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12TH & CAMBIE VPD DOG BITE STATS SOMETHING TO CHEW ON 4 NEWS NORTHEAST FALSE CREEK PLAN GETS GREEN LIGHT 5 THE GROWLER A LOOK AHEAD AT THE YEAR IN BEER 26 FEATURE LUNAR NEW YEAR WHERE TO CELEBRATE 15

VOTE NOW! 2018

February 15 2018 Established 1908 There’s more online at vancourier.com

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THURSDAY

Year of the dog

From pampered pooches to canine-friendly Lunar New Year celebrations, Vancouver has gone to the dogs. SEE PAGE 12

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8


T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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A4

THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8

News 12TH & CAMBIE

Vancouver police dog bites escalated in last two years Mike Howell

mhowell@vancourier.com

You’ll be happy to know that two Vancouver police dogs nabbed two suspects in two separate burglaries last week. The dogs’ names are Bailey and Vader. I know this because I follow the VPD’s canine unit on Twitter. The tweet regarding Bailey and Vader doesn’t provide details on where the break-ins occurred, or how Bailey and Vader nabbed the suspects. Did the dogs have to bite these suspects to stop them from running? Not sure. But I do know that Vancouver police dogs bit 122 people — between April 1, 2016 and March 31, 2017 — and injuries were severe enough that treatment was required at a hospital. I got those statistics from the Office of the Police Complaint Commissioner. Does 122 seem like a lot? I’m sure each and every one of those people who were bitten and required treatment would answer in

the affirmative. And I’m sure the VPD’s dog handlers will say that, in every case, those same people had it coming. “We’re satisfied in each case that the deployment of the dog was appropriate,” said Rollie Woods, the deputy police complaint commissioner, of the Vancouver cases. “And if it wasn’t, we would follow up more and likely order an investigation into the officer’s conduct.” I wanted to discuss the stats with the head of the VPD’s canine unit, but I instead received an emailed statement from Const. Jason Doucette, one of the department’s media liaison officers. Call me old school, but I always prefer to interview the person in charge. I wanted some context and perspective on the 122 bites. After all, bites dropped to 122 from 141 for the April to March period in 2015/2016. I’m interested to know why. I’m also interested to know why there were 73 bites recorded in 2014/2015 and an even lower number (57) in 2013/2014. The statistics show an esca-

Statistics provided to the Courier showed 122 people were bitten by Vancouver police dogs between April 1, 2016 and March 31, 2017. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

lation over the last two years in police dogs biting people so severely they required treatment in hospital. Doucette’s response didn’t directly comment on the escalation, but provided some context. “Fluctuations from year to year can be accounted for by the number of calls that the dogs attend and deploy, and the number of deployable dogs throughout that year, often affected by dog or handler injury,” he wrote. Vancouver has the largest municipal dog squad in B.C.

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— 15 teams — and answers more than 7,000 calls per year. The dogs are trained to track and catch suspects involved in such crimes as burglaries and robberies, recover evidence and search out drugs, guns and explosives. Doucette said there “has not been one substantiated complaint or examination of a reportable injury by the Office of the Police Complaint Commissioner, or the Independent Investigations Office since civilian oversight was introduced.”

That statement didn’t seem accurate to me. I thought of Vick Supramaniam, who had a portion of his ear torn off by a dog in a Sept. 19, 2016 incident in New Westminster. The dog also grabbed the man’s leg and pulled him down a hill. Vancouver police were attempting to arrest suspects connected to a kidnapping and homicides at a house on Dieppe Place, near Grandview Highway and Boundary Road. The VPD apologized to Supramaniam, who was considered an innocent victim. Even so, the police made it clear at the time of the incident what was at stake in rescuing a hostage. “In this situation, I’d be willing to guarantee that if they got away, that hostage would be dead,” said Const. Brian Montague, who was a media liaison at the time of the interview I conducted with him in October 2016. “Obviously, there’s no intent to bite someone that’s not involved in criminal activity like that. It’s an unfortunate set of circumstances that resulted in this person getting bit, who

was clearly not involved.” The Independent Investigations Office investigated that case. I emailed their spokesperson to follow up, but hadn’t heard back by the time of writing this. Back to Doucette, who finished his email by writing Vancouver residents should be “extremely proud” of dog teams. “They work very hard to keep Vancouver safe by apprehending criminals who are actively running, hiding, or resisting,” he said. New rules for all B.C. police dogs and their handlers became effective Sept. 1, 2015. The rules require all officers to complete a detailed report for each bite incident, take photographs of injuries and provide related data to the police services division of the Ministry of Justice. The new standards — the first of their kind in Canada — also require annual testing of every dog handler team. Notably, dogs must demonstrate their ability to be called off a suspect, remain under control while biting and promptly release a bite upon hearing a handler’s command.

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T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A5

News

Council approves ambitious Northeast False Creek plan Area will see removal of Georgia and Dunsmuir viaducts, new highrises, housing for up to 12,000 people Mike Howell

mhowell@vancourier.com

City council has given the green light to a 20-year ambitious plan to transform 58 hectares of land in Northeast False Creek — once home to lumber mills, a ship-building industry and Expo 86 — into the equivalent of a small town. The plan, which council approved Tuesday after more than four hours of debate, requires the demolition of the Georgia and Dunsmuir viaducts and construction of a new road network through what will be a maze of new highrises and other forms of housing for up to 12,000 people. “This is a very bold plan that really revitalizes what is one of the last waterfront neighbourhoods here in Vancouver,” said Mayor Gregor Robertson, noting the addition of 8,000 new homes, with at least 1,800 devoted to social housing. “It’s an amazing opportunity to build a fantastic new neighbourhood around

the stadiums and through where the viaducts are now.” The plan allows for a community centre and ice rink on the former Plaza of Nations site, 32 acres of new and redeveloped parks, at least three childcare facilities and a massive waterfront plaza and wharf lined with restaurants and pubs. The construction of a cultural centre on Main Street to honour the black community of Hogan’s Alley and a $30-million upgrade to the Chinese Cultural Centre of Greater Vancouver on Pender Street are incorporated in the plan. Both of those projects aim to help reconcile the injustice to both communities whose residences and businesses were razed in the late 1960s to construct the viaducts. An Indigenous peoples’ gathering place is also proposed, as well as having First Nations’ input in planning parks and renaming the Northeast False Creek planning area with an

City council approved Tuesday a plan to transform the 58 hectares that comprises the Northeast False Creek lands, which will require the demolition of the Georgia and Dunsmuir viaducts.

Indigenous name. Council voted on 14 separate recommendations and amendments to approve the plan, with NPA councillors Melissa De Genova, Hector Bremner and George Affleck arguing unsuccessfully to defer a vote until more consultation was done with the public. Affleck also raised concerns about the cost of what city staff has said will be a self-funded project that will

generate $1.7 billion in amenities, including an estimate of $620 million in affordable housing, some of it planned for two city blocks that straddle Main Street. “This isn’t the role of the City of Vancouver — to be building so much housing,” Affleck said, noting the city should be forging partnerships with senior governments before drafting such an ambitious plan that he worries could leave the city

in debt. City staff emphasized an implementation plan, along with a financial strategy, still have to go before city council for approval. Rezoning applications for the various properties at Northeast False Creek also have to be heard by council. Development fees, land transactions and money from senior governments are expected to pay for the project, which allows for the construction of three tall towers where Georgia Street will descend on a new sloping road to Pacific Boulevard. Kevin McNaney, project director for Northeast False Creek, told council at a Jan. 31 meeting the towers will add some variation to the skyline. McNaney noted an urban design panel comprised of international experts recommended the taller buildings, which will be 10 to 12 storeys higher than normally allowed. “It also creates a celebratory moment in the skyline, where we can celebrate one

of our biggest entertainment districts in the province of British Columbia,” he said. Green Party Coun. Adriane Carr voted against the city amending its higher buildings policy, saying the three buildings will impede views of the North Shore mountains. Carr also had concerns the type of housing to be built at Northeast False Creek will largely be more expensive condos. “I’m not confident we will get affordability to the degree which we need it,” she said. “I feel 80 per cent are going to be high-end condos, and we do not need more high-end condos in this city.” Northeast False Creek is a complex pattern of lands that are owned by the provincial government and its Crown corporation (PavCo), various private landowners (Concord Pacific and Canadian Metropolitan Properties), the City of Vancouver and countless property owners and renters in existing buildings. @Howellings

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A6

THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8

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Jamie Maclaren (right) suffered a post-game heart attack at Burnaby 8 Rinks but is alive today thanks to his fast-acting teammate, Bart Kupnicki. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

Quick-thinking hockey player racks up assist of a lifetime Bart Kupnicki saved teammate Jamie Maclaren’s life with CPR, a defibrillator and knowledge of what do to

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jkurucz@vancourier.com

At 36, Bart Kupnicki’s got three decades’ worth of playing hockey in the rear view and conceivably at least another 25 years left in the tank. But one thing’s for certain at this stage in Kupnicki’s puck pursuits: he’ll never register a more timely and important assist than the one he collected on Feb. 1. Kupnicki is credited with saving teammate Jamie Maclaren’s life after the 43-year-old suffered a post-game heart attack at Burnaby 8 Rinks. The two Vancouverites had just finished an early evening Adult Safe Hockey League (ASHL) contest when Maclaren began to feel disoriented and jittery. He first brushed it off as a panic attack or heartburn. Within 15 minutes, he collapsed outside of the rink and was clinically dead. “I remember pretty much everything minus the time I was unresponsive,” Maclaren told the Courier. “I remember waking up on my back in a different position I was in before I collapsed. By this time my whole team was outside the dressing room and they were quite visibly upset about what was going on.” What happened in the preceding minutes was a case study in good luck,

good timing and quick thinking. A registered nurse for the past 10 years, Kupnicki almost immediately recognized all the signs before jumping into action. “In the back of my mind I was preparing for the worst,” he said. “His pulse was thready, he said that he had trouble breathing and that he had chest pain. He had all the cardinal factors of having a [heart attack].” Kupnicki got a hold of one of the 13 automatic external defibrillators (AED) at the 8 Rinks facility and immediately began administering CPR. The first round of shocks from the AED, and the subsequent chest compressions, did nothing. “For between three and four minutes, he was dead,” Kupnicki said. Within 10 minutes, Maclaren was revived and en route to Royal Columbian Hospital. “Those last 120 seconds felt like a lifetime,” Kupnicki said. “We shocked him a second time and his eyes opened up. He was alert, he was awake, he pulled the tube out of his mouth and he said, ‘My God, I feel like s***.’” Maclaren has been out of hospital since Feb. 4 and has had time for taking stock since. His family on both sides have issues around high cholesterol and heart disease, though Maclaren is physically active, watches what he eats, doesn’t smoke and only drinks socially. Maclaren, who has a two-year-old son named Morogh, is expected to make a full recovery within six weeks. His cardiologist told him Kupnicki’s application of CPR was done perfectly, to the point of leaving no longlasting damage on his heart.

“I feel incredibly fortunate to be alive,” said Maclaren. “I couldn’t have had better circumstances —I had a heart attack in a place where there’s a lot of people, where there’s a defibrillator down the hall and in the presence of a teammate who’s a registered nurse. So if I was going to have a heart attack, and I probably was going to at some stage, this is the perfect setting for that to happen.” Outside of Kupnicki’s training and wherewithal, the presence of an AED was the game-changing factor that saved Maclaren’s life. ASHL manager Dave Rainville told the Courier via email that Burnaby 8 Rinks has 13 AEDs spread across the facility, along with six league staffers fully trained in Level 2 occupational first aid. “This year, in a span of 18 days [Jan. 14 and Feb. 1] the units were dispatched twice to save both athletes from certain death,” Rainville said. Vancouver Park Board spokesperson Margo Harper said AEDs can be found in all of the city’s rinks, pools, golf courses, including pitch and putts, and at VanDusen Garden. More than 60 of those life-saving devices have been distributed at the city’s recreational facilities since 2008. Maclaren took CPR training 12 years ago, and the first thing on his to-do list once fully recovered is to get a refresher. Kupnicki, meanwhile, has administered CPR thousands of times over the last decade. “I hope this gets people out there to learn CPR. It’s basic training to learn the ABCs: airways, breathing and circulation,” he said. “It can save lives. There’s no question about it.” @JohnKurucz


T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

BANANA GROVE 2705 E. 22nd Ave.

