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FRIDAY

May 16 2014

Vol. 105 No. 40

OPINION 10

Worst SRO ever PACIFIC SPIRIT 12

Chinese Mennonites SWEET SPOT 22

Sundaes in suburbia There’s more online at

vancourier.com WEEKEND EDITION

THE VOICE of VANCOUVER NEIGHBOURHOODS since 1908

KITS AND DOGS A dog walker strolls with her clients at Spanish Banks earlier this week. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

Supporters applaud transgender policy Medical expert calls updates ‘sensible, logical’ Cheryl Rossi

crossi@vancourier.com

Dora Ng wants Chinese-Canadian parents to know that being gay or transgender isn’t just a white,Western thing. That’s why she was one of more than a dozen respondents who wrote to support theVancouver School Board’s proposed revisions to its sexual orientation and gender identity policy. Ng intends to speak at an upcoming board meeting on the topic, preferably in Chinese. “There’s this argument that this is a white thing, that this is aWestern idea, that this is aWestern pollution to traditional Chinese morals,” said Ng, who works with lesbian, bisexual, gay and trans youth at South Arm

Community Centre in Richmond. “And I really do want to make it a point that actually there are folks from all sorts of backgrounds, all sorts of cultures that are gender variant, that are homosexual.” Dr. Daniel Metzger, a pediatric endocrinologist at B.C. Children’s Hospital, whose team, with other medical and mental health professionals, has provided care for gender non-conforming and transgender children, youth and young adults since 1993, also wrote to support the updates. “One of the biggest arguments [against the revisions] that we saw was that there was no medical input, so since I’m the person that sees the most trans kids in the province it was important for me to write what I did,” Metzger said.

He called the updates “clear-headed.” “It’s sensible, logical and it completely complies with our standard of practice… our best knowledge of how to do things with kids,” said Metzger, a member of the World Professional Association for Transgender Health, the Canadian Professional Association for Transgender Health, the Endocrine Society and a clinical professor of pediatrics at the University of B.C. TheVSB’s PRIDE Advisory Committee drafted revisions to the decade-old policy to echo what schools have done to provide positive environments for LGBTQ and twospirited students and staff and provide clearer guidelines for schools that might be working to better accommodate trans students for the first time. (Two-spirited is an aboriginal

term that describes the embodiment of both masculine and feminine spirits. It isn’t limited to gender expression or sexuality.) The revisions were to be discussed at an education and student services committee meeting May 14, for possible adoption by the board May 20. But so many people wanted to address to the committee about the policy, the committee heard speakers May 14, will hear more May 22 and is expected to consider new revisions June 11. All 15 written submissions posted by the board with the May 14 committee meeting agenda support the policy revisions. Submissions came from parents, healthcare providers and researchers, and agencies and individuals that serve the LGBTQ community. Continued on page 8


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F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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News

Harbour a blessing for seafood lovers Wanyee Li

li.wanyee@gmail.com

The third annual Blessing of the Fleet at False Creek Harbour will be about more than well wishes for the fishing boats moored at the docks. Consumers must choose between local and imported, farmed and wild whenever they buy groceries at the supermarket. Donnie Sananin, president of the newly named False Creek Fisherman’s Wharf, wants to make that decision easier for them. The organization wants to raise the profile of the wild-caught prawns, shrimp, salmon and other seafood that people can buy right in the city. “We just want to make sure that people know Vancouver does have a commercial fishing harbour and it’s in their own backyard,” Mike Loy, the harbour manager, said. Vancouver chefs know about this source of sustainable seafood. Over 90 per cent of Vancouver restaurants buy seafood from False Creek fisherman,

Donnie Sananin, president, and Mike Loy, harbour manager, of False Creek Fisherman’s Wharf hope Vancouverites will gain a greater appreciation for wild-caught seafood at Harbour Appreciation Day. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

according to Loy. In addition to the fleet blessing, Saturday May 24 will be Harbour Appreciation Day, complete with salmon burgers. Sananin hopes that the people will gain a greater appreciation for wild-caught seafood

when they see the fishing boats, the fishermen, and fish sizzling on the barbeque all in one place. The chef cooking the delicious fish has a special connection to the harbour as well. Jack Kines has been fishing for 12 years and knows

the fishermen at False Creek well. He graduated from the Pacific Institute of Culinary Arts in 2009 with a culinary diploma and in 2011 with another in pastry. People buying a meal at Saturdays fleet blessing will be in for a treat. “The tuna and salmon will be

marinated with brown sugar, teriyaki sauce and roasted garlic,” he said. Kines will grill the fish on the barbeque before serving it in either a burger or on a salad. The fishermen will receive this tasty meal for free as a sign of appreciation.

Ritchie Hagberg has been salmon fishing for more than 40 years, and is providing the spring and coho salmon that will be featured in Kines’ cooking next weekend. He attended the Blessing of the Fleet two years ago, and found that it gave him great luck. “I had trouble for a while, engine troubles and that type of thing. I did the blessing of the fleet thing and then I had a great season — I had one of my best seasons,” he said. “I didn’t make it last year, but the blessing lasted so I had a good season still.” Hagberg said that he would be sure to attend this year’s blessing. Word in the harbour is this year’s blessing of the fleet foreshadows one of the biggest sockeye runs in recent memory. “We know it’s going to be huge,” said Sananin excitedly. “It’s going to be epic.” Father John Eason of the Holy Rosary Cathedral will bless the fleet soon after noon on Saturday, May 24.The event is open to the public. twitter.com/wanyeelii

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4

News

Student versed on second victory Roberts.The Vancouver premiere happens at the Roundhouse Performance Centre, May 22 and runs until May 31. For more information, see urbanink.ca.

CLASS NOTES

Cheryl Rossi

crossi@vancourier.com

Poetry recitation prowess

A Vancouver student has won the English stream of the national Poetry in Voice competition for the second year in a row. Roan Shankaruk from Vancouver Technical secondary won $5,000, plus $1,000 for her school’s library. Half of the money is reserved for the purchase of poetry books. Leo Chang of St. George’s school won third prize in the English stream.The finalists were selected from 30,000 students from more than 370 schools. Poetry inVoice is meant to encourage appreciation of the beauty of language while instilling a sense of confidence through public speaking. Scott Griffin, chairperson and founder of the GriffinTrust for Excellence in Poetry, founded Poetry inVoice, which is now in its fourth year. Students com-

Food 4 Thought Gala, May 23

Roan Shankaruk won $1,000 with her poetry recitation performances for Vancouver Technical secondary’s library. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

pete in one of three streams, English, bilingual or French.

Hip-Hop play, May 22

Sal Capone:The Lamentable Tragedy Of follows a young hip-hop group caught in the aftermath of

a violent police shooting, inspired by the real-life death of unarmed youth Fredy Villanueva in a police shooting six years ago in Montreal.While struggling to cope with the death of one of their members, the

group confronts their own biases, racism and distrust of authority. Montreal native and Vancouver resident Omari Newton penned Sal Capone, which is directed by Urban Ink artistic director Diane

Twice a month, Backpack Buddies provides 300 needy children in Vancouver with food to sustain them through the weekend.The Community First Foundation is hosting a gala at Science World, May 23, to raise money to continue to provide hungry kids breakfasts, lunches, dinners and health snacks.Those who want to contribute and have a night out can attend a multi-course dinner with an open bar for $250 or a cocktail party for $75. For more information, see communityfirstfoundation.ca.

Inner City Blues, June 5

Speaking of hungry kids, Vancouver blues, R&B and soul musicians will share the stage at the Edgewater Casino, June 5, to raise money

for breakfast programs at two East Vancouver elementary schools: Queen Alexandra and Strathcona. Performers include Jim Byrnes, Incognito with Nadine States and James Buddy Rogers. Inner City Blues starts at 7 p.m. at 750 Pacific Boulevard South. Tickets are $15 at Stadiumclub.ticketleap.com.

Opera and Cyber Bullying, June 6 and 7

Canada’s newest indie-opera group, Opera After Hours, has teamed up with Stop a Bully to tackle Baroque opera and cyber bullying.This won’t be a typical night at the opera. Instead, the audience for #DidoAndAeneas can interact with the characters in person and through social media as teasing turn into malicious mockery. Stop a Bully will provide audiences with information on how to prevent and report bullying. #DidoAndAeneas happens at Café Deux Soleils, 2096 Commercial Dr., June 6 and 7.The show starts at 9 p.m.Tickets at brownpapertickets.com. twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

News

VSB’s transgender rules explained

New regulations clarify decade-old policy

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Should a transgender student use the boys or girls bathroom at school?What about change rooms in the gym? Those questions will be decided on an individual basis, according to proposed regulations drafted by the Vancouver School Board. Washroom and change room use is one of a few new items drafted to clarify a decade-old district policy which seeks to provide a safe, positive environment for students and employees, with a focus on those who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or transsexual, queer or questioning. “The conversation starts in accommodating the trans student,” said VSB associate superintendent Maureen Ciarniello about change rooms. “Often we’re finding them an alternate place to change where they have privacy, so I don’t see it impacting another student.” The VSB’s PRIDE Advisory Committee drafted revisions to the policy to reflect how Vancouver schools are handling such issues, practices promoted by healthcare professionals and pending provincial legislation. A new regulation states, “In instances where students are segregated by sex, such as health education classes, trans students will have the option to be included in the group that corresponds to their gender identity.” The old policy focused on broadly stated goals.The revised document includes a one-page policy statement

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Motorized Screens Associate superintendent Maureen Ciarniello. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

and four pages of more concrete regulations. Regulations say: · “Staff will not refer students to programs or services that attempt to change a student’s sexual orientation or gender identity.” · The VSB is committed to helping LGBTQ students and families see themselves reflected positively through library and curricular resources. • The board is committed to providing resources in languages and formats easily accessible to students and families who read English as a second language. • The board will strive to make a gender-neutral washroom available at all schools and worksites. Ciarniello believes most schools have gender-neutral wheelchair-accessible washrooms. Two other points have drawn concern: • “Students’ rights to discuss and express their gender identity and/or gender expression openly and to decide when, with whom, and how much private information to share, will be recognized and protected.” • “To protect student safety, communications

between school and home shall use a student’s legal name and the pronoun corresponding to the student’s gender assigned at birth unless the independent student or the parent/guardian has specified otherwise.” Ciarniello said parents are concerned about what age students could self-identify their gender and whether parents would be informed. “It’s seldom that a student would be in a situation where they felt that their identified gender status was something that they didn’t want shared with their family,” she said. “Of students who are in that circumstance, very few of them have parents who aren’t aware.Their families knew this before the schools knew this.” An April 10 memo from Ciarniello stated the revisions would be discussed at an education and student services committee meeting May 14, for possible adoption by the board May 20. But so many people wanted to address the policy that the committee heard speakers May 14, will hear more May 22 and is expected to consider new revisions June 11. twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4

News How to say farewell…with dignity, simplicity and affordability…

City hopes for Legg up

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The historic Legg Residence inVancouver’sWest End could be saved from demolition if someone wants to pay to move it to another site. But a deal would have to be made quickly. A 17-storey tower is going to be built on the Harwood Street property. Attempts to come up with a plan to save the heritage home on the site as part of the redevelopment failed. If no one comes forward, the Legg Residence will be knocked down. Moving it would be an expensive project. It cost about $350,000 to move the twin 1930s-era Dorothy houses two blocks recently on Vancouver’s West Side. The Legg Residence is one of the few surviving grand estate homes built in theWest End at the end of the 19th century, according to the HeritageVancouver Society. “This house was under construction in July 1899, just 12 years after the arrival of the CPR railway. The Klondike Gold Rush had ushered in a brief wave of prosperity, and the city’s wealthier citizens were developing a number of

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grand residences, such as Gabriola on Davie Street, in the desirableWest End,” the organization explains in its 2011TopTen Endangered Sites list. “GordonT. Legg, who arrived inVancouver in 1889, was the manager of Union Steamships of BC, and was one of the founders of the RoyalVancouver Yacht Club. Designed in the British Arts and Crafts style, the house — with its broad overhanging jerkin-headed roof — typifies the style and grace of the lateVictorian era and the patriotic connections to the Mother Country of many ofVancouver’s elite.” Brian Jackson said the property owner is required under development permit conditions to offer the house for sale, basically for the cost of moving it. He said the house would have to be moved in at least two pieces. Dan Du from BingThom Architects, the firm working on the development, said it would be a challenging move and street trees might have to come down. Jackson said it’s not clear what would happen. “What happens to the street trees is dependent on the number of pieces that the house is moved in and how the house is divided so we don’t know yet if the street trees are going to be affected,” Jackson said. He wouldn’t speculate

The historic Legg Residence will be demolished unless someone pays to move it to another site. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

on how much it might cost, but said it may be possible to take it down to the water and barge it to another site. “A number of houses used to be barged up to waterfront communities up north like Powell River,” he said. “That happened a lot in the ’60s and ’70s.” A buyer would have to be found within weeks, according to Du. “It would have to [happen] pretty soon because we have to meet our own construction schedule as well,” he explained. “We have not got our

building permit but it’s getting close and we’re hoping to start construction next month.” Du said a buyer would need to come forward with a suitable “receiver site” that can accommodate the Legg Residence, which is about 8,000 square feet over three levels. Jackson said it’s sad the way the situation has unfolded. “We would like to see the house saved in another location.We did everything we could to try and save it in its existing location,” he said. twitter.com/naoibh

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F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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News Council approves Marpole rezoning amendments

Residents say pushy realtors are badgering elderly homeowners to sell their houses Stanley Tromp

stanleytromp@gmail.com

Despite residents speaking out against overcrowding, more traffic and pricier housing, city council voted unanimously last Wednesday to pass amendments that will implement parts of the Marpole Community Plan.This would rezone some arterial streets such as Granville and Osler from one- and two-family dwellings to permit townhouses, rowhouses and four-storey apartments. Council approved the new 30-year plan for Marpole last April. It includes plans for 6,800 new homeownership units, 835 rental units and 1,085 units of social housing. It also calls for expanded park space, enhanced walking and cycling routes and upgraded community facilities. Despite the vote, NPA Coun. George Affleck said discussions on how to apply the Marpole plan in practice will go on. About 50 Marpole resi-

Marpole residents are enjoying new public art, such as a Lending Library at Bean Around the World at 65th and Granville, as their neighbourhood is on the precipice of change. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

dents attended council, and after their anti-densification struggles of the past two years, most of the speakers sounded tired and half-resigned to the neighbourhood’s new reality. Marpole Residents Coalition spokesperson Mike Burdick supported the amendments but with reservations. “Do I want it? No. Do I approve it? I guess so.”

