida Family Dentistry

East siders

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Are you overdue for a dental check-up?

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~ Highly trained dental hygienists to clean teeth and prevent gingivitis. ~ Have your old Mercury-Silver fillings replaced with white composite. ~ Wisdom teeth extractions with oral conscious sedation.

enfrewCollingwood Seniors’ Society represents the northeast corner of the city. The boundaries are generally Knight to Boundary Road, and 41st Ave. to Wall St., but there

Come see us for a free consultation 207-1750 East 10th Avenue, Vancouver Phone: 604-874-1221 or www.dryoshida.com

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is some flexibility. The curriculum for summer at RCSS is always exciting, and includes:

get your vocal cords working, and you may give Celine Dion a run for her money.

Exercises You’ll Love

The G-Seven Band with Johnny Hsu: The musical stylings of multiinstrumentalist Johnny and the crew let you enjoy the karaoke and the atmosphere.

Gentle Yoga: Maryanne Chu comes by to instruct in yoga. Get ready to relax, stretch, and relieve some stress with this ancient form of exercise. Sit Fit: This is a good way to get bodies moving while having fun at the same time! It happens every day at Renfrew-Collingwood Seniors’ Society. Walking Club: With nice weather coming around, it’s time to go out and enjoy the fresh air with a brisk walk.

Variety of Entertainment Dance and Sing with Steve Warner: Tuneful Steve has a song for everyone. He encourages crowd participation by inviting you to sing and dance.

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Sing-a-long with the Crow City Singers: The Crow City Singers will

John Cronin: This guitarist and singer will entertain and keep you stomping and dancing. Come enjoy a pleasant afternoon to delight your soul.

Spoil Yourself Spa Days Irene’s Nail Salon: Wow your friends by getting your nails done by Irene in this season’s latest fashionable colours, for instant glamour. Sarah’s hand massages: Having a stressful day? Unwind with a nice hand massage from Sarah! Drop in for a cup of tea or coffee at Renfrew Collingwood Seniors Centre: 2970 East 22nd Ave.; Phone: 604-430-1441.

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Do you have a history of falls? Are you interested in learning about your risk of falling?

Falls among seniors is a major health care issue. Approximately 1 in 3 older adults experience one or more falls per year. Although falls are commonly thought to be a consequence of physical problems, such as poor balance, research now suggests that brain function also plays a role in one’s risk of falling. University of BC researchers are inviting senior volunteers aged 70 to 80 years old to participate in a research study that aims to examine the effect of brain function on falls. To be eligible for this study, individuals must be: 1) Right Handed 2) Aged 70-80 years old 3) Willing to participate in one MRI scan For more information, please contact Michelle Munkacsy (Research Assistant) at 604-875-4111 Ext. 69056


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A19

news

City designs easier to read development signs DEVELOPING STORY

T

with Naoibh O’Connor

he City of Vancouver is calling for comments on a new design for development signs. Redesigning public signs was one of the recommendations in the Engaged City Task Force report, based on concern that the existing design, particularly with respect to those related to planning and development, were “written in outdated, technical language that makes it difficult for people to understand.” “These signs use small fonts, lack colour, and seem to encourage people to ignore them, rather than to read and be informed by them,” the report stated. The report also recommended earlier public involvement in major rezoning proposals and enhanced notice of planning changes. The city says the new sign design features easier to understand language and details, improved visuals, including a sketch and site map, and information on how residents can give input online or in person. Vision Vancouver Coun. Andrea Reimer says the old signs faded into the urban background. “You know something’s happening, but then you try and read it and you can’t decipher what it is and you have no idea what it might mean to you and you probably don’t act on it,” she told the Courier. From a councillor’s perspective, Reimer said she often hears people say they had no idea a development was happening in their neighbourhood until being told by a neighbour or reading about it in a newspaper — even if a sign had been up, in some

stay connected

@

vancourier.com

The city is seeking feedback on redesigned development signs. cases, for months beforehand. “So, it’s quite critical. [Notification] cards that are mailed matter, the ads matter, but if you’re worried about direct impact in your neighbourhood, chances are you walk by the site and the sign is the best chance we have of getting your attention,” she said. Reimer maintains it’s crucial people find out what’s going on before an application gets to the public hearing stage, so there’s a

courtesy City of Vancouver

greater chance to modify a proposal. “We don’t have that ability at public hearing — we only have a yes/no possibility,” she said. “It’s certainly not the only change that we’re hoping to make or to effect a better dialogue. The sign [redesign] is a piece, but if it helps more people become aware and the quality of the consultation increases, and the social capacity of neighbourhoods increases so they can participate and dia-

logue, then that’s going to help. The sign on its own is not going to change the world, but it may change someone’s ability to access the process.” Mike Andruff, a Dunbar community activist and member of the new political party TEAM, which aims to run candidates and challenge Vision in the 2014 civic election, argues the sign redesign is a very small item. “If our engagement as a community comes down to revamping the signs, I think this is called obfuscation — we’re looking in one direction where right behind you Rome’s burning,” he said. “Oh they’re going to build what? They’re going to build where — you’re kidding. If they put a really, really nice sign at the corner of Commercial Drive and Broadway talking about the pending decimation of the Commercial Drive area, do you really think it would make a difference? Do you think it would engage the community?” Andruff maintains the old signs aren’t difficult to read. “Tarting them up is like changing the font on the page. Very simply the sign’s message is change is coming. How important is a font change when the message is no different.” Andruff calls the Engaged City Task Force a red herring, in which the governing Vision Vancouver council is attempting to create the appearance of engagement. “If they truly were accepting of civic engagement, they would be changing the direction of development in Vancouver, they would be listening to community centre boards, and they would stop telling us what to do, including when to eat meat,” he said. Residents can submit feedback on the new sign design through the city website at vancouver.ca. noconnor@vancourier.com twitter.com/naoibh

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A21

GOT ARTS? 604-738-1411 | arts@vancourier.com

2

1

3

4

OUR

PICKS JUNE 26 - 28 For video and web content, scan page with

1 2 3 4

Potty-mouthed puppets run amok in AVENUE Q. The hit Broadway show featuring failed childhood stardom, excessive drinking, exotic dancing and, most intriguingly, puppet on puppet action is at the Arts Club’s Granville Island Stage until Aug. 3. Not for kids, if you haven’t guessed already. For tickets and more information, go to artsclub.com or call 604-687-1644.

Cloaks of invisibility! Twenty-sided dice! Chainmail vests! Dwarf fighters! Relive the fantasy roleplaying game you enjoyed throughout your teenage years but without the shame, social ineptness and pungent smell of adolescence that prevented you from getting laid. Vancouver improvisers with high agility points team up for the Critical Hit Show’s monthly A LIVE DUNGEONS AND DRAGONS COMEDY EXPERIENCE at the Rio Theatre June 26, 8 p.m. More details at riotheatre.ca. THE VANCOUVER INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL hits its stride this week, as gravelly-voiced R&B singer MACY GRAY teams up with the DAVID MURRAY INFINITY QUARTET, June 27, 8 p.m. at the Vogue Theatre. For tickets and more information, go to coastaljazz.ca.

If the trippy publicity photo didn’t clue you in, THE BESNARD LAKES likes its rock and roll on the psychedelic side of things, with lush orchestration and a dreamy haze coating the proceedings. The Montreal band plays the Biltmore in support of its new album Until in Excess, Imperceptible UFO, June 27, with guests July Talk and Grounders. Tickets at Red Cat, Zulu Records and ticketweb.ca.


A22

THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

arts&entertainment KUDOS& KVETCHES HORTONS HEARS A WHO?

SUMMER RUNWAY OPERATIONS AT YVR

Makers of thawed, deep-fried dough snacks, suckypatriotictelevisioncommercialsandcoffee to which customers aren’t allowed to add their own sugar or cream, Tim Hortons has launched a new contest, which the carb lovers are pretty stoked about. And we rarely get stoked. According to a hyperbole-filled press release K&K recently received, “For the first time in Tim Hortons history, Canadians have the chance to create what could be the next donut to be added to Tim Hortons iconic menu.” But wait… it gets better. Helping choose the new doughnut flavour out of eight finalists will be none other than former 90210 star, early ’90s sideburn revivalist and Barenaked Ladies video director, Jason Priestly. “It’s no secret I love Tim Hortons, and I can’t wait to help choose the finalists for the firstever Tim Hortons donut as voted for by Canadians themselves,” said Priestley, in a totally human-like quote that in no way was made up. According to the press release, the winner of the contest, “not only wins some (serious) bragging rights, but will also take home $10,000.” Fortunately, K&K has been devising new doughnut flavours for years, usually in a sugar-induced haze followed by regret and self-loathing. In addition to such flavours as Lemon Love Handle and Sugarcoated Shame, we’re going to submit a few entries that pay homage to the celebrity judge himself. For instance, The Dylan, is a nod to 90210 bad boy Dylan McKay played by Luke Perry. Besides a hint of vanilla and Drakkar Noir, The

NORTH RUNWAY DEPARTURES Summer 2013, beginning June 1 7:00 a.m.– 7:00 p.m.

Limited north runway departures will occur during the summer months to help reduce delays and congestion during the peak travel period. North runway departures will primarily occur between 7:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

SOUTH RUNWAY MAINTENANCE July 7– August 30, 2013 9:00 p.m.– 7:00 a.m.

The north runway will be used for departures and arrivals nightly while Vancouver Airport Authority conducts its annual runway maintenance and repairs on the south runway.

