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NEWS CRUEL SUMMER FOR VANCOUVER DRIVERS 9 OPINION DEAR JOHNS: PUBLIC WASHROOMS DESPERATELY NEEDED 10 ENTERTAINMENT REAL ESTATE HAS MUSIC SHOP BUSTING A MOVE 20 SHAKEDOWN COMMUNITY GRANT LAWRENCE DOES NOT DIG 4/20 17 March 14 2019 Established 1908

There’s more online at vancourier.com PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

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Several Vancouver breweries, such as James Walton’s Storm Brewing, could become victims of their own success, getting pushed out of the very communities they helped create. SEE PAGE 18

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T H U R SDAY, M A R C H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, M A R C H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9

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News 12TH&CAMBIE

NPA spent $1 million on its 2018 election campaign Mike Howell

mhowell@vancourier.com

Thought I’d give you an update on whether the NPA and its mayoral candidate from the 2018 election campaign — Ken Sim — ever did file their financial disclosure statements with Elections B.C. Breaking news: They did! And it looks like the party spent a million bucks. I’ll get to the details down below, but first some background… As regular readers will recall, I posted a piece Feb. 5 on the Courier’s website revealing the NPA, Sim and the party’s school board campaign failed to file their financial disclosure statements before the Jan. 18 deadline. I also mentioned disclosure statements for park board candidate John Coupar and council candidate Sarah Kirby-Yung were filed after the Jan. 18 deadline. Their campaigns were penalized $500 each, as was the campaign of failed NPA school board candidate Chris Qiu. Overall, the party was hit

with $3,000 in fines. Here’s how then-NPA president Gregory Baker (who has since been replaced by Mark Angus, an independent businessman who works in the film industry) explained the missed deadline when I spoke to him Feb. 5. “You know what, it is incredibly complicated and it’s just taking us a lot longer to complete it than we anticipated just by the virtue of the fact that there are new rules [which banned corporate and union donations and limited individual donations to a maximum of $1,200] and we have a lot of transactions,” he said. A second deadline of Feb. 19 was set for the NPA, Sim and the party’s school board campaign to file their documents. That was a month past the deadline set under the Local Elections Campaign Financing Act, which states disclosure statements must be filed with B.C.’s chief election officer within 90 days after general voting day for an election.

The NPA and Ken Sim, who ran unsuccessfully to become mayor of Vancouver, have now filed their financial disclosure statements after failing to meet the Jan. 18 deadline. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

The election was Oct. 20, 2018. Sim finished runner-up to independent candidate Kennedy Stewart, who raised $244,005 and spent $320,228. But Sim’s party won five seats on council, three on school board and two on park board. So how much did it cost the party? Elections B.C. data shows the NPA raised $1,022,148 for its council, school board and park board campaigns. If I’m reading the disclosure statements correctly, the

party spent $891,866 on its council and park board campaigns, and $184,214 on its school board run for a total of $1,076,080. Sim raised $85,771 in his own campaign, and he spent $81,864, according to the documents. The majority of his contributors gave him the maximum of $1,200 allowed under new rules for last fall’s civic election. I haven’t counted the number of donors to the NPA, but Baker told me last month it was in the 4,000 range. Some of the donors

included Lululemon founder Chip Wilson, Westbank developer Ian Gillespie, developer Ryan Beedie and Rocky Mountaineer owner Peter Armstrong. Fun fact: It appears that if your name is David, you’re more likely than say Denise, Devon or Daryl to donate money to the NPA. I counted more than 30 Davids in the disclosure statements, including David Podmore, David Ostrow, David Todoroff, David Hollands and David Ferguson. The Green Party of Vancouver, meanwhile, said in a news release March 3 that it issued a $1,200 cheque to real estate developer Jon Stovell, who donated that amount to the party for last year’s campaign. The Greens returned the money because the party says it doesn’t accept money from developers, and that initially accepting Stovell’s money was an oversight. Stovell is the president and CEO of Reliance Properties and chairperson of the Urban Development Institute Pacific Region. “I want to make it clear

that we have nothing against Jon Stovell personally, and we appreciate his generosity, but we have a strict donation policy around donations from real estate developers, and that hasn’t changed,” said Green Party Coun. Pete Fry in the release. A few years ago, I spoke to Stovell about the issue of giving money to civic political parties. He said a lot, but here’s an interesting quote you may or may not want to challenge him on: “The idea that the development industry is somehow calling the shots in Vancouver is preposterous. Year in, year out, the amount of public consultation and engagement that needs to occur in development does nothing but go up, and transparency does nothing but go up.” To read more about what Stovell, realtor Bob Rennie, developer Robert Macdonald and CUPE president Paul Faoro had to say about donating money to parties, go to vancourier.com and search “big spenders.” @Howellings

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T H U R SDAY, M A R C H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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News

NPA names new president after party fails to disclose campaign cash Mark Angus replaced Gregory Baker in February Mike Howell

mhowell@vancourier.com

The Non-Partisan Association’s failure to meet an Elections B.C. deadline for filing financial documents from the 2018 civic election campaign is not connected to the ouster of its president Gregory Baker. That is the position of both Baker and the party’s new president, Mark Angus, who framed the timing of the change in leadership as more coincidental than a consequence of the NPA missing the Jan. 18 deadline to disclose how much it raised and spent. “I don’t think missing that filing really has anything to do with it,” Baker told the Courier. “I don’t understand what, perhaps, what was going through [board members’] minds at the time. But there were people that felt it was time for a change.” Angus, an independent businessman involved in the film industry, said the party’s board of directors simply decided to have “a

fresh set of eyes” going into this year. He pointed out Baker remains a member of the board. Baker said the vote to replace him occurred at an NPA board meeting in February. It came about three weeks after Elections B.C. issued a news release Feb. 5 saying the party’s main campaign, school board campaign and the campaign of mayoral candidate Ken Sim failed to meet the Jan. 18 deadline. The party eventually met a second deadline Feb. 19 but not before being penalized with $3,000 fines. Half of those fines were levied on the campaigns of council candidate Sarah KirbyYung, park board candidate John Coupar and school board candidate Chris Qiu. The trio failed to meet the Jan. 18 deadline but had filed their documents prior to Elections B.C. issuing the Feb. 5 news release to announce which parties and candidates missed deadline. The NPA was the only Vancouver party to not meet the deadline.

Mark Angus became the NPA’s new president in February. He replaces Gregory Baker, who led the party in last October’s civic election. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

Baker and Angus cited the sheer number of donors — in the 4,000 range — and having just Baker and another person working on the filings as reasons the party missed the first deadline. Angus

said it won’t happen again. “It was unfortunate,” he said, emphasizing the late filings were not connected to him replacing Baker as president. “I’m not going to reiterate what Greg said, but we had a lot of

paperwork. There was lots of stuff to do. No one ever gets paid. Your financial agent is a volunteer, they have other jobs.” But Angus, who lives in Mount Pleasant, said he wanted the party to become “more relevant” to voters between elections and “make the NPA more than just something that appears eight months before an election.” He also suggested the party may want to look at choosing its candidates, including a mayoral candidate, earlier in an election campaign. “We always seem to be late, and that doesn’t help,” he said. In the 2018 election, the NPA elected five city councillors, three school trustees and two park board commissioners. The party raised and spent roughly $1 million, according to its disclosure statements, courtesy of more than 4,000 donors, many of whom gave the $1,200 maximum. The party has not scheduled a date for its annual

general meeting. Under the NPA’s rules, the president must resign at the meeting in order for another vote to take place. Elections for board members are staggered, meaning some will be up for re-election, some won’t. Baker, the owner and operator of PC Galore computer store, said it was too early to say whether he would be interested in another run as president. His work with the party, he said, has required a lot of his time. He was a council candidate in the 2014 election and served as treasurer. “I’m disappointed, I suppose, but part of me is kind of relieved,” he said of being replaced by Angus. “You know what — the weight has been lifted off my shoulders. I’m able to concentrate on my business, which has suffered considerably. This past year — in 2018 — I’ve spent virtually no time at my business.” The next election is not until October 2022. @Howellings

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Notice of Development Permit Application - DP 19006

Public Open House Arts Student Centre

Join us on Tuesday, March 26 to view and comment on a new Arts Student Centre to serve the Arts Undergraduate Society to be located in the 1900 Block of East Mall. Eight pin oak trees at the north end of the bosque will be removed to accommodate the proposed building. Date: Tuesday, March26,2019 Times: 11:30am - 1:30pm Place: Concourse, UBC Life Building, 6138 Student Union Blvd. Plans will be displayed for a 912m2 multi-purpose facility to support learning, social-interaction, and collaboration for the Faculty of Arts student population. Representatives from the project team and Campus + Community Planning will be available to provide information and respond to inquiries about this project.

This event is wheelchair accessible.

For further information: Please direct questions to Karen Russell Manager, Development Services karen.russell@ubc.ca 604-822-1586

Can’t attend in person? Online feedback on the Arts Student Centre will be accepted until April 2, 2019. To learn more or to comment on this project, please visit: planning.ubc.ca/vancouver/projects-consultations

program in schools

Jessica Kerr

jkerr@vancourier.com

Vancouver’s police department and school board have teamed up with the provincial gang unit to introduce the End Gang Life program into local schools. Staff Sgt. Lindsey Houghton, a former Vancouver police officer who is now with the Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit of B.C., created the program in 2013 as a way to deter teens and young adults from getting involved with gangs. “I don’t think I’m saying anything that people don’t already know but police are not going to arrest our way out of gang problems,” he said. “If we’re going to be successful in preventing youths and young adults from getting involved in gangs, it’s going to take a long-term, coordinated, evidence-based strategic approach.” Since 2013, the program has been rolled out in more than 65 schools across the province. Aimed at high school students, it’s being

introduced at 18 schools in Vancouver. In fact, the first two presentations already took place a few weeks ago. “Information and awareness are key, especially at a young age, when you’re making decisions that could impact the rest of your life,” said VPD Supt. Michelle Davey. “The End Gang Life program will now be one of many programs used by the VPD to connect with students and help build positive and trusting relationships with Vancouver’s youth.” The program includes presentations on the realities of gang life, which will be tailored for Vancouver students, and presented by members of Vancouver police’s school liaison and gang crime units, as well as a talk by a former gang member. End Gang Life also includes a gang exiting and intervention team which, Houghton said, has so far helped 55 individuals leave gangs. “There is no doubt that End Gang Life has saved

lives and deterred people from getting involved in the gang lifestyle,” he said. “Having the Vancouver Police Department as another ambassador for End Gang Life, and relaying its important messages of prevention and education, is a critical piece that may empower youth and young adults to stand up to gangs and make positive choices.” Houghton added that, after giving presentations, officers have been approached by students who say they are actively being recruited to start selling drugs and now feel empowered to say no. “Based on the program’s past success, we are pleased to be partnering with the Vancouver Police Department and the Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit of British Columbia,” said Robert Schindel, associate superintendent at Vancouver School Board. “We strongly believe educating our students is one of the most effective ways of preventing gang involvement.” @JessicaEKerr


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T H U R SDAY, M A R C H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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got people sleeping rough outdoors. For whatever reason that works best for those people they have chosen to be in Oppenheimer Park, that is where they would like to stay and that is where they need to be supported.” Last week, the B.C. government announced $3.1 million in funding to keep eight Vancouver winter shelters, totalling 240 beds, open for the next year. The shelters would normally close as of March 31. The move came after Coun. Jean Swanson tabled a motion at council Feb. 26 requesting that shelters be kept open year round and 24/7. Many shelters are only open overnight and people have to leave every morning. “I’m hoping we can still continue to work on getting them open 24/7 so people have a place where they can be, like if they’re sick,” Swanson said last week before council voted on the motion. “A lot of people that are in the shelters are sick, they have a lot of health issues. I’ve talked to them. They have cancer, they have heart issues, they have diabetes, they have other issues. It would be nice for people to be able to stay inside and not have to leave during the day.” @JessicaEKerr

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Vancouver Park Board Monday night approved several measures, including a warming station and washrooms, aimed at improving conditions for those living in Oppenheimer Park. The motion, introduced by commissioner John Irwin, directs park board staff to work with city staff to create a temporary warming station using large heated tents at Oppenheimer Park or other nearby city-owned land. It also directs staff to set up washrooms in the park that will be open 24 hours a day when the warming station is in use; explore options that would allow those camping in the park to securely keep their possessions onsite; and “continue to communicate with city staff about other possible solutions to help solve and humanize homelessness.” Irwin noted the recent extended stretch of cold temperatures in the city and the number of people living in tents in the park. He added that he spoke to people with the Carnegie Community Action Project, who have been doing outreach work with those living in the park. “They noted that many of the people there are