He worries that thousands of new residents will bring a massive and dangerous rise in automobile traffic, especially around the Gateway project at Cambie and Marine Drive. Resident Gudrun Langolf said it could have been worse: “At least the new houses aren’t condo towers — we don’t need any more of those phallic symbols.”

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Other points were repeatedly raised: urgings that the Marpole-Oakridge Community Centre should be upgraded but remain at its current location, fears that rare old houses might be torn down around Osler Street, complaints that “pre-zoning” details will be worked out in staff meetings and not at full council, and worries that the touted

“affordable housing” is far too pricey to be called affordable. One resident said to applause, “How can a student afford a $885,000 townhouse?” One lone Marpole resident voiced another outlook.The streets seemed too quiet and empty, Ignatius But told council, and he yearned for more excitement and activity in the area.The 21-year-old has lived in Marpole for 10 years in a four-storey condo near 59th Ave and Columbia Street. Many councillors appeared disturbed by some residents’ complaints about pushy realtors badgering elderly Marpole homeowners to sell their houses. One resident said her 84-yearold mother has been called so often that she is afraid to answer the phone or the door. Matt Shillito, assistant planning director, said “absolutely no one is required to sell their homes,” and complainants should call the B.C. Real Estate Council.

Vision Vancouver Coun. Geoff Meggs wondered how newly bought properties on the Cambie Corridor can be kept in use. Stevenson said he sees offshore speculation and absentee ownership in Coal Harbour and the West End, but not so much in Marpole. Shillito agreed: “There is a big demand to buy and rent such townhouses, and the Marpole area is geared more for local families, so buildings are less likely to be left vacant.” Despite their dim view of the Marpole plan, a few residents changed their view of the planning process and voiced some gratitude for it. City planners did a good job of consulting, even for renters, and seemed to respond to two years of protest by scaling down the original high densification plan, they said. “When I got a personalized card in the mail to come to this meeting, I almost jumped for joy, because in the past only homeowners got such notices,” said Langolf.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4

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Continued from page 1 The board has also heard from transgender students and their families, student representatives and people concerned about the proposed revisions. Ng, 26, attended St. Francis Xavier Catholic elementary school on Great Northern Way. She was “tomboyish,” liked to play soccer and was bullied by peers who said she wanted

to be a man.The acceptance she received from new friends at Hamber secondary helped transform her from fearful to confident. “That’s the kind of difference your environment makes,” Ng said. She’d like to see lessons on gender variance taught in more classrooms. “This kind of bullying comes from ideas on gender role and gender behaviour

and what people think proper gender behaviour should be,” she said. Speakers at the board meetings have had to confirm they reside in or have children attending school in Vancouver. “This isn’t a general discourse on LGBTQ, this is a discourse on a policy of the Vancouver School Board,” said Maureen Ciarniello, associate superintendent. twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi


F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A9

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A10

THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4

Opinion ‘Disgusting’ SRO mired Censoring Dr. Seuss and other kids’ stuff in red tape Allen Garr Columnist agarr@vancourier.com In her decades as an activist in the Downtown Eastside Jean Swanson has likely come to know every single room occupancy hotel in that neighbourhood and then some. For generations SRO’s have been the housing of last resort for the poorest of the poor; the aged, drug addicted and the disabled.They are one step away from shelters or the street. Many if not most of them rely on the province’s paltry social assistance housing allowance of $375 a month to pay the rent. That is why Swanson’s description of one such hotel,The Clifton on Granville, is so stunning. “It is”, she says “the most disgustingly maintained place I have been in in the past five years.” It is also the most recent example of what has become known as a “renoviction”; owners evict tenants then renovate the building and jack up the rents beyond the reach of those who were kicked out. The Clifton has not escaped the notice of city hall. In a report to council last summer written by the city’s assistant deputy of inspections Carli Edwards, councillors learned that the property was “ranked as the second worst property on the city’s rental database with 105 violations (25 fire, four building, 16 electrical and 61 standards of maintenance bylaw violations.”) At that time the registered owner of the hotel was a numbered company with three principal directors, Abolghasem Abdollahi, Zohreh Fazl-Mashhadi andYahya Nickpour.The hotel has 73 sleeping units, many of which stand empty. Attempts by city staff to work with the owners proved fruitless. In light of the owners’ intransigence, staff was proposing court action. That threat seemed to move the owners. In her report Edwards said: “although these violations are serious, staff feels the building should not be evacuated at this time.” The month before the matter came before council, architect David Mah received a building permit in the name of the property owners. According to Edwards, correspondence from Mah to the city included a commitment not to evict the tenants. One other thing: since the council hearing last year, one director of the Clifton Hotel, Abdollahi, bought his two colleagues out and is now the sole owner of the building. It is one of a number he owns including The Lion and The Chelsea that are among the

Meanwhile about 150 SROs stand empty in the city while various landlords bide their time to have their own renovictions

worst maintained in the city. Meanwhile, the building has continued to deteriorate until it has reached the “disgustingly maintained” state Jean Swanson observed. So in spite of architect’s commitment and staff’s observation about no need to evict, the owner Abdollahi used the Residential Tenancy Act (RTA) to evict the 45 tenants by the end of next month. He says the repairs required could not take place while they were there. Effectively it means that while the tenant was there, under the RTA, rents could only go up for his room a maximum of 4 percent a year. Once they are gone and the renovations are done, the owner can charge whatever the market will bear. And Abolghasem told 24 Hours as much last week: “What do you expect? I’m not a charity.” The city says it is helpless in this situation even though it could have used its own Standards of Maintenance bylaw to make the repairs and charge the owner. Instead Edwards says, correctly, it can’t withdraw the building permit because the Vancouver building bylaw under which the permit was given is mute on the matter of tenancy. City council, in the person of Vision Vancouver Coun. Kerry Jang, lays much of the cause for this dilemma at the feet of the province; he says it has repeatedly refused to amend the Residential Tenancy Act to protect levels of rent charged by SROs by tying the rent to the room and not the tenant.There is also the point that the $375 housing allowance hasn’t moved up for seven years. Meanwhile about 150 SROs stand empty in the city while various landlords bide their time to have their own renovictions. As for the 45 people who are about to be out on the street and drive up the homeless numbers in the city, they are filing a complaint with the Residential Tenancy Branch arguing their eviction is illegal. Good luck. twitter@AllenGarr

The week in num6ers...

19.5 6

In millions of dollars, the cost of rebuilding Kitsilano Neighbourhood House, expected to open late summer or early fall.

UBC runner Rhiannon Evans’ ranking in the 1500m in advance of the NAIA national championships.

83

The age of Glenburn Soda Fountain and Confectionery’s 1931 Walrus Soda Fountain in Burnaby, which makes sodas the way it was done before bottled pop.

Geoff Olson Columnist

geoffolson.com

This time around, it’s all kids’ stuff. First item:Vancouver School Board superintendent Steve Cardwell “has issued a letter to all parents and guardians warning of potential rotating school closures across the province should a settlement not be reached,” according to a CBC report. Would that outcome count as a success for the government? In February of this year, the AlberniValley News reported that B.C. government lead negotiator Paul Straszak “admitted in court that his strategy in 2012 negotiations with the B.C.Teachers’ Federation was to provoke a full-scale strike.”The supposed intent was to further alienate the public to the union. Straszak reportedly shared this notion in a briefing with Premier Christy Clark’s deputy minister John Dyble before a cabinet meeting. Since February, this intriguing item seems to have disappeared down the local media memory hole. All the more reason that we should watch this ongoing conflict between our “families first” government and the B.C.Teachers’ Federation with this nearly-forgotten factoid in mind. Second item: for the past few years, Dr. Seuss has been taking a beating across Canada. In 2011, a line from the author’s classic 1958 title Yertle the Turtle and Other Stories was deemed inappropriate political content after a Prince Rupert teacher included the quote in material for a meeting with management.

Alas, the road to hell is paved with good intentions and driverless Google cars. In the book,Yertle has a habit of climbing on top of turtles, which causes consternation to those at the bottom of the heap.The offending line in question: “I know up on top you are seeing great sights, but down here on the bottom, we too should have rights.” The B.C. Public School Employers’ Association rescinded theYertle ban in October 2013. Also last year, a UFO (Unidentified Flaming Oddball) lodged a formal complaint against Seuss’s 1963 book Hop on Pop

12

The number of months kiteboarders have to use a special launch area in Spanish Banks until the park board reviews the pilot project.

with the Toronto Public Library because it “encourages children to use violence against their fathers.” Seuss, obviously intending a parental bloodbath from crayon-wielding insurgents, wrote in 1963: “HOP POP We like to hop. We like to hop on top of Pop.” “STOPYou must not hop on Pop,” says the yellow bear to his energetic cubs, with little effect. Wisely, the Toronto Public Library rejected the request to ban the book. (They will also hang on to the good doctor’s lesser know titles Goin’ Medieval on Mom and Poppin’ a Cap in Grandpap.) Seriously now, that’s not the end of it. Suess’s 1950 book If I Ran The Zoo is among books that local patrons have formally asked the Vancouver Public Library to remove, in part because of a stereotyped illustration of Asians who “all wear their eyes at a slant.”Theodore Geisel was obviously a man of his time, but you’ll find far worse portrayals of Arabs and Muslims in today’s action films and video games. Third item: fast food spokesclown Ronald McDonald has undergone a makeover.The pants are less baggy, the jacket has lapels — all in an apparent effort to make him look more, you know, serious. But from my perspective, the McNugget-flogging jester now resembles a children’s entertainer on a fixed budget. Or worse: in the eyes of a friend, he looks like “a pervert.” At least Ron finally got the memo about stripes. Fashion-wise, they are known to be slimming, but this idiot wore them horizontally for decades. Fourth item: it’s well understood that everything kids post online will follow them through life. But this week Europe’s top court ruled that Internet companies can be made to delete problematic or irrelevant search engine results, after a Spanish man protested Google results highlighting a 1998 newspaper article about the repossession of his home. In other words, people have the right to be forgotten, at least in Europe. Alas, the road to hell is paved with good intentions and lined with driverless Google cars. If this decision catches on in the U.S., you can imagine how it could play out. Corporations would petition the courts to have past indiscretions forgotten, because under the 14th Amendment they are people too. Of course, corporations are no more “people” than Seuss’s Star-bellied Sneetches — but their lawyers and lobbyists frequently pass as human in Washington.

14

The number of Tony nominations Monty Python’s Spamalot received when it made its Broadway debut in 2005. It runs at the Stanley until June 29.

18

The number of Chinese Mennonite churches found within the Lower Mainland.


F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A11

Mailbox Speaking up for the aquarium

VA N C O U V E R T H I S W E E K I N H I S TO RY

Native man’s death sparks inquest

May 16, 1989: An aboriginal man is found dead in his room at the Yale Hotel just hours after being released from police custody. Rocky Pearson, 26, died from an internal injury as a result of a blow to the abdomen, and a witness at the subsequent four-day inquest testified he saw Pearson beaten by police while in jail but the VPD claimed the fatal blow must have happened before he was arrested for public intoxication. A coroner’s jury eventually ruled that Pearson’s death was a homicide but no one was blamed.

