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FRIDAY

May 30 2014 Vol. 105 No. 44

FEATURE STORY 14

Respectful divorce THEATRE 26

Witchy woman SPORTS 28

Rookie track star There’s more online at

vancourier.com WEEKEND EDITION

THE VOICE of VANCOUVER NEIGHBOURHOODS since 1908

RUFF STUFF Thor, a French mastiff, and Bosley, an English bulldog, spend quality time together at the Olympic Village. A new citizen action initiative called 100 in 1 Day hopes to bring Vancouver residents together in a variety of different ways, including setting up special dog “sniffing stations” where people and pooches alike can meet up. See story on page 16. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

Letter writer faces the PAC Cheryl Rossi

crossi@vancourier.com

The chairperson of Lord Byng secondary’s parent advisory council has had to withdraw her open letter to theVancouver School Board about its draft sexual orientation and gender identity policy. More than 200 people attended Byng’s last PAC meeting of the year to discuss the letter Cheryl Chang wrote urging theVSB to delay passing its draft revised policy, which she considers seriously flawed. “It got spicy,” said the president of the

West Point Grey school’s gay straight alliance, Irene Lin, regarding the Tuesday meeting that included Chang suggesting the police should be called to cope with people, who weren’t Byng parents, who attended and wanted to speak. “There were a number of people who did storm off in quite a disruptive manner,” said Grade 12 student Myim Bakan Kline, when former Byng transgender student Cormac O’Dwyer took the mic. “It was hard to tell what they were yelling exactly... I was standing with other students and they yelled at us, as well, some seemingly homophobic slurs.”

Chang said she and others objected to those who aren’t Byng parents disrupting the meeting. Chang says she told students she’d be happy to meet with them another time. Lin said she and Bakan Kline achieved their goals by speaking at the meeting.The letter they felt didn’t represent their school has been withdrawn, and 61 parents signed up to join the PAC “so that next year we would have, perhaps, a more balanced PAC,” said Lin. Lin says she’s received numerous Facebook messages from former students who were concerned the inclusive environment

they experienced at Byng had deteriorated. “We’ve had a revolving door of upset kids coming in,” said Shelley Sullivan, department head of counselling and student services at Byng. Sullivan estimates up to one per cent of the 1,300 students at Byng express “gender fluidity” and/or identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender. “It’s just as common to see two girls walking down the hall holding hands as it is to see a girl and a guy or two guys,” she said. “Here, it’s just kind of the norm.” Continued on page 7


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F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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News

Collectors stuck on Panini love Wanyee Li

li.wanyee@gmail.com

After a month and a half, Alex Renowitzky finally had the last of 642 World Cup stickers for which he scoured the city. But the architect turned entrepreneur had to wait Wednesday until he got home to complete his collection because he promised his five year old daughter she could stick the last one in the album. “She would kill me if I didn’t wait for her,” he said. The stickers come from Panini, an Italian company whose sticker collections have been popular with generations of soccer lovers all over the world for their depictions of athletes, stadiums and mascots.This time around, with the World Cup only two weeks away, the Panini craze has reached Vancouver. Renowitzky has collected World Cup Panini stickers since he was six years old in Colombia during the 1982 World Cup. He immigrated to Canada in 2001 as a refugee and stopped collect-

ing — until this year when he received the Panini 2014 World Cup sticker album from Mikey Martins, who owns a board game store inTinseltown across from Renowitzky’s design business. That was all it took for Renowitzky to start his hunt for all 642 stickers. Martins, known as “Miami Mike,” has sold Panini albums in his One Stop Shop store for many years, but says this year sales have exploded. “It’s cardboard crack,” he said, standing beside the Panini BrazilWorld Cup 2014 stand.There were five sticker packages left this week. Renowitzky began his search by buying a box of 350 stickers from Martins’ store. About half of them were repeats, which he used to trade with other collectors.That’s when he started a Facebook group to find other Panini sticker enthusiasts in Vancouver. “You find trust and reliability with people who you’ve never even met,” said Renowitzky. The Panini sticker album phenomenon is much

Alex Renowitzky collected all 642 stickers for his Panini World Cup 2014 album, a feat that soccer fans all over the world are striving to accomplish before the tournament starts June 12. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

bigger in other parts of the world, especially in soccer countries.The furthest place Renowitzky has found stickers in is Evora, Portugal. He visited one of the cathedrals in the town while on vacation and the elderly woman

who collected fees at the entrance was sorting through her stash of repeat stickers. Renowitzky motioned to her which ones he was missing — she didn’t speak English or Spanish — and she gave him two of hers.

“It doesn’t matter who you are — if you have the sticker I need, then I’m thinking, ‘what can I do to get it?’” said Renowitzky. A fellow collector has even seen business benefits from trading stickers. Realtor

Oscar Barrera finds himself talking with clients about their collections. “I’m always in my suit and tie, but inside my briefcase I have a special folder with my album and stickers,” he said. Barrera has been collecting for many years, despite the activity being relatively unknown in Vancouver prior to this World Cup. In the past, he’s had to ask friends visiting Mexico, England, and other soccer-mad countries to bring back stickers. He credits the online community for the sudden popularity of World Cup stickers inVancouver.There’s even an app that helps collectors keep track of which stickers, identified by number, you have and which ones you’re missing. “Basically people just look at your list and send you a message.Then you meet,” he said. For Panini sticker collectors, the hobby means more than the stickers themselves. “It becomes a souvenir of the World Cup. People keep these albums for life,” said Renowitzky. twitter.com/wanyeelii

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4

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The park board released a 45-page report Tuesday with numbers that painted an overwhelmingly positive picture of the controversial access card for Vancouver’s community centres. Twelve community centres introduced the OneCard last summer, but six other community centres opted out due to conflicts regarding the interim agreement between them and the park board. According to the report put together by KPMG, 108,773 people had a OneCard as of March 2014, giving them access to 12 community centres in Vancouver. Ninety-five per cent of those people are Vancouver residents. The cost of implementing the change over to a universal card was $101,896. The introduction of the OneCard brought 33,000 new users to community centres and more than half of them returned to use the facilities again. Despite these impressive figures, concerns about the program remain. NPA park board commissioner Melissa De Genova has heard complaints from communities since the card was introduced. To promote it, the park board gave three free passes to anyone who signed up for one. Each pass was good for a one-time use at any facility, including pools, fitness gyms and classes. Some regular users of community centres

are questioning whether these passes were given to people outside ofVancouver. “There was some concern that these free visits were not only for Vancouver residents,” said De Genova. De Genova was quick to point out that Vancouver community centres have always been available to those not living in Vancouver. But some residents are finding that facilities are crowded and programs are full. Despite these concerns, De Genova is confident that the OneCard was the right step. “I’m hoping we can smooth out those wrinkles because universal access is where we need to be,” she said. Others are less optimistic. Robert Lockhart, pastpresident at Kerrisdale Community Centre, is worried about the cost of the program. “We’re concerned that OneCard wasn’t a budgeted expense. Number two is that it was excessive — we wanted to know the details of what those costs were,” he said. Kerrisdale Community Centre is one of six community centres that have filed three legal proceedings against the park board since August 2013.The community centre filed an FOI requesting all information regarding the cost of the introduction of OneCard. Two weeks ago, the park board told them it would not comply with the request. Lockhart is doubtful that the report released this week would be sufficient. “Once we look at the

report, we’ll determine whether or not we’re going to go back to the FOI commission and ask them to investigate,” he said. The report includes a break down of the implementation cost, including figures for design, marketing, printing and training. Vision park board commissioner Nikki Sharma hopes the report will improve relations with the six community centres currently at odds with the park board. “I hope that they will look at the data that we were able to get from the review and reconsider their position,” she said. Sharma also emphasized that the OneCard increases access to community centres for families with financial barriers. According to the report, there was a 409 per cent jump in the number of OneCards given to low-income residents in July to December of 2013, compared to the same time period in 2012. The six community centres that are not participating in the program are Hastings, Riley Park-Hillcrest, Killarney, Kensington, Kerrisdale and Sunset. In January, the B.C. Supreme Court halted attempts by the park board to evict the six community centre associations.The other 12 community centres are currently in closed-door negotiations with the park board for a new joint-operating agreement. Negotiations started more than a year ago. twitter.com/wanyeelii


F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

News

Blink and you missed your chance DEVELOPING STORY

Naoibh O’Connor

noconnor@vancourier.com

“LARGE ARTS & CRAFTS HOUSE (1899), available for relocation. Contact Dan at ddu@ btagroup.com no later than May 16th, 2014.” This five-line, one-column classified advertisement appeared under “announcements” on the top of page A33 of the May 14 edition of the Vancouver Courier. It also appeared in WEVancouver on May 16. The fact the ad referred to the Legg Residence in Vancouver’s West End wasn’t mentioned. The heritage home is slated to be knocked down to make way for a 17-storey tower.The city has issued the demolition permit, although it’s unclear when it will happen. Bing Thom Architects is handling the project. Efforts were made over the past couple of years to find a way to incorporate the home into the redevelopment, but they failed. Relocation could have cost a buyer upwards of $300,000. The ad was placed as part of the City of Vancouver’s requirements for the project’s development permit, in which the applicant committed to “placing an advertisement online through classifieds and social media to offer the house for relocation.” (Other commitments

included: reusing the stone foundation for paving and retaining walls; offering interested parties the opportunity for viewing and salvaging of interior heritage resources and a private demolition sale of remaining materials to assist diverting materials from the landfill.) No one responded to the ad, according to Brian Jackson, the city’s manager of planning and development. But how many spotted the brief, somewhat unspecific announcement will never be known. The Courier, which reported on the possibility that the house could be relocated in this column on May 16, asked Jackson why the city didn’t require a more visible announcement, with more details, or whether it should have. Jackson said the notice conformed with permit requirements.They were inked before Jackson took his position with the city. “They did offer the residence. Now one of the things is there has been a lot of media attention in the last month or so, which was coincidence with the time that we were holding back the demolition permit, so if anybody would have been interested that they would have been in touch with Bing Thom’s office and my understanding is that nobody had called them about the house,” he said. Pressed about how someone would have noticed the small ad, Jackson said: “It comes to the point of reasonableness in our determination. And, we determined

that they made a reasonable effort to determine whether there were people interested in purchasing the house. The ads, combined with the fact that it’s public knowledge that the house was available, was reasonable.” He added later: “To be honest, the condition was written before I got here. I would have liked, in retrospect, more specificity in terms of the type of ad, the location of the ad, the size of the ad, the publications the ad should have appeared in. But given that there were none of those details set out in the conditions, I have to go by what was written at the time and they followed the condition that was written.” Going forward, city expectations may change. “First of all I’m hoping there aren’t very many cases like this in the future.We have a lot of good heritage news in the coming months, but if there ever is a case where somebody offers a house for sale, I would definitely make sure that the condition is much more explicit,” Jackson said. HeritageVancouver had been looking into the possibility of moving the house with Nickel Bros Moving Ltd., but costs were prohibitive. A person contacted the Courier indicating he was interested in discussing options for saving the Legg Residence, but it’s unclear how his inquiries turned out. An email to the Bing Thom firm was not returned by the Courier’s print deadline. twitter.com/naoibh

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4

News

Casa Mia featured in heritage tour Annual homes tour might be ‘last look’ at home slated for development Cheryl Rossi

crossi@vancourier.com

Occupying aVancouver mansion with a water view is only a dream for most, but this Sunday tour-goers can ramble through Casa Mia. The Spanish Colonial Revival structure that’s been at the centre of a controversial rezoning is one of 11 homes open on the Vancouver Heritage Foundation’s Heritage House Tour June 1. Historian John Atkin toured the Southwest Marine Drive home, which was designed by Ross Anthony Lort and built in 1932, last week. “What struck me most was the split personality of the house,” Atkin said. Hallways with rounded ceilings lead to classical rooms. “You step into these grand, panelled, almost English[style] rooms and you go downstairs and suddenly you’re in a Hollywood theatre,” he said. “It really has a split personality in terms of what it wants to be, which I found totally fascinating.” The ballroom in the home built for brewery baron George C. Reifel, who also owned theVogue and Studio theatres and the Commodore Ballroom, features a sprung dance

25TH

Casa Mia will be open to the public June 1 as part of a tour offered by the Vancouver Heritage Foundation. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

floor, a gold-leaf ceiling and a raised stage. Dizzy Gillespie, Benny Goodman and Louis Armstrong are said to have performed there. The Southlands Community Association, which opposes the proposed rezoning of Casa Mia to allow a 62-bed care facility for seniors to be built on its site, requested that the heritage

foundation share information about the rezoning with tour participants and direct visitors to the community association’s website. The foundation will post a sign in the home that will include a link to the rezoning application on the City of Vancouver’s website. Joe McDermid, spokesperson for the community

association, warns the tour might the last chance for Vancouverites to see the mansion and its grounds before they are “forever altered.” The association worries the project could set a precedent for the development of other heritage properties in the area. Participants will see a

renovated 1906 B.C. Mills Timber and Trading Company prefabricated home and three Storybook-style homes. A “half-Tudor” home designed by Lort will be included on the tour. Lort designed Maxine’s Beauty School, which became [the since redeveloped] Maxine’s Hide-

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away, in the West End, the “hobbit house” at 587 West King Edward and the Art Deco Streamline house that looks like a “landlocked ocean liner” at West 10th and Alma. “He was a great architect in terms of knowing the styles and being able to execute them really well,” Atkin said. “In a lesser hand you could see that [Casa Mia] would just be a mishmash of stuff, and so even though you do have those very baroque and classical rooms and lots of wood carving, it is surprising how, as you flow through the house, it kind of works.” Atkin says the heritage foundation posts knowledgeable representatives at each home and exposes those who own heritage homes to skilled craftspeople. “It really shows people that there are possibilities and that you don’t need to blow it up and build the mega thing,” he said. “We’ve seen some good home renovation based on the examples.” Homes are open to visitors from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., June 1. For tickets or more information, see vancouverheritagefoundation.org. twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

News VSB heard speakers at three meetings Continued from page 1 The VSB’s PRIDE advisory committee drafted revisions to the board’s decade-old policy to reflect how some Vancouver schools have worked to become more comfortable for trans students and to provide clear guidelines for other schools. The VSB heard from speakers at three meetings this month.The policy is to go before the VSB’s education and student services committee, June 11. So did anything Chang hear address her concerns? “No,” she said. The developer and lawyer wants the B.C. colleges of physicians and psychologists to weigh in on the policy instead of medical professionals who are involved in the trans community. Chang said 60 people have joined the PAC “for no other reason than to remove me as chair.” VSB chairperson Patti Bacchus says the policy is about supporting diversity and isn’t a medical issue.

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committed money at the bargaining table “to reach a reasonable deal on issues like class size, composition, staffing levels, and fair wages for teachers.” The Labour Relations Board will consider arguments today (May

Teachers will continue four days of rotating strikes next week.Teachers in Vancouver are to picket Friday, June 6.The B.C.Teachers’ Federation said job action continues because the provincial government hadn’t

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29) about the 10 per cent wage rollback the provincial government has said it instituted in response to BCTF job action.The LRB is expected to reach a decision after the Courier’s press deadline. twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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A8

THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4

News

TWILIGHT MASS at 9 PM

Activists take up King’s role

An experience of Catholic worship to gather & renew the hearts, souls & minds of all who come!