Aboriginal, half or more, there’s some seniors and older people, there’s also some Chinese language people residing there and actually a family of six with two youths are actually there, or were there, I don’t know if they’re still there.” Irwin said that in his work as a researcher, he once authored a report on homelessness for the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. “One of the bizarre things about it as an issue is that people might think that you’re saving money by having people not be housed but it [actually costs] more tax dollars, generally, to support them,” he said. “The Metro Vancouver’s Regional Homeless Task Force estimates that it’s around $55,000 in tax cost for a homeless person compared to $37,000 to house them.” Commissioner Gwen Giesbrecht said that bringing services to people who need them, instead of making people come to the services, helps to foster a sense of community and gives them a sense of autonomy and respect. “We are in the middle of a crisis and we’re in a crisis that is multi-levelled, multi-faceted and will take multi-levels of approaches to heal it,” said Geisbrecht. “But in the meantime we’ve

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Mountain-inspired tower proposed for Coal Harbour

A 33-storey residential tower whose design, the architect states, is inspired by mountains is proposed for 1698 West Georgia at Bidwell Street. The rezoning application for the highrise, which would feature 127 condo units, goes before an open house April 9. Developer Anthem Properties is involved in the project, as is U.S.-based architectural firm John Pedersen Fox, Vancouver’s Dikeakos Architects Inc., and PFS Studio, an urban design and landscape architecture firm. If approved, the building would replace a Chevron gas station that used to be on the site. It closed March 29, 2017, two days before Anthem officially took ownership of the property. The property was assessed at $98,251,400 as of July of 2018, according to B.C. Assessment. The previous year, it was assessed at $65,500,000. The application, which is being considered under the West End Community Plan and Rezoning Policy, cites the mountains of Vancouver as the inspiration for the design. “The bold formation of rocks creates rugged structures, feathery trees lace over the ridges and the terraces, and the facets and the cracks in the rocks create an ever-changing interplay of light and shadow,” the design rationale explains. “Our design is inspired by the balance between boldness and subtlety of the mountains, aiming to bring a sense of nature to the convenience of urban living.” The proposal calls for a total floor area of 16,528 square feet for the building, with a floor space ratio of 9.39. Parking spaces would number 213, while there would be 335 bike stalls.

The rezoning application, which is being considered under the West End Community Plan and Rezoning Policy, cites the mountains of Vancouver as the inspiration for the design.

The open house runs from 4:30 to 7 p.m. at the Westin Bayshore Hotel, April 9. It’s scheduled to go before the urban design panel April 17. —Courier staff

Nature influences design of West Georgia tower

The public will be able to inspect Wesgroup’s plans for a 49-storey tower proposed for 1450 West Georgia at an open house set for April 30. The site is located at the corner of Nicola Street. Like another tower proposed for a few blocks away at Bidwell Street, whose architecture was inspired by mountains, the design for 1450 West Georgia was also influenced by nature — in this case Douglas fir trees. Yamamoto Architecture, which is involved in the project, states in the design rationale in the rezoning application that fir trees provide an “ideal model of sustainability,” and inspire and “shape a new way of thinking about a residential tower.” Each part of the tree — needles, branches, roots and trunk — contributes to its life and health, and work together “to create a singular organism that is responsive to its environment.” “If our city is thought of as a growing urban forest, it might be useful to look

to the local trees to guide a new way of thinking about a tower within this forest,” the document states. “Just as trees grow upward to access light, each new tower rises to capture space and views, contributing to the ever-changing skyline and the view of the city itself.” The rezoning proposal envisions 17 storeys featuring 162 market rental units, 27 storeys containing 193 strata units, commercial space at ground level, 300 vehicle and 707 bicycle spaces. If approved, the new building would replace the Georgian Towers, a 22-storey rental building, which the rezoning application notes is at the end of its life cycle and would not withstand a moderate earthquake. The property at 1450 West Georgia was assessed in BC Assessment’s 2019 assessment roll at $128,115,100 based on its value as of July 2018. The previous year, the site was valued at $91,953,000. The rezoning application is being considered under the West End Community Plan, Rezoning Policy for the West End and the General Policy for Higher Buildings. The open house runs from 5 to 7:30 p.m. at Westin Bayshore Hotel at 1601 Bayshore Dr., April 30. —Courier staff

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T H U R SDAY, M A R C H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

VANCOURIER.COM

A9

News

It’s going to be a cruel spring and summer for drivers You’ll want to avoid these major traffic hotspots as sewer upgrades, road improvements impact all corners of the city John Kurucz

jkurucz@vancourier.com

We’ve all been there — the mad scramble to the ferry or Friday dash for the border that’s surprisingly disrupted by construction, filming or road work. Your beers are getting warmer by the minute, the ferry has left the terminal and now you’re angry. Jerry Dobrovolny maintains that it needn’t be so. The city’s engineering manager laid out March 7 a schedule of construction projects, road upgrades and other large-scale projects ahead of their spring and summer start dates. Dobrovolny’s key talking point was the need for preplanning long before the trip, and potential frustration sets in. The city’s website, the VanConnect app and social media should be your go-tos before it’s go time. “If you take advantage of the many options we produce for people to understand what’s happening, it’s easy to get around this city in a variety of ways regardless of which mode you choose,” Dobrovolny said. Of the roughly 30 kilometres’ worth of roadwork being done this year, none of it will cause the level of disruption seen during last year’s construction on First Avenue, Dobrovolny said. Most of the jobs on the city’s to-do list include modernizing sewers and other underground work, along with pedestrian and sidewalk improvements. Dobrovolny said the city’s “one-dig” policy aims to conduct upgrades alongside any utilities replacement so that any necessary work is done in tandem. Nanaimo Street: • Sewer and street safety

upgrades spanning Fourth Avenue to McGill Street. One lane in either direction will remain open for the duration of work, which runs until spring 2020. The current sewer line was laid in 1905 and is being separated into two streams to divert sewage and rainwater. Pedestrian crossings and sidewalk improvements are also taking place. Granville Street bridge: • Structural and seismic upgrades that will run until 2021. A public consultation on the future uses of the bridge deck begins this spring and will last all year. “We don’t need anywhere near eight lanes in terms of vehicle capacity. The vehicles could easily fit into four lanes,” Dobrovolny said. Quebec Street near Second Avenue, Science World: • The underground pipe network used to heat Olympic Village is being expanded to other parts of southeast False Creek in a project that will extend into spring 2020. While the utility work is being done, the street network and sidewalks are also being repaired. West End: • The bulk of the work is taking place near Haro, Bute, Denman and Chilco streets to replace a water main installed in 1913. The work is expected to continue until the summer of next year and Dobrovolny characterized the job as both “very large” and “very disruptive.” Boundary Road: • Running from First Avenue to the Grandview Highway, the workload includes sidewalk and road maintenance, along with replacing a water main. Traffic signal upgrades will happen at the First Avenue and Lougheed Highway intersection and new street lighting is being installed as well. Macdonald Street • Sewer and street infrastructure improvements are slated for the stretch of Macdonald running from First to 16th Avenue. Sewer upgrades will help divert waste water from flowing

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into English Bay. Outside of those construction projects, some major festivals and events are coming down the turn pike in short order: Vaisahki Parade (April 13), Sun Run (April 14) and the BMO Half Marathon (May 5). To save yourself the headache, log on to vancouver.ca/road-closure.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, M A RC H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9

VANCOURIER.COM

Opinion

School properties need to adapt to the needs of the community Opportunities for innovation obscured by threat of closures

Mike Klassen

mike@mikeklassen.net

Structures that will not withstand an earth tremor. Playing fields in poor shape. Grounds that are often litter strewn. Landscaping is rare if it happens at all, and weeds overtake garden beds. What I’m describing is the condition of innumerable school properties within Vancouver’s boundaries. During evenings, weekends and school breaks, these properties lie fallow, with gymnasiums shuttered, rooms idle and soccer fields abandoned. By contrast, in New York City, former Mayor Michael Bloomberg set about to change how school properties were used. Under the PlaNYC “Schoolyards to Playgrounds” initiative, hundreds of schoolyards were renovated and opened to the public during nonschool hours. NYC’s Department of Education and the nonprofit Trust for Public Land sought to improve many of the schoolyards through capital improvements, including play equipment, painted sports surfaces, trees and benches. This is just one of many similar initiatives popping up in other cities to turn school

With enrolment dwindling in some Vancouver schools and amenities not being used to their full potential, it’s time to reframe the discussion on Vancouver’s school properties, says columnist Mike Klassen. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

properties into community hubs, with access to green, well-maintained grounds and facilities that come alive during non-class hours. Vancouver is now faced with yet another potentially divisive debate about school closures. A 176-page report was recently tabled with a range of observations on several of the school district’s $7.6 billion worth of property assets. If the previous Vision Vancouver-led school board were still in power, you

could bet that the political rhetoric would already be at a fever pitch. The prospect of school closures here has been continuously leveraged by elected officials to drum up fear among parents, with politicians inevitably claiming to “save our schools” when they help to forestall a decision on a district property. Vancouver has been criticized by other school districts for its unwillingness to take a sober look at what to do with its under-enrolled facilities, or to come to a de-

cision on closing classrooms. The political pressure trustees have faced in the past caused the foot dragging. School district studies indicate Vancouver has a surplus of more than 10,000 seats in classrooms sitting empty today, with a projection for those spaces to grow from 12,000 to more than 17,000. We can blame lower birth rates and housing affordability challenges for this trend here. Instead of drumming up fear in our communities,

I think it is time to take a look at the opportunities these demographic shifts are providing the district. Every community in our city has a continuum that in many ways our school properties fail to adapt to. When many of our schools were constructed before the First World War, how could we have imagined the needs of today’s students — such as providing accessible spaces for young people with differing abilities? What planner 100 years ago could have ever imagined our world full of wireless connectivity and the new economy arising from it? No one back then — when average life expectancy was 69 years old — would have thought we must accommodate a society that has more people over age 65 than under age 15 as we do today. What if school properties were part of a new paradigm that accounts for today’s aging society by providing community access for seniors programs? Our popular neighbourhood houses are currently bursting at the seams for lack of space. What if we even considered building long-term care

homes and day care centres by playgrounds to allow more families to “age-in-place” and reduce social isolation (full disclosure: I advocate for the seniors care sector). We also have pent up demand for workforce housing — in particular, a need to house teachers and health care workers who are struggling to afford local housing. School properties should be eyed for this opportunity. To accomplish any real change will require some bold systemic changes. Currently, innovation is hampered by the silos of government — where the district, city, province and even departments within each agency are not communicating effectively. Perhaps setting up a new land trust governed by the district would help break down these barriers, and allow communities and district representatives to explore local needs by making best use of the grounds and facilities, and build 21st century learning environments. This is the conversation I wish parents, community members and our politicians would engage in — one that sees hope and opportunity in the district’s future instead of fear and anxiety. @MikeKlassen

Shame the lack of johns: Vancouver desperately needs more public toilets Michael Geller

geller@sfu.ca

Last week, I stumbled across a most disgusting public toilet in downtown Vancouver. It wasn’t designed as a public toilet. Rather, it was a urinesoaked stairwell in the City of Vancouver-owned Gastown Parkade. Since it was in desperate need of a good washing down, I tweeted a photo to the city and EasyPark, which manages the property. I also tweeted a photo of the extremely filthy wall and canopy along Water Street. Regrettably, I did not receive any response. The Gastown Parkade is one of more than 125 parking facilities managed by EasyPark. The parking business is a tough business prone to complaints. But a review of the comments on Yelp and the Better Business Bureau would suggest EasyPark does not appear to be living up to its mission “to provide safe, clean, friendly parking.” Hopefully, EasyPark

officials will review and address these comments, since many were valid. But this column is not about EasyPark. Rather, it is about why the Gastown parkade stairwells and too many other downtown stairwells, back lanes and alleys have sadly become public toilets. Later that day, I listened to an excellent episode of CBC’s Ideas with Paul Kennedy. Titled “Dignity down the toilet: Public bathrooms as a human right,” it addressed public toilets and why they are so often lacking in North America cities, despite our wealth. Public bathrooms are an amenity we all need. Yet few of us openly talk about this and, unlike European cities, North American cities provide few facilities. The CBC program explored how governments and businesses can respond to this most basic bodily need, especially for the homeless and other disadvantaged people who simply cannot walk into a hotel or restaurant like I can.