We appreciate your support as we continue to maintain the highest safety standards at Vancouver International Airport (YVR). For more information on summer runway operations, visit www.yvr.ca, email community_relations@yvr.ca or phone 604.207.7097.

yvr.ca

Dylan is as sweet and soft as its namesake’s lips and more addictive than his brief dalliance with heroin in season 9. The Plum Pruit, is named after brooding musician character Ray Pruit. And The Red Ziering is essentially a cruller covered in ginger sprinkles in honour of redheaded Ian Ziering who played Steve Sanders, arguably the most lovable 90210 character, except in season 8 when Steve alienates Carly Reynolds, the single mother of one of Erin’s soccer teammates. For shame.

ALL ACCESS Like Jason Priestly’s love of Tim Hortons, it’s no secret we hold strong feelings towards city councillor Andrea Reimer. So we read two Courier stories where she’s quoted in this issue with a sense of excitement and intrigue, followed by a hint of hickory smoked bacon. In one story by Mike Howell, Reimer says: “Elections are not as accessible as they need to be for people who want to run and get ideas out.” We wholeheartedly agree. But then, sadly, we read Reimer’s quote in Naoibh O’Connor’s development column, in which Reimer says: “....but if it helps more people become aware and the quality of the consultation increases, and the social capacity of neighbourhoods increases so they can participate and dialogue, then that’s going to help.” What was that? Maybe we’re cranky simpletons, but if you ask us, the best way to increase “accessibility” and get residents participating in the democratic process is to stop using “dialogue” as a verb. In fact, let’s stop using the word dialogue altogether. Same goes for signage, journaling and scrapbooking. Oh, you didn’t know the city was embarking on a dialogue to make journaling and scrapbooking more accessibile with better signage? You just wait.

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A23

arts&entertainment Writer promotes poetry with a twist STATE OF THE ARTS with Cheryl Rossi

S

o many of the writers featured in previous Twisted Poets Literary Salons are poised to publish new works that the next edition of the twice-monthly event will highlight five authors, in addition to those who sign up for the open mic, instead of just two. The June 27 event at Cottage Bistro will feature Catherine Owen, the award-winning author of nine collections of poetry, Susan McCaslin, an award-winning author of 10 volumes of poetry, Bernice Lever, also the author of 10 books of poetry, Jude Neale, who will read from her new collection, A Quiet Coming of Light, and Kevin Spenst. “He could read the back of a telephone book and have everyone mesmerized,” Bonnie Nish said of Spenst. Nish moved to Vancouver after living in California for six years, joined the West End Writers group and started open mic Twisted Poets nights at the defunct El Cocal on Commercial Drive with another West End Writers member in 2002. Now a typical Twisted Poets night features one established and one emerging poet with three five-minute open mic spots sandwiching the readings. “A lot of it’s very strong,” Nish said. “It’s quite pleasantly surprising.”

Bonnie Nish (left) has slated five featured authors for the next Twisted Poets Literary Salon, June 27 at Cottage Bistro, including Catherine Owen and Kevin Spenst. When West End Writers took a summer break, Nish, a writer of poetry, prose and book reviews, and poet Sita Carboni started the Kitsilano Writers Group, then the non-profit Pandora’s Collective and the Word Whips Writing Series, which runs at Britannia Library, in White Rock and on the North Shore. The monthly Word Whips workshops are free and open to anyone. They start with a writing prompt, participants write for 10 minutes and then can choose to share what they’ve penned. “It’s just a way to get people thinking and writing and then to connect with community, as well,” said Nish, executive director of Pandora’s Collective. “And then if they want to, they can come to Twisted Poets and read

at the open mic.” For art openings at the Jewish Community Centre, Nish calls upon half a dozen individuals to write to the art. After a live band, readings and a break, she invites audience members to write to the art and then hosts an open mic. The motto of the Pandora’s Collective is “Promoting the arts that inspire the world to take notice of itself.” “We really believe that writing is a very powerful tool that can give people voice, especially people who don’t have a voice,” Nish said. “It can help heal, it can help with literacy, it can help with so many things,” she said. Nishaddsthecollective,whichpresentsTwisted Poets and Word Whips, has taken great pains

to create a safe atmosphere for performers. “Because, especially if you’re getting up to read, you make yourself very vulnerable if you’ve never done it before and you’re a new writer, so feeling like you can get up without ridicule or without judgment and just be there is really important for somebody who’s going to continue.” Nish previously worked supporting school children with disabilities. She has a masters in arts education from Simon Fraser University and is pursuing a doctorate in expressive arts therapy at the European Graduate School. The busy Nish has committed much time to fostering fledgling writers at venues that include inner city schools, a drug and alcohol treatment centre and festivals in Metro Vancouver because she gets so much out of it. “We got into a drug rehab centre once a month to do workshops. And I remember walking down the street at Christmastime and somebody calling my name and I turned around it was a girl who had been in one of our workshops. And she told me, ‘You know, I’ve been straight and writing ever since I took your workshop,’” Nish said. “So what greater gift than that?” Pandora’s Collective organizes a annual Summer Dreams Literary Arts Festival. The 10th anniversary edition happens at Trout Lake, for the second summer, Aug. 24. For more information about upcoming workshops and events, see pandorascollective.com. crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi For video and web content scan page using the Layar app.

Terminus, Boeing-Boeing, Bard win big at the Jessies the Commodore Ballroom. The Jessies are Vancouver’s version of the Tony Awards and are divided into three categories — Large Theatre, Small Theatre and Theatre for Young Audiences — along with a handful of special prizes. With the demise of the Vancouver Playhouse last year, awards in the first category have essentially become a two-horse race between the Arts Club Theatre Company, who operate year-round in three different buildings, and Bard on the

Staff writer

A

fluffy Parisian farce set in the swinging ’60s, a sci-fi musical about cybernetic sex toys, a minor Shakespearean rom-com set in Windsor, Ont. and a gruesome drama about two desperate Dublin women and a singing serial killer were among the big winners at the 31st annual Jessie Richardson awards held Monday night at

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Beach, who offer four shows each year at Vanier Park from June to September. TheArtsClubgarneredthemostawardsintotal with six. Their adaptation of the widely produced French bedroom comedy Boeing-Boeing earned three Jessies: Andrew McNee for best leading actor, Nicola Lipman for best supporting actress and Amir Ofek for set design. Gina Chiarelli was rewarded for her high-note performance as legendary opera singer Maria Callas in Master Class, and Robert Moloney won for best supporting actor for

dual roles in the racially charged Clybourne Park. The Unplugging, a new work by Yvette Nolan, also won for best original script. Bard on the Beach’s crowd-pleasing production of The Merry Wives of Windsor picked up four Jessies, including best director (Johanna Wright), best costume designer (Drew Facie), best musical director (Benjamin Elliott) and best production. Lighting designer Gerald King also won for his work in MacBeth. Continued next page


A24

THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

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Continued from page 23 Pi Theatre’s production of Irish playwright’s Mark O’Rowe nightmarish Terminus — which Courier theatre reviewer Jo Ledingham described as “thrilling, exhilarating, jolting, bumpy and yet sometimes funny” — picked up the most hardware in the hotly contested small theatre categories. John Emmet Tracy, a Chicago native relatively new to the Vancouver theatre scene, won for best leading actor for his role in a play comprised of interlocked rhyming monologues, and Terminus also ended up winning for best lighting (Alan Brodie) and best overall

production. Leading actresses Pippa Mackie and Leanna Brodie both lost out to Erla Faye Forsyth for her role as Mary in Pacific Theatre’s How to Write a New Book for the Bible. The Virtual Stage’s original show Broken Sex Doll picked up two Jessies (Anton Lipovetsky for best sound design and Drew Facie, again, for best costume design), as did Théâtre la Seizième for their production of Porcépic (France Perras for best supporting actress and Craig Holzschuh for best director). ITSAZOO Productions’ Brett Harris won for best supporting actor with Mojo, Pam Johnson built the win-

ning set for Touchstone Theatre’s Shelter from the Storm, and the Boca Del Lupo team won for significant artistic achievement for Photog, an original piece featuring the work of awardwinning war photographers. Where the Wild Things Are, produced by Presentation House in association with Manitoba Theatre for Young Audiences, swept the Theatre for Young Audiences category with a total of four awards. Visit jessies.ca to see the complete list of award winners. afleming@vancourier.com twitter.com/flematic

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A25

arts&entertainment

photos Rebecca Blissett

Hundreds of artists, art lovers and curious onlookers investigated the colourful works on display at more than a dozen South Granville art galleries as part of Saturday’s ArtWalk.