Basi-Virk corruption trial begins

May 17, 2010: Nearly seven years after a police raid on the B.C. Legislature in connection with the $1 billion sale of B.C. Rail to private-sector rival CN Rail, the trial of then-ministerial aides Bob Virk and Dave Basi begins in B.C. Supreme Court. The two originally pleaded not guilty but, just as a long list of powerful government and Liberal Party insiders were about to take the witness stand, they switched their pleas to guilty in return for the government paying their $6-million legal bill. Basi and Virk were each sentenced to two years of house arrest.

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To the editor: Re: “Soapbox:Vancouver Aquarium holds high environmental standards,” May 2. When an employee published an open letter in support of the Vancouver Aquarium recently, local activist group No Whales in Captivity was the first to react, asking its followers on Facebook to join the debate by “commenting and blasting this guy out of the water for being one of the biggest whalesh**ters we have ever heard from.” His crime that created this outrage? He dared to point out some of the good the aquarium does. He spoke about rescue and rehabilitation of marine mammals, research and education, and quality of care. He did a great job in summing up what motivates staff and volunteers to defend the Vancouver Aquarium, but one aspect of their work I feel came too short — the most important one in my opinion. Every facet of their exhibits and interpretive shows are designed around that one goal, to make visitors leave with a better understanding of the animals and their natural habitats, conscious about threats to their survival and our connection to these magnificent creatures, even if they live in places as remote as the Arctic.You cannot even grab some fish and chips at the café without getting a conservation message with your order. I have heard stories of people whose careers were sparked by a visit to the aquarium; stories of kids who want to be biologists and scientists when they grow up, stories of volunteers who have dedicated much of their free time to the aquarium’s

mission for decades.These people care deeply, are passionate about marine life. And in all these cases it was the connection with animals they saw at the Vancouver Aquarium that inspired that passion. The aquarium was recently accused by an anti-captivity activist of “turning people into conservationists.” She meant that in a negative way, of course. But that is exactly what the Vancouver Aquarium does — on purpose. They want people to go home thinking about Hana and Helen, and the 300,000 whales, porpoises and dolphins that get entangled and drown in fixed fishing nets every year. And they want people to develop the desire to make a difference, to change their ways, to buy sustainable seafood, to avoid plastic bags, to leave their cars at home. People need to make these connections in order to care.This awareness does not come from nothing, and people do not actively seek that awareness unless something sparks their interest first. The loss of biodiversity this planet is facing does not stop on the beach.We are polluting our oceans, scraping all life from the sea floor to make fishing more profitable, erasing whole populations to get access to cheap seafood.We are invading even the most pristine marine habitats in pursuit of higher profits, criss-crossing the vulnerable habitats of marine mammals with noisy speed boats and tankers.We are slowly turning our oceans into a living hell. It is time to wake up and open our eyes to that reality, to take action.The Vancouver Aquarium is leading the way, and, if anything, they deserve our support.They certainly have mine. MarcusWernicke, Vancouver

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COURIER STORY: “Are we becoming a city of renters?” May 14. David Marnoch @dgmbear:Those of us forced into perma-renter status pray to God THAT doesn’t become unaffordable too. And that’s the way it is COURIER STORY: “Giving voice to Atwood opera,” May 14. City OperaVancouver: Many thanks to Cheryl Rossi for writing a terrific piece about a unique show being created inVancouver.The world premiere of Margaret Atwood’s first opera is a very big deal. No less wonderful are the people who have embraced her story. Our composer,Tobin Stokes, has the gift of glossolalia: he speaks in many tongues, all of them real and intimate.As Cheryl pointed out, Pauline contests the very Canadian question:“Who am I?” It is a question whose answer all of us need to get right — in the arts, in our politics, and in our hearts.Those who come to this opera may find yet another answer, waiting just behind the curtain.Thank you for this story. If we get it right, Pauline’s story belongs to all of us. COURIER COLUMN: “Post-warWest Side bungalow knocked down,” online only. Oliver: I will never understand why people get so emotionally attached to old junker houses with no architectural merit. It’s just a bunch of lumber and asbestos, people. Get over it. COURIER STORY: “Yaletowners want development quashed,” May 7. Fern Jeffries: People move into neighbourhoods expecting that the City will honour its commitments.These commitments are usually to be found in zoning by-laws, Official Development Plans etc. Here in NewYaletown is another example of the City’s changing those commitments without procedural fairness and due process. Hats off to CANY for standing up to this developer led municipal government! Ryan McLaughlin: More anti-development NIMBY tactics, even in the heart of downtown. People buy into these areas and try to halt housing construction to keep housing prices high.


A12

THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4

Community

Chinese Mennonites reflect West Coast mix PACIFIC SPIRIT

Pat Johnson

pat604johnson@gmail.com

Hear “Mennonite” and many of us think of strawhatted, horse-and-buggyriding old believers speaking German dialects. In Vancouver, the word should increasingly conjure images of newcomers from China, Hong Kong and elsewhere in Asia who have discovered an old form of Christianity and made it their own. East may well be east, and west west, but in Vancouver’s religious community as in so much else, the twain absolutely meet. While sometimes seen as an “ethno-religious” group, Mennonites in Vancouver are as likely to have names like Chu, Chan or Wong as Friesen, Rempel or Klassen. It’s a fascinating religious hybrid that happened by accident but has evolved into a significant West Coast phenomenon. Rev. Xavier Law is senior pastor at Pacific Grace Mennonite Brethren Church, a neat, midcentury-style church on East First Avenue near Renfrew. While it was not officially the first Chinese Mennonite Brethren church (another Chinese “MB” congregation filed the paperwork first), it is the de facto granddaddy of what has grown to 18 churches throughout the Lower Mainland. The phenomenon of Chinese Mennonites began more than five decades ago

and stems directly from the faith’s humanitarian mission.When Mennonites began evangelizing in the Downtown Eastside (then still called “skid row”) in the 1950s and ’60s, the proximity to Chinatown led to the unintended, but not unwelcome, consequence of a number of Chinese-Canadians joining the church. Numbers rose steadily until, in the early 1970s, Pacific Grace had a designated Cantonese-language section that by 1977 had become so dominant that English services were discontinued. (They have an English pastor again now, as well as Mandarin and Cantonese ones in addition to senior pastor Law.) The Mennonites did not set out to proselytize to Chinese-Canadians, but the faith struck a chord, says Law. Although Mennonite history is distinctive, worship styles and theology are similar to evangelical churches that have been popular among some Christian newcomers from Asia in recent decades. Law chuckles when acknowledging the divergent stereotypes, but insists the adoption of Mennonite practice among ChineseCanadians is an easy accommodation with the faith’s inclusive worldview. “We focus on mission, which means sharing the gospel to all nations, which means all cultures and all groups,” he says. Mennonites, like Amish and Hutterites, are Anabaptists — products of the

Not exactly as shown: the traditional image of Mennonites doesn’t apply in culturally diverse Vancouver.

Christian Reformation in 1500s central and northern Europe. Simple living

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pacifists, “Anabaptists” got their name from a disparaging term, meaning those

who baptize again, because their belief in adult baptism was seen by traditionalists as needless.Their pacifism and views on religious freedom outside the control of governments put them at odds with dominant cultures over the centuries, including here in Canada during the world wars. Devoted to the care of the spirit and the spread of Christian scripture, Mennonites are also renowned for their work in the world. The 1.7 million adherents support the work of the Mennonite Central Committee, which provides disaster relief and international development. There are about 200,000 Mennonites in Canada, ranging in practice and theology from the “Old Order” who shun technology (mostly in southwestern Ontario) to the socially progressive, with a surprisingly wide swath between. But, as Law says, they all get on well across their not insignificant differences.The church’s empathetic worldview transcends much. Law came to Canada with his parents and went to high school in Coquitlam. Having belonged to an independent Christian congregation in Hong Kong, he sought out a spiritual home in his new country and found a Chinese MB church in Port Moody. When, as a teenager, he heard the call to become a pastor, his church sponsored him through seminary and employed him after

graduation in 1996. In 2003, Law moved to the current flagship church. The Port Moody church remains the largest Chinese MB church, with 450 congregants, compared to the 350 at Law’s second-largest Pacific Grace church. Mennonite Brethren have had success in other Asian communities as well. Like many Canadian churches, Mennonites sponsored refugees from the 1970s Vietnamese “boat people” crisis and there are now two Vietnamese MB churches in B.C. In addition to languagespecific churches, there are also numerous multicultural churches with services in different languages. And if Chinese Mennonites strike outsiders as an unusual amalgam, the reality is that evangelization has meant that, after the United States, Mennonites are now most prevalent in Congo, Ethiopia and India. In places like Kitchener, Ontario, you can still see the picturesque images of simple-living Mennonite farmers, but in most of the world, including Vancouver, the reality is increasingly different. Chinese Mennonites are no longer an exclusively Lower Mainland phenomenon. Churches have been planted (one each) in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. But the singularity of Mennonites of Chinese descent is a result of Vancouver’s serendipitous ferment of people, ideas and practices.


F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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News

A CARIBOO GETAWAY C/O:

…get caught in our web

vancourier.com West End Residents: Parking Permit Renewal Current West End residential parking permits will expire on Saturday, May 31, 2014. To make purchasing your annual parking permit as quick and easy as possible, we now offer three ways to do it starting Thursday, May 1, 2014.

“It would have been cheaper to start from scratch but that’s not what the community wanted,” says Catherine Leach, left, the executive director of Kits House. Volunteer programmer Julie Rieter says donations are still welcome. PHOTO ROBERT MANGELSDORF

Kits House nears completion Historic buildings retained as new services to be offered Robert Mangelsdorf editor@wevancouver.com

With its two-year reconstruction nearly complete, the heart of Kitsilano is ready to beat again. The Kitsilano Neighourhood House at the corner of West Seventh and Vine is mere months away from completion and will feature an expanded multipurpose community space with childcare facilities, a renovated theatre, a community kitchen, open office space and low-cost seniors housing. The new facility will see the Kits House, previously housed in the former St. George Greek Orthodox Church, expanded to include the 1911 George Hay House, with an all new modern building connecting the two. The project is being built to LEED Gold environmental certifications, and

while the historic exteriors of the two heritage buildings will remain intact, the inside of the facility will be completely new and modern. “Once you’re on the inside, you wouldn’t know there are three different buildings,” says executive director Catherine Leach. “It all flows together so perfectly.” Retaining the two historic buildings was a message Leach and the Kits House staff and volunteers heard loud and clear when they started the community consultation and planning process for the project close to seven years ago. “It would have been cheaper to start from scratch, but that’s not what the community wanted,” says Leach Also high on the community’s priority list was affordable, subsidized seniors housing, as well as childcare. Leach says she hopes having children and seniors

using the facility together will open the opportunity for mentorship programs for the young ones, and encourage active lifestyles for residents. Neighbour Larry Hnetka has lived across the alley from Kits House for the past 25 years and says he’s excited to see the refurbished and expanded community facility finally take shape. “It’s going to revitalize the whole neighbourhood.” Kits House has had a long history as the heart of the Kitsilano community, and has been at its present location since the early 1970s. Environmental activist group Greenpeace held one of its first meetings at the hall, and it has long played host to live folk music and community plays and productions. However, the facility’s relevance waned in the past decade, which is why a revitalization was needed, says Leach.