Columnist Michael Geller says public bathrooms are an amenity we all need, and the lack of them is turning stairwells and parking garage into de facto toilets. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

The episode described a group of Ottawa citizens who raised concerns about the lack of public toilets in their city. They eventually developed the GottaGo! Campaign which, amongst other things, managed to get Ottawa transit officials to increase the number of toilets in their stations. It also featured other “toi-

let activists,” including those who run the U.K.’s Loo of the Year awards program. It measures 100 different bathroom criteria, including whether urinals are free from debris and odour. Rather than ruin your breakfast with their other criteria, you can find details online at loo.co.uk. As I reflect on my travels,

a vast array of toilet experiences come to mind. Last fall, arriving at the train station in Baku Azerbaijan after an overnight journey from Tbilisi, I desperately needed to use a toilet but didn’t have any local coins. As is the case in many European and Eurasian cities, there was a bathroom attendant, but I could not explain my predicament since I was unable to use Google Translate on my phone. Eventually, I found a policeman in the station who spoke a bit of English, and he paid for me to go to the toilet. This is just one of the many reasons why I have such fond memories of Azerbaijan. But let’s come back to Vancouver. While the city requires all buildings to have accessible washrooms for tenants and users, there is no similar rule when it comes to public toilets along streets. For homeless people and those on limited incomes, visiting a bathroom in a coffee shop or other business isn’t an option since many businesses restrict their washrooms to customers

who have made a purchase. However, in recent years, a few modern, self-cleaning, public toilets have been installed on select Vancouver street corners. These free automated toilets, which someone described as “shimmering modern outhouses,” are no doubt a godsend for many residents and tourists. The Downtown Vancouver BIA has completed a map of public washrooms. While there are a few in Gastown and the Downtown Eastside, the city desperately needs many more facilities for both those willing to pay and those who cannot afford to do so. We also need EasyPark and other maintenance companies to ensure that while we wait for more facilities, their properties do not become the city’s defacto public toilets. This week is homeless count week. Perhaps it is also a good time to start a public conversation about public toilets. @michaelgeller


VANCOURIER.COM

T H U R SDAY, M A R C H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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Bring on the modular housing Re: “Is modular housing the solution to end Vancouver’s homelessness crisis?” March 4. Recently the No Tower Coalition in Grandview-Woodland launched a campaign urging Vancouver to build temporary modular housing (TMH) on the city-owned parking lot at Commercial Drive and Adanac Street. We believe this site is perfect for TMH

because it’s currently available; it’s suitable in size for around 30 units of SROtype housing; and it would use city land for a valid social purpose, rather than turning it over to a private developer as was contemplated under the now defunct Kettle/Boffo tower proposal. And finally it would deliver 30 units of desperately needed supportive housing without a massive, high-priced condo tower and all the negative community impacts that it would have brought to Grandview-Woodland. So we hope Victoria will get on board and support Vancouver with more TMH funding. Sounds like a win-win for all. Barbara Cameron, Vancouver ADVERTISING

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A12

THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, M A R C H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9

VANCOURIER.COM

News

City of Vancouver launches 30-year plan for Broadway corridor Plan will cover area from Clark Drive to Vine Street between West First and 16th avenues Naoibh O’Connor

noconnor@vancourier.com

Height, density and how much strata versus rental is allowed will likely be among top issues debated during the Broadway planning process, according to chief planner Gil Kelley. But beyond those issues, he said the process is an opportunity to talk about the public realm and how to make Broadway “a more interesting and pleasant street,” as well as how to connect it better with the neighbourhoods it traverses. Kelley made those remarks at a March 6 press conference about the launch of the Broadway Plan, which will take two years to complete, in advance of open houses that began March 7. The final open house takes place March 14. The 30-year plan will cover the Broadway corridor from Clark Drive to Vine Street between West First and 16th avenues, cutting through four neighbourhoods — False Creek Flats, Fairview, Mount Pleasant and a corner of Kitsilano. It will address subjects including housing, job space, and social and cultural amenities around the future subway route — an extension of the Millennium Line from VCC-Clark Station to Arbutus Street. Six stations are planned. Kelley insists the city has no preconceptions about what will be the outcome of the Broadway Plan, but a big part of the conversation will be about protecting existing affordable rental stock, while adding more, and creating job space — the Broadway corridor from Clark to Arbutus has the secondlargest concentration of jobs in the province after downtown Vancouver. Concern about how the plan might affect land values is among issues that have been contemplated. In June 2018, council adopted an anti-speculation measure for the Broadway

Gil Kelley, the City of Vancouver’s chief planner, launched the Broadway Plan at a March 6 press conference. The final open house is March 14. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

corridor — the Development Contribution Expectation (DCE) — to limit price escalation. The DCE outlines the dollar per square foot, which would come back to the city for community benefits, out of any new strata development that’s above what’s permitted by existing zoning. “It doesn’t halt any transactions that might occur privately but we have seen, by observing market activity, that it has had a dampening effect on the price escalation of the land…” Kelley said. The Broadway Plan also takes the opposite approach to what happened when the Canada Line was built. In the latter case, land use planning took place after the Canada Line was constructed, while in this process it’s being done alongside the engineering for the Broadway subway and prior to its construction. City staff have already brought Cambie business people together with Broadway business people so they can share what they experienced and learned during Canada Line construction. Kelley also noted that the

Cambie plan only dealt with a narrow strip on either side of Cambie, with fairly uniform zoning along it, while the Broadway Plan will address a much wider area between First and 16th avenues. “By taking an earlier and broader look here, in the Broadway planning process, we can have a lot more variety and a lot more space to plan, to step development down, to get a mix of uses in and to think more holistically,” he said.

The subway

Jerry Dobrovolny, the city’s general manager of engineering, calls the Broadway subway project a significant addition to the regional transportation network and the single-most important investment that’s being made in the region. On opening day, with its new connection from Commercial Drive to Arbutus that will replace the B-Line system, he said it will carry the equivalent of 12 lanes of car traffic in each direction. Ultimately, it will carry the equivalent of 35 lanes of car traffic in each direction.

“When we’re looking at how we accommodate growth, and the tremendous economic potential in this centre, the only way we can move those volumes of people is by investing in major transportation projects like this,” he said. Preparation for the subway has already started with the relocation of trolley wires and trolley poles so buses can be re-routed during construction, which will involve tunnelling along Broadway and some surface construction at the stations. Full-scale construction of the subway is expected to begin in 2020 and be complete by 2025.

Developing issues

An interim rezoning policy is in place for the duration of the two-year planning process. The city will only proceed with applications that were already in the pipeline for consideration. Any projects that could be considered beyond those proposals would be ones involving 100 per cent social or supportive housing. Projects already in the

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queue include Jameson Development Corp.’s controversial proposal for a 28-storey tower at Broadway and Birch. The developer had received approval for a 16-storey building but then submitted an expression of interest for a higher building under the city’s Moderate Income Rental Housing Pilot Program, which is aimed at creating rental units for households earning between $30,000 and $80,000 annually. Under that policy, a minimum of 20 per cent of the units would be secured for that income range. Aside from that project, city staff said there are about 10 other ones that can be considered under the interim policy. They include proposals for rental buildings, as well as a few office and hotel projects. What will be allowed once the Broadway Plan is completed remains to be seen, but Kelley said what’s permitted may differ from area to area. “We acknowledge that there is new transit coming, which is generally a good thing, but that there is also a series of very distinct neighbourhoods along this [corridor], and we don’t start out assuming they should all be the same,” he said. “…We need to acknowledge that Mount Pleasant and Kitsilano and Fairview are very distinct areas, and [so is] the Flats. They may call for a different mix of uses, a different height profile. Probably, in all of those, there will be a high interest [about to what] extent we accommodate new floor space in any of those areas, priority for rental on the housing side, and priority for job space — that’s what we’re hearing from council and neighbourhoods so far. I imagine those themes will play out in the process, but there’s not, in our minds, [an idea] that it ought to be uniform zoning through that whole district, for the

whole length.” When asked about whether the province might pressure the city to ensure enough density is created to justify the investment in transit, Kelley said the city has told TransLink and the province it’s not funding the subway through increased development charges that would come from higher density. “Whatever density that occurs along here would help with employment, with rental options, and with some share of community amenities,” he said. “We’ve been pushing back and have held the line so far. It doesn’t mean that pressure won’t resurrect itself in the future but we think we have a good agreement at this point.” Dobrovolny added that, from a transportation perspective, the density needed to justify transit investment already exists. “Whether there is more density than that, is what the process will determine, but I want to be very clear about where we are at the baseline — we’re already there. We’ve got huge demand for transit,” he said. To those worried about the prospect of towers being built down the length of Broadway, Kelley encourages them to participate in the planning process. He, again, stressed heights have not been determined, while pointing out that existing zoning, depending where you are, already allows multiple storeys and, in most cases, beyond what’s built. “To the extent that we add more is a central part of that community consultation… What we can say is there is no predetermination about what the heights will be and, I imagine, they will vary from area to area and from station node to in between station nodes. Come help us shape the future of the corridor is my message now.” @ Naoibh Remaining open house Kingsgate Mall at 370 East Broadway at Kingsway 3 to 7 p.m., March 14

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T H U R SDAY, M A R C H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

VANCOURIER.COM

A13

Opinion

Education system often at the mercy of politics of the day

Tracy Sherlock

tracy.sherlock@gmail.com

This week’s column is a cautionary tale about politics and how quickly they can affect education — specifically recent changes made by the Doug Ford Progressive Conservative government in Ontario. Since coming to power in June, the new government in Ontario has come out with several measures that affect school children in a major way. Sex education, full-day kindergarten, class size limits, post-secondary tuition and the children’s advocate have all been hit by changes. First, last summer, Ford’s party scrapped a modernized sex education curriculum, brought in by the province’s first female and first openly gay premier, Liberal Kathleen Wynne. That curriculum, introduced in 2015, included topics such as sexual orientation, gender identity, same-sex relationships, consent and online safety. Teachers and the Canadian Civil Liberties Association took the matter to the province’s Human

Rights Tribunal, arguing that removing these topics from the curriculum stigmatizes LGBTQ people. The province says parents were pulling their kids from school because they didn’t support those controversial topics and that it will develop a new curriculum in the near future. The tribunal dismissed the legal challenge last week, ruling that teachers are free to go beyond the official curriculum. The CCLA called it a “crummy day” and said it would appeal the decision. Although controversial, B.C. introduced a mandatory Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity policy in 2016, which school districts must use in their antibullying policies. It’s hard to imagine going back to a time when such topics were not openly discussed in schools. Ontario’s next move came in November when the government announced it was planning to repeal the Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth Act, which created the office of the province’s Child Advocate in 2007. B.C. has a similar position — Mary

Since getting elected in June, Doug’s Ford Progressive Conservative government in Ontario has come out with several measures that affect school children in a major way. PHOTO NATHAN DENETTE/CANADIAN PRESS

Ellen Turpel-Lafond filled it for 10 years — and the office, now led by Dr. Jennifer Charlesworth, has brought to light numerous tragedies involving foster children and those who have aged out of the foster system. Irwin Elman has held the office in Ontario since its creation, advocating loudly and clearly for vulnerable children, youth and families. Elman has vowed to carry on, despite the

government’s plans. Given the important work done by the advocates, the thought of eliminating the office, such as it may happen in Ontario, would seem like a major, devastating step backwards. In January, the Ontario government announced it is considering removing class-size limits for grades one to three. Primary classes there are capped at 23 students while in B.C.

the limit is 22 students for Grades one to three. In comments to the media about those possible changes, Ontario’s education minister wouldn’t commit to continuing full-day kindergarten beyond the next school year. The fullday kindergarten program in Ontario — which the Toronto Star says costs about $1.5 billion a year — is for four- and five-year-olds. There are two adults in every classroom: one teacher and one early childhood educator. Class size limits are higher for all-day kindergarten because of that; each kindergarten class has up to 29 students. In B.C., kindergarten classes are capped at 20 students, but each class has only one adult. Ford later backtracked, saying full-day kindergarten will continue, but that it may not remain exactly the same. Full-day kindergarten started in B.C. in 2010. Advocates say having fiveyear-olds in class all day is associated with better reading and math skills and smoother transitions to Grade 1. As reported in a recent column, chil-

dren in B.C. are showing up to kindergarten more vulnerable than in the past, making the all-day support even more valuable. Parents in B.C. would surely revolt if full-day kindergarten was removed, as has been hinted at in Ontario, given the ultra-high costs of child care in the province. The new Ontario government has also made some changes to university fees, including cutting tuition by 10 per cent while expecting universities to cover that cost themselves, axing a program that gave free tuition to low-income students and making student union fees optional. Ford was widely reported as saying student unions get up to “crazy Marxist nonsense.” These examples illustrate just how quickly change can happen in an education system, based on the politics of the day. If you value full-day kindergarten, small class sizes, an advocate for children and youth, stability in post-secondary tuitions and a strong sex education curriculum, you’d best be paying attention.