Grandview-Woodland council holding public meeting with city staff Kristen Moran

kristenmoran86@hotmail.com

Sunday, June 1st

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Although Jak King has been a key player in halting the heavily opposed development on Commercial Drive and has stepped out of the public eye, the Grandview-Woodland Area Council continues to make progress in talks with city staff, according to its president. The GWAC board of directors metTuesday to discuss city staff’s recently released documents regarding the formation of a citizens’ assembly on the GrandviewWoodland community plan. GWAC president Steve Anderson had contacted planner Andrew Pask and received confirmationWednesday that both Pask and Brian Jackson, the general manager of city planning, would participate in a public Q&A at the council’s meeting Monday, June 2. “I was really happy because when I talked to Andrew last Friday, he had to check his schedule and availability,” Anderson said. “I’m glad they are able to come here to hopefully alleviate some of the community’s concerns and possibly add a few.” Pask’s silence following the citizens’ assembly workshop in January generated concern among community members and caused the Ad-Hoc Committee, a group now known as the Our Community, Our Plan

Jak King is stepping away from a leadership role with GWAC in order to focus on his writing. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

(OCOP), to consider forming its own citizens’ assembly.That group also held a meeting on Tuesday evening to discuss the documents and plan its next move. King, a high-profile community activist and commentator who left the council to focus on his history writing, was pleased with the quality and quantity of group members involved in the neighbourhood’s concerns over development. He said that while nobody has stepped up to be the sole representative of OCOP, he thought it was better if a few people worked in collaboration. “This isn’t a one-man band.There is a whole group of concerned citizens,” King said. “I couldn’t have done anything in the past without the support of a group behind me.” Creating a group dynamic that would see larger rep-

RARE FORMS OF

ARTHRITIS

resentation was the general consensus at the OCOP meeting and echoed the collaborative leadership style Anderson hoped to bring to GWAC. He said that he appreciated that the previous action taken by King and GWAC made a difference and hopes to use that momentum and create an organized process. “We’ve had a bit of a slow start, but I think that’s deliberate.We want to make sure we are doing things right and consult the community before going forward with decisions,” Anderson said. The GWAC website states one purpose of the group was “to seek representation from and to cooperate with other groups in the area and adjacent areas,” and Anderson said they are happy to meet with any community groups,

www.

including OCOP. “It’s a fairly recently formed group that has a lot of active community members, so although the group is new, the people involved aren’t,” he said. Resident Garth Mullins attended the OCOP meeting and has been actively involved since last summer when the city’s draft planning documents revealed tower heights reaching 36-storeys were in the cards for the neighbourhood. He said he recognized the importance of King’s work in fighting and eventually delaying the city, but said that it’s understandable why he has left the public sphere. “It’s essential for people in those leadership positions to change as movements grow and progress. People burn out. Especially when bureaucratic consultation processes are involved, that burns people out very quick,” Mullins said. “I’m not surprised and I think it’s good because you don’t just need one leader.That’s why movements involve so many people, they have different talents and leadership skills.” The two groups will likely convene in the near future, but not before GWACs Monday meeting which Anderson thinks will draw in a fair sized crowd because of Pask and Jackson’s attendance. He said he encourages any concerned community members to attend. twitter.com/EastVanKristen

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F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A9

News

Car Free Day turns ten Christopher Cheung

chrischcheung@hotmail.com

Ten years ago at the first Car Free Day, Commercial Drive turned away vehicles as streets were taken over by artists, artisans, performers and businesses.The smell of food and music filled the air as Vancouverites mingled. The neighbourhood banded together in response to the provincial government’s Gateway Program, a highway development project. Thanks to 30 core organizers and 300 volunteers, the event was a success and 25,000 people came out. Today, Car Free Day has expanded to Kitsilano, the West End and Main Street. Each festival is organized by volunteers from its own community. An estimated 250,000 people are expected to attend all four events. All of them take place Father’s Day, Sunday, June 15, with the exception of Kitsilano, which is holding an extra day on June 14.Though this makes it difficult for Vancouverites to visit multiple celebrations, it helps accommodate the tens of thousands who now attend Car Free Day and encourage residents to interact with their own communities without having to drive. Car Free Day is a nonprofit and organizers request a small fee from those who wish to set up a space on the street to help out with costs.Visitors have the freedom to wander around, visit stalls set up by shops, and poke inside if they are curious. Many restaurants sell quick eats outside so those who wish to grab a bite can do so while browsing the streets and watching the performances.

Dawn Blohm, manager at Commercial Drive’s Havana, has worked in the area for five years. She believes word of mouth year after year has helped the festival grow. Businesses have also expanded what’s available on the day itself, but above all, she says the community feeling draws people out. “I believe in our day and age a lot of people hang out in their houses and are not as social,” said Blohm. Although the purpose of the festival isn’t solely to promote businesses, it is a great way for locals to see what their neighbourhoods have to offer. Restaurants report accommodating three times the usual traffic, according to organizers. Non-profits and vendors get a chance to know the people who live in their area. This is what Dan Carlos, manager at Main Street’s Front & Company, loves about the event. “You get to learn who are the local people supply local products,” said Carlos. He adds this is especially true since not many chain storefronts are found along Main Street. Matthew Carrico volunteered seven years ago at Main Street’s first Car Free Day and is now one of the organizers. Seeing residents interacting and working together inspired him to take a larger role. “Attending the festival and the organizing process gave me a chance to personally engage with the community I grew up in,” said Carrico. He encourages all those interested to consider helping out at one of the festivals. “A lot of work goes in every year, but it’s very rewarding.” twitter.com/chrischeungtogo

Live Music is always a big part of Car Free Day. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

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A10

THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4

Opinion Chang defeated by Byng parent backlash

LNG bonanza hopes fractured by reality

Allen Garr Columnist agarr@vancourier.com

Geoff Olson Columnist mwiseguise@yahoo.com

Imagine the utter humiliation suffered by Cheryl Chang, chair of the Lord Byng Secondary School Parents Advisory Council (PAC),Tuesday night at a raucous and frequently angry PAC meeting. It was so heavily attended it had to be moved from the library to the gymnasium. Lord Byng is located on the West Side out towards UBC. It is populated for the most part by students whose parents are reasonably well-heeled, well-educated and not about to be taken advantage of. The cause for the overwhelming interest and considerable outrage was an “open letter” Chang had sent off to the Vancouver School Board which started: “I write to you as a parent and as Chair of the Lord Byng Secondary School PAC.” She then went on to attack the board for updating the district’s sexual orientation and gender identity policy. The school board says its intent is “to provide operational guidelines for school staff working to support a small but also very often isolated and vulnerable group of kids,” most specifically the update deals with those who are transgender. But Chang said it was “seriously flawed” and “could have long term damaging impacts on children.” She told school board members that when her letter was circulated she was attacked as being homophobic. “Let’s call a spade a spade,” she said. “I’m Christian. And are there Christians who are homophobic?Yes. I’m not one of them.” Now that is a curious assertion given that Chang was a longtime member of St. John’s (Shaughnessy) Anglican Church, one of four Anglican congregations that left the New Westminster Diocese over their opposition to church policy to bless marriages for same-sex couples. She then, in her role as a lawyer was “special counsel” to all the like-minded congregations in Canada that took the matter of control over church property all the way to the Supreme Court of Canada, where they lost. But I digress. While Chang had been all over the media fromYouTube to CBC radio advancing the same criticism of the school board policy, she had yet to fully inform Lord Byng parents of what she was up to. She argues on the PAC website there was simply not enough time between finding out about the policy changes on April 13 and the next meeting of the School Board

“I’m Christian.Are there Christians who are homophobic?Yes. I’m not one of them.” — Cheryl Chang to consider the matter on May 20. That’s puzzling to parent Hillary Meredith, who says there is the ability to send out a mass email and call a meeting on short notice. One other point: As parent Julia O’Dwier noted, the policy update document had been floating around for the last two years. It is supported by Vancouver Coastal Health and had input from the District Parent Advisory Council. Chang apparently was out of the loop. When Chang finally called this week’s meeting, she said attendance would be restricted to parents with proof they had a kid at Lord Byng. I saw no point in trying to get in. But When Lord Byng students entered the gym, according to parent Rachel Rose, Chang threatened to call the cops: “I saw her berating students. It was bullying. I could not believe it.” Neither could the three other incredulous parents I spoke to who confirmed Rose’s observations. In the end though the majority ruled and the students were allowed to stay. The majority of the people in the room were not upset because they found fault with Chang’s criticism.What irritated them though was expressed to me by parent David Fine: “She was using her position as PAC chair to state her own views.” In the end the vast majority of parents voted to have Chang withdraw her open letter and write a note of apology to the Vancouver School Board. Rose observed that Chang’s “humiliation was palpable and well deserved.” Finally, you may wonder what difference this updated policy will have at Lord Byng. Well, according to the parents I spoke with and Lord Byng guidance counsellor Shelley Sullivan, nothing will really be different. Lord Byng prides itself as a leader in making a safe space for all students and working with students and parents to deal with the complex issues they all face. twitter.com/allengarr

If you were among the Vancouverites who heard muffled explosions one evening two weeks ago, you weren’t imagining things.You just weren’t alerted or invited to the party. The May 13 show of fireworks above Coal Harbour was a private display for the Canadian Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Petroleum at the close of a conference at the Vancouver Convention Centre. It seems the traditional energy sector is in a celebratory mood these days. But this outburst of petro-pyrotechnics was just before a $400 billion, Russian-Chinese gas deal, which threw another monkey wrench into rosy projections for B.C. exports of liquified natural gas to Asia. In the LNG sweepstakes, British Columbia is way behind Qatar, Australia, and Malaysia. Bloomberg News reports that Australia is constructing liquefaction plants that will more than triple its annual LNG-manufacturing capacity to 85 million tons by 2018. Global competition means free-falling prices. “LNG spot prices in northeast Asia, where Qatar shipped 63 per cent of its LNG in 2012, could fall as low as $12 per million British thermal units by 2016 as new supply enters the market,” according to Bloomberg. That would be down to 60 percent of the record $19.70 per million BTUs posted this February. Our province doesn’t even have any LNG plant deals inked yet, and we won’t have any online until 2020 at the earliest. Geoscientist J. David Hughes has studied the energy resources of Canada for nearly four decades, including 32 years with the Geological Survey of Canada. He insists the B.C. government’s numbers don’t add up. For the province to meet the National Energy Board export approvals, it would require drilling nearly 50,000 new wells in the next 27 years, he writes in “BC LNG: A Reality Check”. And we’re mostly talking hydraulic fracturing, with it’s dine-and-dash model of extraction. “Given the steep production declines associated with shale- and tight-gas, drilling rates of more than 3,000 new wells per year would be required to ramp up production to required export levels, followed by nearly 2,000 wells per year to maintain production,” observes the

The week in num6ers...

11

The number of old homes, including Casa Mia on Southwest Marine Drive, open to the public on a June 1 tour offered by the Vancouver Heritage Foundation.

1 36.8 117

The number of former B.C. premiers now involved in the medical marijuana business. Mike Harcourt recently joined True Leaf Medicine Inc. as board chairman.

In millions of dollars, the surplus earned by TransLink in 2013 despite a reported drop in ridership.

The number of intervenors who’ve submitted roughly 10,000 questions about the Trans Mountain pipeline, prompting a request for a deadline extension to June 27 in order to respond.

geoscientist. (This is what energy security expert Thomas Homer-Dixon calls “fracking to stand still.”) “It is uncertain how much of the approved export capacity will be built, but the public would be well advised not to count on an LNG bonanza,” Hughes urges. Yet Premier Christy Clark gushes about a $100 billion dollar “prosperity fund” from LNG royalties, insisting the fund will eliminate the provincial debt by 2028. Damien Gillis, an activist journalist and co-producer of the upcoming film Fractured Land, adds a few more cracks to Christy’s crystal ball. At a recent talk before the Canadian Association of Journalists, he noted how B.C. made $144 million in royalties from gas from 2012-2013. But to get $100 billion over twenty years of prosperity fund you’ve got to make $5 billion a year of additional profit, Gillis observes. The first three to five years of export tax is only 1.5 per cent. But the LNG firms don’t pay any of the subsequent Phase 2 rate of seven per cent “until their multibillion dollar pipelines and LNG terminals projects are paid off,” in a global industry notorious for capital cost overruns. “So we won’t probably see a penny of this for 15 years, and we’re supposed to make $100 billion in 20 years,” he adds. In any case, the LNG cheerleaders aren’t about to let the reality principle get in the way of their gravy-train narrative. In a May 18 Province opinion piece titled, “Want health care? Better get behind B.C.’s LNG plans,” Stewart Muir insists that “by reaching customers in Asia, where growing economies require new energy sources, B.C. gas will continue to pay for the things we need.” (Muir is executive director of the Resource Works Society, a PR outfit connected with the Mining Association of British Columbia.) So now the security of your health care is being linked to a prophesied provincial LNG bonanza. If old-fashioned boosterism isn’t doing the trick, it’s time to play the fear card. There’s one prediction we can reasonably make about the LNG debate in B.C. More fireworks are in the works — but probably not the kind that played over Coal Harbour this month for industrialists, investors, and insiders. geoffolson.com

3 39.9

The number of Tony awards won by the original Broadway production of Wicked. The touring version of this musical inspired by The Wizard of Oz plays at the Queen E. Theatre until June 29.

The average percentage of pretax income Vancouver condo owners spend on their homes, according to a new study from RBC.


F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A11

Mailbox LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Letters may be edited by the Courier for reasons of legality, taste, brevity and clarity. Send to: 1574West Sixth Ave.,VancouverV6J 1R2 or email letters@vancourier.com

have your say online...

vancourier.com FACEBOOK TheVancouverCourierNewspaper TWITTER @vancouriernews WEB

New intern Chris Cheung’s story about commuter confusion over the Train2Main was the Courier’s most-read sotry online this week. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

COURIER STORY: “Train2Main tries commuter patience,” May 28. Transit boy:Yes, my commute has become a nightmare because of this Train2Main, I cannot make my connections with the bus. My question is why is the SkyTrain not stopping as normally and only the some cars open their door. If you want to go to Main you would only use the cars that open their doors? Anna @annamyli: Congrats @chrischeungtogo on your first @VanCourierNews article!

VA N C O U V E R T H I S W E E K I N H I S TO RY

Blind driver kills teenager

May 30, 1993: Recent high school graduate Martina Cerny, 18, dies after a hitand-run accident in Richmond caused by a legally blind man with 12 previous driving convictions. Melvin Broesky, 29, was sentenced to three years for criminal negligence causing death and an additional six months for attempting to persuade a friend to provide him with a false alibi. B.C. Supreme Court Justice Mary Ellen Boyd also imposed a lifetime driving ban.

Fans riot at Rolling Stones concert

June 3, 1972: The Rolling Stones make their first stop of a tour in support new double album Exile on Main Street at the Pacific Coliseum. A mob of around 2,000 people attempted to crash the sold-out concert, the Stones’ first North American concert in three years and also featuring Stevie Wonder as the opening act. Thirteen arrests were made and 31 police were treated for injuries after clashing with fans. Footage and interviews from the tour were released in the film Ladies and Gentlemen: The Rolling Stones, which was digitally re-mastered in 2010.

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COURIER COLUMN: “The victory lap’s over for Christy Clark,” May 28. Jillian P. Stead @JillianPStead: I’d hardly call it a victory lap. Albert Darringdon:This is all irrelevant. B.C. is a one-party state.The NDP is dead because the left is a dead movement based on 200-year-old idiotic ideologies that have been proven to fail 100 per cent of the time ie. Socialism and Marxism. It’s time for a viable third party. One that actually believes in fiscal responsibility and will slash bloated budgets to the bone, cut taxes, rip away the red tape stifling B.C.’s economic growth and put an end to idiotic liberal social agendas by standing up for traditional morals, personal responsibility and common sense. Tom Pankratz: Christy says teachers are greedy and uncaring. I am a teacher. I will tell you who is greedy and uncaring. Big business, the same ones that Christy is courting to prop up our economy.The ones that she is giving a billion dollars of tax cuts each year. Does Big Oil want to save the environment? No. Does our government look after the people of B.C.? No, they allow Big Oil to increase gas prices and put our seniors into debt. The greed of Big Oil never ends. All the while our household debt is increasing, not only for seniors but now many of our working poor are paid too little to make ends meet.Will another tax cut to the wealthy fix this problem?! How about another salary increase to politicians?! Frankly, I am fed up with the government’s talk about the economy.When Christy talks about the economy she means she is going to let McDonald’s continue to pay young workers $7.60/hr for 500 hours. She is going to allow oil companies to continue to increase the cost of gas at the pumps so the government can make 17 per cent profit on the dollar we pay.What about taking care of our community?What about taking care of the people of B.C.? COURIER STORY: “YoungVancouver couple points way to frugal living,” May 28. Cel Rince: Just a minor addition that may help some people:The $15 tickets for the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra are available to all people 30 years old or younger, in addition to full-time students of any age. Also, I don’t mean to imply that downtown Vancouver is the same price as Surrey, on average. Just that a person can live within Vancouver city limits and pay roughly the same as those renting in Surrey — even in downtown if you are comfortable with smaller suites. COURIER STORY: “Childcare spaces in Vancouver remain a luxury,” May 28. Mike Lombardi @LombardiMike: B.C. needs $10/day now! Stewart Rogers @StewartRogers: Lucky to have spaces we have at the center we have. COURIER STORY: “Fire chief the city’s top earner,” May 28. Chester Kendra: It’s no wonder municipalities are struggling financially when they pay outrageous salaries as in this case.With benefits pension etc.,oh my God. So are city employees the new financial elite that we have to support?