South Granville galleries open up for ArtWalk EVENT SHOWS ART CAN BE BOTH ACCESSIBLE AND AFFORDABLE REBECCA BLISSETT Contributing writer

B

y 4 p.m. this past Saturday, those working the South Granville ArtWalk were hoarse. Julie Lepper, director of the Ian Tan Gallery, apologized for her lack of a voice but it was a miracle she had anything left at all since she’d greeted a good chunk of the 800 who came through the doors that day, tracked by her mechanical hand-held counter. “On an average Saturday we would normally get 25 people, could be 50,” she said. Enthusiasm overrode exhaustion, though, as Lepper gestured to Erika Toliusis’s vibrantly natural landscape paintings, all done, incredibly, by a palette knife. While the paintings are the current draw for Ian Tan, Lepper points out many of the day’s walkers are surprised to walk further into the gallery to discover art by a range of artists that come with affordable price tags. Accessibility is the key behind Katsumi Kimoto’sKimotoGallery,whichopeneditsdoorsthree weeksearlytopartakeintheArtWalkalongwith 15 other galleries. A good decision, as the room was packed with artists and art appreciators for its summer group show that included Will Rafus’s oil painting of The Only seafood shop on Hastings, White Rock native Reuben Kambeitz’s “Collective” and Kapil Harnal’s oil and charcoal “Nude with Shawl and Flower.” The gallery features affordable works — yes, some in the thousands but also some sizeable work that can be purchased for a few hundred. “I want to offer art in an accessible range,” said Kimoto. “It’s a way for people to support art as well as collect something original.” Around the corner and down the street from the Kimoto is the delight that is Uno Langmann

Ltd. which, amid chandeliers and antique wood pieces, is showing a collection of oils, watercolours and sketches by Charles John Collings. A departure from white walls and open spaces, this gallery —part antique store, part museum — is the kind of place you want to tuck your purse in a little closer for fear of knocking over a vase. Working from an office that reflects the character of the store with its floor to ceiling bookshelves and ornate framed paintings, Jeanette Langmann, Uno’s daughter, says ArtWalk exposes more people to the art world. “Once in a while you get the feeling people are intimidated, and this is a great way to let them know there’s no reason to be intimidated,” she said. “This day is the nicest thing, people coming in here are just so happy. It’s wonderful.” With just an hour before her gallery was to close, the charismatic Elissa Cristall of the Cristall Gallery showed no sign of weariness. She agreed that ArtWalk is a gentle way to not only expose people to art, but to let them know that despite the upper crust sensibilities of Granville’s Gallery Row (at Uno Langmann, for instance, people have to be buzzed in during regular store hours) that the galleries are for everybody. Cristall says she had a conversation with a man who didn’t realize the galleries were open to the public, as well as a woman who flat-out told her she wasn’t overly keen on Amanda Reeves’ colourful abstract paintings. “So I spoke with her, and she had a better understanding. She was traditional.” At the Petley Jones Gallery, Amelia AlcockWhite wrapped up an artist talk about her latest project “Painting for Change.” Her most recent oil painting in the words, of a kelp garden, will be raffled off (tickets are given with every donation made in 20 dollar increments) and funds will be used to support ocean conservation projects at the Vancouver Aquarium. “Art sometimes feels self-indulgent,” said the Vancouver Island-born artist. “I want to feel like I’m doing something larger, doing something that makes a difference.” To see more photos from last Saturday’s ArtWalk, scan page using the Layar app.


A26

THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

GOT SPORTS? 604-738-1411 | sportsandrec@vancourier.com

SPORT SHORTS DRAGON BOAT FESTIVAL CELEBRATES SILVER JUBILEE For its 25th year, the Vancouver Dragon Boat Festival hosted 5,500 paddlers and a record 212 teams when it took over the waters of False Creek for two days June 22 and 23. On Friday Taoist priests performed the annual eye dotting ceremony as well as more elaborate rituals to mark the milestone year. The qualifying heats dominated the course Saturday. Sunday followed with semi-finals and championship races. The Saggin Dragons of the False Creek Racing Canoe Club won the women’s competitive race in two minutes 26.88 seconds, edging California’s Space Dragons Red by more than two seconds. Far from home, the Space Dragons Red also settled for second in the mixed competitive division. They fell nearly a second behind the Gorging Dragons from Victoria. Vancouver’s Dragon Hearts Thunderbreaker claimed silver in the junior division championship, and the paddlers from Lord Byng, Killarney, David Thompson and Eric Hamber secondary schools trailed the winners from Portland’s Wasabi Kraken by a very narrow 0.3 seconds. — Megan Stewart

photos Rebecca Blissett

Lanni Marchant (second from left) stumbles out of the gate at the Scotiabank Vancouver Half-Marathon June 23 at UBC. Krista DuChene (far right) won the women’s race 45 seconds ahead of Marchant. At right, second-place finisher Rob Watson (in black) congratulates winner Kip Kangogo at the finish line. Scan this page with Layar app to see more photos.

Kangogo,DuChenewinhalf-marathon MEGAN STEWART Staff writer

K

photo Rebecca Blissett

enyan-born Lethbridge runner Kip Kangogo won his fourth Scotiabank Vancouver HalfMarathon Sunday, finishing the 21.1-kilometre race in one hour, three minutes and 33 seconds to beat Vancouver’s Rob Watson by 54 seconds. Watson, who turned 30 on race day, previously qualified in the marathon for the IAAF (International Association of Athletics Federation) world championships and on Sunday announced he would travel to Mos-

cow for the August meet. In the women’s race, Canadian longdistance runners and friendly rivals Krista DuChene, 36, and Lanni Marchant, 29, finished one ahead of the other, crossing the finish line ninth and tenth overall. Neck and neck at the 10km mark, DuChene’s 33-minute split edged Marchant by two seconds before the latter fell of the pace and ultimately finished 45 seconds behind. DuChene, of Brantford Ont., won the women’s race in 1:10:52. Marchant followed at 1:11:37 after she barley got out of the start gate. “I got tripped up at the very start of the race and nearly did a face plant,”

she told the hosts of the Canadian Running Series, which also holds the Spring Run-Off each March in Vancouver and the Toronto Waterfront Marathon in October. “I tried to hang on the best I could, but my body and I decided we were at odds with each other.” DuChene and Marchant will meet again in the marathon at the world championships, held this coming August in Moscow. A sell-out crowd of 7,000 raced in the 15th annual Scotiabank Half-Marathon and raised more than $700,000 for 71 different charities. mstewart@vancourier.com twitter.com/MHStewart

Harry Jerome Classic draws stars and upstarts

JIM MORRIS

R

emember the name Rachel Cliff. Cliff’s name probably doesn’t ring a bell for most people, but come the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, the Vancouver runner could be one of the Canadian athletes in the 1,500 metres. Betweennowandthen,Cliff,aYork House graduate, will need seasoning and the opportunity to compete against other world-class athletes.

That’s why the Harry Jerome International Track Classic is so important for the development of people like Cliff. “This meet, they do such a good job of getting so many top athletes together,” the 25-year-old said during a recent news conference to promote the 30th annual Jerome meet. “There are always a few meets you identify as being a good opportunity and this is definitely one of them.” This year’s Harry Jerome International Track Classic will be held July 1 at Swangard Stadium in Burnaby. Among the high-profile Canadian Olympic athletes attending will be shot-putter Dylan Armstrong, heptathlete Jessica Zelinka and highjumper Mike Mason. The Jerome meet has been a labour of love for founder and organizer Doug Clement and his wife Diane. What started as an idea to give B.C. athletes a local stage to compete has grown into one of Canada’s top track events. It also helped forge the Na-

tional Track League, five competitions staged across the country with a total of $350,000 in prize money. “It’s a foundational part of athletics in Canada,” said Gordon Orlikow, chairman of the board of directors for Athletics Canada. “Over the years, Harry Jerome has really been the track meet in Canada. It has endured. “The National Track League would not exist without Harry Jerome and without Doug and Diane.” Doug Clement, now a professor emeritus at UBC, represented Canada at the 1952 Summer Olympics. As a coach, he helped organize various track competitions in and around Vancouver dating back to 1963. Over the years the meet has attracted Canadian Olympians like Donovan Bailey, Ben Johnson, Angela Chalmers, Lynn Williams and David Steen. They competed against a who’s who of international stars like Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Carl Lewis, Mary

Decker Slaney and Kip Kimeli. One of the attractions of the meet is it allowed young athletes to step on the track against the sport’s marquee names. “I think we’ve been very successful… in producing [the environment] in which athletes can get their first taste of international competition,” said Clement. “We have been very successful at continuing that.” The advent of the IAAF Diamond League, a series of track and field meets which offer huge cash prizes, has drawn some of the high-profile international athletes away from the Jerome meet. The Jerome still remains important domestically as a developmental meet and training ground for athletes who can’t afford to compete on the Diamond League circuit. Brit Townsend, a two-time Olympian in the 800-metres, competed at the Jerome meet and now coaches at Simon Fraser University. She said the

meet is a valuable stepping stone for Canadian Olympians. “I’ve had athletes for the last 20 years that have run personal bests here, have achieved standards for different meets, have just seen what is possible running against athletes that are better than themselves,” said Townsend. In a city obsessed with its NHL hockey team, the Harry Jerome meet is a refreshing alternative. It’s an event not consumed by its own self-importance. It has adapted with time but never lost its vision. “We’re not the Olympic Games,” said Clement. “We’re not ever going to be the Olympics Games. “We think we are in the right niche. We think we are doing the right thing.” Jim Morris is a veteran reporter who has covered sports for 30 years. Reach him at morrisejim@ gmail.com