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A14

THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, M A RC H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9

VANCOURIER.COM

News Hellenic Community targeted after club rents venue for far right event The Free Speech Club is hosting Stefan Molyneux and Lauren Southern at the Hellenic Community of Vancouver March 15 Jessica Kerr

jkerr@vancourier.com

Vancouver’s Hellenic Community has been targeted in recent weeks after the Free Speech Club rented the facility to host its latest event. Started at UBC in the fall of 2016, the club, according to its website, aims to host “the most important and intellectually stimulating events in the world. Our mission is to provide a platform to the great thinkers of our time, and inspire people in our culture to protect, sustain, and promote free speech.” The club was in the media last October when the event it hosted with controversial American rightwing political commentator Ben Shapiro was met with criticism and protests. The club is now hosting an event this Friday at the Hellenic Community of Vancouver featuring Stefan Molyneux and Lauren Southern. Molyneux is the founder and host of the Freedom Radio podcast and YouTube channel, which features videos with titles such as “The Death of Europe – European Migrant Crisis,” “Migratory Patterns of Predatory Immigrants” and “The Female Evil.” Southern is described as a Canadian journalist, political activist, documentary

UBC’s Free Speech Club hosts a controversial event March 15 featuring far right figures Lauren Southern and Stefan Molyneux at the Hellenic Community of Vancouver.

filmmaker and author of the book Barbarians: How Baby Boomers, Immigrants, and Islam Screwed My Generation. Southern also has a YouTube channel featuring videos with titles such as “Asking Feminists: Women’s Rights or Islam” and “Why I Hate Pride Parades.” The event has prompted criticism from some who say the views expressed by Molyneux and Southern are racist and promote white supremacy and gender inequality. The club says that it brings in speakers based on demand from its membership and strives to promote “a diversity of ideas.” “We also alternate between right-wing and left-wing speakers. Just a short while ago, we hosted Indigenous

rights speakers who were left on the political spectrum,” club director Angelo Isidorou said in an email. “Now we are hosting two speakers who are very prominently right on the political spectrum. This is the pattern that we strive to follow.” The event was originally slated to take place at the UBC Chan Centre but was moved, Isidorou said, because of security costs. He said the cost for security for the event was too much this time around — the club had hosted Shapiro at the centre last fall — because the ticket price for Molyneux and Southern is lower. There was an online petition asking the university to cancel the event circulating in February that garnered more than 450 signatures

in a few days. And after the change of venue was announced at the end of February, the Hellenic centre started receiving negative messages and threats, mostly through social media, from people unhappy that the event is taking place there and urging the centre to cancel it. “We have been on the receiving end of a considerable amount of unwarranted grief,” said Hellenic Centre of Vancouver president Demetri Zambus. “We are not hosting the event, we are not promoting the event, we are not endorsing the event. We are merely a public venue where any legitimate group can rent space and do whatever business or speaking or other event that they wish to do so.”

Zambus said the centre has made a commitment to make the space available to anyone. “We don’t want to enter that slippery slope of having to vet who, what, where or why,” he said. “If they’re a registered terrorist group, yes, there’s an avenue to where we could deny access to our space but barring that, we are not in a position to do that, nor do we want to.” Zambus added that ethnic and political groups of all stripes have used the centre to host events over the years. “We’ve had Chinese events, Hindu events, Greek, Italian, Portuguese. You name it, they’ve been through our centre. We’ve had political parties having meetings, gatherings, election night result celebrations of every flavour of the political spectrum. They’ve all been here, they’ve all had an equal opportunity to do so.” At least three groups are planning on protesting Friday’s event — Students Against Bigotry, and the Vancouver chapters of Revolutionary Student Movement and Revolutionary Communists. “We think it’s really important to show solidarity with our friends and our allies in communities in the Vancouver area and not

stand for this kind of hateful rhetoric anywhere because no matter where it is it’s affecting students and it’s affecting our families and friends and communities so it’s important for us to stand together against this sort of thing wherever it might be taking place,” said Jonathan, a member of Students Against Bigotry, who would not give his last name, saying he feared being harassed by far-right supporters. Vancouver police media relations officer Sgt. Jason Robillard said the department is aware of the event and officers will be on site Friday to “encourage peaceful behaviour.” “We will have a visible presence and will be focused on keeping the peace, and providing a safe environment for all attending the event,” he said in an email. “We do have a process in place where we assess intelligence and plan for events such as this Friday,” Robillard said. “We deal with hundreds of rallies, public events and protests a year, where we carefully weigh the needs of our citizen’s rights for free speech with the need for public safety. “While there may be tensions at this event we trust that people will maintain the peace.” @JessicaEKerr

Meet UBC engineer making inroads in traditionally male-dominated field Nationally, women are significantly under-represented in the field of engineering Jessica Kerr

jkerr@vancourier.com

When Cecilia Liu decided to pursue a career in engineering, she says she didn’t really think about the fact it’s a traditionally maledominated field. While women make up more than half of the population of Canada they are significantly underrepresented in engineering, according to Engineers Canada. Less than 13 per cent of practising licensed engineers in Canada are women. That number, however, is on the rise. Liu, a fourth-year engineering student at the University of B.C., said that her class is about 25 per cent women, which is higher than the national average. Across Canada, women account for about 20 per cent of total enrolment in accredited undergraduate engineering programs.

Cecilia Liu (centre front row) and some of the members of UBC Supermilage pose with last year’s entries for the annual Shell Eco-Marathon Americas competition. This year’s edition takes place April 3 to 6 in Sonoma, California. Liu is co-captain of this year’s team. PHOTO WILSON HSU

“It’s really nice to go to work with other women that are in the program, we try to support each

other,” she said. Liu first became interested in engineering in high school and didn’t

give it a second thought when she decided to pursue it as a career. “I didn’t really think

about it… it actually didn’t occur to me at the time that it was such a male-dominated field,” she said. This year Liu is co-captain at UBC Supermilage, leading a team of 80 engineering students working to design and build fuel efficient gasoline and electric powered vehicles for the annual Shell Eco-Marathon Americas competition April 3 to 6 in Sonoma, California. Liu said the team is really trying to push how far a vehicle can go on a tank of gas. And for the first time this year, UBC Supermilage is entering the contest with a battery electric car. This is the 11th year the UBC team has entered the competition and this time around Supermilage will have entries in two categories — Prototype and UrbanConcept. The Prototype category challenges teams to enter futuristic-looking, stream-

lined vehicles designed to reduce friction and maximize efficiency, while the UrbanConcept category challenges teams to design vehicles that are both energy-efficient and roadworthy. Liu said she has never felt like she has been treated any differently than her male counterparts in the program, and encourages young women considering going into the field to follow their dreams. “I think it’s just important to stick with what you want to do and what you’re interested in and to try not to let what other people say affect you,” she said. “It’s great if you have parents or teachers or friends that are supportive of your interests… but if you believe in yourself you don’t have to worry as much about what people are saying. Pursue your passion.” @JessicaEKerr


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, M A R C H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9

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Business

Jeff Donnelly has 26 businesses that are either pubs, cocktail lounges, barbershops or eateries in addition to his planned nine cannabis stores. PHOTO DOMINIC SCHAEFER/BIV FILES

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Donnelly Group to launch ninestore Hobo cannabis retail chain Longtime pub operator plans stores on Main Street, Granville Street and Commercial Drive

Glen Korstrom

gkorstrom@biv.com

Longtime pub operator Jeff Donnelly plans

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to launch a chain of nine cannabis stores branded Hobo Recreational Cannabis, which he expects to open in quick succession starting in April, he confirmed March 11. Eight of those stores will be in B.C., with one in Ottawa. Vancouver locations will include outlets on Granville Street, Main Street and Commercial Drive. The stores will operate under his Donnelly Group, which in Vancouver also operates 10 pubs, two cocktail lounges, five barbershops and a restaurant. His Vancouver-based venture also operates in Toronto: four pubs, a cocktail club, two barbershops and a café. It has been rumoured for months that Donnelly would enter the cannabis retail sector, and he has attended cannabis-related events hosted by Business in Vancouver. Donnelly, however, has previously turned down BIV’s requests for an interview about his plans for cannabis retail stores. “While the venture may be new, our ethos remains the same,” he said in a March 11 release. “Be true to yourself and your neighbourhood; the people will follow.” In order to open in Ontario, Donnelly acquired one of the 25 cannabis licences that the Ontario government is granting to entrepreneurs after it held a lotterystyle system to determine

which applicants would be allowed to open stores, according to the company. Marta James, who is a cannabis lawyer at Sotos LLP, said on Twitter that the Ontario cannabis licences are not transferable so what likely happened is that Donnelly has partnered with the licence owner via a brand or trademark licence agreement. Only five of those licences are for stores that could open in Eastern Ontario, and Donnelly’s store will be on Bank Street in Ottawa’s Centretown neighbourhood. Plans for a cannabis store at that location went public last month when an application from Karan Someshwar was posted on the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario website. The name Hobo caused a buzz among some Twitter users. “Some people got quite creative naming the first round of retail cannabis stores in Ontario. The Hunny Pot, Ganjika House, Smok and Choom are all pretty sweet, but Hobo Recreational Cannabis Store?? Can’t beat it,” wrote Saira Peesker on her @ Peesker account. C. Davis, however, wrote on her @SeaDavis7 account “cool that we are no longer even trying to pretend the cannabis industry isn’t hugely gentrified. WTF kind of

stupid, bullshit, stigmaperpetuating name is Hobo?!” Donnelly did not immediately return BIV’s request for an interview to explain how he came up with that name, but his vice-president of brand and culture, Harrison Stoker, sent BIV a statement that read, “The term ‘hobo’ dates back to the 1920s, and describes a travelling worker. The word evokes a sense of wanderlust, and implies a passion for the journey over the actual, final destination. The team behind Hobo Recreational Cannabis Store fell in love with the idea of a journey, in the context of cannabis, having both literal and figurative meaning, i.e. the journey one might embark on in their own mind while imbibing. “The Hobo logo is iconography based on the ‘Hobo Code,’ a communication system that was used by these travellers and symbolizes a ‘good road to follow.’ We hope that this conveys the inclusive message that all are welcome to come in and join us, and supports Hobo’s ‘Not All Who Wander Are Lost’ tagline.” The news release noted that each store would “reflect its host neighbourhood and feature elements of the community’s aesthetic amid a welcoming atmosphere.” @GlenKorstrom


T H U R SDAY, M A R C H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

VANCOURIER.COM

Community

Columnist Grant Lawrence comes down with a case of reefer madness, calling out Vancouver’s annual 4/20 smoke-out as unwanted, expensive, illegal and now, in the wake of legalization, pointless. FILE PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

VANCOUVER SHAKEDOWN

4/20 event is half-baked and irrelevant Grant Lawrence

grantlawrence12@gmail.com

4/20, Vancouver’s most annoying and illegal largescale gathering, is officially pointless. When the annual contraband event first sparked up on the steps of the Vancouver Art Gallery back on April 20, 1995, they had a point: marijuana was illegal, and regular people faced prosecution and criminal records for possession or public use. Since the 1990s, a majority of Canadians have agreed that smoking marijuana should not be a criminal offense in this country. I am one of those Canadians. I personally don’t partake in the rolled gold (the last time I shared a joint at a party I wound up face down spread eagle on the hosts’ living room rug mumbling Doors lyrics), but I couldn’t care less if you choose to get high. On Oct. 17, 2018, the recreational use of cannabis finally became legal in Canada. It was long overdue, but the minute that law took effect, the ridiculous collective bong hit that is the 4/20 event should have been snubbed like a burntout roach. You won! There is nothing more to protest! Mary Jane is mainstream! Your ganja is good to go! POT IS LEGAL. What isn’t legal in the city of Vancouver is smoking in a public park. It’s a health and cleanliness thing. It takes a special kind of moron to manage to break the law with a legal substance, and that’s just what the 4/20 stoners are about to do en masse at 4:20 p.m. on April 20.