News

DTES disorder down: VPD Jessica Kerr

jkerr@vancourier.com

Vancouver police say there has been a noticeable decrease in violent crime and disorder in the Downtown Eastside since the department increased foot patrols last month. In the last two weeks there were two serious assaults and one robbery in the area — compared to an average of eight assaults and one robbery every two weeks in the prior six months — said Deputy Chief Howard Chow at a Feb. 13 press conference. “When incidents occur, we’re there ready to respond,” Chow said. In one case over the weekend, officers witnessed someone being stabbed in the neck in the 3300-block East Hastings. The officers were able to quickly give first aid to the victim, as well as arrest the suspect. “We are pleased with the positive change this initiative has brought to the Downtown Eastside so far,” Chow said. “Violent crime is down and residents and merchants are able to use the sidewalks again.

We have received positive feedback from the community and our officers will continue to work with residents and businesses to make the area a safer place to live, work and visit.” Chow said the increased patrols have led to several seizures of weapons, drugs and stolen property. “It has become apparent that people from outside of the area have been taking advantage of residents by offering them cash to steal desirable goods,” he said. Tony Hunt, general manager of loss prevention for London Drugs, said the store’s Downtown Eastside location sees up to four times the amount of loss seen at other locations. He said in the past year there have been 11 assaults on staff. He said people are often shoplifting large quantities of items, thousands of dollars’ worth of candy, food items or dozens of packs of razors at a time. “They’re stolen because there’s profit to be made from these things,” he said. Following the department’s announcement last month, Landon Hoyt, ex-

I didn’t expect it to feel like home.

ecutive director of Hastings Crossing, one of the business improvement associations in the Downtown Eastside, said the increased police presence is needed. “One of the things that we’ve been lacking in the whole city, not just the Downtown Eastside, and the BIAs have been pushing for this for some time now, is establishing cops actually walking the streets on a regular basis and having more of a presence and that perception of safety,” Hoyt said. “It’s something that we’ve all been pushing for a little bit more of.” Lenée Son, coordinator of the Carnegie Community Action Program, said more police in the area means the potential for more violence against the neighbourhood’s marginalized population, adding that segment of the community is often forgotten when it comes to public safety. She added the organization has been lobbying the city to take money that would be invested in police initiatives and put it into things such as social housing. @JessicaEKerr

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A8

THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8

Ashton College’s Premiere Event

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News

Adanac overpass closure a go Naoibh O’Connor

10-2:30

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INFORMATION SESSIONS SCHEDULE Ashton College’s Open House is led by our faculty members who can guide you on how to take the next step towards your career success. Take this opportunity to speak with industry experts!

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noconnor@vancourier.com

Residents opposed to the pending “temporary” closure of Adanac overpass to private vehicles delivered a petition to city hall Jan. 31 to try to convince the city to reverse course. But the city intends on moving forward with the plan. The overpass, which is in a residential neighbourhood, allows vehicles to cross Highway 1 without having to use Hastings Street or East First Avenue. It’s being closed temporarily because this spring Fortis B.C. is upgrading a gas line, which will create temporary lane closures and temporary full-street closures of East First Avenue in sections. Once that work starts, city staff expect drivers would want to use the Adanac overpass as an alternative, creating further congestion on a route that’s already popular, particularly during rush hours. The city was already looking at traffic patterns in the neighbourhood, after it says residents raised concerns. As a result, the temporary closure is being treated as a trial for what may become a perma-

nent closure. The city will consider traffic data and resident feedback to determine if it will become permanent. Some local residents, however, are opposed to both a temporary and a permanent closure because it will make getting out of the neighbourhood difficult. Once they found out about the plan, they knocked on dozens of doors of homes near the overpass. Sixty-six of 69 people contacted, or 96 per cent, oppose a temporary or permanent closure, according to their results. They delivered a petition, with names and addresses of those residents, as well as a 10-page letter outlining their concerns, to the City of Vancouver at the end of January. They’re also seeking other changes to traffic regulations due to concerns about having no access to First Avenue from Rupert Street heading south. The wording of the petition includes this request: “We would also like the ‘no entry sign’ removed at First Avenue going south to allow direct access to First Avenue, safe passage to Rupert Street south of First Avenue, and to the Petro Canada Gas

Station at First Avenue and Rupert Street. We expect the ‘stop’ sign to stay.” And, while the city has indicated residents requested the closure of the overpass, the opponents want proof that’s the case because their survey of the neighbourhood provided opposite results. Nonetheless, the temporary closure will happen, according to the city, although the petition, as well as feedback from residents throughout the neighbourhood, will be taken into consideration during discussions about whether it’s made permanent. The city says the “no entry” sign issue would also be considered as part of longer-term solutions. Traffic counters, meanwhile, were installed on several roads last week, as part of measurement efforts related to the temporary closure. “By beginning the count now, we can collect baseline data and measure changes. The data will be input into the collection of information and inform future decisions,” city staff said in an email. The date of the closure remains uncertain as the city doesn’t yet have a date when the Fortis work will begin.

CITY HONOURS WIDHH BC charity, the Western Institute for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (WIDHH) were recipients of the“Accessible City”Award 2018 at the recent City of Vancouver Awards of Excellence. These awards recognize the outstanding achievements of individuals and organizations, across five categories of excellence that benefit everyone by making Vancouver more green, healthy, diverse, and accessible. Barbara Brown, WIDHH President said“We are hugely grateful and honored to have been named the“Accessible City”2018 award winners. For over 60 years WIDHH has been dedicated to creating an accessible society where Deaf and Hard of Hearing individuals are able to fully participate. We are very proud to contribute in making the City of Vancouver a more accessible place to live and work and thank you to all of our volunteers, members and donors, without your support this would not have been possible.” WIDHH provides vital supportive programs and services that focus on the strengths and talents of Deaf and Hard of Hearing individuals rather than barriers, to over 12,000 British Columbians every year. To find out how WIDHH can help you, please visit www.widhh.com • TEL: 604-736-7391 • TTY: 604-736-2527 CHARITABLE REGISTRATION NUMBER: 108200098RR000


T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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News

Heritage Week puts spotlight on culturally significant places Events include walking tours, community celebrations

Naoibh O’Connor

noconnor@vancourier.com

Vancouver’s original Jewish community centre, Davie Street Village and Benny’s Market are among 125 historically significant sites that the Vancouver Heritage Foundation recognized through its Places That Matter project, which was created in 2011 to mark the city’s 125th anniversary. Now, the organization is advancing that project through its Community History Resource, a website with a searchable map that serves as a home for profiles, stories and photos of all 125 sites. But the concept is to add even more information over time, says foundation spokesperson Kathryn Morrow. “If people have stories or pictures or memories from a specific site, they can send them to the Vancouver Heritage Foundation and we can add their information to the website,” she explained. “The idea is that it will build and grow as people send us more things about each site, but it’s kind of a communi-

ty-led project.” While a soft launch was held late last year, its official launch takes place Feb. 21 during the Places That Matter community celebration at Kitsilano Neighbourhood House. It’s one of three events the foundation is staging to mark Heritage Week, which runs from Feb. 19 to 25. The other two events are a walking tour of Gastown led by historian John Atkin on Feb. 24 and Sunday Morning at Punjabi Market, a walking tour revealing what makes that neighbourhood special, on Feb. 25. The theme of this year’s Heritage Week, which is celebrated across the country, is “Heritage Stands the Test of Time.” The aim is to honour the endurance of heritage sites and buildings, their cultural significance and contribution to a sustainable future. Morrow said upcoming events put the spotlight on culturally significant places. The Places that Matter event, for instance, calls attention to sites that were previously unrecognized

that have cultural or community significance. “The Sunday Morning at the Punjabi Market is basically an extension of that,” she said, “in that we’ve taken a community that has a lot of cultural significance in Vancouver and we’re highlighting that.” Atkin’s tour of Gastown, meanwhile, will focus on the evolving landscape of

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Places That Matter — Community celebration and proclamation reading Date: Feb. 21 Details: Celebrate the local, cultural and lesser known history of our city with a free evening of storytelling, community and refreshments. The master of ceremonies is comedian Morgan Brayton. There will be information about the new Community History Resource, a website that celebrates local history, and how you can share stories and add to the project. There will also be displays related to some of the 125 Places That Matter sites. Where: Kitsilano Neighbourhood House, 2305 West Seventh Ave. from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Several speakers will share stories between 7 and 8 p.m. Cost: Free

see some places and learn something about your community,” she said. “The events that we’re holding are free or low cost so they’re really accessible, family-friendly and a good way to talk to your kids or get younger people interested in where they’re from and to learn about places that are near them.” @Naoibh

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8

Opinion

It’s time to rethink how we enforce the rules of the road Mulling over bright lights, red lights, roundabouts and ICBC

Michael Geller geller@sfu.ca

Have you noticed vehicle headlights getting brighter? At first, I thought the problem was my advancing years. But having been recently blinded by a shiny new Mercedes driving down Blenheim Street, I pulled over and Googled “are car headlights too bright?” I was pleased to read I am not the only one concerned about the intensity of new headlights. From an online forum: “Is it my eyes or are some car headlights too bright?” And the LA Times: “It’s not your imagination, headlights are getting brighter.” From the UK Daily Mail: “Wondering why headlights are so painfully blinding?” From CBS in New York: “Drivers say bright headlights are creating a dangerous situation.” At a time when car accidents and insurance rates are in the news, I can’t help but believe blinding headlights may be causing some accidents. My wife and I both drive cars with bright new headlights. I know because occasionally drivers flash their high beams assuming I’m on high beams, when I am not. As we debate how best to reduce vehicle accidents and insurance costs, I hope ICBC will investigate whether blinding headlights are causing not only discomfort for motorists, but also accidents.

Columnist Michael Geller suspects dimmer headlights, more traffic cameras, roundabouts and driver re-testing would lead to fewer car accidents. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

Blinding headlights are not my only traffic concern. No doubt due to increasing traffic congestion and longer commutes, an increasing number of drivers are running red lights. At the same time, many motorists oppose installation of more red-light cameras, or 24-hour operation of the 140 cameras currently in place at the province’s most accidentprone intersections. That’s right. Currently, many red-light cameras are only operated six hours a day since previous

governments did not want to upset voters. Listening to a recent radio phone-in program, I was disturbed by how many listeners opposed red-light cameras, even at dangerous intersections. Presumably, they equate them with photo radar, which was often viewed as a cash cow, rather than accident prevention. Given the increasing number of traffic accidents and fatalities and, yes, increasing insurance costs, I think it is time to rethink our attitudes towards enforcing the rules of the road.

Perhaps we should follow the lead of Scotland and implement a safety camera program that operates both speed and red-light cameras across the country. Scottish red-light cameras are programed to not only catch those running red lights but also speeding drivers. This brings me to an alternative to intersections and red lights. Traffic roundabouts and circles. Having lived in the U.K. and driven in many European countries, I am a fan of roundabouts. I even installed two at SFU’s

UniverCity. However, every time I approach a small Vancouver traffic circle, which is essentially a glorified uncontrolled intersection, I worry whether oncoming drivers know who has the right-of-way. In case you are not sure, if two vehicles arrive at a traffic circle or roundabout at the same time, the vehicle on the right has the right to enter first. Cyclists should be treated like a vehicle. The recent revelations about increased traffic accidents and major ICBC losses due to injury claims

were very disturbing. They were also somewhat surprising. Since cars are increasingly designed with safety in mind, with multiple air bags, back-up cameras and side mirror warnings, I would have expected the number of injuries to be reduced. However, I have also observed that many motorists do not appear to know how to drive properly. They stay in the passing lane and refuse to pull over to allow other motorists to pass. While they may not be in accidents, they cause accidents. Others take little notice of upcoming pedestrian crossings, refuse to stop before turning right on a red light, and seem to have forgotten the concept of “defensive driving.” One solution may be more regular road testing for drivers. My generation hasn’t been tested since the 1960s. Perhaps it should be mandatory for anyone deemed to have caused a serious accident to be re-tested before they can drive again. If Motor Vehicle Testing Stations do not have adequate capacity for more regular road tests, ICBC could set up independent accredited testers. While no doubt many will see this as just another cash grab, I see it as a way to make driving safer. @michaelgeller

Will we ever reignite the spirit of Vancouver 2010?