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Harjun Gill PAST

ST. GEORGE’S SAINTS

PRESENT

NIGEL TOY FIELD

FUTURE

UNIVERSITY OF B.C. THUNDERBIRDS

The Courier presentsVancouver’s Elite Graduating Athletes of 2013 t St. George’s, students walk the hallways in the footsteps of the boys who came before them. And many of those boys, now grown men known as Old Boys, are invested in the school and the young men who’ve come after them. Harjun Gill felt the pressure and pride of competing in gyms and on fields named for alumni, donors and headmasters. And he met that pressure. Recognized this spring as a sportsman of the year and selected by his teammates as the Saints’ best rugby player, his name is now on permanent hardware at St. George’s. “He’s the real deal,” said Spence McTavish, the general manager of the rugby program at the University of B.C. Gill, 18, was selected to the provincial rugby team every year since he tried out for the U14 roster. He trained with the junior national team in Grade 10 and the next year he was called upon to captain the team during a European tour in a match against Belgium. A nimble and fast runner who can play almost anywhere in the back row, Gill also represented B.C. for three years with the provincial 7s. At an international tournament in Hong Kong, he was again called upon as a captain. “When you need player influence, he’s one of the guys you go to,” said B.C. 7s head coach and former national team player Shane Thompson. “The guys look up to him. When I can’t get hold of the guys, I go through him. He’s mature beyond his years.” Gill, six-feet tall and 180 pounds, earns the respect of teammates in part because he shows gratitude, said Saints head coach Mike Stiles. “This is what really stands out for me. He is grateful for the opportunities that have been given to him and he has taken full advantage of them.” Gill, who started high school at McRoberts in Richmond and still plays for the Richmond Rugby Football Club, led the Saints to a nearly perfect season. They won the 7s provincial title and their only loss came in the 15s championship final. “We came five points short. It’s pretty tough,” said Gill. “The night we lost, everybody showed up here [at St. George’s] at whatever time it was. We just sat on the field, nobody wanted to leave. You get attached to this place. You feel responsibility to do the field and the school proud. “I feel no regret. We did the best we could for the school and each other and that’s all you can ask for.” The next generation of boys will walk where Gill left his mark. ● — MEGAN STEWART

PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

Our prospects

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

INDEX Community Notices ....................................1000 Announcements ...............................................1119 Employment..........................................................1200 Education .................................................................1400 Special Occasions...........................................1600 Marketplace ..........................................................2000 Children ......................................................................3000 Pets & Livestock ...............................................3500 Health............................................................................4000 Travel & Recreation ......................................4500 Business & Finance .......................................5000 Legals ............................................................................5500 Real Estate ..............................................................6000 Rentals .........................................................................6500 Personals ...................................................................7000 Service Directory .............................................8000 Transportation ....................................................9000

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Our office will will be be closed closed Our office st Monday, July 1 1st Monday, July

604-630-3300

Become a PLEA Family Caregiver. It just makes sense. PLEA provides ongoing training and support. 604.708.2628 caregiving@plea.bc.ca www.plea.ca

BAGGAGE HANDLERS

Swissport International Ltd. requires baggage handlers for our Vancouver International Airport Operations. Applicants must posses a vaild BC Drivers License, Canadian Citizenship or Landed Immigrant Status.

GROUP HEALTH • UNIFORM • PARKING • FLIGHT BENEFITS Swissport is the leading service provider in the global ground and cargo handling business. Swissport is an equal opportunity employer. We thank all applicants, however only those short listed will be contacted.

Contact by email Contact Sharonyvrhr@swissport.com Fax: 604-207-9941 fax:yvrhr@swissport.com (604) 207-9941 or or email Swissport has been awarded the 2011 Global Swissport has been awarded the 2008 GlobalAviation AviationGround GroundServices ServicesCompany Companyaward! award!

Career Services/ Job Search

OVER 90% EMPLOYMENT rate for CanScribe graduates! Medical Transcriptionists are in demand and CanScribe graduates get jobs. Payments under $100 per month. 1-800-466-1535. www.canscribe.com. admissions@canscribe.com

1240

General Employment

Colony Networks (Van) seeks Comp. Networking Tech. Compl. of college/related field req’d. Prev. exp. an asset but not mandatory. CAD $45,240/yr, 30hrs/week. E-res: colony-job7@mythribehr.com NOW HIRING! EARN EXTRA CASH - Men & Women In Demand for Simple Work. P/T-F/ T. Can Be Done From Home. Acceptance Guaranteed - No Experience Required, All Welcome! www.BCJobLinks.com

TRUTH IN ''EMPLOYMENT'' ADVERTISING Glacier Media Group makes every effort to ensure you are responding to a reputable and legitimate job opportunity. If you suspect that an ad to which you have responded is misleading, here are some hints to remember. Legitimate employers do not ask for money as part of the application process; do not send money; do not give any credit card information; or call a 900 number in order to respond to an employment ad. Job opportunity ads are salary based and do not require an investment. If you have responded to an ad which you believe to be misleading please call the Better Business Bureau at 604-682-2711, Monday to Friday, 9am - 3pm or email inquiries@bbbvan.org and they will investigate.

Classified Line Ad Deadlines

Wednesday Newspaper FRIDAY – 2:50pm Friday Newspaper TUESDAY – 2:50pm

Wednesday Newspaper MONDAY – 4:20pm Friday Newspaper WEDNESDAY – 4:20pm

1250

Hotel Restaurant

COUPLE TO MANAGE all season wilderness resort and Front Desk/Server with strong sales and management skills. Fax 250-968-4445 or email resort@terracana.com. SZECHUAN CHONGQING Seafood Restaurant, #205 – 1668 West Broadway, Van, BC, V6J 1X6 requires 2 Positions: ■ Restaurant Manager to plan and control restaurant operations, help in hiring and training staff, schedule work, negotiate and plan banquets/parties, control inventory and monitor revenues. Must be able to effectively handle customers and ensure compliance with health and safety requirements. Applicants should have three years experience in food service and effective supervisory experience. Salary: $15.85/hr. ■ Kitchen Helpers to wash & chop vegetables, do prep work & wash dishes. Previous Chinese kitchen experience helpful but not necessary. Must be able to work shifts and weekends. Salary $10.50/hour. Please apply by mail to above address or fax resume to: 604- 734-8018

1270

Office Personnel

Van. Umbrella seeks Office Adm. Must have- min. 2 yrs exp & Compl. Sec. School. $20hr/35 hr wk. E-res: victor@vancouverumbrella.com

hotels/restaurants

retail sales

general

accounting

farm workers

health care To advertise in Employment call 604-630-3300

employment program for

SPACE IS LIMITED! CALL 604-895-5854 TO REGISTER TODAY Learn more at ywcajobseeker.org

Funding provided through the Canada-British Columbia Labour Market Agreement.

FOODSAFE 1 DAY COURSES BEST VALUE GUARANTEED Downtown & Broadway locations Every Saturday, Sunday & Monday Public Health Inspector Instructors ADVANCE Continuing Education BC’s #1 FoodSafe Choice since 2003!

www.foodsafe-courses.com

604-272-7213

2035

Burial Plots

Cementary Plot in Oceanview Burnaby, can take 1 coffin or 2 urns, $10,000 obo, 604-465-9572

2060

For Sale Miscellaneous

ALGONQUIN FAMILY 5 person dome tent, used once, exc cond $60 obo. 604-228-9857

2095

Lumber/Building Supplies

STEEL BUILDING - DIY SUMMER SALE! - BONUS DAYS EXTRA 5% OFF. 20X22 $3,998. 25X24 $4,620. 30X34 $6,656. 32X42 $8,488. 40X54 $13,385. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca STEEL BUILDINGS/METAL BUILDINGS 60% OFF! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100 sell for balance owed! Call 1-800-457-2206 www.crownsteelbuildings.ca

BUYING ANTIQUES & Vintage COLLECTIBLES, WW1 / WW2 Items Buying Antiques and Vintage Collectibles, Sterling Flatware, Ivory, Old Toys, Pocket Watches, Moorcroft, Old Coins, Estate Fine Jewelry, Gold Jewelry, Vintage Posters, Vintage Signs, Vintage Postcards, Mantle Clocks, etc etc. Also Buying WW1 and WW2 medals, knives, swords, daggers, etc. $$ CASH PAID $$ CALL: 604-401-3553

2100

Participants must be:

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Education

trades/technical

jobseekers ages 55+

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1410

careers

Job Options Older Workers is a 12-week

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A division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership

Classified Display Ad Deadlines

JOB OPTIONS BC – OLDER WORKERS

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INSTRUCTOR COMPETENCY PROGRAM

Take Your Pick from the

HOTTEST JOBS To advertise in Employment Classifieds call

604-630-3300

Tools & Equipment

AT LAST! An iron filter that works. IronEater! Fully patented Canada/U.S.A. Removes iron, hardness, smell, manganese. Since 1957. Visit our 29 innovative inventions; www.bigirondrilling.com. Phone 1-800-BIG-IRON.

2105

Musical Instruments

B-FLAT TENOR saxaphone, Super Grange Boosay & Hawkes, like new $800; B-flat soprano, Buescher, Elcarte Ind., 90 yrs old, exc cond, $2500. 604-534-2997


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

3540 3503

Birds

LUXURY PET HOTEL @ YVR New customer special $27/ night restriction apply www.jetpetresort.com

YOUNG CANARIES breed 5, $35 per bird. Baby Budgies $20 per bird. Call 604-939-5666

3507

Pet Services

Cats

Cares! The Vancouver Courier has partnered with the BC SPCA to encourage responsible pet guardianship and the humane treatment of animals. Before purchasing a new puppy, ensure the seller has provided excellent care and treatment of the animal and the breeding parents. For a complete guide to finding a reputable breeder and other considerations when acquiring a new pet, visit spca.bc.ca.

ARABIAN-PERSIAN SIBS, imported rescues, in/outdoor, vet checked, go together: Donation. 778-297-4470, glauris@yahoo.ca

URGENTLY NEEDED

INDOOR HOME for 7 year old b/w much loved neutered male cat, owner has passed away. Requires medication monthly at $12.50/per mo. Fur and Feathers Rescue 604 719-7848

★CATS & KITTENS★ FOR ADOPTION ! 604-724-7652

3508

Dogs

4005

Acupuncture

Professional Therapists Traditional Techniques Unbeatable Pricing

PUREBRED Boxer Puppies / 8 wks old 1 Fawn Male, 2 Brindle Females $1000. 604.823.2333.