Since 2016, in growing numbers, potheads have invaded Sunset Beach in the West End by the many tens of thousands (last year’s estimated attendance was 40,000). They seemingly can’t be stopped, as if they’re an army of White Walkers dressed in Guatemalan ponchos. During that time, they have reportedly left taxpayers choking on a bill for more than $583,000, according to a memo from Vancouver city staff to council. A huge part of those costs are for policing, but 4/20 organizers say they shouldn’t have to pay for the cops, because they are a “protest.” “The idea that you can’t hold a protest in Vancouver unless you give a huge amount of money to the police kind of goes against the idea of a democracy,” organizer Dana Larsen recently told Global News. What a pile of bullshit. Since when do protests fight for something that is legalized? Since when do protests have the upwards of 500 vendor tents being sold at either $500 or $750 a pop? We need to clear the air: you would have to be seriously hallucinating to call this event anything but a major city festival. And here’s the reefer madness: it’s a festival that organizers have never had permission to hold — anywhere. They just do it. Sunset Beach was infamously closed for two and a half months after last year’s doobie debacle and, yet, the 100 per cent legal Vancouver Folk Festival brings in an average of 60,000 people

to Jericho Beach Park every summer. You can often catch the scent of blunts on the breeze despite it being a non-smoking festival, and it’s gone like a circus in the night. Show up three days later and you’d never know it had been there. How body-stoned do you have to be to be physically unable to reach down, pick up your empty Doritos bag and throw it in a garbage can? Some proponents of 4/20 have cited the fact that Hastings Park hosts a craft beer festival each year, and so that means that there should also be room in this city for a sanctioned

marijuana smoke-in, maybe even at the PNE. And while a 4/20 Festival at the PNE would probably put the sale of mini doughnuts through the stratosphere, there’s still that burning problem: smoking is just as illegal in Hastings Park as it is on Sunset Beach (the Hastings Park/ PNE Board voted against the relocation). How about Mitchell Island? It’s time for 4/20 and its supporters to take a harsh toke of reality: you’ve smoked yourself out of Vancouver! Your event is now not just annoying, unwanted, expensive and illegal — it is irrelevant.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, M A R C H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9

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Arts & Entertainment THE GROWLER

Craft breweries could be forced from communities they helped create Rising real estate and property taxes pose challenge to brewers new and old Rob Mangelsdorf

editor@thegrowler.ca

Do you remember what Vancouver’s much-loved Yeast Van brewery district was like, before all the breweries moved in? In a word, it was stabby. Twenty years ago, the run-down industrial area was replete with vacant buildings and empty storefronts. Thanks to an animal waste processing plant and a chicken slaughterhouse, it didn’t smell too nice, either. It was not a particularly pleasant place to be. “Needles and condoms everywhere” is how James Walton remembers it. The owner and brewer at East Van’s iconic Storm Brewing moved into his Commercial Drive location in 1994, well before the current crop of craft breweries took root. “I used to get broken into every six months, pretty regularly.” But that changed, and breweries looking for light industrial-zoned space in which to set up shop were a big part of that change. Breweries brought foot traffic back to the neighbourhood. Instead of merely serving as a conduit for commuters travelling in and out of downtown, Powell Street became a destination for locals and tourists alike. The streets were no longer creepily vacant after 6 p.m., and so they became safer, and the neighbourhood

Storm Brewing’s James Walton says the future of the iconic craft brewery is uncertain after its lease expires next year. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

became desirable. Today, the area is home to 12 craft breweries, two distilleries, coffee roasters, ice cream shops, music studios, trendy restaurants and grocery stores. And, of course, condos that advertise themselves as being in the heart of the city’s brewery district. But thanks to the twoheaded hydra of rising taxes and runaway real estate speculation, the very breweries that helped create Yeast Van may be forced out of it. Walton is looking at the very real possibility that his lease won’t be renewed when it expires next year. As

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a result, he’s on the lookout for a new home for Storm, but he’s not finding much. “It’s pretty depressing,” he says. “We’re looking at paying at least double for a similar space.” But in order to justify that expense, he’ll have to expand his brewery, start packaging his product and put in a tasting room. That means more equipment, more space and a more expensive location. When all is said and done, he estimates that he could be spending upwards of four times as much as he is now — assuming he can even raise the investment necessary to build such an expansion. If he can’t, it may be the

end for one of the most important, pioneering breweries in B.C.’s craft beer scene. Making matters worse, has been a corresponding increase in property taxes. And since many small businesses, including most breweries in Vancouver, are on “triple-net” leases, they are responsible for paying not only the monthly rent, but the property taxes and maintenance, too. Property taxes are determined by assessing a property’s “highest and best use,” so when areas of the city are rezoned to allow for different uses — such as mixed use residential as is the case in much of Van-

couver’s industrial-zoned land — suddenly that theoretical highest and best use is a lot more valuable and property taxes skyrocket. According to B.C. Assessment, property values for light industrial land in Vancouver increased 36.5 per cent in 2018. As a result, property taxes on the building Storm leases have jumped by nearly 30 per cent in the past year alone. “Taxes have gone up massively in the past five years,” says Walton. “And the city has been no help.” While the reasoning for taxing properties at their highest and best use is to encourage property owners to redevelop their land, under triple-net leases, owners aren’t paying the taxes, the businesses are. Yet the services the businesses receive from the city haven’t changed. Just a short walk away, Callister Brewing is facing a similar conundrum. Owner Chris Lay recently renegotiated a five-year extension on his lease that included a 60 per cent increase. But it could have been worse. “If we were to leave this space, we’d be looking at a 100 per cent increase,” he says. As a result of the neighbourhood becoming desirable, there are fewer commercial properties available, which drive up prices. That shortage is further exacerbated by rampant speculation,

as some landlords are opting to leave their properties vacant, according to Lay. “It used to be a selling feature to have a tenant in your commercial building, but now, thanks to speculation, it’s a liability if they want to redevelop,” he says. “Properties are literally worth more as a hole in the ground than as a standing building.” Because of the increase in property values and taxes, Lay has had to completely rewrite his business plan. “In the past five years, all the gains we’ve made growing our business have now all been wiped out,” he says. “I don’t know what we’ll do in five years when our lease is up. That’s a lot to take for any small business.” Lay says he’d like to see the City of Vancouver step up and help small businesses who are finding themselves being priced out of the neighbourhoods they helped create, perhaps with a grant program to offset the increase in property taxes. If the city doesn’t take action, the result could be a mass exodus of small businesses, craft breweries included. “All of us are in the same position,” he says. ••• The Spring 2019 issue of The Growler is out now! You can find B.C.’s favourite craft beer guide at your local brewery, select private liquor stores and on newsstands across the province.

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Development Permit Board Meeting: March 18 The Development Permit Board and Advisory Panel will meet: Monday, March 18, 2019 at 3 pm Vancouver City Hall, 453 West 12th Avenue Ground Floor, Town Hall Meeting Room to consider the following development permit application: 3591 West 19th Avenue (Dunbar and 19th Ave) To develop on this site a new mixed-use building consisting of six retail spaces on the ground floor and 28 dwelling units from the second to fourth floor, with vehicle access from the lane. TO SPEAK ON THIS ITEM: 604-873-7770 or kathy.cermeno@vancouver.ca Visit: vancouver.ca Phone: 3-1-1 TTY: 7-1-1


T H U R SDAY, M A R C H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

VANCOURIER.COM

Arts & Entertainment

Vancouver-based screenwriter and showrunner Dennis Heaton digs deep into the world of secret societies in the Netflix series The Order.

THE SHOWBIZ

Netflix series The Order mixes humour, horror and beer pong UBC plays a key role in The Order, Netflix’s new scary series about secret societies

Sabrina Furminger

sabrina@yvrscreenscene.com

Dennis Heaton learned a lot about secret societies when he was writing The Order, but his favourite societies don’t have Wikipedia entries or internet footprints. “We’ll never know about the best secret societies,” says the Vancouver-based screenwriter and showrunner whose lengthy list of credits includes Motive, Call Me Fitz and Ghost Wars. “The Skull and Bones and the Illuminati have percolated to the surface, but I’m really curious about the ones that are out there that we haven’t heard about. They’re the ones that are winning the game at keeping it under wraps.” Heaton’s latest project draws its inspiration from those unknown societies, and injects them with magic and werewolf lore. The Order stars Jake Manley as Jack Morton, a university freshman intent on infiltrating the secret society that destroyed his mother — but in the process, he ends up joining a rival secret society completely by accident. No spoilers, but both societies engage in magic, mischief and murder. And because they’re populated by university students, they’re also rife with texting and beer pong and clumsy hook-ups. The locally shot Netflix series dropped its 10-episode first season on March 7. Its remarkable cast includes Sarah Grey, Adam DiMarco, Katharine Isabelle, Max Martini, Thomas Elms, Devery

Jacobs and Louriza Tronco. Jewel Staite plays a pair of deliciously nasty sisters who are wholly different from Kaylee, the sunny character she played on Firefly, and Max Headroom icon Matt Frewer portrays Jack’s vengeful granddad. The Order is equal parts funny and terrifying. “I’ve always found horror and comedy to be two sides of the same coin when I’m writing,” says Heaton, noting that he drew inspiration from The Howling and An American Werewolf in London. “For me, they naturally go hand in hand. It’s not like I set out and go, ‘OK, I’m going to write a horror film and I need to make sure I get some jokes.’ There’s just a natural balance between horror and comedy when I’m writing something in the horror genre.” Heaton and his Order writers were cognizant of the fact their viewers exist in a world that is already scary. “[With The Order], I think it’s less about trying to scare people in a scary world and more about trying to distract them so they can be entertained again for a while and have a little fun,” says Heaton. While The Order is fun for viewers all over the world, it’s arguably more fun for Vancouverites, given that much of the action was filmed at the University of British Columbia’s Point Grey campus. UBC provided the exterior shots for the fictional Belgrave University; the interiors were filmed at Riverview. The old hospital “has a whole educational building that had classrooms

for training,” says Heaton. “For that, it was one-stop shopping. I appreciated it.” The Order was dreamt up and fleshed out in a writers’ room, which is industry jargon for the physical space in which the showrunner and screenwriters develop plots and generate scripts. Heaton — who is the president of the Writers Guild of Canada — describes his writers’ rooms as “a fusion between a confessional booth and An Evening at the Improv.” “As a showrunner, it’s your responsibility to make sure you’re creating a space where writers feel safe to share their stories, because there really can be those days where you’re drilling down into stuff that you wouldn’t necessarily bring up in conversation with other people.” In The Order’s writers’ room, Heaton and co. spoke freely about fear. “When you’re dealing with stuff about what scares you, you end up telling each other a lot of nightmares and things that scare you and you lean into more primal fear stuff than you might if you’re doing a family relationship drama series,” says Heaton. When it came time to film The Order, Heaton was more delighted than scared. “I think I end up ruining more shots on my show than anybody else because I’ll be sitting behind the monitor laughing out loud at stuff, and oftentimes it’s not the stuff that’s supposed to be funny but it’s scary and I’m laughing because it’s so creepy. It makes me happy.”

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, M A RC H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9

VANCOURIER.COM

Arts & Entertainment

Song remains the same for Vancouver music shop move: real estate Tapestry Music owner David Sabourin is preparing to move locations April 1 John Kurucz

jkurucz@vancourier.com

David Sabourin’s constitution is such that you wonder if he was a Buddhist monk in a former life. The shop housing his West Broadway business Tapestry Music has been sold and hundreds of his students, along with dozens of teachers, are searching for new digs and new gigs. As this plays out, Sabourin is downsizing, changing the business model and finding a new location within a two-month window. Oh, and he’s in the process of moving store locations in Victoria as well. “I could go home and develop an ulcer if I wanted to, but there’s nothing I can do about it,” Sabourin told the Courier. “This is Vancouver real estate. These things happen.” Located near the corner of Broadway and Alma Street, Sabourin established the Vancouver Tapestry Music outlet three years ago after buying the business from previous owner and fellow music educator Jerry Prussin, who retired. Shortly after taking on the

Tapestry Music owner David Sabourin calls Vancouver School District’s decision to discontinue band and stringed instrument programs in elementary schools a few years ago “a bit of a kick in the head.” PHOTO DAN TOUGLOET

new business, Vancouver school district discontinued band and stringed instrument programs in elementary schools in 2016. “That was a bit of a kick in the head for us,” Sabourin said. Although Tapestry went all in on lessons — opening 19

teaching spaces over 9,000 square feet of store space — those lessons are going the way of the dodo come March 16. Tapestry will then relocate to the 4400 block of West 10th Avenue in April. What was once 9,000 square feet becomes

2,000 square feet. The business model’s main bread winner will no longer continue, as Sabourin pivots towards sales, rentals and repairs only. “Those 19 teaching studios were paying the rent,” said Sabourin, who’s also a professional tuba player with the Vancouver Opera Orchestra. Tapestry’s main hub in White Rock has been in operation since 1996. Expansion into Victoria happened less than two years ago in a part of town with no free parking and limited storefront space. Sabourin and his son found a new location recently and plan to move in effective April 1. As for his home turf in White Rock, the new council in town has clamped down on development. Tower projects over a certain height have been put on hold. That decision has an obvious ripple effect on Sabourin, given that new residents mean new money. “When you consider that a lot of White Rock’s revenue comes from pay parking along the beach, you start to think, ‘This isn’t making a lot of sense,” Sabourin said.