A12

THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4

Community

Seeking ‘the divine potential within us’

Unity centre promotes open source spirituality PACIFIC SPIRIT

Purcell, the president of Unity’s board who recruited the Hennesseys to the pulpit less than two years ago. The pair had retired from co-ministering at another church, one of the 10 Unityaffiliated centres in B.C., but “retirement” turned out to be merely a sabbatical. Purcell, a tech entrepreneur who joined Unity in 1981, says that Unity was “very much a prosperity church” in the 1980s, part of a spiritual movement that encouraged people’s career and wealth aspirations. “I think over time the church and the philosophies here have gone beyond that,” he says. “Yes, you shouldn’t be worried about money all the time.You should figure out how to make a living by contributing to society that gives you a reasonable amount of comfort. But beyond that, it’s important to find happiness and to give back, to contribute, to make the world a better place.” Purcell and the Hennesseys are emphatic that they are part of the Christian tradition, though their conversation is peppered with references to Buddha and other “wisdom teachers.” “By studying, for example, some of the basic tenets of Buddhism, we might learn certain techniques that could help us to better live of principle taught by Jesus or by Mohammed or by the Dalai Lama,” says Purcell,

Pat Johnson

pacificspiritpj@gmail.com

On their first date more than half a century ago, Mary and Austin Hennessey were headed for a fancy restaurant. As they got to know each other’s stories, dinner was forgone for a four-and-a-half conversation in the car.Their paths were remarkably parallel. Both had returned to their native Dublin, Ireland, a year and a half earlier. Mary had been at a convent in France studying to become a nun but the order suggested she wasn’t cut out for the religious life. “They said that I had too much spirit in me,” she says. Austin was at a monastery in Northern Ireland preparing for a life as a priest. He chose to leave, driven by what he saw as the loneliness of the life ahead of him. They were soon married. They remained observant Catholics and had two children, who they sent to Catholic schools. But when they decided that two was enough, the church’s doctrine on birth control was a deal-breaker.They continued to attend church on Christmas and Easter but their spiritual eyes were beginning to wander. From the intensely Catholic Ireland, the Hennesseys migrated to Canada, first to

Rev. Mary Hennessey and her husband Rev. Austin Hennessey preside over an eclectic congregation at the Unity Spiritual Centre. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

Toronto and then quickly on toVancouver, drawn in part by the “smorgasbord of belief systems” that were burgeoning in 1960s North America. As they made a new life in a new land, they began exploring the Human Potential Movement, part of the counterculture consciousness-raising and social change ferment. A friend who saw the type of books the Hennesseys were reading suggested a place they should check out. In 1968, the couple first walked through the doors of the Unity Spiritual Centre

on Oak Street and everything changed.Today, the pair are ordained ministers presiding over an eclectic congregation. Since 1964,Vancouverites have been driving by the modernist building just south of 41st Avenue with the simple sign reading “Unity,” but even the ministers acknowledge most people do not know what goes on inside. If they did, says Austin Hennessey, the sanctuary would probably be more densely packed on Sundays. “If you like Deepak Cho-

pra and EckhartTolle, you’ll love Sundays here,” says Unity’s website. And there is no doubt thatVancouverites eat up books by these authors and others like Gary Zukav, MarianneWilliamson andWayne Dyer. The latter recently attracted thousands to a local presentation. Unity attracts a couple of hundred most Sundays to a service heavy on music (in a structure with acclaimed acoustics), a bit of meditation and an uplifting message. “It’s not just the guilt and shame church,” says Randy

See our

*in selected areas

who sees unity as a tradition in line with what we now call the “open source” movement. Austin Hennessy calls it “a do-it-yourself spirituality.” And while some of the ideas and books that Unity members delve into are hot off the presses, the movement itself is more than a century old, founded in Missouri not as a religion but as a spiritual study group. As there is no dogma, Unity adherents are free to believe what they like, to take from one tradition or another, though there is an emphasis on mysticism, elevated consciousness and the power of positive thinking. Most, Purcell says, believe in an afterlife, but cannot say what it might look like and, besides, making the most of this life and being the best one can be is likely to put one in good stead for whatever comes next. At root, Unity is about finding the divine in oneself. If humans are made in the image and likeness of God, says Mary Hennessy, “how can we not be divine in our nature as well?The fact that we are having a human experience doesn’t deny that we are primarily spiritual beings.That divinity in us is always there. It’s for us to discover.” “We all have this divine potential within us,” says Austin Hennessy. “Jesus was the example, not the exception.”

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F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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News

TransLink ridership levels appear to have “hit a plateau” after decreasing 4.9 per cent in 2013 compared with the year prior, the transit authority has reported. In its 2013 annual report, released May 28, TransLink pointed to fare increases and B.C.’s lower employment numbers as possible reasons for the ridership dropping from 238.8 million to 233.9 million. Despite the drop in ridership, the transit authority still posted a $36.8million surplus in 2013. It credits aggressive cost-cutting measures, collecting fines from fare infractions, increased revenues from park-and-ride fees, and “improved cost effectiveness” of its bus and SkyTrain services. “TransLink has adequate revenues to fund existing programs but will require additional revenues to fund much-needed expanded service,” the report said. “The strong financial results in 2013 provide more certainty that TransLink will meet its commitments and address the most critical service needs.” The report noted 19,000 individual customers used the HandyDart service in 2013. HandyDart provides transportation for people unable to use the conventional system, usually due to some kind of disability. However, the service has been dogged by complaints that thousands of users are passed by annually. TransLink announced May 23 it was giving $1 million to taxi companies to help with a pilot program aimed at providing HandyDart users with 30,000 more rides each year. As part of the expansion, 78 new wheelchair accessible taxis will be purchased to add to the existing fleet of 111. —Tyler Orton

Thursday, June 5, 2014 4 – 7:30 pm (drop in anytime) Creekside Community Recreation Centre 1 Athletes Way FOR MORE INFORMATION: vancouver.ca/paddling-centre Open house materials and a feedback form will be available online starting June 5. 604-257-8529 Park

Union S

The Oakridge Transit Centre (OTC) site is changing and we want you to be part of the process. TransLink, the owner of the OTC site (known as the Bus Barns), has asked the City to start a planning program to create a Policy Statement 37th Avenue to guide future redevelopment of the site which is near West 41st Avenue OTC SITE and Oak Street. The Policy Statement will set principles and objectives for land 41st Avenue use; sustainability; transportation; density; building types and heights; public benefits; and phases of development. Willow Street

Come share your thoughts and learn more about a proposal to replace the existing paddling facility in Southeast False Creek with a new and improved permanent home near Creekside Community Recreation Centre.

Open Houses: OTC Bus Barns

Oak Street

New Paddling Centre at Creekside Community Centre

Drop by an open house, the first events of the planning program, to learn more and offer your feedback.

BC Place Stadium Plaza of Nations

East Basin

The Village on False Creek Open House

Telus World of Science

Main St.

TransLink reports $36.8 million surplus for 2013

Open House:

B ea

Kinder Morgan’s proposed Trans Mountain pipeline project is asking the National Energy Board (NEB) to postpone a deadline to respond to intervenors, citing difficulty responding to the more than 10,000 questions it’s received. Trans Mountain is due to respond to information requests by June 4, however, the company announced May 28 it filed a motion with NEB to push the deadline three weeks to June 27. “Because of the large number of information requests posed, Trans Mountain simply cannot respond with full and adequate responses,” the company said in a prepared statement. Kinder Morgan wants to spend $5.4 billion twinning the pipeline that runs from northern Alberta to the Westridge Terminals in Burnaby. The expansion would boost capacity from 300,000 to 890,000 barrels per day. The company said the June 4 deadline would only allow them to complete responses to about half of the 117 intervenors that have submitted questions. Meanwhile, Kinder Morgan is also adjusting part of the proposed route for the pipeline and now wants it to go through Burnaby Mountain as opposed to running along the Lougheed Highway. The company did not provide an official press release over the adjusted route but instead updated its website May 26 with an interactive map showing the change. It also added a blog post saying “there are some pipeline corridors submitted in our application that are no longer being considered. Trans Mountain has officially documented these changes with the National Energy Board (NEB) through the regulatory process.” Trans Mountain’s senior project director Greg Toth said in a statement the company has been consistent with information it has provided. “But in most cases, there is nothing new or different from the information filed in the application or what we have been communicating at most recent route refine-

ment workshops and open houses,” he said. “The route from the Fraser River into Burnaby has been revised as we have switched to the highway-rail corridor and completely taken the proposed Lougheed highway routing option off the table.” —Tyler Orton

Cambie Bridge

Trans Mountain project pushes for deadline extension

Thornton Park

Proposed Site

At our first event, sit down with an artist for an illustrated brainstorming session to see your ideas take shape. Sunday, June 8, 2014 from 12 - 4 pm VanDusen Garden Visitor Centre, 5251 Oak Street (Illustrated Brainstorming Session from 1 - 3:30 pm) Thursday, June 12, 2014 from 5:30 - 8 pm VanDusen Garden Floral Hall, 5251 Oak Street FOR MORE INFORMATION: vancouver.ca/otc

Public Hearing: June 10 Tuesday, June 10, 2014 at 6 pm City Hall, 453 West 12th Avenue Third Floor, Council Chamber

Vancouver City Council will hold a Public Hearing to consider heritage and zoning amendments for these locations:

1. 1451 Angus Drive (Reifel Residence)

To designate the existing building, currently listed on the Vancouver Heritage Register in the ‘B’ evaluation category, as a protected heritage property, and to approve a Heritage Revitalization Agreement (HRA) for the site. The application proposes variances to the First Shaughnessy Official Development Plan, as set forth in Development Permit Application Number DE415755, to retain the heritage building as a singlefamily house, make additions to the west side, east side and rear, and to construct a new detached garage.

2. 2820 West 41st Avenue

(Dorothy M. and Dorothy S. Residences) To designate the existing buildings, currently listed on the Vancouver Heritage Register in the ‘B’ evaluation category, as protected heritage properties and to approve a Heritage Revitalization Agreement (HRA) for the site. The application proposes variances to the Zoning and Development By-law, as set forth in Development Permit Application Number DE417732, to restore the two heritage buildings, convert them to contain two dwelling units each, and to construct two new infill two-family dwellings (duplexes) on the site.

3

2

3. 998 Expo Boulevard (Concord 5B West) To rezone 998 Expo Boulevard (Concord 5B West) from BCPED (BC Place Expo) District to CD-1 (Comprehensive Development) District, to permit the development of two residential towers of 28 and 30 storeys (620 dwelling units) and two floors of commercial development. A total of 38,871 square metres (418,403 square feet) of floor area including 1,948 square metres (20,968 square feet) of commercial floor area is proposed. An amendment to the False Creek North Official Development Plan (FCN ODP) is proposed to allow additional residential development and to decrease the amount of commercial development required on this site. This amendment proposes an increase in the total number of dwelling units in the FCN ODP area from 10,925 to 11,511 and a reduction in the percentage of dwelling units designated for affordable housing. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THESE APPLICATIONS: vancouver.ca/rezapps or 604.873.7038 Anyone who considers themselves affected by the proposed by-law amendments may speak at the Public Hearing. Please register individually beginning 8:30 am on Friday, May 30, 2014 and before 5 pm on June 10, 2014 by emailing publichearing@vancouver.ca or by calling 604-829-4238. You may also register in person at the door between 5:30 and 6 pm on the day of the Public Hearing. You may submit your comments by email to mayorandcouncil@vancouver.ca, or by mail to: City of Vancouver, City Clerk’s Department, 453 West 12th Avenue, Third Floor, Vancouver, BC, V5Y 1V4. All submitted comments will be distributed to Council and posted on the City’s website. Please visit vancouver.ca/publichearings for important details. Copies of the draft by-laws will be available for viewing starting May 30, 2014 at the City Clerk’s Department in City Hall, 453 West 12th Avenue, Third Floor, Monday to Friday from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. All meetings of Council are webcast live at vancouver.ca/councilvideo, and minutes of Public Hearings are available at vancouver.ca/councilmeetings. (Minutes are posted approximately two business days after a meeting.)

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PUBLIC HEARINGS, INCLUDING REGISTERING TO SPEAK: vancouver.ca/publichearings Visit: vancouver.ca Phone: 3-1-1 TTY: 7-1-1


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4

Feature

Mutual respect the goal

Robyn Ross, seen here with her daughter Siena and a friend visiting a film set, says collaborative divorce gave her peace of mind. PHOTO COURTESY ROBYN ROSS

Alternative approach to litigated breakups quietly growing in B.C.

Tom Sandborn

tos65@telus.net

“One of the things I learned going through my divorce that way was that I needed to love my child more than I hated my husband,” said Robyn Ross with a wry laugh.The Vancouver movie industry worker went through her divorce a decade ago, but she was among the first in the province to try an exciting new approach, dubbed collaborative divorce, that avoids litigation, resolves conflicts and enhances mutual respect and regard between the divorcing spouses. Like a small but growing number of B.C. couples, Ross and her ex- husband turned to this new cooperative approach as an alternative to the emotional and financial damage often involved in courtroom litigated battles. Ross credits the collaborative process with allowing her and her ex-husband to get past bitter feelings to become real friends as they

cooperate in raising their daughter. “Our daughter is doing amazingly well,” Ross said. “And at the end of the day, my ex and I both felt the process was fair.” Despite what started as a deeply unhappy separation, Ross told the Courier, she and her ex-husband are now good friends, and when he remarried a few years later, she was comfortable attending the wedding and has developed a friendship with his new partner. “In collaborative divorce,” Ross said, “everyone is held accountable for the best interests of the child. I wouldn’t want anyone to think it was easy. It wasn’t. But collaborative divorce gives you the tools you need. I couldn’t have had all this joy and family without the collaborative process.”

Lawyer sought better way

With 70,000 divorces occurring in Canada each year and a divorce every 13 seconds in the U.S., there is a lot of divorce-related

misery in North America. The received wisdom claim that half the marriages contracted here will end in divorce, while memorable and widely believed, is less than entirely accurate. For starters, the 50 per cent failure rate is an American figure and it is even higher in some European countries. For Canada, the most recently reported (2008) chances of a marriage ending in divorce are closer to 40 per cent. And in both countries, the aggregate numbers for divorce include not only first marriages, which end in divorce less often than the average, but also second and third marriages, which tend to break down much more frequently and drive up the average. But even if you scale down the statistics for accuracy, the number of people who suffer through harrowing marriage breakdowns is huge. Litigated, antagonistic courtroom divorce can increase the pain for all concerned. A quarter century ago, a

family law practitioner in the American Midwest, Stu Webb, decided there had to be a better way to help his clients navigate divorce. He created a new approach called “collaborative practice,” designed to keep families out of the adversarial atmosphere of courtroom litigation and into a focus on cooperating for the sake of their children’s future. A soft-spoken student of Tibetan Buddhism who had been practicing law since 1964,Webb said he became “burnt out” under the stress of adversarial litigation and invented this alternative approach to divorce in 1990. Since then, the number of practitioners around the world has burgeoned and there are now an estimated 40,000 lawyers trained in and employing the methodology,Webb told the Courier by phone recently from his retirement home in Minneapolis. Webb calls the prior commitment made by clients and lawyers who enter into a collaborative divorce process not to take the divorce

into courtroom litigation “Rule One.” He describes — his first realization in the 1990s that such a contract would be fundamental to success in non-adversarial divorce his “breakthrough, aha moment.”