The $19.5 million tab for the project was funded in part by the provincial government ($9.6 million), the Association of Neighbourhood Houses of B.C. ($6.4 million), and the City of Vancouver ($1.6 million) and others ($220,000). That leaves $1.7 million Kits House still need to raise. Of that, Kits Neighbourhood House has already raised more than $330,000, but that still leaves a considerable funding gap. “We have some fundraisers coming up... there are naming opportunities available, and we are accepting donations online,” says volunteer programmer and fund developer Julie Rieter. “Every little bit helps.” The new and improved Kits House is expected to open in the late summer/early fall, with a grand opening celebration tentatively planned for October. To earn more about the

• Online (24 hours a day, seven days a week) at vancouver.ca/parkingpermits • Phone 3-1-1 (seven days a week) • In person, during business hours at City Hall, 453 West 12th Avenue (8:30 am - 5 pm in the Revenue Services Department) and at the West End Community Centre (WECC), 870 Denman Street THE WECC’S PARKING PERMIT DESK WILL HAVE EXTENDED HOURS ON THESE DATES: • Saturday, May 24, 9 am - 2 pm • Thursday, May 29, 9 am - 7:30 pm • Friday, May 30, 9 am - 7:30 pm • Saturday, May 31, 9 am - 2 pm REGULAR HOURS OF OPERATION: Monday – Friday, 9 am – 1 pm and 2 – 5 pm year round (except holidays) To pay online or by phone, you must: live in the permit parking zone and have valid car insurance registered in your name and address, a credit card (American Express, MasterCard or Visa), and a valid email address. You may pay by cash, cheque or credit or debit card if you pay in person. If you are not the registered owner or lease holder of the vehicle, you must purchase your permit in person and bring in the required supporting residential and vehicle documents. Your new permit will be mailed to the residential address provided within 10 business days of purchase. The permit fee is $73.40 and payment options are: cash, cheque, American Express, MasterCard, Visa or debit card. FOR INFORMATION: vancouver.ca/parkingpermits or phone 3-1-1 Visit: vancouver.ca Phone: 3-1-1 TTY: 7-1-1


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4

News Please join us at our second Open House for the Riverview Lands. Two Open Houses have been scheduled to discuss goals and priorities for the future of Riverview. Date: Saturday, May 24, 2014 Time: 2:00pm – 6:00pm (Drop-In) Place: Dogwood Pavilion, Mike Butler Room 624 Poirier Street, Coquitlam (Entrance off Winslow Avenue) Date: Wednesday, May 28, 2014 Time: 4:30pm – 7:30pm (Drop-In) Place: Kyle Centre 125 Kyle Street, Port Moody (Entrance off St. Andrews Street) If you cannot attend the open house in person, please visit our website, www.renewingriverview.com, where you can participate in our online open house starting May 25, 2014. You can also contact us at: t: 604.439.8577 | e: questions@renewingriverview.com m: 1700 - 4555 Kingsway, Burnaby, BC, V5H 4V8

Funerals today for two prominent citizens

Former Musqueam chief, DTES activist mourned Delbert Guerin

A memorial service will be held today (May 16) for former Musqueam Indian Band Chief Delbert Victor Guerin Sr., who passed away on Sunday. Guerin, who worked as a log salvager, commercial fisherman and longshoreman, is known nationwide for a precedent-setting legal case over leasing land to the Shaughnessy Golf and Country Club that ultimately held the federal government accountable for failing to protect the interests of the Musqueam. “It is a sad time for our community as we mourn the loss of a great leader for the Musqueam Nation and a true warrior for all First Nation people,” said Chief Wayne Sparrow in a press release announcing the 10 a.m. funeral service at the Musqueam Community Centre, 6777 Salish Drive. “Delbert

dedicated much of his life to making sure our rights were acknowledged, and we owe it to him and our future generations to keep this vision alive.” Guerin also served as a member of the National Indian Brotherhood (the precursor to the Assembly of First Nations), Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs and was a founding member of the Nauts’amat Tribal Council. He is survived by his wife, Frances, his five children, two adopted nephews and three grandchildren.

Bud Osborn

A memorial service will also be held today for Downtown Eastside poet and activist Bud Osborn, who died last week at the age of 66 after being hospitalized for pneumonia and a heart condition. Osborn was a founder of the

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Vancouver Area Network of Drug Users (VANDU) and Insite, Canada’s first legal safe injection site. He was also the author of five books including Hundred Block Rock, which refers to the 100 block of East Hastings where the memorial will take place outside Insite beginning at noon. Osborn combined his poetry, activism and membership on the Vancouver Richmond Health Board to insist that hundreds of drug overdoses in the DTES were a health emergency. “I credit him with being able to change the way people perceive drug users,” said Vancouver East MP Libby Davies in a prepared statement. People will then march to Oppenheimer Park for food and readings of Osborn’s poetry between 2 and 4 p.m.

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F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A15

Home & Garden

Macs vs. PCs debate is obsolete Computers gather dust as mobile takes over PRACTICAL GEEK Barry Link

blink@vancourier.com

A couple of weeks back a few editors and I in our chain had a brief email debate about Macs vs. PCs. Someone had heard that our IT department was suggesting replacing some of our aging Macs with newer Windows-based machines. Most of the other editors were horrified, and that’s typical of journalists, who are Apple-centric. I was the only one not bothered by the idea, since I use Apple at work, Windows at home and am happy with both. But I didn’t argue very hard, and for one reason: it felt a bit like debating the merits of Catholicism vs. Protestantism.Which branch of Christianity was better might have been a going concern a couple of centuries ago, but now no one cares. Not even the Catholics and Protestants. The same is true of the equally theological and seemingly as ancient Mac vs. PC schism.Wave your precious Macbook Pro or Lenovo ThinkPad Carbon around all you want because whether you like it or not, the world has moved on.

Apples and oranges are both fruit

Years ago, we used computers as overpriced, overcomplicated typewriters. (I’m talking about normal people as opposed to geeks who used them to crunch vast reams of data.) As the machines got better and the interfaces improved, we added spreadsheets, presentations, photo editing, and games. And a whole bunch of other pieces of software, from Quicken to QuarkXpress.

They were still overpriced, and often overcomplicated, but became steadily more useful. Once we added the Internet, from email to the web, they turned into the most profound communication devices ever invented. All of that work was done intimately through the computer we used and the interface it hosted, whether it was designed by Apple or Microsoft. Both the Mac and PC camps attracted adherents, and, in a way that seems stupid and shallow now, we strongly identified ourselves by the company of the computers we kept. A one button mouse vs. a two-button mouse? That mattered! Now think of what you do with your computer today: send email, check Facebook, play Words with Friends, perform routine banking. Almost all of that you likely do through a web browser, and I’m not going out on a limb by suggesting the experience of these activities on a browser is little different on an Mac vs. a PC (or increasingly, a Chromebook). In fact, I’m not going out on a limb to suggest Macs and PCs are at parity, even with the current oddness of Windows 8 and the greater complexity of choice among PCs. Both sides have borrowed from the other and both are mature and powerful technologies. Both will get you to the church on time.

Moving forward with mobile

But chances are you’ve chosen a different route to church.That emailing, Facebooking,Words with Friending and banking you do online?You’re using your phone or tablet to do it. They’re simpler, cheaper and a lot more portable

than computers, and what’s more, they’re all you need to connect to the online services like Facebook that dominate our social lives. That fancy iMac? It’s gathering dust in the corner. It has far more power than anyone needs. Like the Inquisition or the leaders of the Reformation, that big, expensive computer just doesn’t matter anymore and

goes a long way to explaining the decline in traditional computer sales. The old Windows vs. Mac argument will continue in isolated pockets, among for example creative professionals like journalists, who have special technical needs and neuroses to match when it comes to their tools. As for the rest of us, the theological debate in tech

has moved to smartphones and tablets and whether iPhones/iPads vs. Android gets you to social media heaven faster. But even this debate is dying down. Facebook, Gmail, Instagram and even traditional desktop stalwarts like Microsoft Office are making their way to almost all smartphones and mobile devices. Smartphones, like

the PCs and Macs before them, are becoming remarkably alike, as anyone who looks at new phones can see. A touchscreen, some buttons to push, and the same group of popular apps. And that’s not a bad thing, because the real things in life to argue about are not phones, iPads and operating systems. twitter.com/trueblinkit

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4

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See what’s Made in Strathcona Wanyee Li

li.wanyee@gmail.com

It’s no secret that Strathcona is a hot spot for small businesses and budding artists. Six businesses will give tours of their storefronts and workspaces as part of an initiative started by the Strathcona Business Improvement Association. “We wanted to have an opportunity to tell more people about all the really cool and interesting businesses in the area. Unlike most BIAs centered around retail, we have a lot of industry and it’s difficult for people to know what’s happening here,” said Joji Kumagai, executive director of the Strathcona BIA. Here are three Strathcona businesses featured in the Made in Strathcona tours happening May 31 and June 7. Tickets are $10.

AGRO Café

AGRO opened its first location inYaletown, then expanded to Granville Island and Strathcona. The company prides itself on roasting its coffee in

Vancouver and its founder travels around the world to talk to coffee farmers. Founder: Blake Hanacek, a Strathcona resident since 2009 Why Strathcona? “We identified it as an up-and-coming neighbourhood, it had the proper zoning for coffee roasting and was conducive to importing green coffee.” Green coffee is unprocessed coffee, which comes in the form of cherries. AGRO roasts its own coffee in Strathcona. What will people see on the tour? People will see the coffee roasting process and some unique brewing equipment. AGRO café has a wide variety of brewing methods and they can make recommendations depending on your coffee preferences. For instance, customers can try the latest resurgence of old coffee brewing methods with the Chemex Coffeemaker.

Eclipse Awards

Eclipse Awards makes awards out of sustainable materials like recycled glass and reclaimed wood.This

business also got its start in Yaletown before moving to Strathcona after four years. Founder:Toby Barazzuol, a Strathcona resident since 2002 Why Strathcona? “I like Strathcona because it’s different from a lot of Vancouver communities. People who come here like to think outside of the box a little bit.They don’t want to be mainstream.The area supports collaboration between companies and I think that feeling of community here is a valuable part of this neighbourhood.” What will people see on the tour? “They’ll see our green roof, our production space, the space that inspires our work.We’ve put a lot into building a space that’s inspiring and healthy for our staff.” The green roof features a strip of greenery down the centre and garden boxes along the edges where they grow flowers as well as some fruit like strawberries.

YEW Woodshop

The idea ofYEW Woodshop stems from the

company House of Doors, started by an Emily Carr graduate. House of Doors still operates inYew Woodshop, along with four other contracting and design companies.YEW Woodshop focuses on custom wood pieces, but also collaborates with metal shops in Strathcona to create mixed pieces. Founder: Logan Gilbay, a Strathcona resident since 2011 Why Strathcona? “It’s an interesting mix of people and businesses. It hasn’t always been the best area of town. But we’ve been here for three years and you can definitely see the changes happening.” — Danielle Jasinski, coordinator and project manager What will people see on the tour? “When they come into our space we have a show room space filled with objects we’ve already built.We have a lot of doors. One of the things we carried over from Emily Carr is a community working area. Our workshop is quite large and open. Everybody shares everything.” twitter.com/wanyeelii

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F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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Community

HOLIDAY CELEBRATIONS: Nearly 700 people spilled into seven different rooms over five floors of the Vancouver Club, each decked out in an annual holiday theme, to celebrate AYear In A Night, Zajac Foundation’s annual hootenanny. Guests dined and danced the night away to local musicians, bands and DJs while raising funds for the Zajac Ranch for children, a camp for kids and young adults with chronic, life threatening and/or debilitating conditions. More than $100,000 was raised through the evening’s raffle and custom-cool silent auction. Macdonald Development Corp.’s Rob Macdonald was also honoured with the Zajac Young Professionals’ Raising The Bar award. Macdonald spoke of the long-standing influence ranch founder Mel Zajac had upon him. Earlier in the evening, the 86-year-old was seen getting his groove on under the disco ball in the ballroom. COMMUNITY BUILDERS: The founder of Sher, an organization for queer South Asians and their allies, and Dignity House, an initiative to provide affordable housing for the LGBT seniors, Alex Sangha was one of eight community builders cited at the second Pride Legacy Awards. Sangha, a gay writer, was cited in the safe spaces category.Yours truly hosted the second annual awards at the Roundhouse Community Centre, presented by the Vancouver Pride Society and created to honour outstanding individuals who have made significant contributions to Metro Vancouver’s LGBT communities.The other seven winners were: Martin Rooney (sexual health), Dean Nelson (sports), Carl Meadows (volunteer), Dave Deveau (arts), Chris Morrisey (leadership), Andrew Shopland (youth) and Ron Dutton, recipient of the lifetime achievement award for his longstanding work chronicling the city’s queer history.

Carl Meadows (volunteer) and Alex Sangha (safe spaces) were among eight individuals celebrated for their significant contributions to Metro Vancouver’s LGBT community.

Pride Legacy Award nominee Mz. Adrien, right, and Joan-E were among 200 community members in attendance at the Roundhouse for the annual celebration of community heroes.

Paintertainment models from left, Ani Tchakarova, Jenya Dudley and Kianna Lopes dressed in holiday-costumes flanked a shirtless Santa at the annual Zajac Foundation fundraiser.

World-renowned scientist Dr. John Esdaile created the Arthritis Research Centre in 2000 in Vancouver, which is led by executive director Shauneen Kellner.

From left, Zajac Foundation director Tom Wong and wife Selma enjoy the evening’s festivities with Mel Zajac, founder of the Zajac society and ranch for kids living with a life-threatening condition/illness.

PAIN RELIEF: Society darling Naz Panahi once again fronted the second ARThritis Soirée, which she founded in support of the Arthritis Research Centre of Canada. More than 200 guests — business and community leaders, doctors and other health care professionals — gathered with an appreciation for art and a desire to support arthritis research. Sophie Lui and yours truly emceed the standup affair. Guests enjoyed an evening of fabulous hors d’oeuvres, drinks and photographic art, while contributing to ARC’s efforts to finding answers and saving lives of those living with arthritis and chronic pain. An impressive $248,000 was generated. Notables in attendance included ARC executive director Shauneen Kellner and ARC creator and scientific director Dr. John Esdaile. More than 600,000 British Columbian’s are living with more than 100 types of arthritis.

email yvrflee@hotmail.com twitter @FredAboutTown

Chef Robert Clark helped bring in the first freshoff-the-boat spot prawns to False Creek Fisherman’s Wharf to kick off the much-anticipated six-week spot prawn season.