Mike Klassen

mike@mikeklassen.net

The sputtering effort at lighting the Olympic torch in Jack Poole Plaza last week hardly lived up to the spirit Vancouver brought to the Games eight years ago this month. The Vancouver 2010 Winter and Paralympic Games has been analyzed for its medal wins, its sundry controversies and its cost. However, there are those who have said the Games became a rare transformative experience for the whole country — forging a new self-confidence and a boost to Canada’s reputation abroad. But how did the Games turn into a high-fiving celebration, so powerfully embraced by the community that hosted it?

One reason was the cost of admission: free. Back in January 2010, it is fair to say that Vancouverites had already had their fill of pre-Games warnings about traffic disruptions and other inconveniences. Authorities were even going as far as to say the best seat for the Games was in your living room. By closing public access to the Georgia and Dunsmuir Viaducts, the City of Vancouver was symbolically pulling up the drawbridge. “Grumpy” is how you could describe the public mood then about an event where the tickets had long been sold out, even if you could afford the $1,000plus cost to get a family into the stands at a snowboarding or skating contest. Global BC News Hour ran a story just weeks before the

Games’ Feb. 6 start. People interviewed on the street were ambivalent at best about the event, and many were disappointed that they could not take part. None knew, however, that there were free events happening during the Games. Why there was no coordinated effort to promote the dozens of live sites, pavilions and other free events happening concurrently during the Games is unclear. That job fell to a pair of political bloggers who took it upon themselves to become unofficial city ambassadors by letting everyone know “Where to Be for Free.” Before the Games, the CityCaucus.com blog run by me and Daniel Fontaine was all about local municipal politics. But after a lunch conversation with radio

host Bill Good where both lamented the public’s lack of enthusiasm, Fontaine was inspired to use the blog to promote a short list of 15 free of charge venues opening just prior to the Games. We then turned the list into a Tripadvisor-like guide where visitors could comment and rate each venue. Soon our little online guide grew to more than 50 attractions, including information on the First Nations venues and the first-ever publicly promoted Pride House. Thanks to some advertising revenue, we were able to turn the site into a go-to source of what was happening on the street, with venue profiles and video reports posted daily. Global BC News Hour assignment editor Clive Jackson recognized the value of the Where to Be for

Free guide. The station was in tough competition with CTV, who had won exclusive rights to all the Olympic coverage. Jackson decided to promote our guide as a way to make what was happening beyond the Olympic competitions relevant to his audience. Our website traffic went from a few hundred visitors per day to several thousand. Fontaine and I were ecstatic the day we had 25,000 visits, only to be topped days later at 50,000 daily visitors. Then, on an evening prior to the opening ceremonies, News Hour did a full report on the guide. By this time people, who only weeks before had written the Games off, were going from venue to venue carrying inkjet copies of our guide. Our web traffic spiked to more than 150,000 that

evening until the website ultimately crashed, leading me to make a panicked phone call with our web hosting provider. After the Games, we tallied up more than 2.5 million page views over those weeks. We were overjoyed to see the free venues overflow with visitors and an electric mood on downtown streets and in nearby live sites. Veteran Games organizers and other commentators said they had never seen the public embrace the event as much as our city did. Local reporters called it the “People’s Games.” Vancouver’s Olympic torch may have been quickly doused, but let’s hope future leaders someday find a way to reignite the excitement we experienced here back in 2010. @MikeKlassen


T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Inbox letters@vancourier.com LETTERS

Whole building approach needed Re: “Vancouver reaches new heights with Passive House complex,” online, Feb. 6. Buildings that already exist today will make up half of the building stock in 2050. In order to reduce carbon pollution from the building sector and meet our climate targets, we must renew our investment in existing buildings and take a whole-building approach to energy-efficiency measures. These measures — which can include adding insulation, installing triple-pane windows, sealing air leaks, and replacing an old furnace — also help to cut utility bills and make homes and buildings perform better. Retrofitting a home or building can reduce mould and moisture, cut down on drafts and condensation, and improve health and comfort. A comprehensive strategy is needed to set a course for the building sector to meet B.C.’s 2050 climate commitments. A robust plan will require a long-term strategy and commitment of resources, taking advantage of public funds to leverage private investment, and a sustained effort over the coming decades. Dylan Heerema, Analyst, Buildings and Urban Solutions Program, Pembina Institute, Vancouver

We are all pedestrians Re: “Has Vancouver become bikefriendly enough?” Feb. 8. The article seems biased. Why didn’t you also ask if Melissa Bruntlett believes there is anything that the city did that wasn’t needed? i.e. If the money could have been spent better elsewhere? As was said, using the titles cyclists, pedestrians, motorists and transit riders causes competition and bad feelings. No matter how we choose to travel, we are all at some time pedestrians. The city and provincial government recognize that fact by designating all other modes must yield to pedestrians. However, democracy is based on the will of the majority. If we were truly democratic, the individual would be legislated to yield to the majority in all traffic scenarios. A loaded articulated transit bus can carry 125 passengers. Why must it stop when one pedestrian or cyclist wants to cross the street? Why shouldn’t the one individual have to yield to the majority on the bus? Traffic priority should be 1) buses, 2) pedestrians, 3) cyclists, 4) taxies and

Alvin Brouwer PUBLISHER

abrouwer@ GlacierMedia.ca

frieght movement, 5) general traffic (and that includes Uber). If we really believe in saving the environment by reducing greenhouse gases (vehicle exhaust pollution), we would not be forcing all traffic to stop at red signals and idle their engines while one cyclist crosses the street. Making a cyclist wait does not cause additional pollution. Dale Laird, Vancouver

ONLINE COMMENTS

Offended by ‘anti-family garbage’ Re: “Screw Family Day, where’s our Child Free and Lovin’ It Day?” Kudos and Kvetches online, Feb. 8. How dare you call yourselves a respectable and reputable source of news after publishing that anti-families garbage! hope you’re real proud of yourselves! And clean up your goddamn harbours before bitching at Alberta about our oil and gas industry! @SativaDivine via Twitter

Rabbit tales “Don’t let Peter Rabbit tempt you to get your own pet bunny,” online, Feb. 9. We owned a rabbit — the psychobunny we called him — he hated being held, could not be paper or litter trained, and ate a screen door. Not a good choice. And we lived in an apartment — they can dig huge holes in your lawn if you let them. Patricia Fraser via Facebook ••• No animal should be bought on a whim! Geraldine Rollo via Facebook

All roads lead to Portland “While Vancouver mopes, Portland celebrates ‘Worst Day of the Year,’” online, Feb. 9. Portland is 10x the city Vancouver is. Cooler, hipper and just more fun, all while being less angry, arrogant and emotionally needy (they don’t care who’s “top 10” cities list they’re on, unlike poor delicate Vain-couver)....and cyclists actually obey traffic laws. ALWAYS said Portland is the city Vancouver wants to be if/when Vaincouver ever grows up. KD Hamakawa via Facebook ••• Vancouverites are kinda mopey Alison Malis via Facebook

Martha Perkins

Michael Kissinger

mperkins@ glaciermedia.ca

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8

Feature

Pampered pooch owns the throne, 365 dog days a year When isn’t it the Year of the Dog in Vancouver? Martha Perkins

mperkins@vancourier.com

Dawin Apollo Son of the Gods is ready for his close-up. “You say ‘Vogue’ and he starts giving you poses,” the standard poodle’s human companion, Vivian Hatiras, says when she and Apollo drop by the Courier office for a Year of the Dog cover shoot. On this day, however, Apollo is all Blue Steel. As a dozen colleagues take photos of photographer Dan Toulgoet taking Apollo’s photo, Apollo looks straight into Toulgoet’s camera lens as if to say, “Of course I’m wearing a crown and sitting in a big white throne as people swoon over me. I own this look. I am this look.” And yet Apollo somehow retains a hint of humbleness in the resulting cover photo. Now that’s a good modelling trick. Apollo was chosen for our Year of the Dog cover to illustrate a point as we prepare to celebrate the Lunar New Year: when isn’t it the Year of the Dog in Vancouver? Although not every dog is as pampered as Apollo, this is a dog-obsessed city. (Thankfully, that obsession also includes a willingness to scoop the poop, although people with sidewalk-facing gardens

Dawin Apollo Son of the Gods and his human companion, Vivian Hatiras, get ready for their close-up. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

wish people would also be as considerate about where they let their dog pee.) As Apollo obviously thrives on being fawned over at the Courier office, Hatiras is asked when Apollo real-

ized he was so, so... “Fabulous? He was born that way, like Lady Gaga,” she says, adding that Apollo’s cousin, Dawin — the name of the breeder — Hearts on Fire

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won the poodle category in the 2015 Westminster Dog Show. When she got Apollo as a puppy six years ago, they lived on an acreage in Maple Ridge, where Apollo took his guard dog duties seriously. Apollo didn’t find his fashion groove until they moved to Vancouver.

Apollo might not have a closet full of clothes but there is a cupboard of coats, vests and dress-up accessories that are often on display on Apollo’s Instagram account. (“It started out being my Instagram account. but I thought, ‘Who cares about me?’ and I changed it to his,” Hatiras says, taking out her phone to scroll

AFTER SCHOOL

through her photo files. “It’s all him, all the time.”) Although she didn’t get Apollo’s fur cut for the first year, doing all the grooming herself, Apollo is now a faithful devotee of a monthly visit to Pet Shop Boys. With such a mane of beautiful black fur, and the confidence that allows him to pull off any look, Apollo has often walked out of his spa treatment with a variety of Nora Desmondworthy styles. There are, Hatiras knows, some people who would scoff at the coif. But she also knows there are many more people who understand her deep bond with her dog. “He’s woven into all aspects of my life,” she says. A mortgage broker, she often brings him to appointments where he wins the hearts of co-workers and clients alike. “He gets away with everything because he’s elegant and charming,” she says. On those days when he doesn’t accompany her to work, when she walks through the door at home, there’s nothing like being welcomed by a dog who is genuinely happy to see you. “No matter what your day was like, the dog greets you — every day, no matter what.” And every day, no matter, Dawin Apollo Son of the Gods knows he gladly remains the canine sun of her universe. Apollo’s grooming for the photo is by Pet Shop Boys, which also supplied the white throne.

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T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A13

Feature

Canine-crazy city has already gone to the dogs Courier staff vancourier.com

This Friday, the lunar calendar gives way to the Year of the Dog. Based on a 12-year zodiac cycle, people born in the Year of the Dog —1958, 1970, 1982, 1994 and 2006 — are apparently honest, friendly, faithful, loyal, smart, straightforward, venerable and have a strong sense of responsibility. Babies born in 2018 (an Earth Dog Year) are expected to be communicative, serious and responsible in the workplace. Vancouver loves its dogs, and couldn’t be more ready for a year in their honour. • There were 19,703 licensed dogs in the city in 2017. The actual number of dogs is estimated between 32,390 and 55,947. • The most common breeds are Labrador, retriever and Chihuahua. • The number of licensed dogs has increased steadily

over the years. In 2005 there were just over 15,000 dog licenses issued. However, there were fewer licences issued in 2017 (19,703) than there were the previous year (21,332). • 5.9 per cent of Vancouver’s park land is dedicated to dog off-leash areas. • The first off-leash areas were established as a pilot project in four parks — Balaclava, Queen Elizabeth, Nelson and Killarney — in 1997. • Between 1998 and 2006, another 32 were added throughout the city. There are now 36 off-leash dog parks with plans to add more. • The city receives roughly 30,000 311 calls a year regarding dogs, including complaints, concerns and general inquiries. • The city has about a 97 per cent return-to-owner rate on licensed dogs that are reported missing. • The Yellow Pages lists 127 pet stores in Vancouver.

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There were 19,703 licensed dogs in Vancouver in 2017. Not all of them were as cute as this one.

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A14

THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8

News Climb seven of Vancouver’s tallest buildings for prostate cancer research

Your gym’s stair climber? Forget about it. The Grouse Grind? Talk to the glutes. Teams of thigh masters are invited to climb the stairs of some of Vancouver’s tallest buildings for the fifth annual Prostate Cancer Canada’s Step Up

Challenge, Sunday, Feb. 25. Think of it as the ultimate way to achieve buns of steel, but for a good cause. Each team will climb a total of 5,000 feet, either together or in a relay format, while raising a minimum of $5,000 for the Vancouver Prostate Centre. Highrises include: • MNP Tower: 35 floors x 2 climbs • Guinness Tower: 23

floors x 2 climbs • Oceanic Plaza: 26 floors x 2 climbs • Park Place: 35 floors x 1 climb • Waterfront Centre: 21 floors x 2 climbs • Four Bentall Centre: 34 floors x 2 climbs • Harbour Centre: 33 floors x 2 climbs “For Vancouverites who talk endlessly about the challenge of climbing the

Grouse Grind or working on improving their stamina at the gym, this is right up their alley and it’s fun to do,” Mark Mahl, Western Canada executive director for Prostate Cancer Canada, said in a press release. “Not only do you get to race up some iconic skyscrapers with the support of your friends, but you’ll also be helping lead the way to a better tomorrow for Canadians.

IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNERS: Land Assessment Averaging Since 2015, the City of Vancouver has used targeted land assessment averaging to calculate property taxes as recommended by the Property Tax Policy Review Commission in 2014. (Prior to 2015, the City used across-the-board averaging which was in effect since 1993.) Averaging does not generate any extra revenue for the City, but affects the amount of taxes paid by individual property owners. Under the targeted averaging approach, only those properties facing significant year-over-year increases in property values above a certain threshold would be eligible for averaging. For eligible properties, the program calculates property taxes for the City and other taxing authorities using an average of the assessed land value for the current and prior two years, plus their current assessed improvement value. All others would pay property taxes based on the BC Assessment value instead of an averaged value. The table on the right shows the estimated effect of targeted averaging on the City of Vancouver’s general purpose taxes for sample properties based on the thresholds approved by Vancouver City Council for 2017 (i.e. an increase in property value that is 10 per cent above the average property class increase), subject to Council approval for 2018. The vast majority of properties below the threshold will pay slightly higher taxes to provide tax relief for those properties above the threshold. Amounts levied by other taxing authorities such as provincial schools, TransLink, BC

Sample properties BELOW targeting threshold (NOT eligible for averaging) 2018 Assessed Value

Downtown

FOR MORE INFORMATION: 3-1-1 or vancouver.ca/averaging West COMMENTS? vancouver.ca/your-government/ contact-council or write to: Mayor and Council 453 West 12th Avenue Vancouver, BC V5Y 1V4 East

Prior to adoption of the bylaw, you may speak to Council in person at the City Finance and Services meeting on March 14, 2018.

Downtown

Development Permit Board Meeting: February 19 West

Monday, February 19, 2018, 3 pm Vancouver City Hall, 453 West 12th Avenue Ground Floor, Town Hall Meeting Room to consider the following development permit application: Proposal: To develop at 833 West Pender Street a new 13-storey, 106 room hotel with two levels of underground parking accessed from the lane via a vehicular elevator operated by valet service. The hotel will have a restaurant/guest lounge on the ground floor, lobby access from Pender Street, and a vehicle drop-off area on the lane side with a rooftop garden amenity for hotel guests. TO SPEAK ON THIS ITEM: 604-873-7469 or camilla.lade@vancouver.ca

Est .Taxes with Targeted Averaging

2018 Assessed Value

Est .Taxes without Targeted Averaging

Est .Taxes with Targeted Averaging

636,000

766

789

682,000

821

694

739,000

890

917

936,000

1,127

947

895,000

1,078

1,111

1,351,000

1,627

1,402

1,087,000

1,309

1,349

889,000

1,071

952

2,897

2,984

1,438,300

1,732

1,653

3,214,100

3,871

3,989

2,795,700

3,367

3,103

1,217,700

1,467

1,511

634,000

764

625

1,438,000

1,732

1,784

1,151,000

1,386

1,091

1,610,000

1,939

1,998

1,453,100

1,750

1,669

2,405,000

Light Industrial and Business & Other ($)

Email: speaker.request@vancouver.ca or phone 604-829-4272 to register.

The Development Permit Board and Advisory Panel will meet:

Est .Taxes without Targeted Averaging

Sample properties ABOVE targeting threshold (eligible for averaging)

Residential ($)

The report, which details the program and how it could impact property taxes, will be posted on our website at: vancouver.ca/averaging

SPEAK TO COUNCIL:

prostate cancer in their lifetimes; it’s the most common cancer among men. • 21,300 new cases are diagnosed annually. • 4,100 men lose their lives to this mostly preventable disease each year. • If detected early, 90 per cent of prostate cancers are treatable. To register, go to prostatecancer.ca/stepupYVR.

TARGETED LAND ASSESSMENT AVERAGING

Assessment, and Metro Vancouver are not included. On March 14, 2018, Vancouver City Council will consider whether to continue with targeted land assessment averaging for residential (Class 1), light industrial (Class 5) and business (Class 6) properties, and determine the appropriate thresholds for these property classes if targeted averaging is adopted. Should Council decide to continue with targeted averaging, a by-law will be adopted on the same day.

Prostate cancer affects one in every seven Canadian men at some time in their lives. As always, we recommend you see your doctor and get the checkup.” To date, Step Up Challenges in Vancouver, Calgary and Toronto have raised more than $200,000. According to the press release: • One in seven Canadian men are diagnosed with

East

203,800

941

1,033

259,100

1,197

1,045

381,200

1,761

1,933

295,700

1,366

1,193

954,000

4,407

4,836

653,000

3,017

2,640

553,000

2,555

2,804

9,466

8,848

802,500

3,707

4,068

21,282

17,871

1,623,000

7,498

8,228

7,422,000

34,287

30,939

581,000

2,684

2,945

1,874,000

8,657

7,013

1,072,000

4,952

5,435

3,251,000

15,018

14,251

1,951,800

9,016

9,895

5,272,000

24,354

21,465

2,049,000 4,607,000

Sample properties may be single or multi-unit

Visit: vancouver.ca Phone: 3-1-1 TTY: 7-1-1


T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A15

GONG XI FA C AI

Lunar NewYear EVENTS

The Lunar New Year parade takes place in Chinatown Feb. 18.

There are even some dog-friendly events so no one gets left behind SANDRA THOMAS | STHOMAS@VANCOURIER.COM

There are dozens of events taking place across the city and Richmond to celebrate the Lunar New Year designed to attract everyone from families to foodies.

And while the Lunar New Year is officially Feb. 16, some celebrations began as early as Feb. 7. Here’s a look at some of the family-friendly events on offer. For a complete list of events or to schedule your

own, Tourism Vancouver and Tourism Richmond teamed up this year to create a website that offers one-stop planning. Visit lunarfestival.com. CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese Garden

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A16

THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8

GONG XI FA C AI

Lunar New Year parade

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15

International Village Multicultural celebrations 88 West Pender St. Feb. 16 and 17 Enjoy multicultural live performances and variety shows on stage, free lucky draws and an opening event

complete with a lion dance and eye-dotting ceremony.

for cultural performances and activities for all ages.

Visit the festive Chinese Heritage Village on the upper level, where you’ll find colourful arts and crafts, demonstrations of folk life, culinary delights and special New Year snacks.

Collingwood Lion Dance 300-3665 Kingsway St. Feb. 24: 11 a.m. Two lion dance teams will parade along Kingsway between Boundary Road and Rupurt Street and down Joyce to celebrate the Lunar New Year starting at 11 a.m. and concluding at 1 p.m. at the Joyce/Collingwood SkyTrain station.

Exhibition booths on both the main and upper levels include Chinese New Year festive items, souvenirs and gifts, traditional Chinese clothing, festive decorations and ethnic confectionaries and snacks. Admission is free. South Hill Lion Dance Pinpin Restaurant 6113 Fraser St. Feb. 17: 11 a.m. start Join the opening ceremony of the Lion Dance Celebration at 11 a.m. at Pinpin before the parade begins at 11:45. Everyone is welcome to this free event. Visit southhillbia.ca for more information.

Wesbrook Village Lion dance and activities 3378 Wesbrook Mall Feb. 17: 12:30 to 4 p.m. Join Wesbrook Village in celebrating the Year of the Dog with a lion dance ceremony. Following the lion dance head over to the Wesbrook Community Centre

Downtown Soar over China at FlyOver Canada 201-999 Canada Place Until Feb. 18 Flight of the Dragon is back at FlyOver Canada and guests will first follow a mythical dragon as they soar over some of China’s most spectacular landscapes and scenery — including the Great Wall, Zhangjiajie National Forest Park, the city of Shanghai and more. They’ll then take off again to experience FlyOver

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T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A17

GONG XI FA C AI Granville Island Public Market

Canada, an exhilarating journey across Canada. Visit flyovercanada.com.

Vancouver Art Gallery Canine-friendly celebrations Vancouver Art Gallery Plaza 750 Hornby St. Feb. 24 and 25 Your four-legged friends are invited to take part in Year of the Dog celebrations outside the Vancouver Art Gallery. Have your photo taken with Canadog — the giantspace husky — pick up some new toys and trinkets for your walking buddy, make an impromptu play-date with new canine friends and chow down on delicious Lunar New Year foods.

Vancouver Public Library Lunar New Year puppet shows Multiple branches Feb. 16 and 17 Visit vpl.bibliocommons.com.

Lion dance and more Feb. 17 Granville Island is celebrating the Lunar New Year with a traditional lion dance parade starting at 10:30 a.m. in the public market. Follow the lion dancers as they travel to the Net Loft, Creekhouse and Railspur Alley. Take in sugar painting demonstrations from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. during which an artist creates two or three dimensional figures using a traditional Chinese form of folk art using hot, liquid sugar.

Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese Garden Lanterns in the Garden 578 Carrall St. Feb. 23 to 24 Experience an authentic Chinese lantern festival in Vancouver’s classical Chinese garden. The dazzling display

of handmade lanterns showcases various Chinese legends, adding spark to the Year of the Dog celebration. Enjoy live performances and participate in various activities, including classic lantern riddles and Chinese sugar painting. Don’t forget to warm up with some festive nibbles and beverages at the food market.

represent the diverse segments of our Canadian cultural heritage, including the Vancouver Police Department Motorcycle Drill Team, marching bands and various community groups. Visit cbavancouver.ca for more information.

Lantern Festival at Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Garden PHOTO: REBECCA BLISSETT

Chinatown Lunar New Year Parade Parade start: Millennium Gate on Pender Street Feb. 18: 11 a.m. This signature event features lion dances, cultural dance troupes, marching bands, martial arts performances and more. This year’s parade will include about 70 entries, bringing together more than 3,000 participants from various community and cultural groups. The multicultural dance troupes and participating groups

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A18

THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8

GONG XI FA C AI

Dumplings = prosperity According to legend, the more dumplings you eat during Lunar New Year celebrations, the more money you’ll make in the coming year SANDRA THOMAS STHOMAS@VANCOURIER.COM

Happy Lunar New Year Have a Prosperous 2018 year of the Dog

George Chow mla Shane Simpson mla

Vancouver-Fraserview Vancouver-Hastings #112-2609 East 49th Ave. 2365 East Hastings St. 604.660.2035 604.775.2277 george.chow.mla@leg.bc.ca shane.simpson.mla@leg.bc.ca

Chinese dumplings look like silver ingots for a reason — it’s believed they’re directly tied to your financial success in the New Year. To ensure everyone enjoys a prosperous 2018, the Peaceful Restaurant offered Courier readers this recipe, which is simple enough to make a home ensuring there are plenty of dumplings for everyone. Makes 24 Preparation: 20 minutes INGREDIENTS ½ cup water ½ pound ground pork ½ pound Chinese cabbage, cut finely

Happy Chinese New Year 2018 YEAR OF THE DOG

½ tsp salt 2 inches grated ginger ½ tsp sesame oil

3 dashes white pepper 1 tsp Shaoxing wine 1 pack of dumpling skin Rice vinegar or Chinese black vinegar for dipping DIRECTIONS Combine ground pork, cabbage and seasoning and set aside. Place a small spoonful of the filling in the center of the dumpling skin and dab water with your finger around the edge of the skin. Fold and pleat the skin.

two to three minutes, until the bottom is browned. Add 1/3 cup water, cover and steam the dumplings until the liquid is absorbed (about 5 minutes). Remove and cook the remainder of the dumplings. Serve with vinegar. Information about the Peaceful Restaurant and its seven locations across the city can be found at peacefulrestaurant.ca.