“But I’ve learned to be quiet in my business.” In the midst of all this chaos, Sabourin has found three private teaching schools on the West Side that will take some of his students and teachers. He’s working on making sure the lesson costs stay the same as what he currently charges. And despite the numerous balls Sabourin’s juggling, he maintains an in-it-to-win-it attitude. At 62, he’s grooming the business for his son to one day take over. And he wants to continue providing an outlet for young kids so they can fall in love with music from an early age. “There are kids who aren’t going to be on the sports team, there are kids who don’t have the economic ability to go do activities,” Sabourin said. “If you don’t have that option in the school system, whether it’s ukulele, strings or band, I look at that as almost a childat-risk issue.” Information on where teachers and students are going, along with details around Sabourin’s new location, can be found online at tapestrymusic.com.

Left: From vintage clothing and musical instruments to nicknacks and housewares, there’s something for everyone at the Vancouver Market, March 17 at the WISE Hall. PHOTO iSTOCK Middle: The Rio screens the gravity-defying, Oscar-winning doc Free Solo. Right: March 20 is Macaron Day, with bakeries around the world celebrating the tiny bites of goodness.

Vancouver Market dusts off vintage finds at WISE Hall And four other reasons Vancouver is awesome this week Lindsay William-Ross

lindsay@vancouverisawesome.com

The Vancouver Market

Calling all vintage shoppers: The Vancouver Market is holding its inaugural event this weekend at WISE Hall. The market will have 35-plus vendors selling and showing off vintage clothing, musical instruments, homemade goods, nicknacks, jewelry, housewares and more. Food trucks will be there to fuel your shopping, and since it’s St. Patrick’s Day, you might even spot a leprechaun. March 17, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Wise Hall & Lounge, 1882 Adanac St. facebook.com

Dining Out for Life

Now in its 25th year, Dining Out for

Life is a one-day fundraising event in which more than 40 restaurants across the province contribute 25 per cent of their entire food sales to A Loving Spoonful, to help locals living with HIV/AIDS. You’ll find many of your favourites participating, from Whistler to White Rock, including spots such as Forage, Ask For Luigi, Bells and Whistles, Nook, Wildebeest, Mary’s On Davie, Pizzeria Farina, Burgoo, Hy’s, Maenam and many more. March 20 Participating restaurants in Metro Vancouver diningoutforlife.com

#Breakthecycle spin classes

Two special edition spin classes happening this weekend at Ride Cycle in Yaletown aim to keep you

fit while supporting the Downtown Eastside community. Sign up for a seat to spin and #BreaktheCycle. Proceeds from the special classes will go to Employ To Empower, a non-profit that offers training, work experience and support to help homeless individuals in the DTES transition into stable, longterm jobs. Plus there are some perks for spinners taking part in the special classes. Tickets are available online, and you can add donations onsite. March 16, 2-3 p.m. and March 17, 1:30-2:30 p.m. Ride Cycle, 881 Hamilton St. eventbrite.ca

Vasarhelyi and world-renowned photographer and mountaineer Jimmy Chin comes Free Solo, a stunning, intimate and unflinching portrait of the free soloist climber Alex Honnold, as he prepares to achieve his lifelong dream: climbing the face of the world’s most famous rock... the 3,000-foot El Capitan in Yosemite National Park... without a rope. Gulp! March 15, 3:45 p.m. and March 17, 3:30 p.m. (additional screenings March 22-23) The Rio Theatre, 1660 East Broadway riotheatre.ca

Free Solo at the Rio Theatre

Let’s celebrate Macaron Day! On March 20, bakeries around the world will offer special deals on macarons, often with a charitable

Catch a screening of this aweinspiring Oscar-winning documentary film. From filmmaker E. Chai

Macaron Day 2019

component. The treat may hail from France, but we have many macaron masters right here in Vancouver who turn out some absolute gems. To mark the day, patisseries offer special pricing on macarons, often with some or all of the profits going to support a charitable cause. You’ll find such deals at places such as Thierry, Soirette, Ladurée, TWG Tea and Bon Macaron. March 20 Participating Vancouver bakeries, while supplies last vancouverisawesome.com.

For more events, go to


T H U R SDAY, M A RC H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

VANCOURIER.COM

The hockey blog that knows who needs the puck

Pass It to Bulis

Revamp of Canucks defence can’t end with addition of Quinn Hughes Canucks GM Jim Benning is looking to bolster blue line any way he can

Backhand Sauce Daniel Wagner

The Canucks may be out of the playoff picture, but this week they gave fans a good reason to tune in for the remainder of the season: they signed top prospect Quinn Hughes after his season ended with the University of Michigan. Hughes is an exciting addition to the team: an elite skater with game-breaking potential. His mobility and passing make him a one-man breakout machine, and he can quarterback a power-play with his creativity and vision. Defensively, he makes excellent reads and uses his skating to make up for his lack of size. While expectations should be kept in check for the few games Hughes will play to end this season, there is a lot of pressure on Hughes to make a significant difference on the Canucks’ blue line in the coming season. The Canucks’ defence has been a major concern for several seasons, and they can’t expect one defenceman, no matter how good, to fix the problem. Canucks GM Jim Benning said on Monday they are looking in several different directions to revamp their defence. “We’re working right now on college free agency,” said Benning. “We’ve talked to some players, done some interviews the last couple days. We’re hoping that we can get a defenceman signed through college free agency. And then our next step is to, y’know, there’s July 1 free agency, we can look there, and I guess our other thing is we’ll look at possible trades too, to try to help improve our backend.” The Canucks dipped into college free agency this week to sign Josh Teves, a puck-moving defenceman out of Princetone University. College free agency has been good to the Canucks in the past, delivering Troy Stecher, one of their best young defenceman. Teves will look to follow in Stecher’s footsteps.

The biggest free agent signing on defence for the Canucks might just be Alex Edler. The longtime Canuck is expected to re-sign with the Canucks, but a long-term contract with the aging and injury-prone defenceman could cause problems down the line. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

If the Canucks want to add anyone else in college free agency, the issue is they’re not the only ones. Twenty-one-yearold Joseph Duszak, who led all NCAA defencemen with 47 points in 37 games, is reportedly signing with the Toronto Maple Leafs. Twenty-three-year-old Jimmy Schuldt, one of the biggest names among college free agents, reportedly has multiple suitors, led by the Montreal Canadiens, who had him out to their prospect development camp last year. Still, there’s a possibility the Canucks could find a legitimate top-four defenceman in the college free agent ranks. Then there’s NHL free agency, where Benning and the Canucks have made major

A21

missteps in the past. Two defencemen jump out in the current free agent class. Erik Karlsson is one of the best defencemen of his generation, but he’s been plagued by injuries that could limit his effectiveness. Jake Gardiner is a legitimate top-four puck-moving defenceman, but is prone to defensive gaffes. Beyond those two, the field of free agent defencemen is a mix of overrated defencemen, such as Tyler Myers, or those past their prime, such as Jay Bouwmeester and Anton Stralman. Of course, the biggest free agent signing on defence for the Canucks might just be Alex Edler. The longtime Canuck is expected to re-sign with the Canucks, but a long-term contract with the aging and injury-prone defenceman could cause problems down the line. The last option Benning mentioned was trades, but that’s also a minefield for the Canucks. Benning’s track record with defencemen acquired in trades isn’t a good one: Derrick Pouliot, Erik Gudbranson, Luca Sbisa, Philip Larsen, Adam Clendening and Andrey Pedan. Beyond their troubles with talent evaluation, you have to give something to get something; if the Canucks want a legitimate top-four defenceman, it would cost them something significant in return. If the Canucks can’t improve their defence with one of those three options, they’ll have to rely on their prospect pipeline. After Hughes, the Canucks have Olli Juolevi as a potential top-four option, but his development has been stalled by injuries and it remains to be seen when he will be ready for the NHL. Beyond those two, the Canucks have to hope that prospects like Jett Woo and Jack Rathbone will surpass expectations. Otherwise, the question of the Canucks’ defence could continue for years to come.

For daily Canucks news and views, go to Pass It to Bulis at vancourier.com.

Stick-taps & Glove-drops • I’m dropping the gloves with the Canucks for hanging Jacob Markstrom out to dry last Saturday against the Vegas Golden Knights. Markstrom has a strong case as the Canucks MVP for his play this season and he didn’t get any support as Vegas chased him from the net with a five-goal first period.

Jacob Markstrom. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

Big Numbers • 33 Quinn Hughes was tied for seventh among NCAA defencemen with 33 points in 32 games, which led the University of Michigan in scoring. • 19 Among freshman defencemen, Canucks prospect Jack Rathbone is eighth in scoring, with 19 points in 29 games with Harvard. One caveat: he’s mostly played alongside Carolina Hurricanes prospect Adam Fox, who has a whopping 40 points in 29 games.

THE GROWLER: DRINK THIS

Cheap Perfume by Parallel 49 Brewing Rob Mangelsdorf

editor@thegrowler.ca

While the prevailing trend in beer locally has been for more sessionable styles with a lower ABV, down south of the border, the craft games seems to be dominated by big bold beers that will f*** your day up if you’re not careful. Double IPAs, in particular, seem to be the hype can of choice these days, and the hazier the better. Although juicy hops do a great job of hiding any alcoholic warmth, they go down way easier then they should. Remember that time when you first tried Fat Tug, and you had three pints and couldn’t walk straight? Now picture a beer that’s even smoother, fruitier and with significantly more alcohol.

The dangerously fruity and intoxicating Cheap Perfume by Vancouver’s Parallel 49 Brewing comes by its name honestly.

Yeah, these beers are trouble. The best kind of trouble. Yeast Van’s Parallel 49 has been getting into the juicy hop bombs lately, and thanks

to the new 40-tap tasting room and 10 hL pilot batch system, there always seems to be something new to try. Cheap Perfume has been in cans for a few months now, but with spring around the corner, now seems as good a time as any to crack into this double-dry hopped DIPA. One whiff, and it’s pretty obvious how Cheap Perfume got its name, thanks to its intoxicating mélange of tropical fruit and citrus. The beer pours a hazy golden orange, but if you’re looking for maximum opaque-ness and body you can float a quarter on, this isn’t that kind of beer. Which is good, honestly. Some of these juicy IPAs are so thick, they’re bordering on viscous. Personally, I’d prefer my beer to not have the same consistency as motor oil — but that’s just me. Thankfully, Cheap Perfume makes good on the promise of its aroma, with big bold

fruit notes. But while the hop flavours dominate, the hop bitterness is quite manageable. Altogether very smooth, very delicious and very dangerous.

Cheap Perfume by Parallel 49 Brewing (8.1% ABV) Appearance: Hazy golden orange with a persistent fluffy white head. Aroma: Tropical fruit, pineapple, passion fruit, mandarin orange, citrus, pine. Flavour: Tropical fruit, passion fruit, pineapple, citrus, mandarin orange, melon, pine, subtle dankness, slight crackery malt character, low hop bitterness, low alcoholic warmth. Very smooth considering the ABV. Body/Finish: Medium-full bodied with a semidry finish. Pairs with: Trini doubles, hot wings, Tinder dates and a safe ride home.


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T H U R SDAY, M A R C H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Vintage & value Vegas PAGE B6

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PAGE B4

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T H U R SDAY, M A R C H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

VANCOURIER.COM

FROM THE

Is 90 the new 70?