ARC supporters, from left, Laurie Cavanaugh, and Lauren and Maureen Ilich, were among attendees at the second annual ARThritis Soirée at the Vancouver Club, which raised $248,000 benefitting the Arthritis Research Centre.


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4

ExoticCourier

Employees from Royal Oak Safeway celebrating results of the April campaign.

On behalf of our generous customers and employees, Safeway presented a cheque for $534,046 to Easter Seals Canada. 100% of all dollars raised will benefit Easter Seals programs in your province. Safeway’s support of Easter Seals provides memorable camp opportunities for over 1,000 disabled children throughout Western Canada and Ontario.

Courier reader: Kathi Prochotsky and Harold Catt Destination: Turkey Favourite memories of trip: A two-week tour of Turkey took Kathi and Harold to the town of Selcuk Ephesus where the city planners installed the sewer, water and heating systems prior to building the massive port city, which today is a 30-minute drive from the Agean Sea. Other favourite experiences included was crawling around the underground city of Kaymakli and reading the Courier in front of the Library of Celsus. Send your Exotic Courier submissions with your name, travel destination, a high-res scenic photo featuring the Courier and a short description of the highlights of your trip to letters@vancourier.com.

Aging has never looked better.

PARC Retirement Living has taken a healthy approach to becoming BC’s leading provider of independent living focused on active aging. Introducing Independent Living+, providing exclusive programs and classes to stimulate body and mind, along with nutritional, health and wellness expertise. Aging never looked so good. Learn more at our Health & Wellness Open House May 22 – 25, 2014 at PARC Retirement Living residences Visit parcliving.ca for more details

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F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Arts&Entertainment

A19

GOT ARTS? 604.738.1411 or events@vancourier.com

1 May 16-20, 2014 1. Pacific Theatre closes out its 30th season in fine form with a remount of actress/playwright Lucia Frangione’s sexy, provocative and challenging Espresso May 16 to June 14. Sarah Rodgers directs this tale of three fiery women who “find humour and grace in the aftermath of a violent car crash that threatens to take from them the one man they all love.” For tickets and details, go to pacifictheatre.org. 2. Local rock dudes Pigeon Park bring their gritty, blues-infused grooves and love of brick walls to the Imperial May 16 with guests The Post War and Cobra Ramone. Tickets at Zulu, Red Cat Records and eventbrite.ca. 3.The British Columbia Boys Choir performs a sure-to-be debauchery-filled 45th Anniversary Gala Concert, May 18, 3 p.m. at the Chan Centre. And what do you know, the concert coincides with the launch of their book A Song to Remember: 45th Anniversary Memoirs.Tickets at Ticketmaster (1-855-985-2787) or at the Chan Centre. Details at bcboyschoir.org. 4. American performance poet and twotime Individual World Poetry Slam Champion Buddy Wakefield brings his sizable cred and smoothened head (see how we rhymed that?) to Cafe Deux Soleils May 18, 8 p.m. as part of his Riled Up and Wasted on Light world tour.We have it on good authority that he’s a big deal in the spoken word world. So there you go, daddy-o.Tickets $10 at the door.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4

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Arts&Entertainment KUDOS & KVETCHES Build it and we will flog it

When this city’s most awesome and buzz-worthy blogs aren’t singing the praises of the Vancouver Aquarium (on the same day, no less), you can often find them singing the praises of new condo developments — sometimes they’re even provided accommodations in said condo developments. What fun. It’s a sweet and cozy racket to say the least.Which is why K&K is starting its own condo-flogging series called “Keeping it Realty” in hopes of attracting sponsorship, goodies, a free meal at Chronic Taco or whatevs. First stop on the shill express: Mount Pleasant’s way-cool Rize development. Last weekend, we put on our favourite Hall and Oates T-shirt, dusted off our fixie bike and took a spin to Broadway and Main Street. The ride was sweeter than chillaxing to the last Beach House album on a sunny day at Dude Chilling Park. Why? Because we discovered this rad-looking construction site between Main

and Kingsway. It’s the future home of the 21-storey Rize development, which to the best of our knowledge has the support of the entire neighbourhood. And even if there has been some grumblings, we prefer not to let haters kill our vibe and unwavering positivity.That’s just how we roll. Cycling the perimeter of the construction site like a yarn-bomber around a parking meter, we realized that the marketers of the Rize condo development really, really get us.They understand our plight to carve out our own unique and bitchin’ identity in this world of conformity and stuff. “We believe in pushing further and doing better” read one of the placards adorning the wicked chain link fence, to which we replied between sips of our cold-pressed, organic juice cleanse, “Totally.” Another message read, “Embrace passion, soul, craft and craftsmanship,” which at first made us wonder what the difference was between craft and craftsmanship, but then we got distracted by this dude who we thought was

Justin Vernon from Bon Iver but turned out to be a barista who once sold us unbleached filters for our Chemex coffee urn. However, the sign that really struck home was the one that said, “Stand apart and stand for something.” Even though we’re not entirely sure how buying one of the Rize condos is going to make us stand apart from the people who purchased the other 257 condo units in the behemoth development, complete with 7,295 square feet of commercial space, 399 parking stalls and 350 bicycle stalls (bikes rock!), we are confident in our individuality, or at least the sense of individuality that comes from buying a kickass condo in the sky with exposed brick walls (cross our fingers) in a hip and happening neighourhood that isn’t Fraser Street, Chinatown or Hastings Sunrise… because gross. Unless of course, there’s a condo development marketer in any of those up-and-coming neighbourhoods who wants to enlighten us on how awesome they are. Hint, hint. Until then, keep it realty, Vancouver. Peace out. twitter.com/KudosKvetches

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F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Arts Club courts chaos

—The Telegraph

EVERY SHOW FROM

$29! the cast. photo by david cooper

Arts&Entertainment

“It will help you look on the ‘Bright Side of Life’”

NOW PLAYING

FIRST WEEK SOLD OUT!

Monty Python’s Spamalot spreads silliness across Stanley stage

PLAYING AT

THEATRE We travelled down travelled down the We rabbit the rabbit hole hole... . . .

Christine Lyon

clyon@nsnews.com

Things have been getting awfully silly inside the Arts Club Theatre rehearsal hall. In the weeks leading up to the company’s production of Monty Python’s Spamalot, director Dean Paul Gibson was surrounded daily by a motley crew of cross-dressers, evil bunny rabbits, Laker Girls, tap dancers, actors speaking in exaggerated French accents and knights who say “Ni!” “It is tight quarters, let me tell you,” Gibson says of the small — and very crowded — hall. But work is never dull. “It’s the best kind of chaos — entertaining chaos.” The promotional poster describes the musical as “lovingly ripped off” from the 1975 film Monty Python and the Holy Grail, which parodies the legend of King Arthur. Conceived by Eric Idle, a founding member of the British comedy troupe, the original Spamalot production opened in 2005 and earned three Tony Awards, including Best Musical. When it comes to the Arts Club production, Gibson maintains an if-it-ain’tbroke-don’t-fix-it philosophy. “It’s successful, so let it be. Just do it well.” He has steered clear of doing anything that might mess with the Python brand. After all, it’s the troupe’s enduring style of surreal humour that allowed Spamalot to succeed three whole decades after the release of the movie on which it’s based. “It’s a silly, silly brand. I just think that it’s downright stupidly fun,” Gibson says, noting the unique way the

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ONE FOR ALL: Jay Hindle, David Marr, Josh Epstein and Jonathan Winsby appear in the Arts Club’s

production of Monty Python’s Spamalot at the Stanley Theatre until June 29.

Pythons manage to veer from slapstick to “what the hell’s going on?” moments to socio-political digressions. The sketch comedyTV show Monty Python’s Flying Circus ran from 1969 to 1974. In addition to Holy Grail, other film credits include And Now for Something Completely Different (1971), Monty Python’s Life of Brian (1979) and Monty Python’s The Meaning of Life (1983). The five surviving members are set to reunite for 10 live performances in London this July.Tickets to the first show sold out in 43 seconds — an indication of the Pythons’ continued popularity, Gibson says. He believes that Spamalot has enjoyed such success over the last 10 years not just because of its absurd Pythonesque humour, but also because it is a very well done musical. “[The creators] understand what the whole genre is, the framework of a good musical,” he explains, add-

ing that the show also manages to poke fun at Broadway theatrical conventions. “They’re not being particularly earnest about it all; the irreverence is fantastic.” The songs are extremely catchy, Gibson adds, expecting that guests will leave the theatre whistling. Some numbers, such as “The Song that Goes Like This” and “I’m Not DeadYet,” were written specifically for the musical; others are from the Holy Grail movie; and the fan favourite “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life” was originally featured at the end of Life of Brian. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Arts Club Theatre and, coincidentally, Gibson’s 50th birthday.When Arts Club artistic managing director Bill Millerd approached Gibson last year to direct a show for the 50th season, he jumped at Spamalot. “I just immediately knew right away that I wanted to be involved with Spamalot

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because I grew up with the Python people, the Flying Circus, and that was all part of my youth.” Born in Scotland, Gibson left the British Isles with his family when he was five years old and settled in White Rock. But he didn’t leave behind his appreciation for British comedy. In fact, he recalls re-enacting John Cleese’s famous “Dead Parrot” sketch in school. “I grew up understanding that sense of humour.” But he stresses that Spamalot is not just for people like himself who were raised on Monty Python skits and movies.The show will also appeal to musical theatre lovers and, for those unfamiliar with the Pythons, Gibson is hopeful this production will create some new fans. “I certainly hope that they’re entertained as much as I have been in the rehearsal hall.” Monty Python’s Spamalot runs until June 29 at the Stanley Theatre.Details at artsclub.com.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4

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Sweetness in suburbia

Vancouver’s outer limits a treat for sweet tooths SWEET SPOT Eagranie Yuh

thewelltemperedchocolatier.com

Vancouver gets all the praise for its food scene, but let’s be honest — there’s plenty to taste north of Burrard Inlet and east of Boundary Road. If you needed a reason to visit West Vancouver or Burnaby Heights, here are three spots to whet your appetite.

Dundarave Village gets a Temper

If you haven’t heard of Steven Hodge before, that’s OK. Chances are you’re already familiar with his work. Before opening Temper

Pastry this January, Hodge spent nearly five years with Thomas Haas; before that, three years in some of London’s top kitchens (including Gordon Ramsay’s three-Michelin-starred Royal Hospital Road) and eight years in California. But there’s no place like home. “It’s funny,” says Hodge, who grew up in Dundarave Village. “When I first announced it, there were skeptics that said ‘Oh, Dundarave, it’s slow and old. Are you sure you don’t want to go downtown?’” Hodge was, and is, sure. In fact, the shop has already outgrown its kitchen and he’s looking for production space elsewhere.

There’s a story behind everything on the Temper menu. Charlie Bites, named after his daughter, started as a way to use up croissant scraps but are so popular they merit their own dough. A bourbonvanilla confection comes from Hodge using a vanilla pod as a swizzle stick in an after-work drink — and the resulting chocolate explodes with an extravagance of vanilla beans that I’ve never encountered in this city. This summer, Dundaravians can look forward to Temper’s liquor license — and a patio. Temper Pastry (2409 Marine Dr.,WestVancouver) Continued next page


F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A23

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2 1. Christophe Bonzon takes chocolate and pastries to new heights at Chez Christophe Patisserie Chocolaterie. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET 2. Ron and Roberta LaQuaglia have the scoop on ice cream sundaes and handmade sodas at Glenburn Soda Fountain and Confectionery. PHOTO LARRY WRIGHT

Might as well go for a soda Sweet Heights in Burnaby

In Burnaby Heights, Hastings Street feels like a calmer, friendlier Vancouver. Short buildings, hand-lettered signs, family-run shops. In other words, a neighbourhood. That’s exactly why Christophe Bonzon moved here. “For me, it reminds me of Switzerland,” he says. “When you go to small businesses, you know the owner, they know their customers.” The Swiss-born Bonzon has worked in boutique pastry shops in France, Switzerland and Australia for 16 of his 31 years. Most recently, he was the pastry chef at CinCin. In 2013, he and his wife, Jess, opened Chez Christophe Patisserie Chocolaterie; he runs the kitchen and she runs the café. Bonzon makes everything in-house, including the exceptional puff pastry in the tonka-coffee mille-

feuille. And it’s worth a visit just for the flutes; they look like breadsticks, taste like butter, and shatter into flaky fireworks. “In Switzerland it’s a common snack with a glass of wine,” he explains. Given the extensive menu — vienoisseries, cakes, chocolates, flutes — I ask if he plans to do ice creams this summer. He says no. “There’s a great soda place just a few blocks down from us.” Chez Christophe Patisserie Chocolaterie (4712 Hastings St., Burnaby)

Soda Jerks on Hastings Street

Bonzon is referring, of course, to Glenburn Soda Fountain and Confectionery.Walking into the shop, you feel like you’ve stepped back in time. Soda jerk and owner Ron LaQuaglia strides from vintage soda machine to counter, delivering ice cream sundaes and handmade sodas with a grin.