Heat a non-stick skillet over mediumhigh heat and add one tablespoon of oil. Add 10 to 12 dumplings and cook for

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LIVE LIFE WITH no

It’s time to make each hour, day, week, month and year count DAVIDICUS WONG davidicuswong.wordpress.com At the end of this life, we will each be judged by our words and actions. For most of us, our greatest regrets may not be the mistakes that we made but rather what we never got around to doing and saying: the experiences we only dreamt of living and the expressions of love and appreciation left unsaid. One of the great tragedies of human relationships is that few of us will know how much we mattered to others. We either take one another for granted or procrastinate the expression of our caring until all time has passed. Considering that others will judge you and your life by your words and actions, how well do these represent your greatest values and noblest intentions? Will even those closest to you know the real you? At least once each week (always on Sundays and sometimes on Wednesdays), I take time to reflect on how I have scheduled my time. There are only 24 hours in each day, seven days in each week and 52 weeks in each year. If we don’t pay attention to the hours, days and weeks slip away with the months and the years. At the same time, I compare this to what is most important to me — my greatest values.

There are two modes of living that steer us away from what we value most. In the reactive mode, we respond in the most expedient way to the challenge of the moment. We do what we can with what we have on hand. It consumes all of our attention, time and energy. And then, a new crisis arises. It’s like driving without a map, following detour after detour. At the end of your journey, you may be far from home. In the autopilot mode, we act according to an unexamined routine. We do almost every activity each day because that’s what we did the day before, the week before and the year before. Before we’re ready, it’s time to retire or we’ve lost our job. We don’t know where the time went or what to do with the little time left. Unless we are deliberate, life will distract us and rob us of time. We can play Candy Crush Saga, watch endless YouTube videos, catch up on social media, channel surf or shop online or in the mall. Work will consume all the time and energy you are willing to surrender. No one on their deathbed wishes they spent more time making money. Will your family and friends appreciate all the time you spent at work and not with them? Do you value your health? If you don’t now, you will

can transform others — you can shine the spotlight and let them know that they are special.

later when it’s too late to be preventive. What should you focus on today and schedule each day to improve your future health? Every hour of healthy physical activity — a walk, a swim or a bike ride — is an investment in your personal health.

Who is your best and brightest self? What would that person do in your shoes today? That is the real you. Show the world in your words and actions today.

Do you have a dream — a creative pursuit that engages your imagination and abilities? How much time will you commit to it today and this week? This is an investment in personal fulfillment.

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T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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A20

THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8

Arts & Entertainment

Vancouver-based kids TV show up for international award Scout & The Gumboot Kids is a finalist in the Prix Jeunesse International 2018 awards

Jessica Kerr

jkerr@vancourier.com

What started out as a simple idea for a kids television show is now gaining international attention and accolades. Vancouver-based production Scout & The Gumboot Kids, which airs on CBC Kids, is the brainchild of Tara Hungerford and Eric Hogan, co-creators and partners behind Imagine Create Media. And the idea was born out of their personal experiences as parents. “At the time when we first created the show we had a one-year-old and a threeyear-old. We were living in a tiny condo in the city and we found that the only way we could get our kids to sleep was to take them outside,” Hungerford told the Courier in a phone interview. The couple would often take their young children on walks on the Endowment Land trails or to the beach. “We came to realize that as a family we were yearning for some content that we could watch to inspire

Scout & The Gumboot Kids creators Tara Hungerford and Eric Hogan with Scout. The show was recently named a finalist in the Prix Jeunesse International 2018 awards. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

us and inspire the kids to go outside,” she said. “Scout & The Gumboot Kids was really inspired by our two little ones living in the city, needing to go outside and connect with nature.” Scout is a little stop-motion animation mouse. “He’s kind of the maestro,” Hogan said. “He devises little nature mysteries for the kids to go outside and explore nature… All the kids that you see in the show

are solving nature mysteries and they’re real kids outside playing in nature.” The couple first conceived the idea in 2011. Fast forward seven years and season three of the show is currently in production. In addition to airing on CBC Kids, it’s been picked up internationally and is broadcast in Australia, South Korea and the Philippines, as well as in the U.S. on Houghton Mifflin’s

streaming platform Curious World, ComCast Xfinity’s Kidstream and was recently picked up by Amazon. It’s also spawned two spin-offs — Jessie & The Gumboot Kids and Daisy & The Gumboot Kids. The show has also picked up a number of awards over the years, including the 2016 and 2017 Golden Sheaf Award for Best Children’s and Youth Production, as well as multiple Leo

awards and a Canadian Screen Award nomination. Scout & The Gumboot Kids was also recently named a finalist for the Prix Jeunesse International 2018, the highest honour in children’s television. The Prix Jeunesse Foundation aims to shine a spotlight on outstanding television productions for children. “We had no idea we were actually going to get picked,” Hungerford said. “It’s considered the award to be granted as kids’ television content creators. We were actually really blown away and honoured.” The award winners will be announced at the Prix Jeunesse International festival in Munich in May. It’s also received an endorsement from the David Suzuki Foundation. “They don’t usually endorse television shows but ours is really a bridge between the family room and getting outside,” Hungerford said. The show is simple. Aimed at a pre-school-aged audience, each five-minute

episode begins with Scout and a nature mystery. The Gumboot Kids, a group of children ranging in age from one to 10, explore the clues and solve the mystery. Each episode also includes a mindful moment. “It really caters to children’s imaginations, and then our mouse also teaches children about mindfulness and reminds parents to slow down,” Hungerford said. The show is a family affair; the couple’s children, who are now six and eight, are two of the Gumboot Kids and also help their parents come up with ideas for the show. As well, Hungerford’s sister, Juno-award-winning artist Jessie Farrell, composes all the music for the show. “It’s this super simple little gem and we’ve put our hearts and souls into it and our kids have been on the journey with us and everyone who works on the show really, really cares,” Hungerford said. “It’s one of those projects that we think will live on.” @JessicaEKerr

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A21

Arts & Entertainment

Rio Theatre begins massive crowd-funding push Plans in the works for director Kevin Smith to hold fundraiser

John Kurucz

jkurucz@vancourier.com

The threat of redevelopment that’s hung over the Rio Theatre for 11 months appears to have passed. Theatre operator Corrine Lea told the Courier that her bid to buy the 80-year-old East Van venue was accepted by owner and theatre magnate Leonard Schein. She now has a 60day window to raise the necessary dough, which is “significantly higher” than the land’s assessed value of $4 million. “It feels like all this euphoria and excitement building up,” Lea said. “It’s like winning something then being careful what you wish for, so now we really have to make this happen. I’ve raised money before, so this is not a foreign thing for me.” Lea put in a bid to buy the property near the intersection of Commercial and Broadway last Tuesday. Schein told the Courier that two other offers were on the table. Should the 60-day window elapse without Schein’s asking price, which was not disclosed, the single-screen theatre goes back on the market. “Certainly the neighbourhood would like to keep her there operating the theatre,” Schein said. “I’m going to assume that will happen. She has 20,000 signatures on a petition. If she could get $100 from each one, that’s $2 million.” Lea is now turning her mind towards a crowdfunding push that’ll begin in the coming days and a way to incentivize the do-

All donations Rio Theatre operator Corrinne Lea collects will be put towards a model she describes as part non-profit, part community trust. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

nation process. She’s had hundreds of offers from people wanting to donate anywhere from $20 to $100,000 and will begin collecting that money once the crowdfunding effort goes live. All donations Lea collects will be put towards a model she described as part non-profit, part community trust. Those who donate will essentially buy a share of the property, though she will become the landlord and owner of the site, and assume the mortgage and debt. “I didn’t feel right with them investing in a property that then becomes my asset,” she said. “It kind of felt like a conflict of interest there. I wanted to figure out a way where it could go back to the community.” Outside of financial offers and a petition push with more than 20,000 signatures, Lea’s efforts have included letters of

support from the Vancouver Film School (VFS), Live Nation Canada and the Vancouver International Film Festival, among others. “For a lot of our students over the many, many years, the Rio is an important rite of passage,” VFS spokesperson Christopher Bennett told the Courier. “Whether they’re from other countries or from here in Canada, at some point or another they’re going to find themselves having a great time at the Rio.” Theatre groups, community advocates and Hollywood celebrities — including Kevin Smith and Elijah Wood — have pledged their support for Lea’s efforts since news of the theatre’s potential sale hit the media two weeks ago. Lea confirmed that Smith, a former VFS student, will stage a fundraiser at the Rio at some point

in the coming weeks. “We are talking to his people. That is going to become a reality for sure,” she said. The Rio was built in 1938 and owned by Schein since 2011. Lea and a

group of about 10 other investors first purchased it in 2008, but sold it to Schein when the market for singlescreen theatres took a nose dive. She’s continued on as the operator and manager since. The Grandview-Woodland community plan specifically calls for preservation of the area’s heritage and culture sites such as the Rio, the Cultch and the York Theatre. Building restrictions in the area limit development to 10 storeys and any plans to redevelop the site would require a theatre to be retained on the building envelope. This isn’t the first time Lea’s business has felt the pinch, as she won a protracted battle for a liquor licence with the province in 2012. Around that same time, the business model moved away from solely movies, to live music, burlesque, comedy shows and other events. The theatre has been in the black since then.

Should Lea’s fundraising efforts materialize, the programming will remain as it is now. “Because when there’s so much focus on development, everything is motivated by how much money you can make and everybody’s building up,” Lea said. “Meanwhile all the amazing communitybased businesses are going out the window — it’s just so disheartening. It has to end at some point. We can’t keep letting it happen. I think that’s what happens when people give up. We could’ve easily said, ‘We can’t afford this, let’s just not do it’ and just watched a developer roll in and it would be over. If I didn’t have the support of the community I probably would’ve given up.” Lea expects her crowdfunding effort to be online within a week. Details will be posted on the theatre’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/TheRioTheatre. @JohnKurucz

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International VIllage Mall February 16-18, 2018 Vancouver Chinatown Parade February 18, 2018


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8

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Ching Tien grew up during China’s Cultural Revolution. She was forced to leave her schooling to work in a factory in Gansu Province. After immigrating to Canada, she never forgot the poverty she witnessed in Gansu, particularly the plight of girls forced to quit school to support their families. In 2005, Tien founded Educating Girls of Rural China, a charity dedicated to providing young women the opportunity of an education and a brighter future. Thanks to her fundraising efforts, 842 young women

Educating Girls in Rural China fundraiser Veronica Stanford and EGRC alumni Meifen Gong were all smiles after more than $40,000 was raised to give 40 girls in the most rural areas of China the opportunity of an education.

march

have received the opportunity to attend school, achieving a 99 per cent successful graduation rate. Tien continues her efforts to sponsor more girls. Several hundred guests convened at Sun Siu Wah Restaurant on Main Street to support her annual Charity Dim Sum Luncheon. Yours truly served as master of ceremonies of the power lunch that raised more than $40,000 to give another 40 young women the gift of schooling. For a longer version of this column see vancourier.com.

Robbie Kane’s Café Medina hosted the public launch of the 100 per cent compostable OneCoffee single-serve pods.

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Mary Ann Saunders and her child Levi — a past camper — sang the praises of UBC’s CampOut at a donor and community celebration held at Scotiabank.

B.C. Achievement Foundation executive director Cathryn Wilson and chair Scott McIntyre fronted British Columbia’s National Award for Canadian Non-Fiction at the Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre.


T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Arts & Entertainment KUDOS & KVETCHES Alberta/B.C. wine war headlines not as bold, plummy and playful as we had hoped

The recent news that Rachel Notley’s Alberta government had launched a trade war against B.C.’s wine industry had our tannins a quiver. And not just because our tannins are easily quivered. You may recall that Notley announced Alberta would ban the import of wines from its neighbour to the west in retaliation of B.C. imposing regulations on the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion between Edmonton to Burnaby. Yes, it was an oil and wine smack down, resulting in what we hoped would be some exceptionally creative headlines from our media friends. Sadly, like a zinfandel grape shrivelled on the vine, few media outlets produced the full-bodied, richly bouqueted, playfulon-the-mouth headlines we had hoped for. A couple media outlets did their best. Postmedia should get props for its “B.C. wineries see red as Alberta declares war in pipeline dispute.” Same goes for CBC’s “Sour grapes: Albertans react to boycott of B.C. wines.” But just about everywhere else we looked, writers took a humdrum, chardonnaylike approach to their wine headlines. Which is a shame. Here’s a few we’d like to offer up to our media brethren, free of charge.