SANDRA THOMAS | STHOMAS@VANCOURIER.COM

I recently watched an HBO documentary film from 2017 called If You’re Not in the Obit, Eat Breakfast, hosted by Carl Reiner, who turns 97 on March 20.

The question Reiner puts to these men and women in their 90s and even older is: “What’s the secret to living into your 90s — and loving every minute of it?”

The film is as funny, smart and irrepressible as Reiner himself, as he interviews other celebrated nonagenarians, including long time buddies Mel Brooks (92), Norman Lear (96) and Betty White (97), as well as others not so celebrated, but still remarkably impressive. And it’s not just celebrities Reiner focuses on. He also features yoga teacher Tao PorchonLynch, who turned 100 last year, and runner Ida Keeling, who turns 104 in May, among others.

And their answers are almost as varied as the subjects. While one credits his diet — no booze or drugs — another claims exercise is the key to longevity, while yet another (Dick Van Dyck) insists the fountain of youth can be found in dancing every day and marrying a woman 40 years his junior. But the running theme of the movie seems to be that staying active and finding something to do that you love — and a little humour

— goes a long way towards “I could work nine days a living a happy, productive life. week and not be tired,” he tells the camera with a huge grin. In one scene, pianist Irving “I go on and on because I love Fields, who died in 2016 at the what I do.” age of 101, is shown playing piano at his regular afternoon Of course, life, genes and gig at the Park Lane Hotel health don’t always cooperate — and it was obvious he was as we’d like them too, but I having a blast. found the film motivating

in the fact all of these nonagenarians were having so much fun, something I hadn’t considered before about one day turning 90. So, until that day, I’m going to follow Reiner’s advice and so long as my name’s not in the obits, I’ll be eating breakfast.

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: CARL REINER, GEORGE SHAPIRO, MEL BROOKS AND NORMAN LEAR ARE FEATURED IN THE DOCUMENTARY FILM IF YOUÕRE NOT IN THE OBIT, EAT BREAKFAST. PHOTO HBO

April Learning Events at Legacy April 2nd 2:30 - 3:30 pm Dementia, New Insights from Neuroscience. Presented by Nadine Jans, Registered Clinical Counsellor, Uptimize Coaching, Counselling & Training Limited. April 9th 2:30 - 3:30 pm The “Low Down” on High Blood Pressure. Presented by Kim Lepp with Home Instead Senior Care. April 16th 2:30 - 3:30 pm Oral & Dental Health. Presented by Dr. Wilson Kwong.

Your Life, Your Way at Legacy At Legacy, life is about choices. Whether it’s relaxing in the privacy and comfort of your air-conditioned suite with your morning cup of coffee, going for a walk in the park nearby, or joining friends for the morning yoga class, Legacy offers choices for the ideal retirement lifestyle.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, M A R C H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9

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Dementia Village THE CRAFT ROOM IN WHAT WILL EVENTUALLY BE A DEMENTIA VILLAGE AT HOLY FAMILY RESIDENCE. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

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T H U R SDAY, M A R C H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A new project from Providence Health Care allows residents with dementia the freedom to roam

ARTIST RENDERING

SANDRA THOMAS | STHOMAS@VANCOURIER.COM

Imagine a loved one living with dementia, but who is still able to safely walk out their front door, shop at the grocery store and even drop into a pub for a drink without anyone to guide them.

households of 12 residents each in its north wing to simulate dementia village households where residents share a common bond. The majority of residents now have private rooms allowing for more personal That’s the model Providence and individualized space. Health Care is introducing Providence also increased the by way of what’s known as a number of resident care aid dementia village or “household staff available in the evening. innovation project,” which will eventually be surrounded by a “In these households the secure perimeter so residents residents can get up and leave can go about their daily lives out the front door because with liberty and dignity, but they’re confined by the outer also safely. extremities,” said Tait. “The household holds 12 people Jo-Ann Tait, Providence who share their own kitchen corporate director of seniors and social space and 12 care and palliative services, said private bedrooms.” to get the trial started as soon as possible, the north wing of Tait said the project was made the Holy Family Residence possible by a $3.3-million donation to Holy Family care home on Argyle Street, was transformed into a type of Residence from Beatris and Peter Jurazs, to adapt dementia village. In January, the existing care home to Providence created two

infrastructure and programs based on the principles of the De Hogeweyk dementia village model in the Netherlands. The goal is to eventually transfer the model to stand-alone dementia villages. As part of research for the project, Tait visited Europe with a group of professionals to see De Hogeweyk dementia villages for themselves. Tait said the residents they met with were able to visit a café, go grocery shopping and enjoy the music room on their own. “We went to 19 different places in five countries in two weeks,” said Tait. “In one

place in the Netherlands it was 10 a.m. and a bunch of residents had congregated in a pub and were drinking beer and having a sing-along. People were living with such vibrancy.” Tait said based on the research gathered, Providence decided not to wait until it could build a stand-alone dementia village, but instead began introducing elements of the project into existing residences, including the creation of smaller dining rooms in the households to encourage a more intimate and communal mealtime experience. As well, beds have ARTIST RENDERING

been designed and prototyped with motion sensor lights under them, which illuminate the way to the bathroom so residents who get up in the middle of the night don’t have to search for a switch. The next step is building a secure perimeter around Holy Family Residence with creative fencing and landscaping, which will give residents access to the outdoors. Tait said with a secure perimeter, the need for chemical restraints is often diminished. The themes of the two households at Holy Family include “Gastown” and “Hollywood” with a goal to make the residences feel more like a home than a work space. To that end, offices have been moved out of sight and nursing stations removed from the north wing. As well, institutional-style signs are no longer in use.

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“The north wing of Holy Family Residence will no longer be a workplace where people live, but a home where people happen to work. People who currently live at Holy Family are excited about this as well as their family members,” added Tait. Tait noted the Jurazs were a husband and wife who lived within humble means in order to make this substantial gift and no one is exactly sure what their connection to Holy Family is. Tait added with future donations made to the St. Paul’s Foundation, dementia care services and dementia villages are also planned for St. Joseph’s in Comox and Heather Street in Vancouver. To help support this program, as well as all seniors care at Providence, visit helpstpauls. com. According to Alzheimer Society Canada, in 15 years, the number of Canadians living with dementia is expected to nearly double.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, M A R C H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9

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BELLAGIO FOUNTAIN

Vintage valueVegas

Eight free or affordable activities to do in Las Vegas that don’t include a casino SANDRA THOMAS | STHOMAS@VANCOURIER.COM

“Luck be a lady tonight. Luck be a lady tonight. Luck, if you’ve been a lady to begin with luck be a lady, tonight...”

Listening to Frank Sinatra croon “Luck be a Lady,” while standing in the North Gallery of the Neon Museum in Las Vegas, I was

immediately transported back to the days of the infamous “Rat Pack,” a group of Vegas headliners from the 1960s, which included among others, Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Junior, Peter Lawford and Joey Bishop.

In perfect timing with the song, a previously inanimate

Lady Luck Casino Hotel sign danced back to life and, in what turned out to be a brilliant optical illusion, each individual neon bulb appeared to twinkle and shine with light.

that brings back to life longdimmed neon signs rescued from oblivion — and sets their resurrection to a playlist including everything from Elvis to Sinatra to Elton John to Panic at the Disco.

I was attending the museum’s 9:30 p.m. showing of Brilliant, a multi-media extravaganza

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and 3-D photogrammetry (the science of making measurements from photographs) to create a digital model of each sign, bulb by bulb. And Winslow did a great job — even previously knowing the 40 signs that make up the show aren’t functional, I had a hard time believing it as I carefully eyed each of them as they become illuminated once again. I wasn’t the only person grinning from ear to ear as an image of Liberace appeared at a white grand piano above our heads, the Terrible Herbst

T H U R SDAY, M A R C H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Check out these FREE or affordable activities

cowboy played both bad guy — to “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly” — and, later on, a bespectacled Elton John, and large vintage signs from the iconic Golden Nugget and Flamingo hotels lit up the dark desert sky on a cool January night.

For the complete story with full descriptions, visit vancourier.com. HIKE RED ROCK CANYON redrockcanyonlv.org $15 per car or truck and FREE on several national holidays.

This was my first visit to the Neon Museum, founded in 1996, despite numerous trips to Las Vegas over the years, and I immediately regretted never having been before. Already famous for its Neon Boneyard exhibit, Brilliant opened in February 2018 to offer visitors an immersive,

MOB MUSEUM themobmuseum.org Tickets start at $27 for all day admission — and you could spend an entire day there checking out the exhibits.

PINBALL HALL OF FAME

after-dark experience that combines history, art and entertainment.

NEON MUSEUM

The Neon Museum is operated by a non-profit organization dedicated to collecting, preserving, studying and exhibiting iconic Las Vegas signs. The museum’s campus includes

the Neon Boneyard outdoor exhibition space, a visitors’ center housed inside the former La Concha Motel lobby (of course), and the Neon Boneyard North Gallery, which showcases additional salvaged signs and is available for weddings, special events, photo shoots and educational programs.

SHELBY AMERICAN HERITAGE MUSEUM shelby.com FREE entrance and guided tours. PINBALL HALL OF FAME pinballmuseum.org Free to wander, but you need money to play. INTERACTIVE ART TOUR AT THE COSMOPOLITAN cosmopolitanlasvegas.com FREE

THE PARK theparkvegas.com | FREE BELLAGIO FOUNTAINS SHOW, CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN bellagio.com | FREE SAVE ON THE STRIP FLAMINGO HOTEL AND CASINO caesars.com/flamingo-las-vegas During my last visit I stayed at the Flamingo Hotel and Casino, which combines vintage Vegas with modern amenities. The Flamingo is located on the strip and is right across the road from Caesars Palace — the Flamingo is part of the Caesars Entertainment group. The resort is a tribute to mid-century modern, complete with large pink flamingo paintings on one wall of my room, but with comfortable, contemporary furnishings. A 15-acre Caribbean-style water playground is also a bonus.

A Caring and Sharing Community for Our Residents At Chelsea Park, everyone belongs. With a mandate as simple as that, it is no wonder the independent senior retirement residence is one of the most sought after in the city.

“We are a warm and welcoming community,” said Karen Dupont, the manager at Chelsea Park. “People who want to enjoy the total community will not find a better setting.” Nestled

B7

in a quaint residential neighbourhood, seniors of Chelsea Park are perfectly situated to stroll through John Hendry Park, walk around Trout Lake, or meander down the block to the retail shops lining Commercial Drive.

Though, with organized activities filling calendars, home cooked meals and “sit and fit” exercise classes, seniors might be hard pressed to leave the comforts of their home. Whether it is Monday afternoon tea with Dianne the resident hostess, live entertainment with dinner, or bingo night, Chelsea Park

seniors have every chance to live their lives to the fullest. Residents also have the choice of Nintendo Wii bowling, playing tennis or golf indoors without leaving their home, or join in the exciting new Bocce games on the patio. Gardening and card clubs, the games room, and QiGong relaxation exercises and the knitting social also ensure residents do not have to give up their hobbies and cherished pastimes.

do think of ourselves as family.” Chelsea Park proudly earned the BC Seniors Living Association Seal of Approval in 2011. “Standards matter to us and the seal of approval ensures that safety and comfort are always prioritized,” Karen explained. Offering comfort, security, and affordability without compromise, Chelsea Park can truly ensure seniors enjoy one of the best phases of life.

“Our organized activities are a great opportunity for our residents to get to know one another,” Karen added, “everyone here, from the residents to the staff, get along so well that we really

To learn more about Chelsea Park: VISIT: www.chelseaparkbc.ca | CALL: 604-789-7132 | EMAIL: info@chelseaparkbc.com


B8

THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, M A R C H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9

VANCOURIER.COM

Kerrisdale’s sequoia tree to find new life as public benches

It’s believed the decades-old tree had been dead for about two years before its removal SANDRA THOMAS | STHOMAS@VANCOURIER.COM

The much-loved sequoia tree that stood on West 41st Avenue adjacent to the Shopper’s Drug Mart in Kerrisdale for almost 90 years was removed March 3, but will eventually find new life as benches placed along the Arbutus Greenway. As reported in the Courier last September, a horticulturist had determined the tree was not only sick, but was likely already dead. At the time, Bill Trafford with TPMG Capital real estate, which manages the property on which the tree grew, told the Courier the results of the horticulturist exam were “not good.” The

tree had turned red and had been dropping large pieces of bark for about two years. “Unfortunately the tree roots extend under the road and the tree has been under heavy stress,” Trafford said at the time. “We’ve had a tree company take care of the tree for several years, but it was their latest recommendation that the tree come down. A full report was forwarded to the Kerrisdale Business Association as they had concerns too...” So on a quiet Sunday evening, the tree was cut down leaving behind a stump large enough to make a bench on its own.