All the toppings and syrups are made in-house from local fruit and, where possible, local nuts. Pie comes from The Pie Hole in Vancouver, ice cream from Birchwood Dairy in Abbotsford and sorbet from Rocky Point Ice Cream in Port Moody. Ron and his wife Roberta (operations manager for the Vancouver Farmers Market society) have lived in Burnaby Heights since 2006. “We wanted to bring something that would be a benefit to the community,” he says. “People are bringing in their kids, young kids. Twenty years from now we may be gone but that kid’s 25, 26 and they’ll say, ‘Remember when we used to go to Glenburn?’To be able to provide those memories for people is really important for us.” Glenburn Soda Fountain and Confectionery (4090 Hastings St., Burnaby) twitter.com/eagranieyuh

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A24

THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4

BECOME A VITAMIN VIP Say hello to Vitamin VIP, an on-site, virtual VIP room you can think of as an extra indulgence—all of our Vitamin Daily content, plus exclusive giveaways, videos and more. Become a VIP member today at www.vitamindaily.com/vip-room

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FARE ISLE: CULINARY TOUR OF MAUI By Anya Georgijevic

Breakfast, lunch, dinner, dinner redux: with all the eating we did in Maui, it was a miracle we can still fit into our jeans. E ài kākou ... let’s eat! Read the full travel dose at www.vitamindaily.com

TRAVEL & LEISURE

KANAKA: GASTOWN’S NEW TIKIBAR By Adrienne Matei

Gastown’s got a tiki bar. It’s open till 2 a.m., Wednesday to Sunday, underneath (and affiliated with) Blacktail Florist. It’s called Kanaka —a Polynesian term for a local.

DINNING & NIGHTLIFE

Find our tiki drink picks at www.vitamindaily.com

HELLO DOLLY! By Sarah Bancroft

Last Saturday we set the alarm for the 7 a.m. pre-opening of Vancouver’s first American Girl store. With blankie and bedhead, my five-year-old daughter Charlotte watched in awe as her new doll got a flip ponytail at the in-store salon. Read more from the Sarah File at www.vitamindaily.com

START NOTHING: 0:02 a.m. to 2:58 a.m. Monday, 3:12 p.m. Tuesday to 5:18 a.m. Wednesday, and 11:26 p.m. Thursday to 9:01 a.m. Friday. PREAMBLE: I’ve noticed over the years that some Pisces people seem unconcerned with inheritances. In two separate instances recently — one a friend, one a client, one male, one female —upon the death of their spouses, found themselves without a will. Both, with hardly a blink of an eye, simply gave up the inheritance to their dead spouse’s children. Both Pisceans had been in a long-term marriage — the shortest was 17 years. The man, G.K., spent an hour during dinner listening to my urgings that he simply let the law abide. He would not. He thought it was both generous and decent that his three stepchildren were going to let him stay in the matrimonial home for six whole months before turfing him out.

A busy but not important month begins Tuesday, a month of errands, visits, communications, paperwork and casual acquaintances. Be curious, ask questions, seek variety. This is an easy week. Be ambitious Sunday. You’re good at expressing yourself this day, so even if the office’s closed, write a superior a note, a proposal. Friends gather Monday/Tuesday — wishes come true, life breathes joy, entertainment and light romance are recommended!

A month of depths, secrets, research, lust and health ills ends Tuesday. In its place come four weeks of gentle love, compassion, understanding, far travel, higher education and cultural rituals. Another change occurs: three months of delay in relationships (truly, in your decisiveness about relationships) ends. If male, you might feel newly energized sexually; if female, you can feel men are finally aware of you.

Your energy and charisma remain high, Taurus, but a subtle downshift from 4th to 3rd occurs Tuesday, as you enter a month of earnings, buying and selling, possessions, rote learning, and sensual attractions. If you’re married, let these sensual beauties be flowers in the garden, or a vacation in nature; if single, enjoy, but realize a love affair started now probably won’t make a passionate marriage.

A time of open, honest relationships ends Tuesday, when a month begins that emphasizes the private, even secret, side. Actions here have long-range consequences, so ponder before you act. Your intuition will be high. Generally, if you feel a calm nudge to do something, do it; if you waver between choices, do nothing. Wavering means your intuition has fled.

Take care of any last duties or tasks Sunday to Tuesday. These won’t go so well Sunday but they do Monday/ Tuesday, especially in legal, travel and communications zones. Someone might show they love you or are attracted. On Monday, Mars goes direct, ending three months of “weakened” testosterone/romance, and Tuesday boosts your presence, magnetism, energy and clout for a month.

Charge ahead with practical chores Sunday —especially those that involve money (spending or selling). Your path will be smooth — a lot like this easy, peaceful week. (Well, I’m ignoring the midnight hour Friday, pre-dawn Saturday.) Friends, errands, calls and visits, paperwork and variety fill Monday/Tuesday. Charge ahead, except Tuesday. morning.

A relationship can go either way Sunday, Cancer — be cheerful and hope for the best. Avoid political or philosophical arguments. A late (and minor) wish could come true Monday/Tuesday also, when contacts slide into intimacy or business associations meet deep pockets, funding is available. Otherwise, Mon./Tues. are for research or health diagnoses.

Your energy and charisma stay high Sunday, so act. You’ll succeed, especially in creative, romantic, childrearing and speculative or sports venues. Monday/ Tuesday help you find bargains, sell items, find clients or angle for a pay raise. Two things happen these two days: 1) a month of work and health concerns begins; 2) your career, which has been left hanging since early March, now (to late July) finally proceeds to an “answer.”

A serious month ends Tuesday and a fun month begins. Work hard Sunday to clear up any neglected chores. Your efforts will be noted by higher-ups or will simply succeed. Exciting new horizons, fresh opportunities and relationships arrive Monday/Tuesday. Don’t seek agreement Tuesday morning: otherwise, all’s good.

Be still and contemplative Sunday, Aquarius. Think about where you’ve been and where you want to go. Align your direction for the future. Decide who and what should stay in your life and who/what should be abandoned. You’ll make the right decisions this day. Your energy and charisma surges upward Monday/Tuesday. Impress people, ask favours, lead others — you’ll be noticed and will get your way.

Sunday’s for romance, creativity, beauty, pleasure but it also gives you one last splendid chance to pursue gentle love, wisdom, far travel, cultural venues, higher education, insurance, publishing and intellectual pursuits. Two changes occur early this week: one, three months of delays in earnings, buying, end – you can push forward now (right into late July).

A restless period ends and a “down home” month begins. Travel, communicate Sunday; contact friends — you’ll be pleased by your popularity and you might gain a truthful view of your future. Relax, rest and retreat into sweet solitude Monday/ Tuesday. Contemplate, plan and look ahead. Money delays (since March) dissolve now to late July. Financial answers and actions flow swiftly.

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Monday: Pete Townshend (69). Tuesday: Cher (68). Wednesday: Mr. T (62). Thursday: Ginnifer Goodwin (36), Friday: Jewel (40). Saturday: Bob Dylan (73). Sunday: Mike Myers (51).


F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A25

Sports&Recreation

GOT SPORTS? 604.630.3549 or mstewart@vancourier.com

New again: Schneider returns to the C’s John Schneider managed theVancouver Canadians in 2011 and is back for 2014 CANADIANS Megan Stewart

mstewart@vancourier.com

The new manager of the Vancouver Canadians isn’t all that new. Earlier this year John Schneider was appointed to the club, which he helmed in 2011 when the C’s won the first of three Northwest League championships. Except he wasn’t withVancouver for the win. Schneider missed the last three weeks of the regular season and then the entire post-season because he was needed in New Jersey for a pressing personal matter, a divorce. This summer, Schneider intends to see the season through from start to finish. “It’s something that I expected to do last time and am looking forward to this time, hopefully with the same outcome,” he said Wednesday on the phone from his home in Florida. “I don’t know if I can say it’s unfinished business, but I’m definitely looking forward to 77 games and hopefully the playoffs with this team.” When he joined the Canadians in 2011, Schneider, now 34, was the youngest manager the club had known.The next season the C’s major league affiliate, the Toronto Blue Jays, shifted Schneider to the Gulf Coast League where he managed the rookies in Dunedin. In his months with the Canadians, he oversaw the slightly older group of players,

primarily ones that had been drafted from college, and he’s looking forward to their relative maturity and experience. “Being around the older guys was nice,” Schneider said, noting a manager learns with each player that progress happens differently. He comes to know “when to push the gas and when to hit the brakes a little bit.” The Blue Jays need their prospects to improve and learn the club’s system but also to adjust to the demanding home-and-away schedule of a travelling class-A team, including nine weeks of continuous baseball and the pressure of road, nooner and night games. “Getting used to playing every day is the challenge,” said Schneider. He arrives in Vancouver at the beginning of June. Clayton McCullough, the C’s manager for the past two seasons, takes on a role with the Jays minor league operations as the coordinator of instruction and will work with its six teams, including the AAA Buffalo Bisons and class-A Canadians. Schneider will be joined on the coaching staff by Dave Pano and pitching coach Jeff Ware, the Jays first-round pick in 1991, who replaces Jim Czajkowski as he moves on to the class-AA club in New Hampshire. The Canadians season begins June 13 with a five-game road series against SalemKeizer.The C’s first home game is June 18 when they host the Spokane AquaSox. twitter.com/MHStewart

John Schneider, a retired catcher, was selected by the Blue Jays in the 13th round of the 2002 draft. PHOTO LES BAZSO / THE PROVINCE

Rival bird ends T-birds’ season BASEBALL

Tyson Popoff turns a double play at second base in a 1-0 win over the Vanguard University Lions on May 12. PHOTO WILSON WONG / UBC THUNDERBIRDS

The UBC Thunderbirds baseball team had two losses to give in the opening round of the national championship Santa Clarita bracket, a doubleknockout tournament with the promise of a seat at the NAIA World Series at Harris Field in Idaho. The T-birds impressed but ultimately relinquished both games to another bird, the Hawks from San

Diego Christian College who shut them out 2-0 and then won the bracket final by a convincing margin. To reach their second game against the Hawks, UBC pulled off wins in two elimination games before meeting the Hawks in the final and losing 12-2. “As a coach, all you ask for is that your guys leave it all on the field and without a doubt, these guys did that and that’s what I’m most proud of,” said

head coach Terry McKaig. “At the end of the day, we weren’t good enough to win this tournament but we were good enough to win three games as a No. 5 seed and there’s a lot to be proud of there. I couldn’t be happier.” UBC finished with a 3513 record, and earlier in the season, McKaig registered his 500th win with the Thunderbirds program he’s been building for 17 years. — Megan Stewart with files from UBC


A26

THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4

Sports&Recreation

Evans kicks it up a notch ATHLETICS

Megan Stewart

mstewart@vancourier.com

Rhiannon Evans was patient for four years as she treated niggling muscle aches, stress fractures and pervasive fatigue. She slept a lot, skipped long runs on socalled “off” days and didn’t compete as well as she knew she could. Now in her final year of eligibility for the UBC Thunderbirds track and field team, the middle-distance runner has addressed her health concerns, which stemmed from low iron, and is ranked sixth in the 1500 metres and heading into the NAIA national championships in Alabama, May 22 to 24. (UBC is the only Canadian school registered in the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics.) Evans, a 22-year-old graduate of Point Grey secondary, ran her best time in the 1500m at the storied Mt. SAC Relays track meet in mid-April.