• Grapes of wrath • Notley in my backyard • Que syrah, syrah, whatever will be will be • Merlot blow • Wine of the times • Bordeaux guard • New day Riesling • Alberta government is being un-riesling-able You’re welcome.

Where’s our Child Free and Lovin’ It Day? This past Monday marked Family Day in British Columbia, where parental units and their ungrateful spawn clogged roadways, public transit, shopping centres, border crossings, the seawall, breweries and once peaceful coffee shops to bask in the radiance of their reproduction and contribution to disproportionate depletion of the world’s resources. Family Day has only been a “thing” in B.C. since 2013 thanks to Liberal Premier Christy Clark, whose government had already established such family-friendly benchmarks as having the highest rate of child poverty in the country for nearly a decade. But we digress. Critics claimed the new holiday was a clear attempt to pander to voters, while others appreciated a stat holiday to break up the dreary stretch between New Year’s and Easter. Why said holiday had to celebrate families still strikes us as a little exclusionary. What about those of us who have selfishly —

or selflessly, depending on how you look at it — chosen not to bear fruit from our loins or strap ourselves to a brood of little diaper fillers, dream killers and bank account drainers? Surely, we deserve a holiday in our honour as much as the next easily duped automaton. Whether you call it Childless Day, Child-Free Day or Celebration of Personal Freedom Day, there’d be far more perks to the holiday than having a slew of families make Granville Island somehow even more unbearable. The new holiday celebrating childlessness would include such activities as: • watching Netflix for six hours straight with no one judging you except the reflection in your computer screen • buying a pair of jeans that costs more than signing an uncoordinated nine-yearold up for Little League only to have them languish in the outfield • shopping on Craigslist for cool teak furniture with dangerously sharp corners. There’d be no scrambling to arrange “playdates.” There’d be no scheduling. No consideration of healthy consequences. And, most importantly, no tote bags jam-packed with water bottles, granola bars, wet wipes and containers of sliced apples. That’s right, screw sliced apples. @KudosKvetches

A23

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8

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And four other reasons Vancouver is awesome this week Lindsay William-Ross

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Chutzpah! Festival

The annual Chutzpah! International Jewish Performing Arts Festival returns to shake up Vancouver’s arts scene with four weeks of dynamic programming. The event showcases globallyrecognized eclectic and cutting edge multidisciplinary artists who are bringing their talents in dance, music, theatre and comedy to Vancouver. Feb. 15 to March 15 Various venues in Vancouver chutzpahfestival.com

The Sheepdogs

Saskatoon’s blues-tinged and retrovibed rock group the Sheepdogs are settling into the Commodore Ballroom for a two-night stop on their current tour. Catch their feel-good, guitar-heavy sounds from their latest album Changing Colours, and their impressive back catalogue. Feb. 15 to 16 The Commodore Ballroom commodoreballroom.com

Lunar New Year

Vancouver has gone to the dogs this year. That’s because we are celebrating the Lunar New Year and the arrival of the Year of the Dog with dozens of events spread all over Metro Vancouver. Some event standouts include Lanterns in the Garden at the Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Chinese Garden on Friday and Saturday nights, festivities Saturday at Granville Island, a dog-friendly gathering outside the Vancouver Art Gallery Sunday, and the parade in Chinatown on Sunday.

Feb. 15 to 18 Various locations around Metro Vancouver lunarfestival.com

Pizza Palooza

The Wellness Show

For over a quarter-century, the Wellness Show has provided Vancouverites a full weekend of programming and one-stop access to information, products and experiences aimed at improving bodies, minds and spirits. Attendees will have the opportunity to roam the exhibit hall and engage with a host of experts who can answer questions about any aspect of wellness, plus there’s a full schedule of live programming on multiple stages, from cooking demos to family fitness and more. Feb. 17, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Feb. 18, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Vancouver Convention Centre, 999 Canada Place thewellnessshow.com

Eat your way through Vancouver’s epic pizza scene at the third annual Pizza Palooza. Vancouver Foodster has brought onboard a handful of multi-regional and multicultural restaurants specializing in pizza, from Lebanese flatbreads to Roman square slices. Grab your tasting passport and make your way from place to place checking out your fill of ’za. Feb. 21, 6 to 10 p.m. Participating restaurants in downtown Vancouver vancouverfoodster.com For more events, go to

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T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

The hockey blog that knows who needs the puck

A25

Pass It to Bulis

Should the Canucks blow it all up? At the trade deadline, the Canucks could take a page from the 2015-16 Maple Leafs

Backhand Sauce Daniel Wagner

As the Canucks head into the 2018 trade deadline, they find themselves in a very similar place to the Toronto Maple Leafs in 2016. Like the 2015-16 Leafs, the Canucks are on their way to a third straight season out of the playoffs and potentially a second straight season with fewer than 70 points. There were some positive signs for the Leafs, however. They had some great young players stepping up, such as Nazem Kadri and Morgan Rielly. They also had some fantastic prospects in the system, such as William Nylander, Mitch Marner and Travis Dermott, and were guaranteed a high draft pick. Likewise, the Canucks have Brock Boeser, Bo Horvat and Troy Stecher in the NHL, with prospects such as Elias Pettersson, Adam Gaudette and Olli Juolevi on the way. While it depends on how the rest of the season plays out, they’re also likely to get another top-10 draft pick, if not top-five. It seems like the Canucks would be justified in thinking things were progressing well and they could calmly stay the course. Perhaps a move or two at the deadline, but certainly nothing drastic. The 2015-16 Leafs, however, took a different tack: Like the proverbial “maniacs” in The Planet of the Apes, they blew it up. At the 2016 trade deadline, the Leafs traded every veteran who wasn’t nailed down, along with one who was. They moved Dion Phaneuf in the second year of a seven-year contract that paid him $7 million per year. The trade involved nine players, but ultimately all the Leafs got back was a second-round draft pick. That trade was completed in early February, but closer to the deadline the Leafs shipped out Shawn Matthias, Roman Polak, Nick Spaling, James Reimer, Jeremy Morin and Daniel Winnik. They received at least one draft pick in every deal, even turning a Polak and Spaling package into two second-round picks in 2017 and 2018. It was actually the second year in a row that they dealt Winnik at the trade

Stick-taps & Glove-drops • A tap of the stick to Canucks prospect Adam Gaudette, who continues to rack up points and plaudits in the NCAA. This past weekend he helped the Northeastern University Huskies win their first Beanpot Tournament in 30 years with a hat trick in the championship game; he had four goals and two assists in the two games and was named MVP.

If the Canucks really want to clean house and stockpile draft picks like the Toronto Maple Leafs did, they could start with finding a suitor for highly sought after Chris Tanev. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

deadline, ultimately getting three draft picks and prospect Connor Carrick for the journeyman third liner. In combination with deals made the previous year, the Leafs ended up selecting 11 players in the 2016 draft and had even more picks they used in trades. Their commitment to stockpiling draft picks is a big reason their AHL affiliate, the Toronto Marlies, has been so dominant. Meanwhile, the Canucks have just six draft picks heading into the 2018 draft, with their fourth-round pick sent to the Pittsburgh Penguins as part of the Derrick Pouliot trade. The Canucks badly need to add to their prospect pool, with defence a particular area of need. To do so, they’ll need more draft picks. The Canucks only have two pending unrestricted free agents in Thomas Vanek and Erik Gudbranson, and they need to move them at the deadline. But what if they weren’t satisfied with just a couple of moves? What if they blew it all up like the Leafs in 2016?

Moving Alex Edler and the Sedins would do it, but that’s a non-starter. They could, however, find a suitor for Chris Tanev, move Sam Gagner, Michael Del Zotto and Anders Nilsson, who all have additional seasons remaining on their contracts, and maybe even figure out some way to get out from under the Loui Eriksson contract. That raises the concern of next season. Without veterans, where will the Canucks be? But it worked out well for the Leafs: They graduated their prospects to the NHL, added top-pick Auston Matthews and made the playoffs. While the Canucks aren’t guaranteed the top draft pick, it might be time to bite the bullet, blow it up and embrace a real youth movement.

For daily Canucks news and views, go to Pass It to Bulis at vancourier.com.

• I’m dropping the gloves with Colten Teubert. He called P.K. Subban “Monday” in a tweet, a nickname Teubert and his teammates called Subban at the 2009 World Juniors. “Monday” has been used as a racist code-word for years, entering popular culture in a Russell Peters’ stand-up routine that came out the same year Teubert and Subban were teammates. If he was unaware of the racial connotations of his usage of the word, it took him far too long to apologize and, when he did, it wasn’t to Subban, but to his Twitter followers.

Big Numbers •

47 Adam Gaudette’s 24 goals and

9 Canucks top prospect Elias

47 points have him atop the NCAA leaderboard in both categories.

Pettersson is currently nine points behind Swedish legend Kent Nilsson for the most points by an under-20 player in Swedish Hockey League history. He currently has 45 points in 37 games and has just seven games remaining in the SHL season to rack up those nine points.

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Lager-heads and locavores have something to look forward to in 2018.

THE GROWLER

Look into the craft beer crystal ball

Rob Mangelsdorf

editor@thegrowler.ca

As we look at 2018, it’s pretty remarkable to consider how far the B.C. craft beer scene has come in such a short time. And with 26 new breweries opened in our province last year — the most ever! — it begs the question, what’s next? Well, allow me to posit my proverbial two cents on what this year will bring for craft beer.

The return of lagers

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You heard it here first: 2018 is the year of the craft lager. Here’s why: we’ve basically run out of weird, esoteric styles to revive and when it comes to crushing six-packs, imperial brettfermented triple IPAs aren’t what a lot of people are going to reach for. While the craft beer movement in North America began as a revolt against the thin, tasteless, watery industrial lagers that your parents still drink, this generation of lagers will be made with quality ingredients and have something those in the craft beer industry like to call “flavour.” Instead of cheap adjuncts such as corn and rice, craft breweries will use quality malts. Instead of cheap hop extracts, they’ll use actual hops. Lagers (which include pilsner, helles, kolsch, altbier and many other beer styles) are technically challenging beers to brew, are expensive and time-consuming to make, and when properly executed, are sublime. These beers will appeal not only to neophyte craft beer consumers transitioning from Bud and Kokanee, but also to seasoned craft beer nerds who have finally come full circle to appreciate the subtle beauty, craftmanship and balance of these styles.

Vancouver-based contract brewer Slow Hand Beer Company has recognized the trend, and will be focusing solely on craft lagers. Their initial offering, a Czech-style pilsner, launched a couple months ago. “In the U.S., pilsners are experiencing a huge renaissance,” says co-owner Kurtis Sheldan. “We want to be the guys who’re known for lagers when everyone up here comes around.” In addition to traditional German- and Czech-style pilsners, look for breweries to try more obscure varieties such as Dortmunder export, schwarzbierand rauchbier, as well as West Coast dryhopped lagers.

Keeping it local

As breweries continue to explore the notion of terroir, look for more local ingredients to find their way into your beer. B.C. hops have always been in demand, and local grain is becoming increasingly popular as well, with breweries such as Phillips and Longwood relying on custom B.C. malts. However, to truly capture the taste of B.C., brewers are turning to foraged flavours. Tofino Brewing helped popularize the use of local spruce tips and kelp, and tiny Mayne Island Brewing Company’s lineup features a seasonal foraged beer series. B.C. forests abound with flavour: perhaps we’ll see a beer brewed with Nootka rosehips and salmonberry? Salal? Labrador tea? The possibilities are endless.

The future is small…

B.C. saw a recordbreaking 26 new breweries open last year. There are at least another 15 in the works that I know of, and I’m sure a whole bunch more that are still under wraps. The trend of small

community breweries will continue until every Main Street in the province has its own brewery (right next to the butcher and the baker). These community breweries require little in the way of initial investment, and they don’t have to worry about packaging and distribution. The trend is dovetailing nicely with the growing “locavore” movement, too.

…and specialized

New breweries opening in crowded urban areas such as Vancouver and Victoria are going to have to specialize if they want to get the attention of the public, so look for them to do one thing, and do it well. In the case of Victoria’s Île Sauvage Brewing Co., that means focusing on just oak-aged sour beers. Meanwhile, Real Cask Ales (operating out of Callister Brewing) is all about U.K. cask-conditioned ales. It’s a matter of time before someone goes 100 per cent IPA.