Terri Clark, executive director of the Kerrisdale Business Association, said in an email to the Courier, that Kerrisdale Lumber president Mark Perry took a large piece of the trunk of the tree to his warehouse where it will be dried out

for about a year and then the Kerrisdale Business Association will get it milled. Clark said the association has asked the head shop teacher at Magee Secondary to use the wood — once

Your kind of Retirement Living Join us for a

St. Patrick’s Day celebration

it’s been milled — as a major project for his senior students next year. Eventually the two benches they’ve been asked to create will be placed at the Kerrisdale crossing of the Arbutus Greenway.

A note about the sequoia on the association’s website from last September read, in part, “the response of Kerrisdale’s populace has been amazing; so much love and concern for a stately wooden sentinel reminiscent of a time when the surrounding neighbourhood was only forest.” “It’s so sad. It’s breaking everyone’s heart,” Clark told the Courier at the time.

before

PHOTO: JENNIFER GAUTHIER

Gone, but not forgotten.

“We intend to affix a modest plaque on the benches to give reference to this once woody sentinel that was at the village’s heart for 90 or more years,” said Clark. “It seemed appropriate to me that it’s heart would remained with the community that was heartbroken at its demise.”

THIS LARGE STUMP IS ALL THAT REMAINS OF A HISTORIC SEQUOIA TREE THAT STOOD IN KERRISDALE FOR ALMOST 90 YEARS. PHOTO: DAN TOULGOET

after

Sunday, March 17 • 3:00pm – 5:00pm

Call 604-263-0921 ext 2000 today to RSVP Crofton Manor 2803 West 41st Ave, Vancouver 604-263-0921 • reveraliving.com

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Enjoy all things Irish featuring live entertainment by local favourite, The Wheat In The Barley band and a selection of treats and refreshments


T H U R SDAY, M A R C H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

VANCOURIER.COM

B9

Queen reigns supreme PHO HO OT TO: TO O:: iSTO O S C ST CK K

either way (19 per cent) or are undecided (17 per cent).

A recent poll shows Prince William more popular choice for king than his father MARIO CANSECO

As 1992 was about to come to an end, Queen Elizabeth II referred to the previous 12 months as an “annus horribilis” — a horrible year. There were plenty of reasons for the monarch to feel that way, ranging from a destructive fire at Windsor Castle to the official announcement of the separation of her son Charles and Diana, Princess of Wales.

Almost three decades later, there are lingering questions about another separation, this time featuring the United Kingdom and the European Union. Through it all, the Queen has remained one of the most beloved royals in Canada. But when Canadians are asked what should happen when she no longer reigns over us, the situation becomes a bit more confusing.

Research Co. asked Canadians this month about the monarchy. As has been the case since I first had the opportunity to review these sentiments more than a decade ago, Canadians can be assembled in three groups of a similar size. One-third of Canadians (33 per cent) say they would prefer to have an elected head of state, and a similar proportion (31 per cent) want Canada to remain a monarchy. The remaining respondents either do not care

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Support for the continuation of the monarchy is strongest in Atlantic Canada (42 per cent) and Alberta (40 per cent), while the idea of an elected head of state is particularly appealing for Quebecers (53 per cent). While roughly the same proportion of men and women want Canada to remain a monarchy (30 and 32 per cent, respectively), men react more positively to the notion of having a Canadian as our head of state (39, compared with 26 per cent of women). Queen Elizabeth II maintains an extraordinary favourability rating of 71 per cent across the country. Exactly the same proportion also hold positive views of Prince William, while 70 per cent feel the same way about his younger brother, Prince Harry. The favourability numbers are also high for Catherine, Duchess

of Cambridge (68 per cent) and the newest addition to the Royal Family: Meghan, Duchess of Sussex (60 per cent). Prince Philip checks in at a very decent 54 per cent. Still, a problem that I have consistently witnessed over the past 11 years remains in place today, fewer Canadians have a positive view of the person who will eventually be featured on our coins and bills. Only 43 per cent of residents have a favourable view of Prince Charles, and even fewer (32 per cent) feel similarly about Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall. The differences between Canadians’ perception of Charles and their view of William are striking. In monarchy-friendly Alberta, 69 per cent of residents have a favourable view of William, but only 37 per cent feel the same way about his father. A similar situation ensues in B.C., where William’s rating

(76 per cent) towers over that of Charles (42 per cent). When Canadians are provided with a choice as to who their next monarch should be, the first-born son fares better than his father. We find that 41 per cent of Canadians would prefer to have Prince William as King, while only 20 per cent express a preference for Prince Charles. The heir apparent continues to struggle. Just over two in five Canadians view Charles favourably, and only a third feels the same way about his wife. If Canadians — by a 2-1 majority — currently prefer to have Prince William as their next monarch, the ascension of Charles, regardless of which of his four names he ultimately selects as King, may not be as joyous as originally envisioned. For the complete version of this story, visit vancourier.com. Mario Canseco is president of Research Co.

“I work full time “I need to get to a medical appointment.” so can’t take Mom to her appointments.”

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, M A R C H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9

VANCOURIER.COM

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‘Come on down’ The Price is Right is heading to Richmond STAFF WRITER | RICHMOND NEWS

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*SourCe: ViVidata Winter 2019 Study

To advertise contact: Maureen Laventure 604-727-6405 • mlRvKTMLNK@vRTcPLNJKN.cPm

It’s time to start studying the exact prices of peanut butter, pasta sauce, shampoo and paper towel — the Price is Right Live stage show is heading to Richmond this spring.

Randomly selected contestants will be invited to play classic games from the longest running TV game show while some audience members may even win prizes from their

seats in Richmond’s River Rock Casino. Four shows are scheduled for June 14, 15 and 16. Tickets — starting at just under $40 — are on sale now. Registration will take place at the theatre three hours before start time and prize winners will be

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T H U R SDAY, M A R C H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

VANCOURIER.COM

B11

Off the (chocolate)wall PHOTO FAIRMONT HOTELS

Chocolate walls, creative cocktails and desserts galore highlights of new culinary experience at Notch8 SANDRA THOMAS | STHOMAS@VANCOURIER.COM

A pop-up chocolate dessert lounge at Notch8 Restaurant & Bar at Fairmont Hotel Vancouver is taking sweet treats to a whole new level.

Chocolate Laboratory Dessert Lounge, by selecting their preferred choice of Fairmont’s LOT 35 Tea to sip on — FYI, the Creamy Earl Grey, a black tea with cornflower petals The private dining room of and a wickedly delicious Notch8 Restaurant has been cream flavour has become a transformed into a dessert favourite of servers and guests oasis complete with custom alike. Anyone looking to add built, floor-to-ceiling chocolate a tipsy twist to their afternoon covered walls — though the tea can select from themed themed offerings and creative cocktails, including the cocktails promise to take Oscillating Clock, made with centre stage. For the past three Empress 1908 Gin, simple years, Notch8 has offered syrup, lemon and tonic. themed afternoon teas with a playful twist on the classic The experience continues tradition. Changing quarterly, with s’mores crème brûlée, past themes include the Mad followed by a triple chocolate Hatter’s Tea Party, Old World Carnival and Enchanted Forest. scone and a raspberry white chocolate scone served with Guests begin this sacchariferous milk chocolate clotted cream celebration, dubbed the and mixed berry compote.

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The savouries include a chili chicken sandwich with mole sauce and fromage frais, a chocolate BLT made with chocolate apple bacon, tomato and iceberg lettuce, and a cocoa gravlax served with lemon mascarpone and chives. Sweet treats from the in-house pastry shop complete the tier with items like the gold popping candy chocolate sable, a red velvet cream puff, a popcorn brownie and a chocolate waffle topped with caramelized banana and sour cream Chantilly.

Dessert offerings include Liquid Matter made up of a dark chocolate cake, peanut brittle chunks, chocolate meringue, peanut butter ice cream and molten chocolate, or the Truffle Specimens, which comes in flavours such as goat cheese and lime or olive oil and chipotle. For a longer version of this story and more information on the Chocolate Laboratory Dessert Lounge and the Chocolate Laboratory Dessert Lounge, open Friday and Saturday evenings, visit vancourier.com.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, M A R C H 1 4 , 2 0 1 9

VANCOURIER.COM

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L I Q U I D A T I O N

S A L E !

ALL PRODUCTS WILL BE LIQUIDATED ATTENTION: ALL PRODUCT WILL BE LIQUIDATED, and we are coming to you! Do not miss out on this genuinely unbelievable opportunity. The inventory will be sold to the public at LIQUIDATION PRICES! Please note Silver Street will continue to serve our customers with regular trade shows but cannot guarantee the same liquidation style of prices. This sale is open to the public, retailers, and wholesalers. All Jewellery will be reduced to LIQUIDATION PRICES. EVERYTHING MUST GO!!!

Jewellery LIQUIDATION on now! This event will not be held over. All jewellery will be LIQUIDATED. Once it’s gone, it’s gone! These are top quality jewellery pieces set with genuine gemstones, and being sold for liquidation prices. Get your Christmas shopping done early and save thousands!!!

INVENTORY BEING LIQUIDATED: Jewellery, and gems from over 16 countries. Beautiful, unique pieces from around the world. Amethyst, Amber, Ametrine, Apophyllite, Aquamarine, Australian Opal, Azurite, Banded Agate, Black Onyx, Biwa Pearl, Blood Stone, Blue Copper Turquoise, Blue Topaz, Blue Lace Agate, Bumble Bee Jasper, Cacoxenite, Carnelian, Chalcedony, Cherolite, Chrysophrase, Citrine, Dendritic Agate,Diamond, Druzy, Emerald, Ethiopian Opal, Garnet, Green Amethyst, Green Onyx, Hematite, Herkimer Diamond, Hessonite Garnet, Imperial Jasper, Iolite, K2 Jasper, Kyanite, Labradorite, Lapis Lazuli, Larimar, Leopard Skin Jasper, Lodolite, Mahogany Obsidian, Malachite, Meteorite, Mexican Fire Opal, Moldavite, Montana Agate, Mookaite, Moonstone, Moss Agate, Mystic Topaz, Noreena Jasper, Ocean Jasper, Pearl, Peridot, Picture Jasper, Pietersite, Prehnite, Psilomelane Dendrite, Purple Copper Turquoise, Rainbow Calsilica, Rainbow Moonstone, Red Jasper, Rhodochrosite, Rhodonite, Rhyolite, Rose Quartz, Ruby, Rutilated Quartz Sapphire, Seraphinite, Shattuckite, Shungite, Smoky Quartz, Snowflake Obsidian, Sonora Sunrise, Tanzanite, Tiger Eye, Tourmaline, Turtella Jasper, Varicite, Vivianite and more!!!

FAQ

VANCOUVER St. Mary’s Ukrainian Catholic Centre

F r e q u e n t l y

We have no overhead, and travel directly to the source, cutting out the middle man.

ETH

D

A

Q u e s t i o n s :

How can your prices be so low?

Y S O U RC LL E

Can I always expect this deep of a discount?

G

E

We cannot always guarantee these savings as the world market sets silver and precious stone prices and they often fluctuate, making your purchase an investment.

L

ER Y

FRIDAY, MARCH 15TH 12pm to 7pm SATURDAY, MARCH 16TH 12pm to 6pm SUNDAY, MARCH 17TH 12pm to 5pm

IC

3150 Ash St. Vancouver

A s k e d

M

S & JE W

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Do you have a brick-and-mortar location or sell online? No, we choose to keep overhead low and transfer the savings onto the customer.

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Hello,

Wes Hutcheson

Owner llers reet Jewe Silver St

This in turn frees us to conveniently come directly to a city near you. This is a unique opportunity to access these fantastic deals at incredibly low prices.

How do I know this is real? The Silver Street experience has been offering only the finest quality jewellery for the past 12 years. We pride ourselves on quality craftsmanship, attention to detail and excellence in everything that we do, including, the ethical treatment of every piece from start to finish. Our family stands behind our products.

Where does the jewellery come from? We hunt down the best pieces from all over the world and bring them direct to you.

BCGEMSHOW.COM

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Vancouver Courier March 14 2019  

Vancouver Courier March 14 2019  

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