Designed for families

Readers curious about the contracts that formalize these commitments can find the documents that the divorcing couple and all the professionals on their collaborative team sign described on the website of Collaborative Divorce Vancouver at collaborativedivorcebc.com. According to the website, when you sign a Participation Agreement, you are committing to: • Stay out of court • Communicate openly and with respect • Disclose all relevant information promptly • Keep negotiations confidential • Hire new lawyers and start over if you do decide to go to court


F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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Feature

of collaborative divorce

• Not use any disclosed information against each other if you go to court. Although most contested B.C. divorces are still done in the classic, bruising courtroom litigation style, a small but growing group of local practitioners have been building up a collaborative practice community in the province since Webb and two other pioneers in the approach, Peggy Thompson and Pauline Tessler, conducted a training session here in 1999. Nancy Cameron, the Vancouver lawyer who invited the trainers to Canada, said nearly 500 B.C. lawyers are trained in the approach. CBC TV’s Doc Zone aired a powerful film called How to Divorce and Not Wreck the Kids in 2009, including a portrait of Sally and Lionel, a B.C. couple using the collaborative approach, but the option remains relatively littleknown here. Phyllis Tessler, the California lawyer who helped lead the first B.C. training sessions in collaborative practice, was scathing in her assessment of the litigation approach to divorce in an email exchange with the Courier. “In family matters,”Tessler wrote, “which are inherently complex and deal with a rupture in the most essential human relationships, litigation — which builds in adversarial aggression, oversimplification, and polarization, as well as a focus on blame, is the wrong model. Nobody designing a system for resolving divorce related legal issues arising during normal family restructuring would design the one we’ve got.” Litigation,Tessler wrote, is a zero sum process that is more costly than divorcing families can afford financially and emotionally. “It damages those who participate in it by causing both lawyers and clients to act from the most primitive reptilian parts of their brains, remaining in high levels of biological stress that are inconsistent with creative problem solving,” she said. She added that the process itself damages clients, depressing immune functioning and cognitive processing capacities and damping energy available for work, volunteering in the community, and parenting children.

“One eminent California family law judge has said family court is where they shoot the survivors,” she added. “Collaborative divorce builds in value-added interdisciplinary services that meet the full spectrum of needs that every family has in divorce: emotional, legal, financial — with a constructive, respectful, creative and private focus on shared values and the best outcomes for every member of the family system,” she concluded.

Teams support spouses

Typically, a collaborative divorce involves the spouses, a trained collaborative lawyer for each and two mental health professionals who function as a “collaborative divorce coaches,” with one for each partner. It can also involve a neutral child specialist and a neutral financial planning specialist to fill out the team working to make the divorce as cooperative and child-friendly as possible. While the number of professionals involved can entail significant costs for clients, with various B.C. experts quoting typical expenses for a collaborative divorce between $10,000 and $25,000, the costs of litigated courtroom divorce can be much higher both in financial and emotional terms. For example, Sally and Lionel, the couple profiled in the CBC documentary, required only six sessions to come to an agreement that both accepted, even in the face of complicated disagreements over division of property, a situation that could, conceivably, have been much more embittering, expensive and time consuming in adversarial litigation. “Collaborative divorce was enlightening for me,” said Jake Fraser, a Pender Harbour resident who used the process. “It was a reality check. I found out some things about myself that embarrassed me, but things would have been far worse in an adversarial process. I learned a lot about my need to control everything and always be right.” Fraser called lawyer Cameron, who acted for him in the divorce, and the collaborative process itself “sources of good cheer in a

world of pain.” That’s the kind of feedback that Danny Zack loves to hear. Zack is a burly, jovial Metro Vancouver lawyer who also practises in Nelson. Zack, like Cameron, has decided to abandon adversarial litigation altogether and handle all his cases without recourse to courtroom battles. (Cameron and Zack are the lawyers shown on screen in the 2009 CBC documentary.) In a sun-drenched office near Vancouver International Airport, cheerily cluttered with memorabilia from his career in collaborative law and his passionate other life as a highly competitive and successful amateur golfer, Zack said he hasn’t been in a courtroom contest in over a decade and he doesn’t miss the stress at all. In fact, he credits his shift to collaborative practice with improving his health and making his life happier. “In-court competition was tough,” Zack said. “Now, I don’t have to win anymore. I don’t need to go in with a suit of armour. In collaborative meetings I am not outcome-oriented in the same way I was as a litigator. Our goal is to positively

restructure families, not tear them apart.” He never believed children and families should be in court rooms. “I believed that was destructive,” he said. “The litigious approach has all of that negativity of looking backward and alleging bad conduct. Collaborative practice doesn’t mean you ignore what has happened, but you don’t punish people for it.You try to help them look forward and build a new future that is positive. I quickly decided I wasn’t going to keep going into the court system.” Cameron agrees. She said the skills she was developing in courtroom litigation “were not the skills I wanted to embrace in my personal life at all.” She didn’t want, she said, to “increase the size of the parts of me that were fostered by the win-lose, blameand-shame nature of the adversarial court system.” Catherine Brink, a young Vancouver lawyer, went to law school explicitly in order to engage in collaborative practice. Called to the bar in 2008, she conducts her practice entirely outside of the court-

room doing collaborative divorce, negotiation, mediation, estate planning and pre-nuptial agreements. “I was seeking a career where I could help people,” she said. “The collaborative model is so empowering and respectful. It brings safety into the room for our clients, and the teams are so mutually supportive.”

Empathy for all

The supportive team that Brink mentions often includes collaborative divorce coaches.Two experienced coaches working in B.C. are Deborah Brakeley and John Boland, mental health professionals who frequently work together as part of the team that supports a couple going through the collaborative process. “While we are in alliance with our own client, we are not aligned against the other spouse,” Brakeley said. “We show empathy to both spouses, knowing that divorce means experiencing multiple losses for everyone. We want to address the needs, desires, and views of both parents.” In particular, Boland said coaches focus on parenting plans for the divorcing

couple. “Our goal is to help them redefine the relationship from a marriage to a coparenting partnership.We ask our clients what they want their kids to say in 20 years about the separation.” “We want the kids to love both parents,” Brakeley added. “Our goal is to teach compassion and empathy, and we focus on emotional self regulation, practical ways like breathing exercises, yoga and mindfulness to manage the hurt and anger that can go with a divorce.” At the end of the CBC documentary, Sally, a woman the viewer has seen angry and tearful as she engaged in a difficult and sometimes bitter and painful (but in the end, visibly healing) process during her collaborative divorce meetings, sums it up. “I am proud of Lionel and me. I think we have a great agreement here for our kids. It makes me feel happy for them.” Robyn Ross tells the same story. Her collaborative divorce, she told the Courier, left her “at peace.” Tom Sandborn lives and writes inVancouver

Lawyer Danny Zack has abandoned courtroom litigation in favour of the collaborative process: “Our goal is to positively restructure families, not tear them apart.” PHOTO DAN TOULGOET


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4

News

Dogs and dancing to shake up city Cheryl Rossi

crossi@vancourier.com

Hendrik Buene wants Vancouver to be a city where people of different socio-economic classes mix, so he’s organizing a “sniffing station” for dogs and their owners. Buene lives in the lowincome housing portion of the Woodward’s complex and says the dream of people of different means mixing hasn’t happened yet.That’s why he intends to organize sniffing stations at Woodward’s, CRAB (or Portside) and Andy Livingstone parks. “I really do believe in mixed societies,” said Buene, who doesn’t own a dog. The Downtown Eastside community activist’s project is part of an international festival of citizen action called 100 in 1 Day, which runs June 7. Urban design students from Denmark, working with students in Colombia, launched the celebration of active citizenship in Bogota

Special canine “sniffing stations” could help neighbours get to know each other. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

in 2012.They were assigned to carry out six urban “interventions” in one day and actually ended up with 250, says Robyn Chan, volunteer coordinator at Evergreen, a national non-profit environmental organization that’s

helping organize festivities in Vancouver,Toronto, Halifax and Montreal. Buene’s dog-centred approach is one of many Vancouverites can discover next week. Freelance illustrator and

Staying cool in the Dog Days of Summer! Sales, Service & Repairs for: • Air Conditioning • Gas Fireplaces & Outdoor Heaters • Tankless & Conventional Water Heaters

graphic designer Liang Ding wants residents of Metro Vancouver to bring their broken umbrellas to the square in the former Olympic Village, remove the hardware and stitch their umbrellas together to

2

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create one great canopy, to “represent the fabric of the community being knit together from a common object that everyone uses,” according to the project description.The end result could then be used to create a big tent for community gatherings. The organizer of “Speed BFF” invites neighbours to connect in three-minute meet and greet session at Bute and Davie streets. And because others prefer to connect on a dance floor, the Silent Disco Squad will get revellers to sync their electronics and groove to the same music in a giant dance party. Chan says Halifax 100 in 1 Day participants are mounting a pop-up beer garden, which she notes would not be allowed in Vancouver. “Vancouver, especially, we have a reputation of being an isolated city,” Chan said. “When people talk about, say, millennials, everyone talks about not being engaged. And 100 in 1 Day is an easy, low-pressure

way for people to be really engaged in the city and to take part and to kind of take ownership of the city.” Three workshops are left before the celebrations begin. The workshops and celebration aim to see citizens make new connections and make their visions for Vancouver come true in a way they can interpret in one day. “A lot of people have said they’ve had this idea for a long time and this is the first chance that they’re taking to really act upon it,” Chan said. Evergreen isn’t funding the grassroots projects but will help secure permits and materials. Chan said the project leaders are a “great mix” of people who were born and raised inVancouver and others who just moved here. Evergreen hopes to get all age groups actualizing their dreams, so May 31 is a family workshop. For more information, see 100in1day.ca/vancouver. twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A17

News View my video with

Harcourt joins medical marijuana grower

Former NDP premier and Vancouver mayor Mike Harcourt has joined medical marijuana grower True Leaf Medicine Inc. as its board chairman. “By separating fact from folklore,True Leaf has an opportunity to fill in the knowledge gap for both doctors and end users when it comes to aligning a specific ailment with a documented cannabis remedy,” Harcourt said in a statement. The company has yet to set up operations and is waiting for approval from Health Canada for a licence to grow and distribute medical cannabis. True Leaf plans to set up a 16,000-square foot facility in Lumby, B.C., a small town in the Okanagan valley.The building has 40-foot ceilings, giving True Leaf room enough to construct three additional floors. CEO Darcy Bomford said he met Harcourt through a business connection who knew they once belonged to the same college fraternity. “We’re absolutely thrilled to be working with Mike Harcourt.That sort of sets the theme for our company,” he said. “Our next focus is to have a medical advisory board that’s filled with the top people from different disciplines.” Bomford added the company’s focus would be solely on medical cannabis as opposed to other large producers that are trying to appeal to recreational users. The CEO wants the medical advisory board to feature experts in chronic pain, spinal cord research and Crohn’s disease. The facility will be upand-running by January if it receives approval from Health Canada within the next few months, according to Bomford. True Leaf has eight people under contract right now and the CEO expects to add an additional two people to the payroll when the facility opens. Bomford has previous experience in the manufacturing of consumable products, serving as the founder of Darford International, a Vernon-based pet nutrition company. — Tyler Orton

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The first time 6S Marketing opened an office out east, the Vancouver-based company did not send a co-founder or senior manager to guide the launch in Toronto. “It didn’t work and we had to scale that back,” recalled 6S president Chris Breikss. “You need to have a co-founder there to bring across the values of the company and the culture.” But as the marketing firm launches its NewYork City office for a subsidiary targeting affluent Chinese customers, Breikss will be there to steer the company as it navigates business in the Big Apple. The co-founder of 6S is moving to NewYork on May 31 after the federal government accepted the company into its Canadian Technology Accelerator program. The program provides Canadians startups with resources and contacts in cities across the U.S. In the case of Sheng Li Digital — the subsidiary 6S launched in March — the government is helping out with office space in one of the most expensive cities on the planet. Breikss said Vancouver’s strong connection to Asia should prove to be a big advantage for the new business, which does everything from media buying to social media management on Chinese services. He added 6S has already been offering those services to Chinese customers for about five years, so it only made sense to spin it off into its own company in time for an expansion in NewYork, where the Chinese population in larger in terms of sheer numbers. “Online marketing has existed in North America for a dozen years, however, it’s a relatively new business in China,” he said. “We’ve got a history with more than a dozen clients under our belt where we’ve run these (Chinese-language) campaigns and now we’re looking to scale that up.” Support teams in Toronto and the West Coast will back up the NewYork office with specialists fluent in English, Cantonese and Mandarin. Breikss said the plan is to partner up with established ad agencies in NewYork and help manage digital campaigns for Chinese customers. “The Americans get

advertising and while the Chinese are catching up very quickly, it has not been as large of a market as what we expect here in Canada and the U.S.” —Tyler Orton

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4

Travel

London tourism biz sees a sea change John Keyes

MeridianWriters’ Group

Amateur sleuths look for historical artefacts on the rocky foreshore of the River Thames at low tide during a walk led by Dr. Fiona Haughey, an expert on intertidal Thames history. Items not of significant archaeological interest may be kept by their finders.

PHOTO JOHN KEYES/MERIDIAN WRITERS’ GROUP

Redeem without penalty at the end of each year. Or let your savings grow at a higher rate. Either way, your wealth is fully protected with a 100% principal and interest guarantee.

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LONDON—The knee-high rubber boots on a dry, sunny day are a giveaway that you have arrived at the right place. As you exit Mansion House station on the London Underground you might encounter a group of urban explorers, many wearing protective footwear not called for by the balmy weather. They have convened to go “mudlarking” on the River Thames foreshore at low tide, and are waiting for their guide to arrive. Dr. Fiona Haughey holds a PhD in archaeology and is an expert in intertidal Thames history. When not on a dig abroad, she guides these tours 50 or so times per year. Haughey, a jovial woman with a droll sense of humour and an encyclopaedic knowledge of local history, arrives exactly on schedule. She assembles the group, collects the modest London Walks fee (£9 for adults; children under 15 accompanied by parents are free) and explains the ground rules. Sensible footwear is a must, as are disposable surgical gloves, which she will hand out just before we go down to the river. (You don’t want to contact potentially fatal Weil’s disease, transmitted through rat urine.) Unless you possess a Thames Foreshore Permit, which takes three weeks to arrange and costs £20 for a single day, you may not use a metal detector nor dig below the surface with any implement. You may only pick up what you can see lying there, and any items of significant archaeological interest must be reported to the Museum of London. Now off we go. We spend the first hour on a meandering route, stopping several times so Haughey can deliver entertaining dissertations on

London’s underground rivers, the influence of the Roman occupation, the history of the many bridges over the Thames, the various environmental crises the Thames has faced, and so on. We cross Southwark Bridge, stroll along Bankside past Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre until, finally, near the Tate Modern, pass through a gate most of us would never have noticed and descend a stone staircase to the pebbly, rock-strewn foreshore. Within seconds, Haughey bends down and picks up a small, ochrecoloured brick the size of a deck of cards. “This is a Tudor roof tile.You can tell by the shape of the nail hole,” she says. Over the years, her groups have found all manner of artefacts: pilgrim badges from the medieval period, 16th-century clay pipes discarded after their tobacco plugs were smoked, military paraphernalia and more. It takes a practised eye to find these items, and knowledge like Haughey’s to identify their provenance, which is why she patiently stands near the steps for the next few hours, explaining everyone’s discoveries. Mindful of the tide, we eventually call it a day. This is a fascinating way to spend an afternoon; even if you don’t find anything worth keeping, you get to view the London cityscape from an unforgettable perspective. And if you come here again, the foreshore will be subtly different. Roiled by the tide and the opposing current, the River Thames is constantly giving up new things to discover. Thames mudlarking tour times coincide with the river’s low tides. For details, visit walks.com.For information on London, visitlondon.com. More travel stories are available at culturelocker.com.


F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4

5 YOUTH WORK TIPS FOR LIFE LONG EMPLOYMENT

Did you know the official unemployment rate for youth in BC is nearly double the adult rate but, youth are under represented in seeking support from WorkBC Employment Service Centres. We welcome youth into our Employment Services Centres. 1. Be a lifelong volunteer.

For youth, volunteer work is one of the best ways to start building skills and good work habits. Treat volunteer work with the same priority you would give paid work. Think of your interests, hobbies and what you love to do and then find a way to connect this to volunteering. Volunteering is a great way to gain references for your first job. For many people, volunteer work leads to future employment.

2. Do every job and task to the best of your ability. Some jobs or task may seem small or unimportant. Because employers are paying you to be productive they rarely assign tasks that arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t important. So, adopt an attitude that everything you do is important and do the best job possible. Whether the job is flipping

burgers, washing dishes, holding a sign or cutting grass, take pride in what you do. Promotions go to people who work hard and get things done.

3. Be reliable.

Show up to every scheduled work day on time. Many entry level jobs have schedules that change weekly or each pay period. Check the schedule on a regular basis. When in doubt, call your employer and ask. Prioritize work before play. Drinking too much the night before, staying out too late or friends doing something more interesting are not valid reasons to call in sick. Strive for 100% on time attendance.