Contract killers

Who says you even need a brick-and-mortar location to make beer? Thanks to contract brewers such as Factory Brewing, anyone with a great recipe and a snappy marketing plan can get their beer on shelves and on tap without having to invest in building an actual brewery. The success of brands such as Superflux and Boombox will no doubt inspire countless new brewery-less breweries. What about brand-specific craft beer tasting rooms, offering the brewery experience, but without the actual brewery? Denmark’s Mikkeller has been doing it for years, and it’s a matter of time before the concept comes to B.C. For more beery insights, go to thegrowler.ca.


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2018 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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LEGAL After thirty (30) days without claim to any rights, title or interest in MICHAEL SPENCER MILLAR, Estate sent to the above address and addressee, notice of all claims against the Estate and all its property, including tangible and intangible property and accounts, must be made to Lumen Trust, Attn: Trustee, c/o 5647 Gulf Drive, New Port Richey, Florida near [34652] as the property has been exchanged into a private Trust by the Executor of record.

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SKILLED HELP

ADVERTISING POLICIES

All advertising published in this newspaper is accepted on the premise that the merchandise and services offered are accurately described and wil ingly sold to buyers at the advertised prices. Advertisers are aware of these conditions. Advertising that does not conform to these standards or that is deceptive or misleading, is never knowingly accepted. If any reader encounters non-compliance with these standards we ask that you inform the Publisher of this newspaper and The Advertising Standards Council of B.C. OMISSION AND ERROR: The publishers do not guarantee the insertion of a particular advertisement on a specified date, or at all, although every effort wil be made to meet the wishes of the advertisers. Further, the publishers do not accept liability for any loss of damage caused by an error or inaccuracy in the printing of an advertisement beyond the amount paid for the space actually occupied by the portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred. Any corrections of changes wil be made in the next available issue. The Vancouver Courier wil be responsible for only one incorrect insertion with liability limited to that portion of the advertisement affected by the error. Request for adjustments or corrections on charges must be made within 30 days of the ad’s expiration. For best results please check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Refunds made only after 7 business days notice!

ARTEBUZ HOLDINGS INC (http://www.artebuz.ca) IS LOOKING FOR CARPENTERS. Greater Vancouver, BC. Permanent, Full time. Wage - $ 27.80 per/h Skills requirements: Experience 3-4 years, Good English. Education: Secondary school Main duties: • Read and interpret construction blueprints, drawings and specifications. • Measure, cut, shape, assemble, and join lumber and wood materials. • Layout and framing of buildings wall structures; Cut, fit and install different trim items as required. • Build decks, flooring, fences and other wooden structures. • Operate measuring, hand and power tools. • Supervise helpers and apprentices. Company’s business address: 111-625 Como Lake Ave, Coquitlam BC, V3J 3M5 Please apply by email artebuzgroup@gmail.com

BRING HOME BRING HOME THE BACON THE BACON

Discover new job possibilities.

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classifieds.tricitynews.com classifieds.vancourier.com

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IC/@G1I:B7G1B?D@G2 HELPER NEEDED to assist in sorting out storage locker and move for approx 4 hours. Must have a truck. $30/hr. Call 604.263.5376

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

CANTONESE SPEAKING CAREGIVER WANTED Are you looking for rewarding work? Join the Home Instead Senior Care team! We are seeking Cantonesespeaking CAREGivers to provide companionship, home helper and personal care services. Training provided, Call 604-428-9977 STAFF LITIGATION Lawyer required to serve our clients in Kelowna and Penticton Registries. Experience in BC Courts, family law, commercial, and estates is desired. dmiller@kelownalegal.com

To advertise call

604-630-3300

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21$)..- "/1). '#*(%%,(,&,, TRUTH IN EMPLOYMENT ADVERTISING Glacier Media Group makes every effort to ensure you are responding to a reputable and legitimate job opportunity. If you suspect that an ad to which you have responded is misleading, here are some hints to remember. Legitimate employers do not ask for money as part of the application process; do not send money; do not give any credit card information; or call a 900 number in order to respond to an employment ad. Job opportunity ads are salary based and do not require an investment. If you have responded to an ad which you believe to be misleading please call the: Better Business Bureau at 604-682-2711 Monday to Friday, 9am - 3pm or email: inquiries@bbbvan.org and they will investigate.

HITTHE BOOKS Upgradeyour knowledge&skiskills yo

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TODAY'S PUZZLE ANSWERS


A28

THE VANCOUVER COURIER THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2018

GARAGE SALES

PETS

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REAL ESTATE WANTED

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WANTED: Fixer-Upper houses and properties incl. condos/ townhouses in any condition (private investor) Please call Ali @ 604-833-2103

ALL SMALL BREED PUPS Local, Non-Shedding and Vet Checked. 604-590-3727 www.puppiesfishcritters.com

'*1# ) $73 /%*! , 3%/37 $-39 + *9/"5-% "@?60 $*"3 + 3%;"*(;% +"()!' *%)$#,& &?2?8 .<=:==>:><44

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APARTMENTS/ CONDOS FOR RENT

SAWMILLS from only $4,397 Make money & save money with your own band mill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT 1-800-566-6899 Ext:400OT

DRAINAGE DRAIN Tiles, Sewer, Water,

Video Inspection, Jack Hammering, Hand Excavating, Concrete Cutting, Rootering, WET BSMT MADE DRY

BAYSIDE PROPERTY SERVICES

604.782.4322

LANGARA GARDENS

(->#9$ $7!& "%)%!!%3> 7!& '7#918 *9/#5-% 1#!2 +%38 ))0 @ ))? ;%&*!1 $ *&'')*#(+')%! )#*" $ '<44: ,=6260.2?0.. Old Books Wanted. also: Photos Postcards, Letters, Paintings. no text books or encyclopedias. I pay cash. 604-737-0530

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info@langaragardens.com Managed by Peterson Commercial Property Management Inc.

YOUR ELECTRICIAN $29 Service Call. Lic#89402. Fast same day service. Insured. Guar’d. We love small jobs. 604-568-1899

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HIP OR KNEE REPLACEMENT? Arthritic Conditions, COPD? Restrictions in Walking/Dressing? Disability Tax Credit $2,000 Tax Credit $20,000 Refund. Apply Today For Assistance 1-844-453-5372

LEGAL SERVICES CRIMINAL RECORD? Why suffer Employment/Licensing loss? Travel/Business opportunities? Be embarrassed? Think: Criminal Pardon. US Entry Waiver. Record Purge. File Destruction. Free Consultation 1-800-347-2540, accesslegalmjf.com

/-4,966, 0:664 .+*8<3@<8B 75)4/'& 2 6%4/+/+3 8+&%4-84%/*+ "'55 $&%/,4%5& 2+8A;47 /-4,966, 0:6643 C5)>?1C>1==) !!!(05+%#'914'.!**.(0*, A to Z CERAMIC TILES Installation, Repairs, Free Est. 604-805-4319

SKYLINE TOWERS

HEALTH & BEAUTY

102-120 Agnes St, New West .

Hi-Rise Apartment with River View & Indoor Pool. 1 BR & 2 BR Available. Rent includes heat & hot water. Remodeled Building and Common area. Gated underground parking available. References required.

Facial & Body Reshaping, Acupuncture & TCM treatment, Venus Versa, Viva laser treatment, 6D Microblading, East West Beauty & TCM School. 210 - 1610 Robson St. Cell & WeChat: 1.778.893.3422

202!*,1!1".

PERSONALS GENTLEMEN! Attractive, discreet European lady offers companionship. 604-451-0175

**SWEDISH MASSAGE** 604-739-3998 Broadway & Oak St.

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WILDWOOD LANDSCAPE Spring Clean-Up •Lawn Restoration •Hedge and Tree Prune • 604-893-5745

CAN YOU U DIG IT? Find help in the Home Services section

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A LIC’D. Electrician #30582 Rewiring & reno, appliance/ plumbing, rotor rooter 778998-9026, 604-255-9026

Responsible Tenants looking for long term space. 2 bright rooms in good cond, commercial building or small house for non-profit Spiritual Group. For more info call: Catherine: 604-435-9259 or Mavis: 604-430-1882

Get MORE

LIVING ROOM Find it in the Rental Section

To advertise call

604.630-3300

GUTTERS MASONRY AND REPAIRS

Ken’s Power Washing Plus WINTER SPECIALS

•Stone Walls •Bricks •Chimneys •Fireplaces •Pavers •Asphalt •All Concrete Work •20+ yrs exp

GEORGE • 778-998-3689

Gutter & window cleaning Power washing " WCB, Insured, Free est.

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Call Ken 604-716-7468

$133&7A799% ("&*<#<$ +*7' ("&*<#<$ 5<9- 7&!9/*" ()66 58402@ ,:>;=?:;:,=.

HANDYPERSON

MOVING #661/8#".7 51-034 GGGE5??,CD5-4B1,HBCA-+E+,1 )0"!

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%9*)+!&)*(*9 AAA All types repairs, renos, kitchens, baths, tiling, painting, plumbing, electrical and more. David 604-862-7537

778-322-0934

Electrician, Res/Comm New or old wiring. Reasonable rates. Lic #22774 604-8799394

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.

#1 Backhoes & Excavators Trenchless Waterlines Bobcats & Dump Truck & All Material Deliveries

Drainage, Video

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604-341-4446

• House Demolition & • House Stripping. • Excavation & Drainage. • Demo Trailer & • End Dump Services. Disposal King Ltd.

604-306-8599

www.disposalking.com

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OIL TANK REMOVAL

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bf#37309 Commercial & residential renos & small jobs.

x#1 A-CERTIFIED Licensed

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PATIOS

BC’s BEST

PAINTING (25 yrs exp.) Top Quality Paint & Workmanship. 3 Coats & Repairs for $250 each room. BBB. BEST PAINTER IN TOWN! 778-545-0098 604-377-5423 masterbrushespainting.com

#!($' #+(&"(&) *%, $7-%"+BA #67!+")+,A .1 #35)( 3$,* "2&'3$&* !&%440 ;23 =+,!<8BA 02 )3-,5+2&+2/ 0) > .<<C,@ :1?? &B!)8=+B/ 6"+BA0 '.77 (,A+C"A7,

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A+ PAINTER. 20 yrs. of exp. interior & exterior. licensed & insured. free estimates. Local call 778-770-2806

Do-It-Yourself Not Working Out? Find a Qualified Plumber Fast In Our Home Services Section 604-444-3000 classifieds.royalcityrecord.com

604.630.3300

PLUMBING Licensed plumber, boiler and hotwater tank, fire sprinkler, drainage, camera inspection, experienced. Call: 604.723.2007

NAND’S PLUMBING & TILES LTD. Complete Renovations

$('#" %&!& $$$*#()%'!"*+&#

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• Licensed Builder • Plumbing • Heating • Hot Water Tanks • Boilers •Gas Fittings •Fireplaces

/8%!1+)!'%&+ HANDYMAN Reno, kitchen, bath, plumbing, countertop, floors, paint, etc. Mic, 604-725-3127

PAINTING/ WALLPAPER ARMONIA PAINTING.COM INSURED BBB A+ WCB Ronaldo 604-247-8888

LIC. ELECTRICIAN

BAYSIDE PROPERTY SERVICES

WANTED TO RENT

call 604.630.3300

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VILLA MARGARETA

320-9th St, New West Suites Available. All suites have balconies, Underground parking avail. Refs. req. Small Pet OK. CALL 604-715-7764

MASONRY

To advertise in Home Services

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Donny 604-600-6049

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BAYSIDE PROPERTY SERVICES

GET UP to $50,000 from the Government of Canada. Do you or someone you know have any of these Conditions? ADHD, Anxiety, Asthma, Arthritis, Cancer, COPD, Depression, Diabetes, Difficulty Walking, Fibromyalgia, Irritable Bowels, Overweight, Trouble Dressing & Hundreds more. All Ages & Medical Conditions Qualify. Call British Columbia Benefits 1-800-211-3550

•Aerate •Power Rake •Lime Chaefer Beetle Repair New Lawn; Plant & Install • Prune •Hedges •Trimming •POWER WASH •GUTTERS •Concrete & Repairs; Walls Sidewalk, Driveway, Patios WCB & Fully insured. All Work Guar. Free Est.