Reflexology: Acupressure: Fire Cupping: Acupuncture:

33/50 Mins 38/55 Mins 38/40 Mins $ 45/session

$

$

$

* GST Included in Price * 7950 Granville St., Van

604-266-6080 8179 Granville St., Van 604-558-3689 GOLDEN RETREIVER Pups, vet checked, shots, dewormed males $650 No Sun calls 604-997-0024

4007

Beauty Services

EYELASH EXTENSIONS call and book your MOBILE service today (778) 387-5477 BKBlashes.com

GOLDEN RETRIEVER pups CKC reg, vet ck’d, ch parents, health tested. Ph 604-794-3786

5035

Financial Services

DROWNING IN DEBT? Cut debts more than 50% & DEBT FREE in half the time! AVOID BANKRUPTCY! Free Consultation. www.mydebtsolution.com or Toll Free 1-877-556-3500 BBB Rated A+

MINI DACHSHUND Puppies CKC Reg’d, Vet ✔ 1st shots, health guarantee. $1000. 778-388-1057

IF YOU own a home or real estate, ALPINE CREDITS can lend you money: It’s That Simple. Your Credit / Age / Income is NOT an issue. 1.800.587.2161. PB KANE Corso ready, m/f, dew claws/tails, 1st/2nd shots, deworm, $1300, 604-802-8480

MONEYPROVIDER.COM. $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-1660.

5040

Business Opps/ Franchises

MAKE MONEY and save lives. We are offering exclusive rights in your area, 100% guaranteed return of investment. Don’t pay until you see your business up and running. Voted top vending program in North America. Absolutely no selling involved; www.locationfirstvending.com. Call 1-855-933-3555 for more information today.

SAVE A LIFE. Wonderful rescue dogs from Foreclosed Upon Pets. Spay/neutered, regular vaccinations & rabies, microchipped. $499 adoption fee, avail at your local Petcetera stores.

AUCTION CALENDAR

2020

Auctions

PUBLIC AUCTION:

July 27th - 9 AM 6780 Glover Rd., Langley B.C. 80-100 CARS, LIGHT TRUCKS & RV’s Industrial, Construction, Forklifts, Farm & Turf Equip., Fleet Trucks & Trailers, Lumber, Boats, Tools

Industrial Smalls Welcome / Online Bidding Available Phone: 604-534-0901 www.canamauctions.com

5040

Business Opps/ Franchises

A Great Janitorial Franchise Opportunity

*Annual starting revenue of $12,000-$120,000 *Guaranteed cleaning contracts *Professional training provided *Financing available *Ongoing support *Low down payment required

5060

CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certification, adoption property rental opportunities. For peace of mind & a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540

5070

www.coverallbc.com

GET FREE VENDING MACHINES Can Earn $100,000.00 + Per Year. All Cash-Retire in Just 3 Years. Protected Territories. Full Details CALL NOW 1-866-668-6629 Website WWW.TCVEND.COM

5060

Legal Services

CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let your past limit your career plans! Since 1989, Confidential, Fast Affordable - A+ BBB Rating employment & travel freedom - all for free info booklet 1-8-now-pardon (1-866-972-7366) www.RemoveYourRecord.com

Borrow Up To $25,000

Legal/Public Notices

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS RE: The Estate of Dorothy Muriel Burgess, also known as Dorothy Murial Burgess, Dorothy M. Burgess and Dorothy Burgess, deceased, formerly of Crofton Manor, 2803 West 41st Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6N 4B4 Creditors and others having claims against the estate of Dorothy Muriel Burgess, also known as Dorothy Murial Burgess, Dorothy M. Burgess and Dorothy Burgess, deceased, are hereby notified under Section 38 of the Trustee Act that particulars of their claims should be sent to the undersigned Executor, c/o Cohen Buchan Edwards LLP, Lawyers & Notaries, Suite 208 - 4940 No. 3 Road, Richmond, BC, V6X 3A5, on or before July 26, 2013, after which date the Executor will distribute the estate among the parties entitled to it, having regard to the claims of which the Executor then has notice. DATED at Richmond, BC, this 24th day of June, 2013. JEAN H. OLAND COHEN BUCHAN EDWARDS LLP, Solicitors for ROYAL TRUST CORPORATION OF CANADA, Executor NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public lien sale of the described personal property will be held at 11:00am on July 19th, 2013. All sales are cash only. The property is stored at Storage-Mart Self Storage, 1311 E. Kent Ave. N., Vancouver, BC The items found in the unit(s) are described as follows: #4206 Tracie Ann Kingsley: ladder & empty boxes; #3113 Jalil Mohammed: brief cases, instruments, lamps, tool box, accordian, dollies, table saw and boxes; #1005 Elevate Restoration Ltd: wood ladder, hoses, shelving units, tubberware bins, painter clothes & jerry can.

GARAGE SALES KILLARNEY ESTATE ART SALE Sat Sun June 22th & 23rd Sat & Su June 29th & 30th 10 am - 4pm

6693 Doman St. Oil & Watercolours, Landscapes & Florals.

@

place ads online @

classifieds.vancourier.com

No Credit Checks! Cash same day, local office

www.PitStopLoans.com 604-777-5046

7005

Wilson Heights United Church Thrift Sale

Household items including: dishware, glassware, kitchenware, gadgets, pictures, frames, vases, candle holders, decor pieces and collectibles. Women’s, men’s, youth, baby clothing and accessories. CD’s, DVD’s, books and more.

Saturday June 29th, 10am - 2pm 1634 East 41st Avenue Vancouver, BC, V5P 1K5 email: office@whuc.net tel: 604-325-9944, fax: 604-325-3835

SUDOKU

Body Work

Authentic Chinese bodywork, gentle or deep tissue 15 yr exp’d 10a-9p 604-329-8218. S.E. BBY

**RELIEVE ROAD RAGE**

604-739-3998

LEGALS 5505

Money to Loan Need Cash Today? Own a Vehicle?

Contact Coverall of BC A Respected Worldwide Leader in Franchised Office Cleaning!

604.434.7744 • info@coverallbc.com

Legal Services

A29

5505

Legal/Public Notices

NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE ESTATE OF TOMMASO PAULETIG ALSO KNOWN AS THOMAS PAULETIG DECEASED, LATE, OF VANCOUVER WHO DIED MARCH 16, 2013 TAKE NOTICE that all persons having claims upon the estate of the above named must file with the undersigned Executrix by the 15th day of July 2013 a full statement of their claims and securities held by them. OLGA PAULETIG EXECUTRIX 3361 Queens Avenue VANCOUVER, B.C. V5R 4T9

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a Sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes.

PUZZLE ANSWERS ON SEPARATE PAGE

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS

RE: ESTATE OF KATHLEEN ELLEN WADDINGTON, also known as KATHLEEN E. WADDINGTON, AND KATHLEEN WADDINGTON late of 203 – 8655 Selkirk Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V6P 4J2 (the “Estate”) NOTICE is given that creditors and others having claims against the Estate are required to send them to the executor, Royal Trust Corporation of Canada, at P.O. Box 11130, #3000 - 1055 West Georgia Street, Vancouver, BC, V6E 3R3, on or before August 9, 2013, after which date the Estate assets will be distributed having regard only to claims that have been received. EXECUTOR: Royal Trust Corporation of Canada SOLICITOR: Bull, Housser & Tupper LLP

One call does it all!

To advertise:

604-630-3300

Kane v Kane: Notice of Civil Claim Notification

An Action has been started in the Supreme Court of British Columbia; Crystal Kane, an infant by her litigation guardian, Candice Marko, and the said Candice Marko VS. Veronica Kane (Vancouver Registry No. M-123294). The claim is against the Defendant Veronica Kane for damages for injuries sustained by the Claimant Crystal Kane in a motor vehicle accident which occurred on or about the 21st day of February, 1997. It is asserted that the accident and injuries sustained by the Claimant Crystal Kane were caused by the negligence of the Defendant Veronica Kane. A full copy of the Notice of Civil Claim can be obtained at the Vancouver Registry of the Supreme Court at 800 Smithe Street, Vancouver BC. On application by the Plaintiff on May 21, 2013 the Court Orders: 1. The Plaintiff shall be at liberty to serve the Defendant, Veronica Kane, by an alternative method; namely, substituted service, by publishing the Notice of Civil Claim, together with the terms of this order, in the Vancouver Courier newspaper for eight (8) weeks (two 28-day notice peariods) and that such service is deemed to be good service upon the Defendant; and 2. The time within which the Defendant may enter a Response to Civil Claim is 28 days following the expiry of the two 28-day notice periods, the two 28 day notice periods to commence running from the date of the first publication of the notice. The Defendant begun notification onWednesday June 12th,2013,giving the Defendant, VERONICA KANE until Wednesday, September 4th to enter a Response to Civil Claim.