4. Attributes are even more important than skills, so develop them. Attributes are personality characteristics that are often closely linked to your attitude. Taking initiative, being positive, being a good team player

or delivering great customer service goes along way to workplace success. Employers know that it is far easier to teach a skill, like operating a cash register, than it is to train someone to be patient with the customers. It is hard to change someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personality so, develop the right attributes before you start looking for work.

5. Build your references by creating a great reputation.

By following the above suggestions you will be building a good reputation and therefore developing solid references. A positive reputation speaks volumes about you, but a negative reputation is hard to overcome. Develop such a positive reputation that every job you leave would be willing to hire you back if there was an opportunity to do so.


F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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Chickens home to roost on East Side Jennifer Thuncher thuncher@shaw.ca

East Vancouver is a mecca for backyard chickens. According to the City of Vancouver’s food policy department, 164 Vancouver households have registered backyard chickens and 107 of them are on the East Side. The city doesn’t keep track of exactly how many chickens there are in total, but each household is permitted four chickens — hens to be exact, no roosters allowed. Assuming every household with chickens has registered with the city as required and no one is keeping more chickens than the bylaw allows, approximately 428 chickens reside east of Ontario Street. “It is like a little symbol of food sovereignty,” said Vicky Baker, who keeps three chickens in her yard. “I know what they are fed, I know how they are during the day. It is to be closer to the food system.” Beyond access to fresh free-range eggs, other

Spectrum Program students Gell San Diego, Bohdan Burgess and Scout Wyness bond with newly hatched chicks. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

advantages include educating her three children about where their food comes

from and getting to know her neighbours. Baker opened up her

coops a few years ago and invited neighbours and passersby to stop to chat.

Since then, other neighbours have gotten chickens. Continued on next page

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4

School hatches hands-on educational program Continued from previous page Someone else organized a bike tour of each of the backyard coops and over 60 people participated. According to Baker, the birds have created a tight knit community. Chicken keepers get together for social events and to help each other out doing feed runs or sharing advice. But caring for chickens is not all happy clucking. For Baker, the many unforeseen ethical decisions involved have been challenging. “Trying to, in my own mind, conceptualize the difference between pet versus commodity. So, if they get sick for example, and it costs $60 to deworm them, but it costs $8 to buy a new chicken, what route do you take?” In the past she spent a lot of money nursing her chickens back to health, but it is an issue she still struggles with and something potential chicken keepers should consider carefully before getting birds, she said.

Fellow East Vancouver chicken keeper Duncan Martin builds and sells backyard coops (dailyeggs. com). He said in spite of the challenges of owning farm animals in the city, more and more people seem interested. Martin attributes the concentration of chicken keepers in his part of the city to simple word of mouth and a strong community desire to be closer to food production. The positive offshoot of that collective desire is a stronger bond between members of the community. “It brings generations together,” he said. “A lot of elderly in the city grew up with chickens and now young kids are growing up with them so they kind of have a connection there.” Martin built two coops for the students at the East Side’s Spectrum Program high school. The students take care of the chickens themselves doing everything from composting to cleaning the

Gell San Diego handles Fat Joe at the Spectrum Program chicken coop. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

coops, feeding the hens and caring for the chicks. The eggs collected are used for the school’s sustainable lunch program. Head teacher Frances Alley said keeping chickens has been great for the students.

“They love it, they absolutely love it,” she said. One student is taking a chick home at night and another student will take all the birds home over the summer. Alley said none of the youth had been exposed to

farm animals prior to the program. The night before the Courier paid the school a visit a recently hatched chick died, which created another opportunity for the urban youth to learn about nature.

“That is life isn’t it,” Alley said. To learn more about Spectrum chickens, go to speggtrum.tumblr.com. For information on the city’s backyard chicken program, go to vancouver.ca. twitter.com/thuncher

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F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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A home for art in ‘real Vancouver’ MY EAST SIDE

Jennifer Thuncher thuncher@shaw.ca

NathanWiens ofWiens Studios is best known as a craftsman of custom wood furniture pieces that can be found in the homes of some of the city’s elite and in businesses around the world.But while his craft is his creative outlet,it is his East Vancouver arts studio,Chapel Arts, that is his labour of love. The historic Art Deco former chapel and funeral home at 304 Dunlevy St. is now an eclectic space that reflects the many interests of its owner. With a nod to his former days in the music industry as a builder, roadie and performer in the ’80s underground punk scene, the Chapel hosts various music acts such asVancouver’s Hard Rock Miners. Reflecting his artistic bent, the Chapel’s white walls feature the works of Vancouver artists.The Chapel also hosts community events such as a clown ensemble that performed in the Chapel’s theatre space earlier this month. Wiens, 50, sat down this

week for a Q&A with the Courier about Chapel Arts and being a part of the Downtown Eastside.

How did you come to own Chapel Arts? Just over a decade ago, I was looking to relocate my furniture business from Yaletown. I was not looking to buy a funeral home, just a nice space for my studio. I found the garage that is now my woodworking studio across the street from the Chapel and fell in love with it.The catch was the owner said I had to buy the Chapel as well. Once I owned the chapel, I envisioned it as a family, community arts and multi-use facility.The community is always screaming for such facilities, which remain scarce in the area, so it served a need. Tell me about the history of the Chapel. Before I bought it, it was likely the oldest operational funeral chapel on the West Coast. It was run for three generations by the Armstrong family and catered

What does being in East Vancouver mean to you? East Van to me is the real Vancouver. I love its diversity, history and its characters. I was inYaletown 20 years ago and it was very much like this then.There were interesting people on corners and stuff in the alleys and plenty of activity. Now, it is this wall of gentrification and it is all trendy and lovely, but not gritty. I searched everywhere for a new spot and I just kept coming back to the Downtown Eastside. There is a great vibrancy to the neighbourhood and a sense of community not matched in other areas.

Nathan Wiens hosts cultural and music events at the Chapel Arts venue on Dunlevy Street. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

to the predominantly Asian clientele that was in this neighbourhood. It had a drive-through for hearses — the first drive-through in the city apparently.The main part of the building was built in about 1911 and the add-on, with the drive-through, was built in

1936. It was all pink when I bought it, having been renovated in the 1970s — pink awnings and multitoned pink inside.When I renovated, I tried to make it feel as it was back in 1936, including Marmoleum flooring, which was common in the 1930s.

You have been in the area for over nine years now, how has it changed? There are more young business owners, especially in Chinatown. Otherwise it has stayed pretty much the same, which I like.There are not a lot of highrises and it is still affordable for young entrepreneurs and independent businesses to set up here, at least for now.

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What has changed the most is people’s attitude. When we first opened, it was next to impossible to get clients from outside of the area to come down or book events. This issue remains but is far less of an obstacle. People are realizing it is a vibrant area with lots to offer.

What do you see for the future the area and the Chapel? With the new community plan, I believe we will remain a low-income community while diversifying and increasing density further east of the Chapel on Hastings Street.The new policies make predicting the Chapel’s future a challenge. I hope to do a few more renovations to open the space up a bit so we can have more people in there. This will greatly increase the Chapel’s opportunity to serve the community and sustain itself as an independent community, cultural and heritage amenity. I remain optimistic. For more information, go to chapelarts.com.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4

The Drive is World Cup central Kristen Moran

kristenmoran86@hotmail.com

The 2014 FIFA World Cup tournament is just around the corner and Commercial Drive is arguably the best place in the city to watch the games. The Drive, fondly known as Little Italy, has endless cafes and pubs that never fail to draw in swarms of soccer fans during the World Cup and this year

won’t be any different according to business owners and locals. Caffé Roma on Grant and Commercial has always been one the hottest spots to watch the games.While locals have been puzzled over the cafe’s closed doors, owner Frank DiSalvo said they are doing an upgrade and will reopen in time for the tournament equipped with a full liquor licence. DiSalvo recalled previous World Cups and

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recognized the importance of the venue. “Caffé Roma has been a mecca for World Cup fans from all different countries over the years.This is the meeting spot,” DiSalvo said. “I remember in 2010 when Spain won, the whole street just lit up. Everybody wants to be part of the celebration.” He said those games and the 2006 World Cup, when Italy beat France, caused the street to be shut down completely after thousands of soccer fans came to join the festivities. “They just let us have a big party.They say there were 180,000 people on the street,” DiSalvo said. Besides a large banner, he said they are hoping to get every country’s colours to honour all the different fans, but wouldn’t reveal what else he had in store for the month-long event. “There are going to be some surprises for the games,” he said, “Different

things going on for different countries. “ Another contender for best venue is Caffé Napoli, a more intimate space just a block and a half south of Caffé Roma that has always overflowed with spectators during the tournament. Owner Lina Cristiano has hosted World Cup events there since 1994 and expects a packed house for every game. “I think people want to come to Commercial because it’s really lively and just a lot of fun.When there is something exciting going on like Italian Day or World Cup, people want to be seen and this is the place to be during those events,” Cristiano said. Longtime Commercial Drive resident Liese Seaver isn’t much of a soccer fan, but can’t help but get into it during the World Cup matches. “I always get roped in to watching the games when I go to pick up a coffee from

Napoli,” Seaver said. “It’s hard not to with all the excitement.” Server Stavroula Tardalis has worked at Caffé Napoli for the last two World Cup tournaments and said fans from all walks of life come there to watch the games. “It’s like that Olympics feeling. No matter where you come from everybody loves everybody,”Tardalis said. Cristiano agreed that the diverse crowd only adds to the fun. She’s already received calls for reservations, which she said are essential for anyone hoping to pack into the small café during the games. Resident Sean Minagh remembered the last games and said finding a spot well before the start time was essential to getting a seat anywhere. He plans to watch most of the matches at the Charlatan on Commercial and Grant, which has three levels and flatscreen TVs throughout.

Falconetti’s is another venue that has been a fan favourite in previous years. Owner Carmine Falcone looks forward to a filling up the seats, which have nearly tripled since the restaurant’s renovations. “We attract everybody here.We had flags from all the countries here last World Cup,” Falcone remembered. “Everybody’s welcome. Come support your team.” He said that the cultural ties on the Drive make it the best place in the city to watch the games. “People identify this street with soccer and I think that’s because of its Italian roots,” he said. Other notable venues to catch the action on Commercial include the Portuguese Club of Vancouver, St. Augustine’s and Fets Whiskey House, but anywhere on the strip with a TV will likely be buzzing with excitement. twitter.com/EastVanKristen

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Owners Gino Crudo (right) and Frankie Disalvo (left) say Caffe Roma will re-open in time for the World Cup. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET


F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

E5

Down on the schoolyard farm

Canada’s first school-based farm opened atVan Tech Kristen Moran

kristenmoran86@hotmail.com

An East Vancouver high school has changed the way students learn by starting up its own working schoolyard farm. It’s the first of its kind in Canada. The 1,000 square metres of garden space at Vancouver Technical secondary school and the weekly market stand opened May 28 to sell the fresh produce, with funds going back into the garden and the school. This innovative outdoor classroom was created after Melanie Beliveau, a biology teacher at the school, tried to garner support to put a community garden in the space recently opened after seismic upgrades saw a wing of the school demolished.When she heard about Fresh Roots Urban Farm, a non-profit society that promotes urban

agriculture and how they helped bring the garden at Queen Alexandra Elementary back to life, she got in touch with co-director Ilana Labow. “Together we dreamt up the idea of a school farm,” Labow recalled. Bringing that dream to life was a process and both Fresh Roots and the Vancouver School Board had to work to grow the idea to life. “It took a couple of years to figure out how to make it work for both the VSB and Fresh Roots,” Labow said. “There were no examples of a school with a working farm on it in Canada to look upon for guidance so we had to work together and create a licensing agreement.” The next step was funding and volunteering, both of which came in abundance.

“The very first people that believed in this project was Vancity.We submitted the idea to their Good Money Impact Venture Challenge in 2012 and won first prize,” Labow said. After partnering up with Vancity, the Real Estate Foundation of B.C., the Vancouver Foundation and securing the Greenest City Funding, Fresh Roots took the underutilized space and transformed it last spring into a quarter acre of garden space with the help of hundreds of volunteers. “Students, parents, teachers and neighbours all came out to volunteer,” Labow said. “The goal was to have the community feel like they created the garden together.” A couple months later, the organization developed a second schoolyard farm at David Thompson sec-

ondary school, which has also proven to be a success. While the operation of the gardens are reliant on Fresh Roots, they continue to have endless volunteers helping out and the garden is used in the core curriculum for a variety of classes at the school, ranging from biology to marketing. The society also hosts professional development days for teachers to learn how to use the garden as part of their curriculum. “From the VSB perspective we want to make sure there is a learning component there,” said Vision Vancouver school board trustee Rob Wynen. “It’s amazing how you can use gardens for the curriculum. You can almost apply it to anything. It creates a bit of excitement around learning and gets kids out of the classroom.” Wynen said the prin-

cipal and teachers at the school are all extremely happy with what the garden has done for them and students are excited about it as well. “This is part of a larger goal of us being the greenest school district in North America and being innovative with our land use.This is one of the many areas we

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are working on,” he said. The Good Food market is open at the garden every Wednesday afternoon from 3 to 6 p.m. and selling a variety of leafy greens, herbs and vegetables or you can choose to sign up for the weekly veggie box program and get an assortment of produce. twitter.com/EastVanKristen

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4

Renfrew Collingwood Collingwood Days Festival Saturday, May 31, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Beginning with a pancake breakfast with firefighters (until 11 a.m.), the official website promises “an old fashion fair with a multicultural flair” celebrating the neighbourhood at Carleton elementary, 3250 Kingsway. Music includes jazz, the Aklan Ati Atihan marching band, and the Los Dorados Mariachi Band. A dog show, a freestyle BMX bike airshow, and a martial arts demonstration are sure to amaze. Children can try their hand at carnival games and get their faces painted. Grab some refreshments and stroll through the marketplaces and displays.

Event Guide JUNE 2014

Mount Pleasant

Car Free Day: Main Street Sunday, June 15, 12 p.m. - 7 p.m. The festival will run 21-blocks from Broadway to 30th Avenue on Main Street and is looking to be the biggest street party ever held on Main. Check out crafted knick-knacks and local products at mini-festivals and artisan markets along the strip. Grab a bite to eat and enjoy live bands from many community-supported stages. Score a good deal at the many consignment and vintage clothing boutiques.Visit some new stores that have popped up since last year, such as BookWarehouse andThe Fish Counter. Families can bring younger visitors to the multiple kids zones for yoga, art and even button-making.

Introducing the 2014-15 Britannia Board of Management Oles Andreinko Mary Arakelyan Scott Clark Oliver Conway Susanne Dahlin John Flipse Ray Gallagher

Gwen Giesbrecht Ingrid Kolsteren Alex McKechnie Morna McLeod Craig Ollenberger David Parent Edward Stringer Meseret Taye

Partners Geoff Taylor (VSB) Beth Davies (VPL) Peter Odynsky (VPB)

GrandviewWoodland Car Free Day: Commercial Drive, Sunday, June 15, Noon - 7 p.m. The site of the original Car Free Day, the festival will run from Venables to Grandview on Commercial Drive. Experience parading drummers, healing gardens, swordplay performances and the return of Roller Disco, with public roller skating. Kidzone has music and storytelling for younger folks. Keep Vancouver Spectacular will provide a free drop-off for old electronics and small appliances. Eat Italian,Thai, Japanese, Cuban, gluten-free, vegetarian, or just dance all day to the live music at eight different locations. Free bike valet service.

Champlain Heights

Western Hoedown Friday, June 6, 12:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Celebrate Seniors’Week at the Champlain Heights Community Centre (3350 Maquinna Dr.) with a throwback to western hoedowns.The program will include both square and line dancing with live entertainment. Admission is free, just be ready to get your body moving. Complimentary tea, coffee and cake will be served. Barbecue items will be available for purchase.

PLANNING FOR OUR FUTURE Join the Planning and Development Committee in the ongoing process towards the renewal of the Britannia site. Over the years we have developed a variety of concepts, such as a new pool facility and an integrated arts and community building. We are looking for other creative and innovative ideas and comments to build on the work. The goal is to assemble a comprehensive renewal approach to the site that we can present to our partners in the City, Vancouver School Board and Vancouver Public Library.