(3-30#&102- 2+5 52#2 0*,,!+102#1*+ )&*/30#%'

Large Deluxe 1 BR w/ den, 604-524-5494

BUSINESS SERVICES

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Winter Clean-up

FLOORING

Licensed. Res/Com. Small job expert. Renos, Panel changes. (604)374-0062

#101 - 621 W. 57th Ave, Van Spacious 1, 2 & 3 BR Rental Apartments & Townhouses. Heat, hot water & lrg storage locker included. Many units have in-suite laundry and lrg patios/balconies with gorgeous views. Tasteful gardens, swim pools, hot tub, gym, laundry, gated parking, plus shops & services. Near Oakridge Ctrl, Canada Line stations, Langara College, Churchill High School & more. Sorry no pets. www.langaragardens.com

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TWO AMAZING Vending Opportunities. All Cash Business Part/Full Time. Plus Raise Money for Missing Children or Breast Cancer Research. For Details Call NOW 1-866-668-6629 Ext 1. www.tcvend.com www.vendingforhope.com

BC GARDENING

Gardening & Landscaping

All Electrical, Low Cost.

Your Junk is someone’s Place your ad online Jackpot

MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION! In-demand career! Employers have work-at-home positions available. Get the online training you need from an employer trusted program.Visit:CareerStep.ca/MT or 1-855-7683362 to start training for your work-at-home career today!

West Coast Cedar Installations New, Repaired, Rebuilt since 1991. Fences & Decks. 604-788-6458 cedarinstall@hotmail.com

#0)7)9- : 60310 69?)915

Call 604-327-1178

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

LAWN & GARDEN

ELECTRICAL

NEW TO YOU

TRAVEL

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GARDEN VILLA

1 Cremation Plot OCEAN VIEW CEMETERY, Evergreen Gardens, Burnaby $3500 includes transfer fee, Firm. Call 604-438-4680

FOR SALE - MISC

FENCING

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1010 6th Ave. New West. Suites Available. Beautiful atrium with fountain. By shops, college & transit. Pets negotiable. Ref req. CALL 604 715-7764

BURIAL PLOTS

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CONCRETE

RENTALS

MARKETPLACE

ART & COLLECTIBLES

HOME SERVICES

REAL ESTATE

.

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PRP PLUMBING Taking care of all your plumbing needs!

604-505-1771

HOME SE RVICES Find the professionals you need to create the perfect renovation. To advertise call 604-630-3300


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2018 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

HOME SERVICES RENOS & HOME IMPROVEMENT CONCRETE FORMING framing, siding crew available 604.218.3064

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35 years of experience Project Manager, New Home Builder, Renovations, Formwork, Framing, Finnish carpentry, kitchens, etc. www.integralcontractingltd.com Anders 604-916-2000

Canam Roofing 778-881-1417 Res. Roofing, New, Re-roofing & Repairs. Peace of mind warranty. www.canamroofing.ca

GL Roofing & Repairs. New Roof, Clean Gutters $80. info@ glroofing.ca • 604-240-5362 MCNABB ROOFING ALL Types of Roofing & Repairs Insured, WCB, 40 yrs exp. Call Roy • 604-839-7881 MCR Mastercraft Roofing Right the 1st time! Repairs, reroofing, garage, decks. Hart 322-5517

RUBBISH REMOVAL

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SPORTS & IMPORTS

DISPOSAL BINS starting at $229 plus dump fees. Call Disposal King 604-306-8599

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2015 VOLVO AWD 41Km XC60 2014 JETTA sedan $10,888 VW 2014 Toyota RAV4 ELECTRIC 2012 FIAT 500 Lounge $8888 2008 Honda FIT Hatch $6880

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Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a Sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes.

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DOWN

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A30

THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8

Automotive GRINDING GEARS

Canada gets a lot of cool cars that aren’t available in the U.S.

Brendan McAleer

came out that only the sedan version would be available in the United States. As for Canada? We’re going to get ’em both. Now, selling an A-Class in Canada presents a couple of problems. “What kinda MercedesBenz ya got there bud, eh?”

brendanmcaleer@gmail.com

The announcement that the Mercedes-Benz A-Class would be coming to North America in the coming year was greeted with joy by fans of small European hatchbacks. At least, it was until word

Canadians will get to try out a new Mercedes-Benz A-Class hatchback that won’t be available in the United States. PHOTO MERCEDES-BENZ

M{zd{

i-ACTIV ALL-WEATHER DRIVE EVENT O F F E R S E N D F E B R UA RY 28 T H

BEST SMALL UTILITY VEHICLE IN CANADA FOR 2018 GT model shown with available accessory roof rack

2018 cX-5 gx OFFER FROM

Mazda’s predictive i-ACTIV AWD is an on-demand system featuring sensors designed to check road conditions 200 times every second. Built to sense and respond to these conditions, i-ACTIV AWD helps to ensure a more confident drive.

86

$

WEEKLY FINANCE

with

$

0

DOWN at

3.49%

APR

for 84 months. On finance price from $27,820. Taxes extra.

0% PURCHASE FINANCING

ON SELECT MODELS

GET A WINTER ACCESSORY CREDIT

ON ALL NEW MAZDA MODELS

2018 M{ZD{3 gx OFFER FROM BEST SMALL CAR IN CANADA FOR 2018

$

WEEKLY FINANCE

50

$

0

1.50%

with DOWN at APR for 84 months. On finance price from $17,120. Taxes extra.

GT model shown

2018 CX-3 GX GT model shown with available roof rack and Thule cargo box accessories

OFFER FROM

$

WEEKLY FINANCE

64

$

0

2.49%

with DOWN at APR for 84 months. On finance price from $21,515. Taxes extra.

7- PA S S E N G E R S E AT I N G

2018 cX-9 GS $

OFFER FROM BEST LARGE UTILITY VEHICLE IN CANADA FOR 2018

WEEKLY FINANCE

120

0

$

3.90%

with DOWN at APR for 84 months. On finance price from $38,220. Taxes extra.

GT model shown

m{zd{ *

C A N A D A ’ S O N LY

“Yes. A.” “No, ya hoser, I mean like what kind is it eh?” “Um. Yeah, that’s what I said. A.” “Whaddya mean, eh?” “I said A!” The A hatchback isn’t the only small Mercedes that you can buy in Canada but not in the U.S. Currently, Mercedes-Benz Canada also sells a wagon variant of the C-Class. The C400 wagon is a pretty great machine if you prefer the lower centre of gravity of a car but still need to haul around a crossover’s-worth of cargo. Why don’t they sell such a thing in the U.S.? Well, the market’s got a slightly different flavour down there. In point of fact, they can’t even spell “flavour” correctly. Sedans are where it’s at in the U.S., so Mercedes has decided not to roll out a smaller wagon to go with their E-Class variants. But what if sales of the C400 wagon and A-Class hatchback suddenly take off in the Great White North? Well, you can bet Mercedes-Benz U.S.A. will be taking a good look at whether they might add those models to the range. It’s a bit like Canada is the perfect place to dip your toe in the pool before diving headfirst into the market. Besides having a smaller population than the U.S., Canadians are also a little slower to trade their vehicles in. You’d think that, taking the country as a whole, the salty roads of the Eastern provinces would force people to swap into new cars more often, but we tend to hang on to our old jalopies. It’s probably a combination of being a slightly pennypinching nation, and of being so swamped with taxes we’ve got less disposable income to throw around. As such, we sometimes get offered cheaper variants of existing cars, or especially cheap models to tempt us into

showrooms. The most obvious example presently on sale is the Nissan Micra. It’s peppy but slow, cheap but cheerful, and economical above all. Just the kinds of attributes Canadians seem to love. Back in the days of Fargo and Mercury, domestic brands like Ford and Chevrolet used to have Canada-specific models that were smaller than their U.S. counterparts, or had fewer features. Sure, we got high performance versions of the Beaumont, but most Canadian cars were a little de-contented. That’s one reason we still get some of the cheap stuff, or cars like the Acura EL and CSX, which were basically slightly nicer Honda Civics. The really good stuff comes when we’re not just being pandered to, but being used as a test market for the U.S. Let’s stick with Honda for a bit. Back in the early 1960s, Honda was looking to get into the automobile exportation business and achieve the same success they were having with motorcycles. Instead of stampeding into the U.S. market, where Datsun would have a bit of a struggle initially, Honda headed for Canada instead. Thus, while the Americans were mostly still driving big lead sleds, Canadians got to have a go at cars such as the Honda S600. A sprightly little two-door machine that came in either roadster or coupe variants, the S600 punched above its weight with a rev-happy engine and bantamweight nimbleness. As a vehicle that’s testing the waters for a larger market, we should just be glad Canadians have the chance to try out something new. And, when the Chinese auto manufacturers start putting feelers out, perhaps there’ll be a chance for us to be the first wave to determine whether manufacturers like Geely and BYD are up to the task.

M I L E AG E WA R R A NT Y

STA N DA R D O N A L L N E W M O D E L S .

zoo}-zoo} Vancouver’s Only Mazda Dealer

BEST BUY - CORRECTION NOTICE

DRIVING MATTERS

NEWSPAPER RETRACTION FOR THE BEST BUY February 9th CORPORATE FLYER 1595 Boundary Road, Vancouver CALL 604-294-4299 Service 604-291-9666

www.newmazda.ca

MazdaVancouver

Your journey begins here.

@Destinationmzd Visit NEWMAZDA.CA today to browse our NEW & USED inventory.

▲0% APR Purchase Financing is available on select new 2017, 2018 Mazda models. Excluded on 2017 MX-5, 2018 MX-5, CX-5 and CX-9 models. Based on a representative agreement using an offered pricing of $17,595 for the new 2018 Mazda3 GX (D4XK68AA00), with a financed amount of $18,000 the cost of borrowing for a 60-month term is $0, monthly payment is $300, total finance obligation is $18,000. Offer includes freight and P.D.E. of $1,695 and $100 air conditioning charge (where applicable). Offer excludes PST/GST/HST. ▼Winter Accessory Credit Offer is available to qualifying retail customers who cash purchase/finance/lease a new, in-stock 2017 and 2018 Mazda model from an authorized Mazda dealer in Canada between February 1 – 28, 2018. Winter Accessory Credit Offer value of $425. Customer can substitute for a $425 cash discount. Cash discount substitute applied before taxes. Winter Accessory Credit will be deducted from the negotiated accessory item price before taxes. Winter Accessory Credit Offer cannot be combined with Winter Tire Credit Offer. Some conditions apply. See dealer for complete details. †Based on a representative example using a finance price of $38,220/$21,515/$27,820/$17,120 for the 2018 CX-9 GS (QVSM88AA00)/2018 CX-3 GX (HVXK68AA00)/2018 CX-5 GX (NVXK68AA00)/2018 Mazda3 GX (D4XK68AA00) at a rate of 3.9%/2.49%/3.49%/1.5% APR, the cost of borrowing for an 84-month term is $5,516/$1,952/$3,577/$925 weekly payment is $120/$64/$86/$50, total finance obligation is $43,736/$23,467/$31,397/$18,045. Taxes are extra and required at the time of purchase. All prices include $25 new tire charge, $100 a/c charge where applicable, freight & PDI of $1,695/$1,895 for Mazda3/CX-3, CX-5, CX-9. As shown, price for 2018 Mazda3 GT (D4TL68AA00)/2018 CX-3 GT (HVTK88AA00)/2018 CX-5 GT (NXTL88AA00)/2018 CX-9 GT (QXTM88AA00) is $26,120/$30,315/$37,020/$49,420. PPSA, licence, insurance, taxes, down payment (or equivalent trade-in) are extra and may be required at the time of purchase. Dealer may sell/lease for less. Dealer order/trade may be necessary on certain vehicles. Lease and Finance on approved credit for qualified customers only. Unless otherwise stated herein, offers valid February 1 – 28, 2018 while supplies last. Prices and rates subject to change without notice. Visit mazda.ca or see your dealer for complete details. *To learn more about the Mazda Unlimited Warranty, go to mazdaunlimited.ca. 2018 CX-3 GT model shown with available roof rack accessory and Thule cargo box accessory. 2018 CX-5 GT model shown with available roof rack accessory.

In the February 9th flyer, page 2, the LG 65” 4K HDR OLED webOS 3.5 Smart TV (Web Code: 10620656) was incorrectly advertised. Please be aware that this product does not include the Geek Squad Elite TV Service Package at this time.

We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused our valued customers.


T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A31


A32

THE VANCOUVER COURIER T H U R SDAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5 , 2 0 1 8

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Vancouver Courier February 15 2017  
Vancouver Courier February 15 2017  
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