ACROSS

1. Part of a deck 5. Georges, French philosopher 1847-1922 10. Winglike structures 14. Swift Malay boat (var. sp.) 15. White poplar 16. Ripped 17. Dog: ____ best friend 18. Grimes 19. Goods carried by a vehicle 20. Freestanding cooking counter 23. Apiary residents

DOWN

1. Cycles per minute 2. Traditional Iraq liquor 3. Wife of a rajah 4. Holds rubbish 5. Ribbon belts 6. Double-reed instruments 7. Strap used to control a horse 8. Schenectady, NY, hospital 9. Leaseholder 10. Books of maps 11. Bird with a laughlike cry 12. Little Vienna on the Mures

June 25/13

24. Mains 25. Paved outdoor space 28. Colonic irrigations 32. __ Ladd, actor 33. Point that is one point E of SE 34. Fixed boring routine 35. Relative biological effectiveness (abbr.) 36. Burrowing marine mollusk 38. Walk heavily 39. Capital of Zimbabwe 42. Levity 13. The termination of a story 21. Executive responsible for operations 22. Local area network 25. Make thirsty 26. Spurious wing 27. Invader of 13th C. Russia 29. Country legend Haggard 30. Superior of an abbey of monks 31. Worn and shabby 37. Louise Ciccone 38. AKA threadworm 40. British rule over India

44. Hoover and Aswan 46. Admin. div. of a county 47. Klum reality show 52. Doyen 53. One who converts skins into white leather 54. Iridescent silica gem 56. Longest river in Albania 57. Homer’s epic poem 58. White, brown or wild 59. Booby bird genus 60. Pennies 61. Create 41. Induces vomiting 42. Hard rind vine fruits 43. Grass bristle 45. Instrument for weighing 46. Source of a special delight 47. South American country 48. Track for rolling vehicles 49. One of two born at the same time 50. Samoan capital 51. Noisy talk 52. Tooth caregiver 55. Side sheltered from the wind


A30

THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

HOME SERVICES Carpentry

MR. BUILD - Renos and Repairs. Est 1989. 9129 Shaughnessy St. Please call 604-732-8453

8055

Cleaning

A QUALITY CLEANING exp res /comm. low rate’s senior’s disc 778.239.9609 or 778.998.9127

EUROPEAN DETAILED Service cleaning. www.puma-cleaning.ca Sophia 604-805-3376

8060

Concrete

A 1 Retaining Walls, Foundation, Stairs, Driveways, Patios, Sidewalks. Any concrete project. Free Est. Since 1977. Basile 604-617-5813 A Concrete Specialist sidewalks, bsmts, paving stones, patios. Santino 778-892-5559 CONCRETE Removal / Replace Small jobs okay ● Fence repair Free est. Mario, 604-254-0148 CONCRETE SPECIALIST, patio sidewalk, driveway, exposed aggregate reas. rate. Call Mario @ 604-764-2726

8068

Demolition

DEMOLITION

Excavating - Drain Tile Old garage, carport, house, pool, repair main waterline, break concrete & removal. Licensed • Insured • WCB

604-716-8528

8073

Drainage

RNC DRAINAGE

−Augering −Water & Sewer line repair & replacement −Sumps −Drain Tile −Concrete Work −Foundation, −Excavation −Retaing Walls −Site restored Call Ron 778-227-7316 or 604-568-3791

★RITE-WAY★ DRAINAGE & SEWER 15% OFF - 604-722-1105

8080

Electrical

The current choice serving the Lower Mainland for more than 15 years. All Kinds of Work and Reasonable Rates.

Contact us today for a free estimate.

Max: 604-341-6059 Licensed & Bonded

Lic. 22308

#1 A-CERTIFIED Lic. Electrician. New or old wiring. Reasonable rates. Lic #11967. 604-879-9394 A Lic’d. Electrician #30582. Rewiring & Reno, Appliance/ Plumbing. Rotor Rooter and Hydro Pressure Jetting Service, 778-998-9026 or 604-255-9026 Free Est / 24/7 ALL YOUR electrical & reno needs. Lic’d electrician #37940. Insured, bonded & WCB. Free est Reasonable rates 604-842-5276 YOUR ELECTRICIAN $29 service call. Insured. Lic # 89402. Fast same day service guar’d. We love small jobs! 604-568-1899

8087

Excavating

8130

8185

Handyperson

# 1 BACKHOES, BOBCATS, EXCAVATORS & DUMP TRUCKS Drainage, Paving, landscaping, stump / rock / cement / oil tank & demos, dirt removal, paver stones, Jackhammer, Water / sewer line / sumps. Slinger avail. 24 hrs. Call 341-4446 or 254-6865

Excavating - Drain Tile Demolitions. Fully insured • WCB 604-716-8528

8090

Fencing/Gates

West Coast Cedar Installations New, repaired or rebuilt ★ Fences & Decks ★ 604-435-5755 or 604-788-6458

8105

Flooring/ Refinishing

AFFORDABLE MOVING 1 to 3 Men

Since 1989

RENOS • REPAIRS 9129 Shaughnessy St., Van.

732-8453

DUSTTIN’S HANDYMAN Service All jobs Large and Small. Competitive Rates 604-562-5711 MIKESHOMEWORK.CA Bath, kitchen, paint, decks, tiles, repairs carpentry, free est 604.688.2306 R’s Vinyl Windows Flooring, Entrance Drs, Pressure Washing, Welding, Free Est. 778-863-1944

Artistry of Hardwood Floors

THE HANDYMAN CAN Professional Home Services Big or small - we do them all Free Est. Sr.Disc. 604-340-4633

** HARDWOOD FLOORS ** Installed, Repaired, Refinished Free Est. Peter 604-329-4498

ROT, rust, crumbling,cracks? HandiFix can help!Quality work, fair price.Free est.Vic 778-2294215. HandiFixPS@gmail.com

Refinish, sanding, install, dustless Prof & Quality work 604-219-6944

INSTALLATION REFINISHING, Sanding. Free est, great prices. Satisfaction guar. 604-518-7508

PROVINCIAL HARDWOOD Ltd. Make your old Hardwood Floors look like New! Sanding, Finishing Installation, Re-coating. Call 778-928-6600.

8120

Glass Mirrors

ANGEL GLASS, Comm/Res, windows & doors, store fronts,patio doors, mirrors etc. 2837 Kingsway, Van 604-603-9655

8125

Gutters

AT YOUR HOME GUTTER SERVICES. Installs, cleaning, repairs. WCB Insured 604-340-7189 DIRTY WINDOWS? DIRTY GUTTERS? Black Bear Window Cleaning does windows, gutters & siding. Insured & Guaranteed. Commercial & Residential. Call: 778 892-2327

Gutter & window cleaning, power washing. Prompt, professional. 30 yrs exp. Simon 604-230-0627

★RITE-WAY★ GUTTERS 15% OFF - 604-722-1105

8130

Handyperson

AaronR CONST Repairs & Renos, small repairs welcome. Insured, WCB, Licensed. 604-318-4390 aaronrconstruction.com GET OUT YOUR LIST! We do all the fussy little jobs no one else wants to do. Complete home repairs. Workmanship and your Satisfaction Guaranteed. Est 1983. Ralph 682-8256 Vcr West & East D/Town

8135

Hauling

604-RUBBISH - ’’ We do all the loading & cleanup and we remove almost anything'' 604-782-2474

8155

Landscaping

FREE ESTIMATES Seniors Discount

604-537-4140 www.affordablemoversbc.com

B&Y MOVING Experienced Movers ~ 2 Men $55 ~

Over 10 yrs. Exp. • Licenced & Insured • Professional Piano Movers

604-708-8850

ABE MOVING & Delivery and Rubbish Removal $35/HR per Person • 24/7 604-999-6020

Renovations & Home Improvement

HOME IMPROVEMENT CENTRE Construction Services We specialize in Home Renovations, Kitchens, Baths, Decks, Fencing, etc.

778-865-0370

hansv@shaw.ca

• Painting • All wood, stucco & drywall repairs

Patios/Decks/ Railings

8200

604.240.9081

FERREIRA HOME IMPROVEMENTS

www.PatioCoverVancouver.com

New Lawn Installation Turf • Seed • Artificial Excavation Drainage • Pavers Call for a Free Estimate www.englishlawns.com

Greenworx Redevelopment Inc. Hedges, pavers, ponds & walls, returfing, demos, drainage, jackhammering. Old pools filled in, decks, concrete 604.782.4322

HEDGES, SHRUBS, TREE REMOVAL

INSURED, FREE EST.

224-3669 Lawn & Garden

Services

SAME DAY SERVICE

“More than just mowing” Lawn Mowing • Yard Clean-up Aeration • Fertilizing • Hedges Pruning • Gutters Fences • Decks Rubbish Removal Odd Jobs

TCP MOVING 1 to 3 men from $40 Licensed & Insured, local & storage. Ca & US long distance 604-505-1386 * 604-505-9166

604-220-5296

8160

★ 604-652-1660 ★

8193

Oil Tank Removal

FLECK CONTRACTING LTD.

www.jimsmowing.ca West-side Lawn & Garden

604-261-9697 Free est

GB GARDENING - lawn cut, trim, prune, clean up, power wash, free est. 778-847-9412 604-322-9412 Ny Ton Gardening Trimming, Shrubs, Pruning, Yard Cleanup, 604-782-5288

604-618-2949

ALLEN ASPHALT concrete, brick, drains, foundations, walls, membranes 604-618-2304/ 820-2187

8220

Plumbing

• Oil Tank Removal • Work complies with city bylaws • Always fair & BC Mainland reasonable rates • Excellent references

Off: 604-266-2120 Cell: 604-290-8592 Serving West Side since 1987

Painting/ Wallpaper

YOUR WAY

Plumbing & Renovations Full Kitchen & Bath Reno’s • Plumbing Service - all types • H/W tanks • Plugged drains No job too small!