June 7, 10:00am to 1:00pm

Meet at the Information Centre Field trip to various co-located facilities Lunch provided Please RSVP by calling 604-718-5809

June 12, 7:00pm to 9:00pm

1661 Napier Street Vancouver, B.C. V5L 4X4

604.718.5808

Meet at Information Centre Committee to discuss and draft criteria for evaluating site renewal concepts Please RSVP by calling 604-718-5809


F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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QUICK FIX Bike mechanic Richard Machhein works on Sadia Badiei’s front tire at the Bike to Work Week maintenance station set up at the corner of 37th and Ontario. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

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E8

THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4

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F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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Community

FOOD INTENTIONS: Children continue to go hungry in our city. Many are supported through school breakfast, snack and meal programs. Still there are kids who go home from school for the weekend who won’t have anything to eat until they come back to school on Monday.Thanks to the efforts of Joanna Griffiths, along with her daughter Emily-Anne, the Backpack Buddies program was born to help feed hungry children over the weekend.The pair started distributing bags of food to three inner city schools two years ago with the help of volunteers — other school kids. Today, they distribute more than 300 bags of nutritious food to children in need.The Community First Foundation, which runs the backpack program, staged its inaugural Food for Thought Gala at Science World. Sponsored by the Vancouver Courier, guests gathered for the $250-a-plate dinner and cocktail party in support of our community’s most vulnerable. BIG RIDE: Clara Hughes received a hero’s welcome on the Vancouver stop of her 12,000-km cycle across Canada to build awareness, educate and raise funds for mental health.While here the Olympian fronted a fundraiser in support of the Kettle Society’s community mental health programs.The sixtime Olympian took time out of her grueling and physically challenging schedule to meet with attendees and deliver an emotional and inspiring keynote touching on her own personal experiences with mental illness. HOME FOR LIFE: A new $18.5-million alumni centre will open at UBC in spring 2015.The 4,000 square feet, multi-level centre will be named after prominent B.C. business leader and philanthropist Robert H. Lee in honour of the many contributions he has made to the university. Located in the heart of the Point Grey campus, the Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre will serve as a resource for UBC’s 300,000 alumni, providing a place to network and participate in intellectual, cultural and social programs. Lee, along with his family, were on hand for the official unveiling at a Raising the Roof party hosted by UBC president Stephen Toope and alumni UBC executive director Jeff Todd. FREEDOM JEWELS: Not Abandoned is a Seattle-based non-profit organization with a mission to combat sex slavery through prevention, intervention, employment and restoration. One of their projects is a line of jewelry called Freedom Stones with a unique mandate: to create beautiful accessories while transforming impoverished individuals and communities by providing skills development and social entrepreneurship. The handmade jewelry were showcased at a night of fashion and fundraising presented by local spa SKOAH and sustainable fashion designer, Nicole Bridger.

email yvrflee@hotmail.com twitter @FredAboutTown

Skoah’s Andrea Scott and Not Abandoned’s Jeff McKinley helped raise awareness of sex trafficking in Southeast Asia at a fundraiser held at the Yaletown store.

Master of Wine Rhys Pender and the Arts Club’s Bill Millerd raised a glass to the theatre company’s 13 Jessie nominations at their Best of B.C. Winemakers Dinner fundraiser.

From left, Greg Martin, Kyle Harland and Stash Bylicki were among eight of Chor Leoni’s finest singers who battled for karaoke supremacy in the company’s first ever Chor Leoni Idol competition. The fundraiser, won by Harland, netted $15,000 for one of Canada’s preeminent male choirs.

Joanne and Emily-Anne Griffiths staged their first Food for Thought fundraiser at Science World. Proceeds to provide more than 300 hungry children with breakfasts, lunches, dinners and snacks.

Drawings of UBC’s new Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre back former chancellor Robert Lee and his wife, Lily. The centre will be named after the prominent business leader and philanthropist.

From left, Spencer O’Brien, Jill Earthy, Jennifer Schaeffers and Deanna Embury modeled Nicole Bridger’s (third from left) spring/summer collection at Skoah’s Not Abandoned benefit in Yaletown.

The Courier’s Janine Jurji enjoyed a fun-filled evening at Science World. Helping provide Vancouver’s inner city schools with backpacks filled with nutritious food, more than 200 guests attended the Food for Thought benefit, sponsored by the Courier.

Six-time Olympian Clara Hughes took time off from her cycle across Canada to front a fundraiser for Denis Piper’s Kettle Society. The Evening with Clara Hughes raised $90,000 for mental health programs.


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4

Community

CAREGIVER AND SENIORS' APPRECIATION WEEKS

Saturday, May 31 - Saturday, June 14, 2014

Camping trips are always a favourite of Youth Leadership Millennium program participants.

PHOTO DENNIS TSANG

Program teaches youth to survive and thrive Christopher Cheung

chrischcheung@hotmail.com

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They have survived nights in the woods.They learn from lawyers, doctors and business professionals.They have visited senior homes, city halls, newsrooms, safe injection sites and the Williams Lake Indian Band. They have worked with organizations from B.C. Transplant to the David Suzuki Foundation. TheYouth Leadership Millennium (YLM) program is a seven-month program that aims to develop life and leadership skills for participants aged 14 to 24. YLM is tied to the completion of the three levels of the Duke of Edinburgh Award, encouraging youth in areas of service, skills and physical recreation. Participants callYLM much more than just a program; it’s also a community, a family. UBC student Daphne Chen completed the program in 2011 and is one of manyYLM alumni who return to help out. She stresses that participants are not put into a lecture hall or classroom to learn about leadership but experience a range of activities. Hiking, rock climbing, kayaking, and camps in addition to weekly meetings bring youth closer. Former participant Jodie

Mak understands the seven-month duration is a bit unusual, but believes it contributes to the program’s success. “Not many programs last that long, but it helps participants build relationships, learn to work with each other and see the fruits of the things they do.” Chen fondly recalls YLM’s outreach efforts as youth are required to plan initiatives based on community needs. Chen helped plan a multi-school battery drive to help educate a younger demographic on recycling. She also helped plan a series of talks in partnership with B.C. Transplant, which included testimonials from those who had undergone surgery. The experiences have encouraged her to take a more active role in university life. “If I didn’t haveYLM, I would have been a lot more shy and wouldn’t take the initiative to go find different ways to get involved,” said Chen. The program also provides opportunities to help youth start thinking about careers, inviting professionals from different fields to talk about their jobs and answer questions. Kenneth Tung got involved with Duke of Edinburgh programs in Hong Kong and founded theYLM in Vancouver in 1998 with SUCCESS, a non-profit that assists immi-

grants at all stages of their Canadian experience. “To raise youth you need a village,” said Tung, who viewed SUCCESS as the perfect platform to teach social awareness while developing important skills such as communication, public speaking, project coordination and physical fitness. “It’s important to help youth develop more than one area to become a successful person.” Tung’s son, Anthony, enrolled inYLM’s first year and is still involved today. He shares his father’s vision and believes the program’s diversity makes it unique. Looking for a word to describe the experience, he compares it to a buffet. “You get to try a lot of different things,” said Anthony. “YLM doesn’t try to mold youth into a cookiecutter leader. It’s about trying many experiences through resourcesYLM has built over the years and finding out what you like.You learn about yourself and how you can give back.” Chen has learned exactly this. “It took time, but I matured a lot from the different opportunities and working with different people.” Those interested can find out more at successlym.org or e-mail info@successlym. org.The deadline for applications is June 15. twitter.com/chrischeungtogo


F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Arts&Entertainment

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GOT ARTS? 604.738.1411 or events@vancourier.com

1 May 30 - June 3, 2014 1. The Vancouver Art Gallery presents the first major survey exhibition of artist-writer-thinker Douglas Coupland’s work. Douglas Coupland: everywhere is anywhere is anything is everything “addresses the singularity of Canadian culture, the power of language, as well as the ever-pervasive presence of technology in everyday life.” It also invites the public to stick gum on a seven-foot-tall self-portrait of the artist outside the art gallery.Talk about a visionary.The exhibition runs May 31 to Sept. 1. Details at vanartgallery.bc.ca. 2. Local purveyors of positive vibes BESTie bring their world beat-infused indie pop stylings to Fortune Sound Club May 30 in support of their debut album No Bad Days, which features a picture of a hipster dog wearing a tanktop, baseball hat and sunglasses licking an ice cream cone. How positive is that? Sunshine, Needs and Derrival open the early show, which runs 8 to 11 p.m.Tickets at Red Cat, Highlife, Beatstreet, Zulu and ticketzone.com. 3. Despite the title and premise, Taking My Parents to Burning Man is not a horror film. Billed as a “parental coming of age story,” it’s a documentary directed and produced by two 22-year-old Vancouver filmmakers, one of whom (Bryant Boesen) rips his nearly retired parents from their comfortable existence and takes them to the Burning Man arts festival in the Nevada desert that is notorious for dust, destruction and debauchery. It screens May 30 and 31 at the Rio Theatre. Cast and crew will take part in a Q&A after the screenings. Details at riotheatre.ca. 4. Bob Bossin brings his one-man musical stage show, Davy the Punk, to Havana Theatre June 3 to 7.The show details the colourful life of Bossin’s father, a big man in the gambling underworld of Toronto in the 1930s and ’40s. Details at davythepunk. com.

For video and web content, scan page using the Layar app.

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3

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4

Arts&Entertainment

This immortal coil KUDOS & KVETCHES

McDonald and Point Grey Tidal Marsh Projects Proposed McDonald and Point Grey Tidal Marsh Projects Between May 26 and June 8, 2014 Port Metro Vancouver invites you to participate in a public engagement regarding the proposed McDonald and Point Grey Tidal Marsh Projects. The proposed projects are initiatives of Port Metro Vancouver’s Habitat Enhancement Program and involve the creation of intertidal marsh habitat to benefit fish and wildlife. The proposed McDonald Tidal Marsh Project site is located on Sea Island, north of Vancouver International Airport and upstream of the mouth of the McDonald Slough. The proposed Point Grey Tidal Marsh Project site is located along the eastern portion of the Point Grey Booming Grounds, near the mouth of the North Arm Jetty of the Fraser River. We invite you to participate by: Reading the Discussion Paper and submitting a Feedback Form (in print or online at www.PortTalk.ca/HabitatEnhancement) Signing up for the PortTalk web forum: www.PortTalk.ca/HabitatEnhancement Providing a written submission to: habitat.enhancement@portmetrovancouver.com Attending a public open house:

• • • •

DATE

TIME

Mon, June 2nd

6:00 PM – 8:00 PM Delta Vancouver Airport, 3500 Cessna Dr, Richmond B.C. Liu Institute for Global Issues, 6476 NW Marine Drive, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM UBC: Vancouver B.C.

Wed, June 4th

LOCATION

Engagement materials, including the Discussion Paper and Feedback Form, will be available online on May 26. The deadline for submitting a completed feedback form or providing a written submission is June 8, 2014. All input received during the engagement period will be compiled in an Engagement Summary Report. Port Metro Vancouver will also prepare a Consideration Memo, demonstrating how feedback will be considered by the Port. For more information, please email habitat.enhancement@portmetrovancouver.com or phone (604) 665-9066.

According to a story in the Province this week, a Vancouver entrepreneur is trying to raise $8 million through crowd-sourcing site Indiegogo to fund an antiaging research lab in India. The goal is to halt or reverse the aging process so we can elude mortality’s icy hand tapping us on the shoulder and live for 1,000-plus years, or a millennia as the kids like to call it. “I want to live, I like living,” an age-phobic Jason Timmins told the Province. “I want to enjoy life for as long as possible… I do this because I have a self-interest.” No kidding. Disregarding the fact that science is not onTimmins’ side and he more or less pulled the figure of $8 million out of his 44-year-old ass, we think living until you’re 1,000 is a terrible idea. Don’t get us wrong. Death and getting old don’t always feel great and it can be downright sad, but it’s a necessary part of the cycle of life. Besides the tremendous drain on the world’s resources, there are other problems with having an immortal population. First of all, imagine all the junk you would accumulate in 1,000 years — all those unfashionable clothes, outdated phones, useless computers, Beanie Babies

Imagine all the junk you would accumulate in 1,000 years — all those unfashionable clothes, outdated phones, useless computers, Beanie Babies... that still haven’t appreciated in value despite what we were led to believe. Then there would be the widening generation gaps.We still have a hard time relating to co-workers who don’t get our daily references to Weekend at Bernie’s and Mitsou’s “Bye Bye Mon Cowboy.” And that disconnect would only get bigger when we’re approaching 900 and our vast pop culture knowledge is met with the stony silence of a 23-year-old who probably doesn’t understand us anyway because they speak a hybrid digital language involving coded eye flutters, hashtags, incomprehensible slang and sighs. But arguably the worst part of living forever would be how boring it would get. Sure, culture is constantly evolving, but it’s also constantly borrowing from the past.That means we would likely hear BTO’s “Taking Care of Business” and the Eagles’ “Hotel California” for hundreds and hundreds of years to come. Simply

agonizing. Television would also be problematic.We’ve already grown weary of The Big Bang Theory, and we’ve never seen an episode. Compound that weariness over another 75 or 300 seasons, and that weariness would likely turn into psychotic rage. We’re even bored of Vancouver’s artisanal pizza craze and it’s only two years old. Same goes for tapas, walking the seawall, the view of the North Shore mountains and the Canucks new GM Jim Benning. Seriously, what has that guy done in the past week? So we’re going to embrace the finiteness of life. Sure it will be sad when friends and loved ones pass on, and we’re left alone in our room full of Beanie Babies, barely able to walk to No Frills or go to our weekly zumba class. But it will make us appreciate life more — at least the part of it that doesn’t include tapas, The Big BangTheory and “Hotel California.” twitter.com/KudosKvetches


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F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Rum in the morning... it’s not just for pirates anymore

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—Mark Leiren-Young, The Vancouver Sun

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the cast. photo by david cooper

Arts&Entertainment

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Diplomático makes a splash with ritzy rum

Gospel Remix:

SKOOKUM CITY

OPERA MEETS

Andrew Fleming

afleming@vancourier.com

GOSPEL

10th Anniversary Gala Concert

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enjoy on its own.When was the last time you saw someone order a shot of Bacardi at the bar? Noted imbiber and author Kingsley Amis once wrote that “the sign of a serious spirit is that it’s profitably or even preferably drinkable neat or with a little water,” and these days most people only ever drink rum after first adding Coke, fruit juice or egg nog. Although ideally not all together. Last but not least, many people now prefer to drink the more recently invented light rum — also known as white or silver rum — which

is more thoroughly distilled to remove impurities and consequently flavour, than they do the real thing. This could soon change. While there are still plenty of rotguts of the “15 men on a dead man’s chest” variety available, there are many others that are made just as carefully and lovingly as fine tequila or single malt scotch. Take Diplomático, which is no so-so bottle of rum.The award-winning distillery, whose master blender Tito Cordero was recently voted the best in the world for a second time

at the Golden Rum Barrel Awards, are expanding into Canada with a selection of six different rums. Options range from four-year-old Añejo, which has a hint of brown sugar and oaky spice, to Reserva Exclusiva, a fruitier and very expensive tipple that is aged for 12 years, and Hacienda Saruro, a sweet liqueur made with vanilla and honey. Turns out that sipping dark or golden rum can be just as pleasant as good scotch, although you still probably don’t want to do it first thing in the morning. twitter.com/flematic

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Rum suffers a bit of an image problem thanks to its association with drunken pirates and the slave trade. Top shelf rums such as Venezuela’s Diplomático aim to change people’s perceptions of the so-called “demon rum” with its line of smooth, barrel-aged sippers.

n

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There’s an old joke that says drinking rum in the morning doesn’t make you an alcoholic, it means you’re a pirate. I tried to keep this in mind and channel my inner sea rover after being invited to a weekend tasting event at the Wedgewood Hotel for several blends of top shelf Venezuelan rum at the ungodly hour of 11 a.m. It has to be said that the demon rum suffers from a bit of an image problem. For starters, people still refer to it as “the demon rum,” an indignity other refined spirits certainly don’t have to put up with. But then again most of them don’t owe their popularity thanks to human slavery. Rum is distilled from sugar cane, and early Caribbean sugar production was so labour-intensive that slaves were often literally worked to death.The rum trade and the slave trade basically went hand-in-hand for generations. As far as lingering PR problems go, it’s kind of a biggie. There’s also the issue of being widely considered more of a cocktail ingredient than something you

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A26

THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4

volunteer

Passionate WOMEN

OUTSPOKEN

EQUALITY

Musical’s Madame Morrible not all bad THEATRE Christine Lyon

clyon@nsnews.com

Vancouver Rape Relief & Women’s Shelter needs volunteers like you!