Rhiannon Evans, ranked No. 6 in the 1500m, will compete at NAIA nationals in two weeks. PHOTO RICH LAM / UBC THUNDERBIRDS

Going in, she was seeded somewhere in the low 100s out of 200 competitors. She placed 45th in four minutes, 30.16 seconds. “There were so many girls in the race […] It was tough from the beginning, with lots of pushing to get into position. In the first

laps, I felt boxed in and I wasn’t able to stretch out my legs and stride as well as I wanted to,” said Evans. “I just waited because sometimes in those situations you waste more energy trying to get out of a group of girls. I waited until the last 500 [metres] and it stated to thin

out a bit and I really worked hard over the last 400.” Evans has a need for speed and trains with the 800m specialists like Devan Wiebe, who is also a Point Grey alumna, and Catharine Farish. At nationals, she will be in good company. Although she is now ranked sixth, she had been No. 4 until two T-bird teammates clocked faster times. Maria Bernard, who won’t run the event in two weeks, and Natalia Hawthorn are now Nos. 4 and 5, respectively. Farish sits seventh. Evans sees herself on the podium but she won’t be disappointed if it’s one of her teammates instead. “We sometimes give each other a word of encouragement during the race. Definitely if we’re in the same heat together we will work a strategy to qualify for finals.” One of Evans’ strengths is her powerful kick at the tail end of races. It’s the same potency that is powering her break-out season in her fourth and final year. twitter.com/MHStewart

CATCH A DRIFT: Kiteboarders are now welcome at Spanish Banks. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET For the next 12 months, kiteboarders can set sail at a designated launch near the western end of Spanish Banks. Following the urging of the Squamish Windsport Society, the Vancouver park board created a specific zone and signage to accommodate the recreational kiteboarders. The launch will remain in place for one year before it’s reviewed. Kiteboarding, also

known as kitesurfing, was previously prohibited on Vancouver shorelines by the park board bylaw that reads, in part, “No person shall use, carry or possess a surfboard, windsurfer, canoe or boat in a park or on a beach.” Kiteboarders who travelled to Howe Sound or Delta to get out on the water can now take flight at Spanish Banks on days when optimal winds are blowing. — Megan Stewart


F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Sports&Recreation

A27

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UFC 115, whose main event featured heavyweights Rich Franklin and Chuck Liddell, was the fastest sellout in the league’s history. Tickets for UFC 174 aren’t selling nearly as well. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

A modest proposal for the UFC Retitling title fights might incite more ticket sales MIXED MARTIAL ARTS Andrew Fleming

afleming@vancourier.com

There’s just one month to go before Demetrious Johnson defends his flyweight championship title against challenger Ali Bagautinov as the main event at UFC 174 June 14, but there are still good seats available. A lot of seats, in fact. The Ultimate Fighting Championship made its Vancouver debut four years ago with UFC 115, and fight fans immediately made it the fastest sellout in the league’s history. UFC 131 the following year didn’t quite pack Rogers Arena, which probably had something to do with it taking place in the middle of the Canucks’ Stanley Cup final series against the Bruins, but an estimated 15,000 mixed martial arts enthusiasts still turned up to watch Junior dos Santos beat the crap out of Shane Carwin in the heavyweight division. The latest one, on the other hand, might be turning into a bit of a bust. While head honcho Dana White deserves a lot of credit for turning a sport that wasn’t even allowed in a lot of places (including Vancouver) only a few years ago into the multi-billion

dollar juggernaut it is today, he could still learn a thing or two from boxing promoter Don King when it comes to marketing. Let’s face it, a three-letter acronym followed by a number doesn’t exactly scream “must-see event.” Who can even remember, say, at what particular UFC XYZ GSP first won his belt back or when female fighters stepped into the octagon for the first time without googling it?

Fighters and fans alike deserve something punchier.

There’s a reason fight fans know what went down at Rumble in the Jungle or the Thrilla in Manila despite them occurring nearly half a century ago. I humbly submit that White should consider retitling title fights to be more memorable. Fighters and fans alike deserve something punchier. Or with a bit more kick. It’s hard to go wrong with a rhyme. Just look at gems like “Showdown in Motown” (Mike Tyson vs. Andrew Golota), “Drama in Bahama” (Muhammad Ali vs.Trevor Berbick) or “the Brawl in Montreal” (Sugar

Ray Leonard vs. Roberto Duran). Unfortunately, not a lot rhymes with B.C.’s biggest city but one possibility would be “Ground Maneuvers in Vancouver,” although this risks being off the mark if the main event isn’t decided by grappling. Another option worth a shot would be to use local nicknames or geography to give us possibilities such as “War in the 604,” “Unrest in the Pacific Northwest,” “No Pity in Van City,” “Wham Bam in Vansterdam” or even “the Battle up the road from Seattle.” Using fighters’ names can also be effective. Exhibit A: “The Devil and Mr. Jones” for the 1995 middleweight bout between Vinny “Pazmanian Devil” Pazienza and Roy Jones Jr. Sadly, UFC 174’s headliners don’t provide a lot to work with; five-foot-three Demetrious Johnson is known as “Mighty Mouse” while Ali Bagautinov goes by the even sillier “Puncher King.” Using their first names could be an option though. After all, Ali vs. Frazier, Ali vs. Foreman or Ali vs. anyone really are all enshrined in the annals of sports history. It’s possible that rebranding it “Ali vs. Demetrious” might help sell a few more tickets or pay-per-view subscriptions. twitter.com/flematic

Run, cheer or volunteer! Run for the charity of your choice in the Scotiabank Charity Challnege!

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A28

THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4

Today’shomes Vancouver sees country’s biggest jump in apartment construction prices: StatsCan Emma Crawford Hampel ecrawford@biv.com

Construction prices for apartment buildings in the Vancouver census metropolitan area (CMA) increased 3.2 per cent according to Statistics Canada data released May 13, which is the highest growth in the country. This is 1.7 percentage points higher than the national average of 1.5 per cent. Manley McLachlan, president of the British Columbia Construction Only one in five strata corporations have agreed to acquire depreciation reports. PHOTO DARREN KIRBY

Condo owners ignoring depreciation reports Frank O’Brien

wieditor@biv.com

Fewer than 20 per cent of the 30,000 strata corporations in British Columbia have agreed to acquire depreciation reports, which were mandated for most condominium buildings in December 2013 under the provincial Strata Property Act, Regulations and Amendments. Strata corporations can opt out of the requirement with a 75 per cent vote among members. But, nearly six months after the amendment was introduced, half of the B.C.’s stratas have ignored the amendment and fewer than one in five have signed up to get a depreciation

report done, an industry insider claims. “Anecdotal evidence is 50 per cent did nothing, by way of not voting, 15 per cent to 20 per cent ordered the report and the balance voted to exempt themselves,” said Jeremy Bramwell, president of Vancouver-based Bramwell & Associates Realty Advisors Inc., a commercial appraiser that operates one of the largest depreciation report departments in the province. The depreciation reports are meant to inform consumers of what repairs and maintenance are required for any strata building, seen as important due to the large and growing number of older condo buildings.

The requirement covers both residential and commercial stratas. Bramwell said not completing a depreciation report can prove costly. “Purchasers are looking for them to get an understanding of their long-obligations,” he said, adding it may even be difficult to get financing if there is no depreciation report in place. “Lenders who do not see a depreciation report will raise the mortgage interest rates to offset the increased risk. Higher mortgage rates will force down the offer price from the buyer as more money is required to service the loan. Or in older buildings, they may decline the loan,” Bramwell said.

Association, said this growth is a combination of increases in the costs of materials, equipment and labour. “We’ve seen a resurgence of private sector investment particularly in the Vancouver market, so there’s a lot of activity going on there,” said McLachlan. “We know that there is a significant demand for skilled labour and a lot of that demand is being generated out of northern Alberta and northern B.C., so I suspect that that’s had

an imp on labour costs, in the Lower Mainland in particular.” Calgary saw the secondlargest increase at 2.1 per cent, followed by Edmonton at 2.0 per cent. When compared with one month prior, the construction price index for apartment buildings in Vancouver increased 0.3 per cent, which is below the national average of 0.5 per cent. Calgary prices increased 0.9 per cent over the quarter – the highest increase in the country. twitter.com/EmmaHampelBIV

City sees the country’s biggest drop in new home prices Emma Crawford Hampel

ecrawford@biv.com

The price of new homes dipped in the twelve months to March, according to the New Housing Price index released by Statistics Canada earlier this month. Year-over-year, prices in Vancouver were 1.1 per cent lower than a year ago. This represents the biggest drop in the country compared with all other major cities. Ottawa-Gatineau came in second place with a decrease of 1.0 per cent. Victoria (down 0.9 per cent), Edmonton (down 0.1 per cent) and Charlottetown (down 0.4 per cent) were the only other cities where prices dropped over the year. Across the country, prices increased an average of 1.6 per cent over the same period.The strongest gains

The average new home price increased by 0.2 per cent across Canada.

were by far found in Calgary, which saw a jump of 7.5 per cent. After Calgary, the biggest increases were seen in St. CatharinesNiagara (up 3.4 per cent) and Saskatoon (up 2.9 per cent). Prices were down 0.1 per cent compared with Febru-

ary.The average new home price across the country increased 0.2 per cent over the same period, with Calgary once again posting the highest increase at 0.8 per cent.This is the third consecutive month in which Calgary led the country in price increases.

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F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

today’sdrive drive dr driv r ve e 20 Cadillac 14 CTS V-Sport

A35

Your journey starts here.

BY BRENDAN McALEER brendanmcaleer@gmail.com Tweet: @brendan_mcaleer

This new car is moving up to compete with the 5-series and the Mercedes-Benz E-class

“Some folks built like this. Some folks built like that. But the way I’m built, don’t you ever call me fat. ‘Cause I’m built for comfort, I ain’t built for speed. But I got everything, all a good girl might need.” And that’s the old Cadillac, Willie Dixon slingin’ the twelve-bar blues, black paint, chrome and a cushy suspension floatin’ you on down the road to N’Awlins and the big muddy. A car? More like a paddleboat steamer with a big ol’ grille, I reckon. It’s heady stuff but an image that faded away in the new dawn of a world-favouring agility and fuel-economy. No more land-yachts — luxury might still be big, but performance credentials are needed for true bragging rights. Mercedes-Benz had AMG. BMW had M. Cadillac had the Cimarron. Uh-oh. Happily, as part of General Motors, Cadillac also had access to the brains behind some of the fastest machinery ever to come out of Detroit. They gave Cadillac the V-series, a badge which this latest new CTS

0.99% APR # #

1

somewhat from the original CTS’s very angular profile, and the addition of “waterfall-effect” LED lighting gives the car a unique look you can spot from a mile away. At night, it looks more Blade Runner than Goodfellas. As you’d expect from a Cadillac, the front is dominated by an enormous grille, with a glassed-in emblem the size of Shaquille O’Neal’s palm. The rest of the car is actually quite reserved, from a single strong accent line running the length of the side profile to the twin integrated exhausts out back. Even the V-badge is a fairly subtle arrangement of chrome with a red slash. The wheels are 18” alloys (standard on the V-Series) and they wear sticky Pirelli rubber in a run-flat application. Pirellis tend to wear more quickly than other tires, and that’s probably a good thing here as run-flat tires often ruin the way cars ride.

mid-sized sedan wears proudly. As I flick the shifter into manual mode and drop down a gear, Willie Dixon’s voice fades out on the satellite radio and the track changes. It’s Jackie Brenston and a young Ike Turner hammering out “Rocket 88” at an uptempo speed. That song, homage to an Oldsmobile V8 that once scorched up the highways, was based on a song called “Cadillac Boogie.”You heard the man, big Caddy. Let’s boogie.

Design:

The new CTS sedan stretches out longer than the previous generation by a good four inches or so. With Cadillac’s new ATS sedan taking on the BMW 3series, this new car is moving up to compete with the 5-series and the Mercedes-Benz E-class. On looks alone, it’s certainly got the chops to do so. Cadillac’s signature straight-edged styling has evolved

Continued on page 37

G SE LL INAC T CO MP CA R IN BC

#

1

G SE LL INPA CT

#

CO M

BC SU V IN

2014 CIVIC DX Lease for

79

$

0.99% APR#

* $0 down*

freight and PDI included.