‘Old Home Specialist’

Steve ✔

604-830-8555

THE REAL DEAL 3 Rooms $250 Exterior Special on NOW

Give us a Call We’re Tough to Beat

Free Estimates

604-771-7052

A-1

PAINT CO. Summer 10% OFF Special Exterior Repainting Free Est. - 15 Years Exp. Insured /WCB

604-723-8434

ALLQUEST PAINTING Quality Work You Can Trust! Interior & Exterior ★ UNBEATABLE PRICES ★ Free Est. / Written Guarantee

Insured/WCB

778-997-9582

FAIRWAY PAINTING Fully Insured 20 yrs. exp. • Free Est.

INTERIOR & EXTERIOR SPECIALS 10% OFF

Call 604-

7291234

Actual Plumbing & Heating, Boilers, Furnaces, Tankless, Hotwater tanks, 24/7, Seniors Disc. Lic. BBB, 604-874-4808 Hot Water Tank Special Electric 50 gal $550. Gas 40 gal $650. Insured WCB 604-839-3537

8225

Prompt Professional Service 30 years experience

Simon 604-230-0627

Renovations & Home Improvement

WE CAN FIX IT •Interior / Exterior •New Construction/ Renovations/ Additions Drywall • Plumbing Electrical • Foundations/ Framing • Flooring • Lic. & Insured • Free Estimates Call 604-220-7422

604-946-4333

AT YOUR HOME ROOFING SERVICES. New roofs & repairs. WCB Insured 604-340-7189

Vcr West & East D/Town

AMBLESIDE ROOFING

Canam Roofing 778-881-1417 Residential roofing, new, reroofing & repairs. Peace of mind warranty. www.canamroofing.ca ★ MCNABB ROOFING ★ ALL TYPES OF ROOFING 40 years exp. Call 604-839-7881

Since 1989

RENOS • REPAIRS 9129 Shaughnessy St., Van.

8255

Rubbish Removal

732-8453

ALLQUEST PAINTING Quality Work You Can Trust! 778 997-9582 GET OUT YOUR LIST! We do all the fussy little jobs no one else wants to do. Workmanship & Satisfaction Guaranteed. Vancouver D/town & West & East side. Est 1983. Ralph 682-8256

bradsjunkremoval.com

604-220•JUNK(5865) 20 YARD BINS Avail Now ! We Load or You Load

'Haul anything...but dead bodies!!'

Moon Construction Building Services Additons, Renovations, New Construction, Specializing in Concrete Forming, Framing & Siding. 604-218-3064

EASTSIDE RUBBISH Removal. Best Rate, 12 Years Straight! Friendly & Cheap. 604-266-4444

★PAUL’S PAINTING★ Painting, Reno’s, Handyman Call 778-865-0370

JACK’S RUBBISH Removal. Household Junk Specialist! Fast, Friendly & Cheap. 604-266-4444

RUBBISH REMOVAL Reasonable rates - Free Est. Pat 604-224-2112, anytime

www.RenoRite.com Bath, Kitchens, Suites & More Save Your Dollars! 604-451-0225 BATHROOM• KITCHEN • BASEMENT Structural ★ Water Ingress Kelly Construction 604-738-7280

RNC RENOVATIONS Ins, WCB, Member of BBB, 778-227-7316 www.rncrenovations.com ROMAN’S PAINTING Interior/Exterior 604-339-4541 www.romanpaint.com

8250

Roofing

STUDENT WORKS Disposal & Recycling. Trips start at $49. John 778-288-8009 www.studentworksdisposal.com WESTSIDE RUBBISH Removal. Household Junk Specialist! Friendly & Cheap. 604-266-4444

8309

Tiling

STONE & tile setting, embellished tile decorating. Call Steve 604-888-1285

8315

Tree Services

Wildwood Tree Services, Exp Hedge Trimming and Removal & Tree Pruning. Free Est. 604-893-5745

ROOFING 604-722-1105 GUARANTEED IN WRITING

RE-ROOFING & ROOF REPAIRS

8240

Liability Insurance, WCB, BBB, Free Estimates

GET OUT YOUR LIST! We do all the fussy little jobs no one else wants to do. Complete home repairs. Workmanship and your Satisfaction Guaranteed. Est 1983. Ralph 682-8256

Power Washing

POWER WASHING GUTTER & WINDOW CLEANING

Bros. Roofing Ltd. Over 40 Years in Business SPECIALIZING IN CEDAR, FIBERGLASS LAMINATES AND TORCH ON.

All types - Reroofs & Repairs Insured/WCB 778-288-8357

Renovations • Repairs

10% Off with this Ad! For all your plumbing, heating & reno needs. Lic Gas Fitter, Aman. 778-895-2005

604-803-2808

10% DISCOUNT. MG Roofing & Siding. WCB. Re-Roofing, New Roof, Gutters. 604-812-9721

NORM, 604-466-9733 Cell: 604-841-1855

High United Construction New build, complete renos, drywall, tile, stucco, patio cover. Big/ small. Randy 604-250-1385

For Free Estimates Call

8195

310-JIMS (5467)

Driveway, Walkway & Parking Lot Garage Apron / Speed Bump / Pot Hole / Patch Commercial & Residential www.jaconbrospaving.com

Concrete Tiles • Cedar Shakes Asphalt Shingles • Skylights 20 yrs exp. • Insured • Free Est.

A EASTWEST Roofing & Siding Reroofing, Gutter, BBB Member, 10% disc, Seniors Disc, 604-783-6437

Paving/Seal Coating

8205

Roofing

Additions ★ Renovations Concrete Forming ★ Decks Garages ★ Bathrooms Ceramic Tile ★ Drywall Hardwood Flooring ''Satisfaction Guaranteed''

• Sunrooms • Aluminum patio/deck covers • Aluminum railings • Glass railings • Aluminum fencing • Auto gates Free Estimates 604-782-9108

8250

STORMRIDER ROOF REPAIRS

PAUL’S PAINTING

Experienced Movers with Affordable Rates! Starting $40/ hour FLAT RATE also available Licensed & Insured • Seniors Discount

8240

ROMAN’S PAINTING

•Interior/Exterior •Reasonable Rates •Warranty •Free Estimate 604-339-4541 www.romanpaint.com

BEST RATE MOVING

Low Budget Moving.com

Need a Great New Lawn?

Gardening Services 21 yrs exp. Tree topping, West & Eastside & Rmd. Michael 604-240-2881

classifieds.vancourier.com

Licenced & Insured Local & Long Distance

Painting/ Wallpaper

8195

ASPHALT PAVING

DUNBAR LAWN and GardenHedging, Gardening, cleanups, pruning. WCB. Est 41 yrs 604-266-1681

Place your ad online

45 We accept Visa, Mastercard & Interac

EXP PROF movers fully equip, piano specialist. Evening moves available. George 778-875-8202

WILDWOOD LANDSCAPING Hedge Trimmimg & Tree Pruning & Hedge Removal Spring Clean Up Lawn Restoration. Planter Box, Garden Installation. Comm/Strata/Res Free Estimates. 604-893-5745

PLACE YOUR GARAGE SALE ADS 24/7

1, 3, 5, 7 or 10 Ton $ From

604-787-8061

● Landscaping ● Gardening ● Pruning & Planting HANDYMAN, reno, kitchen, bath, plumbing, countertop, flooring, painting, etc. Mic, 604-725-3127

Moving & Storage

JIMM218

8030

HOT SPOT FOR SALE

15%OFF TODAY!

604-722-1105 A-1 Contracting & Roofing ReRoofing & Repair. WCB. 25% Discount. Jag, 778-892-1530

For information call

604-630-3300


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

RENTALS 6505

Apartments & Condos

ROCHE POINT Tower, nice clean, view ,1 bdrm+den, 2 bath, patio, ugrnd prk, 5 app, 1000sf, close to shop/bus/library $1180/mnth 604-460-1125 Ann

6508

Apt/Condos

1 BR’s - Kerrisdale, great location! Close to shops, transit & schools. $1010-$1165 Available Now. 604-677-3205 www.lougheedproperties.com

AMBER LODGE

Oak & West 14th Studios (Avail. July 1) 1 BR’s (Avail Now & July 1) Well maintained building close to all amenities and VGH. Some pets ok. 604-731-2714

6508

Apt/Condos

7th & Clark, East Van. Lrg 2 BR, hardwood, reno’d. VIEW. Av July 1. $1100 + utls. 604-218-7660

6510

Co-ops

OPEN HOUSE Killarney Gardens Housing Co-op Saturday July 6th 2-4pm @ 2998 E 54th Ave., Vanc. Unit tours. 604-436-9554 www.kghousingcoop.ca

6535

6540

Real Estate Services

2BDRM/1BTH CENTRAL Lons. Coachhouse w/d, f/s, dw, on de -mand hw,fp,strge,pkg.Aug1 N/P 2495+Ref sec dep.604.349.2083

2BDRM/2BTH 1328 Camridge Place West Van Kitchen, patio $2800/mth. No pets/non-smoke. Utilities included. 604-446-8466.