Call us now 604.872.8212 to interview. www.rapereliefshelter.bc.ca

We travelled down travelled down the We rabbit the rabbit hole . . . hole...

Something Wicked this way comes The name Madame Morrible is about as subtle as a Kansas tornado. “It rhymes with horrible for a reason,” says Kathy Fitzgerald, who plays the nasty character in the touring production of Wicked.

...and we found . . . and we fou nd our fairie our fairie taletale... ...

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“She’s just awful.” Based on the 1995 Gregory Maguire novel Wicked: The Life and Times of the WickedWitch of theWest, the Tony Award-winning musical adaptation — which flew into Vancouver this week and runs until June 29 — is the untold story of the witches of Oz. Long before Dorothy and her dog Toto are blown into the famous fantasyland, two other young women meet at Shiz University. Green-skinned social outcast Elphaba becomes unlikely friends with her popular, blonde roommate Glinda. Respectively, the two students grow up to become the Wicked Witch of the West and Glinda the Good, their divergent paths in life heavily influenced by their headmistress Madame Morrible. “Basically she’s the nemesis to the two witches. She’s the bad guy, she’s the antagonist of the piece,” says Fitzgerald, who played the part for a year and a half on Broadway before joining the touring show. Madame Morrible immediately recognizes Elphaba’s natural magical abilities

Kathy Fitzgerald dons some of the most elaborate costumes in Wicked. Her Elizabethan-style gowns are corseted, ruffled, beaded and very heavy.

and, believing these talents will be of use to the Wizard of Oz, she manipulates the young witch to help advance her own career. But her cruel intentions are not revealed right away. “In the beginning you think she’s just a sweet schoolmarm, you know, and she’s not going to cause any havoc,” Fitzgerald says. “You don’t really know at the top of the show that she’s going to be horrible. You think, ‘Oh, what a nice old lady,’ and it’s kind of fun to do that twist and to go to that dark place.” While performing Madame Morrible’s dastardly deeds, Fitzgerald dons some of the most elaborate costumes in the production. Her Elizabethan-style gowns are corseted, ruffled, beaded and very heavy — so heavy, in fact, that she has to do regular maintenance on her back. A seasoned stage actress, Fitzgerald usually takes on comic roles, so playing

the villain has been a fun change with some unique challenges. “Even though these are completely made-up people, you have to find the humanness and some comedy in them so they’re not just one-dimensional, because nobody’s just all bad or all good.” While she insists she’s actually very nice in real life, Fitzgerald admits she has grown rather fond of the particularly evil scene in which her character conjures up the storm that brings Dorothy to the Land of Oz. “You feel like it’s really a storm because the sound effects these day are so good. So that’s kind of exciting, I really like that moment, it’s really evil and really powerful.” Though Wicked’s cast of characters and plot are based on Maguire’s novel, Fitzgerald says the musical is “a different beast completely.”

“The book is more sexual, frankly, and more political,” she explains. “If you put the book to music, it would be too dark.” The socio-political undertones are still present in the musical, but have been dialed down, making the show appropriate for a wider audience. “You can take a whole family and everyone can enjoy it for different reasons,” Fitzgerald says, explaining it’s smart enough for grownups to appreciate, while the visual spectacle and friendship storyline will appeal to youth. She’s not surprised that the blockbuster show continues to fill theatres more than a decade after its 2003 premiere in NewYork. “Everything works together, you know, the story’s interesting, the music’s exceptional and it’s epic to look at,” Fitzgerald says. “Some plays work and some don’t and I’ve been in flops and I’ve been in hits and this one’s definitely a hit.”

May 30, 31 & June 1 201 4 Presented By:

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F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A27

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PREAMBLE: In the ’80s, I predicted that the 250 years ahead would form an era of peace and progress, sympathy and inter-dependence. Rather than world wars, there would be police actions. (Oddly, universities will be places of crime and deception, as will law courts. Both institutions will decline.) In the Bible, Jeremiah states that such predictions — of peace — will only be believed if they come true (Jer. 28:8-9). Well, no one has particularly believed me. But so far (30 years and counting) I’m right. Look around you — surely we have outgrown world wars. And I think I will be right, for hundreds of years to come, but after 2232, this “peace prediction” ends for the next era (2232 to about 2480 AD) is not particularly peaceful. It will pit religion against spirit.

BIG LOVE BALLS By Adrienne Matei

The busy pace continues: errands, paperwork like falling snow, calls and messages. Might as well plunge in and have fun. When it comes down to it, you’re a people person. Make sure you contact everyone you should, answer all queries now — by Saturday (June 7) some of these people will be unavailable, some of your missives will go astray. Mail will be lost: a more frequent occurrence with the new, wounded post offices.

This is an easy week in an easy month, Libra. June highlights international travel, culture, social rituals (e.g., weddings) higher learning, religion/philosophy, publishing/media, advertising, fame, science, insurance, love, etc. Your view of the world will expand and build a platform within you that supports a mellow understanding. Until June 23, you can face a sexually alluring potential relationship.

Chase money, buy/sell, seek new clients or a pay raise, count and insure your possessions. This is a very natural month for you, Taurus, you’ll feel confident and your strong, velvet touch will impress others. Accept surface appearances; don’t delve too deep. A sensual attraction could arise. However, don’t be so confident that you launch a big new project. Wait until July 1 onward to start anything new.

Complete projects a.s.a.p. DON’T start any new ones before July 1. This is an easy week, Scorpio, but it isn’t “light” – depths and consequences fill June. Your sexual longings increase, as does your intuition — in essence, your subconscious —rises to the surface. It’s a great month for (health) diagnosis, and for research, detective work, and delving into your own past and motives.

Your energy, feeling of well-being, your confidence and charisma stand at a yearly high. You’ll impress others, obtain favours (or a favourable review). Usually, this would be a great time to start big new projects but this June Mercury retrogrades (June 7-July 1) so don’t start anything new. Instead, use your heightened energy to give ongoing or lagging projects your support, or to reprise a promising situation/contact/venture from the past.

Use this easy, productive week to complete tasks and projects. Start nothing new all June. An influence of indecision, delay and mistakes will plague new ventures. In shopping, lemons lurk everywhere — or you might find later that you don’t need or don’t want the item you purchased. There’s a bright side in all this: a project, venture, job, relationship, relocation, business or other opportunity from the past might re-appear.

Proudly made in Vancouver, these giant, five-foot, hair-dryerinflatable, PVC spheres emblazoned with the word “LOVE” are perfect as an Instagram prop, good to toss in the swimming pool and ideal for use as décor at an event (suggestion: destination wedding—these big balls ship worldwide). Read more at www.vitamindaily.com

DECOR

LITTLE PINK DRESS by Alexandra Suhner Isenberg

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Start nothing new before July 1, Cancer. Use this week to wrap up ongoing duties and jobs, obtain supplies and answer calls/emails — then use the following three weeks of June to either protect ongoing projects from second thoughts, indecision, missing supplies, cancelled meetings, etc., or to reprise a venture or project from the past.

June is filled with chores. Might as well just plunge in and do them. But with a small difference. This week, strive to complete all tasks: target the easy ones, and wrap them up. Next week, through June, handle ongoing tasks as alertly and cautiously as you can, while refusing to begin any new ones. A chore from the past might be laid on your shoulders but DON’T volunteer for anything.

You’ll like this easy, uplifting, optimistic, social and happy week, Leo! Stay in the background Sunday daytime, though — rest and nap. This night to Tuesday, your energy and magnetism soar. Others admire you, will grant you favours or will tend to follow your direction(s). Welcome flirtatious attention! However, DON’T start any new projects now through June. Instead, use this week to clean up any lagging duties or tasks.

The accent continues on romance, beauty, creativity, pleasure, speculation, and charming children. You’re riding a winning streak! But DON’T start a new relationship or a new project this month. Stick with a faithful lover or welcome an old flame (who might return around mid-June). In practical areas, complete chores this week; start no new ones. A former task might return soon.

Your career, status, community reputation, ambitions, goals and relations with bosses, parents and VIPs — these are highlighted now to late June. But bend your efforts during this easy, smooth week, toward protecting ongoing goals and projects from missing supplies, schedule disruptions, etc. One of the best protections is simply to finish them and wrap up dangling ends.

The general accent lies on home, security, retirement and Mother Nature. This is a restful time, which is just as well, for many activities will get tied in knots during June, by indecision, delays and missing elements. Complete rather than begin projects this week, then strictly avoid any new starts the rest of June. Instead, take care of neglected things: repair those back stairs or explain to a child why you acted a certain way, bring your insurance up to date, etc.

Monday: Charlie Watts (73). Tuesday: Anderson Cooper (47). Wednesday: Russell Brand (39). Thursday: Mark Wahlberg (43), Friday: Sandra Bernhard (59). Saturday: Prince (56). Sunday: Joan Rivers (81).

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4

Sports&Recreation

GOT SPORTS? 604.630.3549 or mstewart@vancourier.com

Young Lion ‘the real deal’

Emerging track star competes above her age ATHLETICS Megan Stewart

mstewart@vancourier.com

During an after school practice Wednesday afternoon at the Point Grey secondary track, Julie Kawai Herdman honed the steps that follow the inevitable command of her sport: Runners, take your marks. Kawai, a Grade 8 student at Magee secondary, rehearsed the rhythm of getting set, coiling tightly and holding still until she heard the gun, which in this case was the voice of coach Dave Douglas. “You have to remain still,” he told her twice. “Another thing, try not to stand up before you start running.” The next attempt, she considered these steps too soon. “I haven’t said on your marks yet,” said the coach. “It’s getting better,” said Kawai. It’s much better than that. As a complete untrained novice, Kawai’s sprint and long jump results are in the top one per cent of all high school athletes — of any age. “I’ve been around track and field a long time. She’s the real deal,” said Douglas, a veteran coach who competed for UBC and trained under Gerald Mach, Canada’s national team sprint coach at the time, and B.C. Sports Hall of Famers Lloyd Swindells and John Freeman. Kawai may have a lot to learn, but her limited training isn’t holding her back, said Douglas. “Her long jump is even more extraordinary when you consider she’d only

Magee Lion Julie Kawai Herdman, 13, qualified to compete against seniors five years older at the B.C. track and field championships this weekend. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

been doing it for two weeks [before the city meet].” Halfway through the athletics season this spring, the untested bantam athlete joined the Magee team because she enjoyed running and jumping. At the city championships May 8 and 9, she won the three events she entered: the 100 metre and 200 metre races and the long jump. She was the best in her age group, the best in the age group above that and better than the juniors. She clocked 26.85 seconds in the 200m and 4.75 metres in the long jump, remarkable results that put her in the top two of all public school athletes and qualified her to compete with the best seniors in the province at the B.C. championships this weekend in Langley. (In practice, she can now jump over five metres.)

“I didn’t really believe it at first because I was watching the senior runners.They looked really good so I thought [the coaches] were just joking,” said Kawai in the halting, high voice of a girl who may have outperformed competitors five older but doesn’t yet share their maturity. But Kawai and her parents made a measured decision about her motivation for competing this season and she won’t race against the Grade 11 and 12 athletes as a 13-year-old rookie. “It’s my first year and I didn’t want to take it really seriously and I wanted to make it a fun year,” she said. “In Grade 9, if it happens like this again, I’ll run with the seniors.” Just like practising her starts, Kawai, leaning toward modesty, is still learning the subtle difference

between bragging about her successes and celebrating her accomplishments. “I like competition. It’s fun and it feels good to win, but I don’t really like to say it out loud,” she said. As her coach, Douglas is mindful Kawai continues to enjoy the sport. “I try to motivate her and keep her happy. I don’t do any more than that,” he said. “I’ve seen so many kids get burned out at a young age and that’s my big concern. I want to see her still running in grades 11 and 12.” Douglas, whose daughter Danielle captained the track team at UBC, pointed out that Kawai is also younger than most of her Grade 8 peers. “She was born Dec. 29. If it weren’t for two days, she’d been in Grade 7.” twitter.com/MHStewart

TWO TO WATCH AZARIAH JOHN

CONNY BREGMAN

Windermere’s Azariah John recorded one of the fastest times in the province in the senior boys 100 metre dash and he’ll be on the B.C. championship podium this weekend if he even comes close to meeting his personal best. His best time of 10.74 seconds was recorded last year at a track meet in St. Vincent and the Grenadines, the Caribbean island nation where John grew up. It’s faster than the 11.22 he recorded at the city championships on May 9, which he believes he can outrun. “That day, I was feeling pretty good and my performance was pretty good but I know I can do better. I wasn’t peaking yet,” he said. His time entered at the provincial meet is the seventh fastest on paper and his personal best is second to only one time, the 10.44 seconds recorded by Jerome Black from Rutland secondary. John, who trains with Winston Reckord of the Burnaby Striders, wants to medal. “I have a lot of confidence in myself. I’m going into this meet with a lot of confidence. I think I can win the finals. I’m actually pretty excited to go into the finals and do really good.”

Conny Bregman can’t help but go faster and faster. The Grade 11 sprinter at Hamber secondary ran for two gold medals in the senior girls 100 metre and 200 metre races at the city championships May 9. She clocked a personal best in both distances and wants to drop even more time at the B.C. track and field championships this weekend in Langley. She also set a city record in the longer distance, running half a second faster than any time recorded in the past six years. “I was really happy with my performance because it was an improvement over my time from last year,” said Bregman, 16, in an email. “I’d never gotten a time like that before so it was a welcoming surprise.” In the 100m, she finished first in 12.91 seconds and in the 200m came in 1.20 seconds faster than the runner-up when she crossed the finish line in 25.94 seconds. She plays basketball and field hockey at Hamber and joined the track team in elementary school because of a family connection. “My brother was also a sprinter and I wanted to sprint like him,” she said. As one of the fastest in B.C., she’s now setting the example.

Azariah John at the city meet May 9. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

Wolves, Talismen welcome B.C.’s best SOCCER Megan Stewart

mstewart@vancourier.com

West Point Grey Academy forward Emily Kasa fires a shot on net in a group stage match of the senior girls single-A B.C. championships at Jericho on May 29. WPGA defeated Queen Charlotte secondary. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

The West Point Grey Academy Wolves don’t have far to travel from their lair this year to stalk the most crucial prey. As the hosts of the senior girls single-A soccer championships, the Wolves aspire for a top-three finish, which would be their best result in school history, said coach Kelly Macintyre. “Our goal is to medal, which we’re capable of. Last year our fifth-place finish was the school’s highest ever.We’re trying to improve,” she said.

The Wolves have two High Performance League players in Hannah Dodd and Gabby Freeman as well as Total Soccer Skills player Emily Kasa; all three will be back next year. Goaltender Gitanjali Madan is also developing quickly, said Macintyre. “It’s nice that we have a few strong players that we can build around that will still be around next year,” she said. “We try to play a possession-based style.We have a range of players and the biggest thing is to get them prepared for the season by getting them to play with each other and playing to each other’s strengths and weaknesses since they’re

used to playing on teams with players all of a similar skill.” The Wolves are ranked fourth and will be playing in front of a home crowd at various pitches around the West Side, which brings the added pressure of competing in front of friends and family. The championship game is scheduled for 11:30 a.m. May 31 at Andy LivingstonWest. Across town at Vancouver Technical, the Talismen host the senior girls AAA soccer provincials.The Talismen and Kitsilano Blue Demons are in the running. The championship game is set for 12 p.m. May 31 at Van Tech. twitter.com/MHStewart


F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Sports&Recreation

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STANDING SCRUM: St. George’s Cathal Long grips the ball and surges forward against two Carson Graham tacklers in a senior boys AAA rugby championship quarterfinal at Abbotsford Exhibition Park on May 28. The Saints won 32-17 and advanced to meet Oak

Bay in a semi-final Thursday afternoon (after the Courier’s print deadline). On the other side of the bracket, Lord Byng eliminated Robert Bateman 21-10 and advanced to the other semi-final against the 2013 champions from Shawnigan Lake.