604-723-7368 (Royal Pacific Realty)

Rates are going Up! Call Now. 2.60% 5 year Variable 2.79% 5 year Fixed Self Employed, Credit Damage OK, Commercial & Residential Martinique Walker, AMP Verico Assent Mortgage Corp Call: 604-984-9159

6008

Condos/ Townhouses

6008-02

SMALL PEACEFUL farm set up for horses right beside South Langley riding trail. Bright & comfortable older 2 bd home, f/p, barn, riding rings, pastures. $849,900. Call 604-323-4788 See Propertyguys.com ID: 76788

6020

Chilliwack

Abbotsford

TOP FLR 762sf 1br condo, in-ste laundry, 45+ building Mt. Baker view $85,000. 778-822-7387 see uSELLaHOME.com id5553

6008-18

New Westminster

TOP FLOOR quiet side of bldg 650sf 1br+den condo nr Hosp, & Sky train $244K 778-241-4101 see uSELLaHOME.com id5580

6008-28

6020-34

Surrey

FLEETWOOD RENO’D 2140sf 4br 3ba, large 7100sf lot, bsmt suite $529,000. 604-727-9240 see uSELLaHOME.com id5617

GUILDFORD 1900SF 3br 2ba w/basement suite on huge 8640 sf lot, $489,000 604-613-1553 see uSELLaHOME.com id5608 STEVESTON VERY large 1284 sf 2br 2ba top fl condo amazing mtn views, $455K 604-275-7986 see uSELLaHOME.com id5376

6008-42

S. Surrey/ White Rock

PARTIAL OCEAN view, 920sf 2br+den 2ba quiet condo, kids, pets ok. $309,000 778-294-2275 see uSELLaHOME.com id5575

classifieds. vancourier.com

THE SCRAPPER

SCRAP CAR & TRUCK REMOVAL 2H

Vans

2005 CHEV Astro Cargo Van, Ladder rails, 68k, a/c, $13,900 Downtown.nissan.ca 604-257-8900

E

Sport Utilities/ 4x4’s/Trucks

LIVING ROOM Lots & Acreage

LANGLEY BUILD your dream home, secluded 5 ac view ppty, well inst $630,000 604-825-3966 see uSELLaHOME.com id4513

6052

6065 LANGLEY NR town fully reno’d 2474sf home on 5ac ppty, bsmt suite $1,150,000 604-825-3966 see uSELLaHOME.com id5582

Collectibles & Classics

Real Estate Investment

LANGLEY RENOD sxs duplex +1/2ac lot, rental income $2,300 /month $489,900 604-807-6565 see uSELLaHOME.com id3186

Recreation Property

CANCEL YOUR TIMESHARE. NO RISK program. STOP Mortgage & Maintenance Payments Today. 100% Money Back Guarantee. FREE Consultation. Call us NOW. We can Help! 1-888-356-5248

1988 FLEETWOOD Brougham d’Elegance Rare, orig owner car! 83km! Perfect cond Collector Car Status 25-yrs! $10,950. D# 10578 Auto Depot NVan 604-727-3111

9125

Domestic

2005 PONTIAC WAVE LT, 104,000 kms, black, a/c, fully loaded, auto, newer brakes, timing belt and tires, sunroof, runs great. $3900 Firm. 778-846-5275

Okanagan/ Interior GALIANO EXECUTIVE Home & Cabin on priv beach, completely furn’d, many extras, ready to move in. Reduced to $849,000! Global Force Rlty. 604-802-8711 www.yourlinktorealestate.ca

10 ACRES OF OKANAGAN VIEW PROPERTY FOR SALE Located 6 km from Penticton Hospital on the eastern hillsides above the city. Numerous building sites with view to the north up Okanagan Lake. One of the few remaining 10 acre country residential parcels that has not been developed. On paved road with power to the lot line. For sale by owner at only $289,000. Contact donaclair11@gmail.com or 250-493-5737

MERRITT HERITAGE style 3070 sf 4br 5ba on 9.9ac lot detached shop, view $895K 250-378-8857 see uSELLaHOME.com id5592

Out Of Town Property

HATZIC LAKE 1 hr drive from Vanc, 2 vacant lots 1 is lakefront $65K is for both 604-240-5400 see uSELLaHOME.com id5588

2006 CHEV Cobalt LT, White, 69k, alloys, power group $6,495. Downtown.nissan.ca 604-257-8900

BIG

or small...

Find all the help you need in the Home Services section

1997 LANDROVER Defender(s) 90, 5 spd diesel, mint, 160,000km, from desert $23,900 1-780-945-7945 604-926-7087 lancebright@hotmail.com

9160

Sports & Imports

1989 19’ Bayliner Capri Blue, 2.3 litre IO Fresh water cooled, new windshield/canvas/swim grid, trailer. $6,975. 604-837-7564

9522

RV’s/Trailers

2006 MINI Cooper, Grey, 58k, loaded, $16,988. Downtown.nissan.ca 604-257-8900 OVER 11 CARS UNDER $5000. Auto Depot 604-727-3111

1979 FORD M/H, 23 ft, cozy, bunk beds, fully equipped, low k, hi way usage, $4,950. 778-737-3890

“You could’ve had it all!” (Adele)

Scrap Car Removal

Removal FREEScrap/Car No Wheels No Problem

HOUR 2Service From Call

Family Owned & Operated

Any project,

Boats

2011 Hyundai Sonata Limited Affordable Luxury 35,600 kms. 2.4L GDI DOHC. $19,999. Email: sjscot@shaw.ca (604) 794-3428.

9145 HATZIC LAKE Swans Point, 1 hr from Vanc incl lot & 5th wheel ski, fish, $134,500. 604-209-8650 see uSELLaHOME.com id5491

2006 DODGE Caravan Cargo, 70k, shelves, ladder rack, $9,900 Downtown.nissan.ca 604-257-8900

9515

9110

6030

@

place ads online @

9173

#1 FREE Scrap Vehicle Removal Ask about $500 Credit!!! $$ PAID for Some 604.683.2200

Get MORE

6050

Richmond

Scrap Car Removal

9155

Langley/ Aldergrove

ALDERGROVE SXS DUPLEX 80K below assessment. $3100mo rent $529,900 firm 604-807-6565 see uSELLaHOME.com id3428

9145

604-790-3900 OUR SERVIC

6040

6020-14

A1 AUTO LOANS. Good, Bad or No Credit - No problem. We help with rebuilding credit & also offer a first time buyer program. Call 1-855-957-7755

604.630.3300

CULTUS LK gardener’s dream 1160 sf 2 br 1.5 ba rancher, a/c 55+ complex $63K 604-858-9301 see uSELLaHOME.com id5400 IMMACULATE TOP fl 963sf 2 br condo, insuite laundry, +55 building, $121,500 604-309-3947 see uSELLaHOME.com id5565

Auto Finance

To Advertise Call

Houses - Sale

6020-06

9102

CASH FOR ALL VEHICLES

HOMESTAY FAMILIES needed for long & short term students. 778-232-1003 or online: www.harmonyhomestay.com

For Sale by Owner

Suites/Partial Houses

3090 E43AVE, 4 bdrm, 2.5 bath, h/w flr, two garage, 2175sf, lease, n/pet, n/s, $2800, NOW. Eric

Homestay

6015

6602

1 BR rear bsmt ste, priv entry, patio, Langara area, nr amen., no w/d, np ns, suits 1 person, lease, $660. July 1. 604-322-0639

REAL ESTATE 6005

Houses - Rent

AUTOMOTIVE

A31

(604) 209-2026

Which SUV sips gas like a subcompact?

CRANBROOK 2060SF 4br 3ba reno’d home w/side suite on 2 lots $239,900 778-887-4530 see uSELLaHOME.com id5304

If you had NOT listed with Craig. No matter what you have to DUPP Q MXHEHGYUUV WPHDDRNUV HVD TUY YSU job done. Just list it and sell it for one low price.

$69 buys you a print and online ad in 1 market until sold.*

* if you reduce the cost of your item by 10% each month. Private party only.

Book online now!

WSOIITRUVIPXOLWKYJTUJPWKM

TODAY'S PUZZLE ANSWERS Research vehicles on driving.ca

KFX TUY OSHY LFX GUUV Q TXHEHGYUUVI Book today! Trusted Vendors, Local Buyers


E32

THE VANCOUVER COURIER WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

Your Original

Food Store

e y e k c o S e l o Wh Salmon

6

Beef Short Ribs

Cantaloupe

79

/lb $15.41/kg

Bone In

Blade Steaks

Lyoner

Whole Seedless Watermelon

$109 100g

Certified Organic California Grown

Broccoli

$199 /lb $4.39/kg

/lb $6.59/kg

California Grown

$498 each

Seventh Generation

Bathroom Tissue

1.74/kg

Non-Medicated

Non-Medicated

Chicken Legs

Bone In • Centre Cut

$299 /lb $6.59/kg

California Grown

Pork Chops

$399 /lb $8.80/kg

BC Grown

Hot House Grape Concerto Tomatoes

Nectarines

$179

/lb $3.95/kg

Smooth & Crunchy Organic Natural

12 pk

each 500g

$725

/lb $15.98/kg

Certified Organic California Grown

Mini Watermelon

Boo Bamboo Hair Care

Strawberry or Raspberry

each 500g

383ml

each

Cruelty Free & Vegan

Sulphate Free

$699 each assorted

Que Pasa

Non-Organic

O’Canada Chips

Raw Energy Snack Mix

$329 454g

1595 Kingsway 604-872-3019 Sale Dates: Wednesday, June 26, 2013 – Tuesday, July 2, 2013

Inside Round Steaks

Crofter’s Premium Jam

Organic

Peanut Butter

Organic

$499

1 pint

Nuts To You

/lb $14.98/kg

$248

$899 $399 $599 $399

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 8 am-9 pm

Family Pack

$ 79 ¢

$299

From The Deli

6

California Grown

$399 /lb $8.80/kg

Extra Lean Ground Beef

Small Size

$ 99 Fresh

Organic

Certified Organic

Fresh

$449

CHECK US OUT WITH

www.famousfoods.ca

455g

2 0 1 3

Vancouver Courier June 26 2013  

Vancouver Courier June 26 2013

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