In 2013, Shawnigan Lake defeated St. George’s in a thrilling match in which the Saints came just inches, literally, short of forcing overtime. The 2014 championship match is scheduled for 4 p.m. May 31 at Rotary Stadium in Abbotsford. — Megan Stewart

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4

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v a n c o u r i e r. c o m Donna Chen with her Norco Drop 1 Indie, affectionately named Irish. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

My bike: I cycle to connect with others WHEEL WORLD Kay Cahill

kay@sidecut.ca

Donna Chen Age: 34 Bike: Norco Indie Drop 1, which she calls Irish Time on this bike: 15 months Favourite ride: In Vancouver, the Adanac bike route Quote: Remember to log your trips during bike to work week to win prizes, including a trip for two to Cuba

Run, cheer or volunteer! Run for the charity of your choice in the Scotiabank Charity Challnege!

June 22, 2014

VancouverHalf.com

Donna Chen grew up cycling in Beijing,then took a long break from riding before rediscovering her love for bikes.Seven years later,she’s the bike-friendly business program manager for HUB,the region’s bicycling network,and one of our city’s biggest cycling advocates. The spring instalment of the twice-annual Bike toWork Week continues until June 1,so I caught up with Donna to ask her how she gets around town. Q:What kind of bike do you ride? The bike I ride the most often is a Norco Indie Drop 1 named Irish. It’s a steel frame and has disc brakes. It’s a pretty comfortable and reliable bike for city riding. It’s also fantastic for touring. Q:What’s your favourite bike route inVancouver? There are so many favourites, but if I have to pick one, it would be Adanac.

Not only does it connect some of my favourite neighbourhoods, but there is a plethora of great local businesses, cafes and establishments along the route that I can easily hop off my bike and visit. I also love riding with the many other people who use this route. It often feels like a community or a collective movement — pretty neat. Outside of Vancouver, my actual favourite ride is Deep Cove on the North Shore or Iona Beach in Richmond. Q: How does cycling inform your work as a cycling advocate? When I was growing up, cycling was one of the most popular modes of transportation in Beijing because it was easy and affordable. Arterial routes had separated bike lanes, and bike parking was everywhere. It was a lifestyle. Everyone biked to work, to school, to shop and to visit family and friends. Around seven years ago I started to see more bike routes popping up in Vancouver and more people riding and it looked kind of fun.To help build my confidence riding in traffic, I took a StreetWise course (organized by HUB) to learn about rules of the road, safety precautions, communicating with other road users, route planning and things I can do to make my ride as comfortable and easy as it can be. So I would say my background as a cyclist gave me experiential understanding

of the importance of safe cycling facilities and cycling education to encourage and normalize cycling. Now that I work for HUB, I notice myself becoming more conscious of areas where safety improvements could be made and what it means to have safer streets and neighbourhoods. I’m also more aware of the relationship between cycling and other modes of active transportation and how they work together to create healthier and happier cities. Q:What was your best cycling adventure? The most recent best one has to be a bike camping trip to Comox last summer. We timed it with the Comox Valley Farm Cycle Tour. Cycling and visiting local farms go so well together. We had some of the best cheese and blueberries. Q:What advice do you have for commuters during bike to work week? Have fun and stop by one of our 50 celebration stations across MetroVancouver.We have free coffee, snacks, tuneups and raffle prizes to be won at all the HUB-hosted stations. Remember to log your trips each day you log a trip you will be entered to win a new bike and a trip for two to Cuba. In 2013 we had over 8,000 people participating in Bike toWorkWeek, including 1,300 who had never biked to work before. Let’s break that record this year. Kay Cahill is a cyclist and librarian who believes bikes are for life, not just for commuting.


F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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Today’shomes

B.C. housing demand to grow: CMHC Emma Crawford Hampel ecrawford@biv.com

Demand for housing in British Columbia is expected to increase this year and next, driven by employment growth and an increasing population, according to the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC). The average price for home sales across the province is forecast at $550,400 in 2014, with an increase in higher-end real estate sales. The average price in 2015 is expected to be $552,300. The CMHC forecasts that the resale market will remain balanced. Home resales are expected to be 76,200 in 2014 and 77,300 in 2015. Single detached-home home starts are expected to increase to 9,200 units in 2014 and 9,500 in 2015. Multi-unit home starts are anticipated to be 18,600

The population of Vancouver is expected to grow by one per cent this year. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

units in 2014 and 18,400 in 2015. “Starts of apartment condominiums, townhomes and semi-detached

homes are forecast to edge lower, as the combination of multi-unit homes under construction, the existing inventory of completed and

unabsorbed units, and a well-supplied resale market are expected to satisfy some of the demand for denser housing types going for-

Housing in Vancouver becoming even less affordable Emma Crawford Hampel ecrawford@biv.com

Rising real estate prices in Vancouver are helping to increase market confidence, but are leading to housing becoming even less affordable, RBC announced May 27. According to the bank’s Housing Trends and Affordability Report, the percentage of pre-tax income that the average Vancouverite needed to service the costs of owning a home in 2014’s first quarter has increased overall.

The report also said that home resales fell 6.5 per cent in the quarter, which is 8.5 per cent below the ten-year average. Bungalow owners need to spend 82.4 per cent of their income — an increase of 0.9 percentage points over the previous quarter. Those who own two-storey homes must spend 86.5 per cent of their income, which is up 0.6 percentage points. The only home type that became more affordable was condos, with owners spending 39.9 per cent of pre-tax income — a one

percentage point dip. “The upside from current resale levels may be limited given the market’s long-standing poor affordability conditions,” said RBC senior vice-president and chief economist Craig Wright. “With prices back in growth mode, the improvements we’ve seen in Vancouver’s affordability levels over the last two years will be difficult to replicate.” After Vancouver, Toronto has the second-least affordable housing, at 56.1 per cent of pre-tax

income — an increase of 0.2 percentage points, followed by Montreal (38.9 per cent, up 0.1 percentage points, and Ottawa (36.4 per cent, down 0.5 percentage points). Affordability also fell across the province as a whole. The average British Columbian must spend 68.4 per cent of their income for housing — up 0.9 percentage points compared with Q4 2013. The index takes into account mortgage payments, utilities and property taxes. twitter.com/EmmaHampelBIV

ward,” the report said. The CMHC forecasts employment to increase by 1.5 per cent in 2014 and 2.3 per cent in 2015, while

unemployment is expected to remain low, with both factors supporting housing demand. At the end of April, B.C.’s unemployment rate was 5.8 per cent, according to Statistics Canada, and the CMHC expects this to remain in this lower range. The population will grow by one per cent this year, which will increase home sales and house prices and lead to lower rental vacancy rates. Business investment and increased exports to the United States will strengthen B.C.’s economy. “Accompanying job gains and ongoing population growth will support consumer demand for goods and services,” said the CMHC in its Housing Market Outlook. “Real GDP is forecast to grow 2.3 per cent in 2014 and 2.8 per cent in 2015, versus an estimated 1.8 per cent increase in 2013.”

Vancouver had most expensive houses in Canada in 2011: Statistics Canada Jen St. Denis

jstdenis@biv.com

Not surprisingly, British Columbia led Canada in home value in 2011 — and the value of housing in Vancouver was the highest of any Canadian city. Statistics Canada released data on residential property values for 2011, showing that the total value of residential properties in Canada was $3.8 billion in 2011, up 6.5 per cent from 2010. The data shows the housing market recovering after the sharp

declines seen in 2008 and 2009. Ontario and B.C. made up the highest percentage of total national home values: Ontario represented 40 per cent of residential property values, while B.C. made up 21 per cent. Quebec represented 17% while Alberta accounted for 12 per cent. While property values in urban areas were hit hardest by the recession of 2008 and 2009, they recovered more quickly in 2010 and 2011 than home values outside of urban areas. twitter.com/jenstden

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F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

today’sdrive drive driv dr r ve e

A39

Your journey starts here.

Phone might make driving safer, lol Using the mobile phone to prevent accidents

As we all know, thanks to a constant media barrage and messages from local law enforcement, cellphones and cars don’t mix. The carnage caused by so-called distracted driving is on the tip of everyone’s tongues these days, and has almost supplanted drinking and driving as one of the more heinous crimes you can pull off behind the wheel. However, researchers at the University of Michigan are working with funding from the U.S. Department of Transportation to come up with a way for smartphones to actually cut down on pedestrian and cyclist crashes.You might be blithely crossing the street without looking up from composing that latest tweet, “Crossng st so nice day #yvr #cherryblossoms,” but your phone could actually be looking out for you. #GuardianAngel. The key is in a GPS locator chip that can be embedded in the phone to broadcast your location up to ten times a second. Using technology under development for car-to-car communication, something that’s developing fast, a next-generation automobile can actually track the pedestrian that’s obscured by the car turning right, and also keep an electronic eye on the cyclist that’s coming up fast. Now, none of this will be able to handle the famed Vancouver Pedestrian’s ability to suddenly dart into the road like a panicked squirrel, but it will cut down on potentially lethal interactions if auto-braking cars can react even before you do. The only drawback is perhaps a greater reliance on electronic safety nets and even more complacency behind the wheel. Not to mention, donning our tinfoil hats, that THEY can monitor your position at any time, if you have the app enabled.You know who I mean. The Pentaverate (ooh, I hate the Colonel).

VW mulling re-launch of the Bulli

Remember the Routan?

That’s the time VW thought it would be a good idea to appeal to aging hippies and burgeoning families by bringing back the iconic VW van. Sounds good? Well, they just scraped the decals off a Dodge Caravan and called it a day — nobody was fooled, and the van didn’t sell all that well. However, this time VW might get it right. Reports indicate that the success of the Beetle over past years has convinced VW that perhaps a more retro approach might be needed. Now, we’ve had rumours of a rebirth of the Microbus umpteen times before, usually about once a year. Mostly, that’s been wishful thinking, but VW’s new MQB platform technology gives it flexibility in construction that keeps costs down. Essentially, the modular nature of the chassis means that money need not be spent in developing a one-off chassis for a vanity project — they just plug in a 1.8-litre turbo, a 2.0-litre turbodiesel, slap on a couple of calico curtains, and Bob’s, like, your uncle, maaaaan. There are other rumours here, including that the Dune concept (think modern Baja Bug) might make it into production.With VW sales slipping in North America, it’d be a good way for the company to inject some excitement into their brand.

Honda tackles Pikes Peak race in seven categories

For most people, Honda is a nice safe automaker who used to build wacky racecars but now is all about EarthDreams and hybrid, and the fuel-sipping Civic.Turns out, they still have a passion for racing. The Pikes Peak International Hill Climb is one of the most well-known such events in the world, involving a hair-raising dash up a mountain in Colorado. It used to be partially gravel but now the entire way is paved, making for a rapid pace and a really, really hard landing if you accidentally drive off the side of the mountain. As there aren’t any guardrails, this actually happens from time to time. While nothing’s quite as nutty as the 532 horsepower Odyssey Minivan they brought last year, Honda

Aston Martin finally launching new platform

still has a strong field for 2014, including two motorcycles and five cars.They’ll have an NSX running in the open class, a Honda-powered Norma racing chassis, two Fit subcompacts (one an EV, the other a Spec-B racing car), and a Honda S2000 with a 3.7-litreV-6 shoehorned into it. That last one sounds pretty darn great. Hey Honda, why don’t you build one of those for the rest of us? PLEASE READ THE FINE PRINT: Offers valid until June 2, 2014. See toyota.ca for complete details on all cash back offers. In the event of any discrepancy or inconsistency between Toyota prices, rates and/or other information contained on toyotabc.ca and that contained on toyota.ca, the latter shall prevail. Errors and omissions excepted. 2014 Corolla CE 6M Manual BURCEM-A MSRP is $17,544 and includes $1,549 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, and battery levy. *Lease example: 2014 Corolla CE 6M with a vehicle price of $17,269 (includes $275 Toyota Canada Lease Assist, which is deducted from the negotiated selling price after taxes, and $1,549 freight/PDI) leased at 0.9% over 60 months with $0 down payment equals 120 semi-monthly payments of $87 with a total lease obligation of $10,715. Lease 60 mos. based on 100,000 km, excess km charge is $.07. **Finance example: 1.9% finance for 84 months, upon credit approval, available on 2014 Corolla CE 6M. Applicable taxes are extra. 2014 RAV4 Base FWD LE Automatic ZFREVT-A MSRP is $25,689 and includes $1,819 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning federal excise tax. †Lease example: 3.9% Lease APR for 60 months on approved credit. Semi-Monthly payment is $139 with $1700 down payment. Total Lease obligation is $18,380. Lease 60 mos. based on 100,000 km, excess km charge is $.10. ††Finance example: 1.9% finance for 48 months, upon credit approval, available on 2014 RAV4. Applicable taxes are extra. 2014 Tundra Double Cab SR5 4.6L 4x4 Automatic UM5F1T-A MSRP is $37,029 and includes $1,819 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning federal excise tax. ‡Lease example: 0.9% Lease APR for 60 months on approved credit. Semi-Monthly payment is $175 with $3,100 down payment. Total Lease obligation is $24,040. Lease 60 mos. based on 100,000 km, excess km charge is $.15. ‡‡Finance example: 0.9% finance for 72 months, upon credit approval, available on 2014 Tundra. Applicable taxes are extra. ‡‡‡Up to $4000 Non-Stackable Cash Back available on select 2014 Tundra models. Non-stackable cash back on 2014 Tundra Double Cab SR5 4.6L 4x4 Automatic is $4000. Applicable taxes are extra. Down payment, first semi-monthly payment and security deposit plus GST and PST on first payment and full down payment are due at lease inception. A security deposit is not required on approval of credit. Non-stackable Cash Back offers may not be combined with Toyota Financial Services (TFS) lease or finance rates. If you would like to lease or finance at standard TFS rates (not the above special rates), then you may be able to take advantage of Cash Customer Incentives. Vehicle must be purchased, registered and delivered by June 2, 2014. Cash incentives include taxes and are applied after taxes have been charged on the full amount of the negotiated price. See toyota.ca for complete details on all cash back offers. ‡‡‡‡Semi-monthly lease offer available through Toyota Financial Services on approved credit to qualified retail customers on most 24, 36, 48 and 60 month leases (including Stretch leases) of new and demonstrator Toyota vehicles. First semi-monthly payment due at lease inception and next monthly payment due approximately 15 days later and semi-monthly thereafter throughout the term. Toyota Financial Services will waive the final payment. Semi-monthly lease offer can be combined with most other offers excluding the First Payment Free and Encore offers. First Payment Free offer is valid for eligible TFS Lease Renewal customers only. Toyota semi-monthly lease program based on 24 payments per year, on a 60-month lease, equals 120 payments, with the final 120th payment waived by Toyota Financial Services. Competitive bi-weekly lease programs based on 26 payments per year, on a 60-month lease, equals 130 payments. Not open to employees of Toyota Canada, Toyota Financial Services or TMMC/TMMC Vehicle Purchase Plan. Some conditions apply. See your Toyota dealer for complete details. Visit your Toyota BC Dealer or www.toyotabc.ca for more details. Some conditions apply; offers are time limited and may change without notice. Dealer may lease/sell for less.

Brendan McAleer

brendanmcaleer@gmail.com

lowed to do the same with your offspring, no matter how much you might want to. A-M reports that the new chassis is under development, this tying in with their new contract with AMG. MercedesBenz’s Skunk Works will provide the engines for the next round of British Grand Tourers, in much the same way as they build motors for exotica like the Pagani Huayra.

The underpinnings of the current range of Aston Martins (apart from the 177 hypercar) are currently old enough to get all sulky and start listening to Linkin Park. Released at the beginning of the millennium, the VH chassis is entering its terrible teens, and it’s time to throw it away and start over. FYI, you’re not al-

And yes, I still have to Google the spelling of Huayra. While a new chassis is great, there’s a bit of sadness here at the passing of the old Aston V-12, which made a glorious noise and gave you a boot up the backside like you were a soccerball and it was David Beckham. I’ll miss it a bit, right up until the AMG-sourced engine does the same trick. twitter.com/brendan_mcaleer Follow us at:

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A40

THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 3 0 , 2 0 1 4

CAMBIE’S ANNIVERSARY Prices Effective May 29 to June 4, 2014.

While quantities last. Not all items available at all stores. We reserve the right to correct printing errors.

100% BC Owned and Operated PRODUCE

MEAT Fair Trade Organic Green Seedless Grapes from Heaven’s Best Mexico

Fair Trade Organic Grape Cherry Tomatoes from Del Cabo Mexico

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product of Canada

product of USA

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4.99lb/ 11.00kg

3.98lb/ 8.77kg

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Best Organic Produce

250g


Vancouver Courier May 30 2014