$

*

Bi-weekly on a 60 month term with 130 payments. MSRP $27,685** includes freight and PDI

Model shown: RM3H3EES

IN TE

CA R IN BC

Lease for

1.99% APR#

135* 0 down freight and PDI included. $

G SE LL INRM ED IA TE

2014 ACCORD LX

2014 CR-V LX Lease for

1

1.99% APR#

125* 0 down freight and PDI included. $

$

*

Bi-weekly on a 60 month term with 130 payments. MSRP $25,685** includes freight and PDI

Model shown: CR2E3EE

Bi-weekly on a 60 month term with 130 payments. MSRP $17,185** includes freight and PDI

Model shown: FB2E2EEX †The Civic, CR-V and Accord were the #1 selling retail compact car, compact SUV, and intermediate car respectively in BC in 2013 based on Polk 2013 Dec YTD report. ‡In order to achieve $0 down payment, dealer will cover the cost of tire/battery tax, air conditioning tax (where applicable), environmental fees and levies on the 2014 CR-V LX, Accord LX, Civic DX and Fit DX only on behalf of the customer. *Limited time bi-weekly lease offer based on a new 2014 Civic DX model FB2E2EEX. #0.99% lease APR on a 60 month term with 130 bi-weekly payments O.A.C. Bi-weekly payment, including freight and PDI, is $78.54 based on applying $800.00 lease dollars (which is deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes). Down payment of $0.00, first bi-weekly payment and $0 security deposit due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $10,210.20. Taxes, license, insurance and registration are extra. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometers. ΩLimited time bi-weekly lease offer based on a new 2014 CR-V LX 2WD model RM3H3EES. ¥1.99% lease APR on a 60 month term with 130 bi-weekly payments O.A.C. Bi-weekly payment, including freight and PDI, is $134.80 based on applying $1,250.00 lease dollars (which is deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes). Down payment of $0.00, first bi-weekly payment and $0 security deposit due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $17,524.03. Taxes, license, insurance and registration are extra. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometers. £Limited time bi-weekly lease offer based on a new 2014 Accord model CR2E3EE. €1.99% lease APR on a 60 month term with 130 bi-weekly payments O.A.C. Bi-weekly payment, including freight and PDI, is $124.79 based on applying $1,250.00 lease dollars (which is deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes). Down payment of $0.00, first bi-weekly payment and $0 security deposit due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $16,222.30. Taxes, license, insurance and registration are extra. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometers. **MSRP is $17,185 / $27,685 / $25,685 including freight and PDI of $1,495 / $1,695 / $1,695 based on a new 2014 Civic DX model FB2E2EEX / 2014 CR-V LX 2WD model RM3H3EES / 2014 Accord LX model CR2E3EE. License, insurance, registration and taxes are extra and may be required at the time of purchase. ¥/£/€/Ω/#/* Prices and/or payments shown do not include a PPSA lien registration fee of $30.31 and lien registering agent’s fee of $5.25, which are both due at time of delivery and covered by the dealer on behalf of the customer on the 2014 CR-V LX, Accord LX, Civic DX and Fit DX only. ‡/#/*/Ω/€/¥/£/** Offers valid from May 1st through June 2nd, 2014 at participating Honda retailers. Dealer may sell/lease for less. Dealer trade may be necessary on certain vehicles. Offers valid only for British Columbia residents at BC Honda Dealers locations. Offers subject to change or cancellation without notice. Terms and conditions apply. Visit www.bchonda.com or see your Honda retailer for full details.


A36

THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4

Attn: Honda Owners SAVE UP TO SA O $ They can’t leap tall buildings in a single bound, but there are plenty of reasons the Fit, Civic and CR-V are best-sellers† in BC.

100

ON YOUR SERVICE ON T EVER PAY MAE NNE W HO ND A ON

HERE’SHOWITWORKS:

2014 FIT DX Lease for

67

$

£

0.99% APR €

0 down

$

freight and PDI included.

Bi-weekly on a 60 month term with 130 payments. MSRP $16,130** includes freight and PDI Model shown: GE8G2EEX

# 2014 CIVIC DX Lease for

79

$

*

0.99% APR #

1

S E LL IN GB C C A R IN

WINTERMULTI-POINTINSPECTION SPRING MULTI-POINT INSPECTION

WITH WITH GENUINE GENUINE HONDA HONDA OIL OIL CHANGE CHANGE

freight and PDI included. Bi-weekly on a 60 month term with 130 payments. MSRP $17,185** includes freight and PDI Model shown: FB2E2EEX

2014 CR-V LX Lease for

135

$

Ω

#

1.99% APR ¥

0 down

$

freight and PDI included.

You spend: $500.00-$599.99, You save $50.00 You spend: $600.00-$699.99, You save $60.00 You spend: $700.00-$799.99, You save $70.00 You spend: $800.00-$899.99, You save $80.00 You spend: $900.00 or more, You save $100.00

0 down

$

You spend: $50.00-$99.00, You save $5.00 You spend: $100.00-$199.99, You save $10.00 You spend: $200.00-$299.99, You save $20.00 You spend: $300.00-$399.99, You save $30.00 You spend: $400.00-$499.99, You save $40.00

1

G S E LL IN PA T C O M BCC IN V U S †

Bi-weekly on a 60 month term with 130 payments. MSRP $27,685** includes freight and PDI Model shown: RM3H3EES

• Oil & filter change. Check for fluid leaks • Battery load/charging test • Inspect coolant level and freezing point • Check cooling system, inspect hoses and clamps • Inspect all brakes for wear % and condition • Inspect brake calipers, wheel cylinders and parking brake • Inspect tire wear and pressure and tire rotation • Inspect drive belt condition (if applicable)

$

88

88

*

• Top-up washer fluid • Inspect transmission fluid level, power steering fluid level (if applicable), brake fluid level, clutch fluid level (if applicable) • Inspect windshield wipers, washer jets and blades • Inspect all lights and bulbs • Inspect and lubricate door locks, latches and handles • Wash and vacuum, plus shuttle service

Reg $169.95

Ultra fuel-efficient vehicles that require 0W20 oils are additional cost.

FREE SERVICE SHUTTLE (DOWNTOWN CORE) COURTESY CAR WASH FOR ALL SERVICE CUSTOMERS

bchonda.com †The Fit, Civic and CR-V were the #1 selling retail subcompact car, car, and compact SUV respectively in BC in 2013 based on Polk 2013 Dec YTD report. ‡In order to achieve $0 down payment, dealer will cover the cost of tire/battery tax, air conditioning tax (where applicable), environmental fees and levies on the 2014 CR-V LX, Accord LX, Civic DX and Fit DX only on behalf of the customer. £Limited time bi-weekly lease offer based on a new 2014 Fit DX model GE8G2EEX. €0.99% lease APR on a 60 month term with 130 bi-weekly payments O.A.C. Bi-weekly payment, including freight and PDI, is $66.59 based on applying $1,250.00 lease dollars (which is deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes) and $1,000 consumer incentive dollars (which is deducted from the negotiated selling price after taxes). Down payment of $0.00, first bi-weekly payment and $0 security deposit due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $8,656.70. Taxes, license, insurance and registration are extra. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometers. *Limited time bi-weekly lease offer based on a new 2014 Civic DX model FB2E2EEX. #0.99% lease APR on a 60 month term with 130 bi-weekly payments O.A.C. Bi-weekly payment, including freight and PDI, is $78.54 based on applying $800.00 lease dollars (which is deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes). Down payment of $0.00, first bi-weekly payment and $0 security deposit due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $10,210.20. Taxes, license, insurance and registration are extra. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometers. ΩLimited time bi-weekly lease offer based on a new 2014 CR-V LX 2WD model RM3H3EES. ¥1.99% lease APR on a 60 month term with 130 bi-weekly payments O.A.C. Bi-weekly payment, including freight and PDI, is $134.80 based on applying $1,250.00 lease dollars (which is deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes). Down payment of $0.00, first bi-weekly payment and $0 security deposit due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $17,524.03. Taxes, license, insurance and registration are extra. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometers. **MSRP is $16,130 / $17,185 / $27,685 including freight and PDI of $1,495 / $1,495 / $1,695 based on a new 2014 Fit DX model GE8G2EEX / new 2014 Civic DX model FB2E2EEX / 2014 CR-V LX 2WD model RM3H3EES. License, insurance, registration and taxes are extra and may be required at the time of purchase. ¥/£/€/Ω/#/* Prices and/or payments shown do not include a PPSA lien registration fee of $30.31 and lien registering agent's fee of $5.25, which are both due at time of delivery and covered by the dealer on behalf of the customer on the 2014 CR-V LX, Accord LX, Civic DX and Fit DX only. ‡/#/*/Ω/€/¥/£/** Offers valid from May 1st through June 2nd, 2014 at participating Honda retailers. Dealer may sell/lease for less. Dealer trade may be necessary on certain vehicles. Offers valid only for British Columbia residents at BC Honda Dealers locations. Offers subject to change or cancellation without notice. Terms and conditions apply. Visit www.bchonda.com or see your Honda retailer for full details.

* All offers are effective until June 15, 2014. Not applicable to tire sales. Taxes not included. Environmental levies extra. °Not to be combined with other offers. January 11,2014. Please consult Kingsway Honda for more details. Please present coupon during write-up. Valid at Kingsway Honda only. Limit one per person. Coupon does not apply to prior purchases.

12th and Kingsway, Vancouver CALL 604-873-3676

Dealer # D8508

www.kingswayhonda.ca

The Spring Event. Take advantage of these fresh offers. THE 2014 SPRINTER 2500 144" CARGO VAN*: $43,560 Lease APR

%

Lease Payment * $

60 Months

$5,000 Down*

3.49

Fees and taxes extra

1

508

Includes

5,000

$

*

Discount

PLUS RECEIVE

3 years no-charge scheduled maintenance

**

When you lease or finance

THESE OFFERS VALID ONLY FROM MAY 15-31.

Sprinter Sales and Service Centre | 1502 Boundary Road, Burnaby, BC D#9916

604-676-3778 | vancouversprinter.ca

© 2014 Mercedes-Benz Canada Inc. Lease offer based on 2014 2500 Cargo 144” Cargo Van MSRP is $39,900. Total price of $43,560 includes freight/PDI of $2,895, dealer admin fee of $595, air-conditioning levy of $100, PPSA up to $45.48 and a $25 fee covering EHF tires. † Additional Options, fees and taxes are extra. *Lease example (Stock #S1470596) based on $508 per month (excluding taxes) for 60 months. Lease price already includes $5,000 cash discount. Promotional Lease APR of 3.49% applies on approved credit for well qualified buyers. Down payment or equivalent trade of $5,000, plus first payment and applicable taxes due at lease inception. Cost of borrowing is $4,550. Total obligation is $39,804. **Three years of scheduled maintenance covers the first 3 factory scheduled maintenance services or 3 years, whichever comes first; and is available only through finance and lease through Mercedes-Benz Financial Services. Scheduled maintenance interval for model year 2014 Mercedes-Benz Sprinter is the earlier of 1 year or 25,000 km. The specific maintenance services included are described in the applicable Owner’s/Operator’s Manual and Service/ Maintenance Booklet. Offer is non-transferable, non-refundable and has no cash value. Certain limitations apply. †Vehicle license, insurance, and registration are extra. Dealer may lease or finance for less. Offers may change without notice and cannot be combined with any other offers. See your authorized Mercedes-Benz Sprinter dealer for details or call the Mercedes-Benz Sprinter Customer Care Centre at 604-676-3778. Offer valid until May 31, 2014.


F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A37

today’ tod toda t to oda o d sdrive Continued from page 35

Environment:

While longer than the outgoing car, the CTS is still smaller inside than other offerings in the class.The back seats aren’t exactly cramped, but the Cadillac falls behind both BMW and Mercedes in terms of total passenger volume, including trunk space. Beyond that, it’s very nicely laid-out, with carbon-fibre trim and very comfortable seats. Fit and finish is up to a competitive level, and it looks great in here. Or at least it does when clean. Cadillac’s CUE system takes a bit of getting used to as it’s less intuitive than some of the other infotainment options on the market, but between the steering-wheel-mounted redundant controls and voice commands, mastering it isn’t too bad. Some of the haptic functions remain frustrating — like the volume slider — but the rest is workable. If you have the car for a week, you’ll only just be getting used to it; after a month, I’d imagine it’d be second nature. But do yourself a favour: keep a microfibre cloth and/or detailing spray in the glove box as the glossy surface collects fingerprint smudges and fluff like crazy.

Performance:

Spec’ing the V-sport version of the CTS gets you the upgraded brakes and rim sizes you might find in the German brands. It also gives you a twin-turbocharged 3.8L V6 cranking out 420hp. The V6 purrs along on the highway, usually netting around 8.5L/100kms, and then transforms the car into a backroad barnburner. Chevy makes such good V8s you sort of wonder why this car doesn’t have one, but the twinturbo six sounds angelic and hauls like a demon. I’ll take it. Forget all the lead-sled slow-rolling of the past, this isn’t the car once desired by the characters of Tin Men, this is a lightweight creation of magnesium and aluminum that weighs a good 10 per cent

less than the equivalent BMW 5-series. It storms to 100km/h in four and a half seconds, pulls nearly a full G on the skidpad and carves up a backroad with stiletto precision. The steering is electric power-assist, but whoever did the programming on it deserves a medal. It’s excellent, and gives the CTS life beneath your fingertips. The eight-speed transmission is slightly more of a mixed bag. The paddleshifters aren’t quite as quick as they could be so better to choose one of the four selectable automatic modes and let the computer set the gear for you. Also, in “Touring” mode, the eight-speed sometimes doesn’t hold onto top gear long enough. With this much power, there’s no need to drop down a gear suddenly under gentle acceleration. Quibbles aside, this is one of the best driving experiences you can get from a luxury sedan without shelling out huge money for an M5 or Mercedes AMG. It’s built for speed and, as far as the comfort side of things goes, the ride would be just about perfect if the tires weren’t run-flats.

The Cadillac’s steering is electric power-assist, but whoever did the programming on it deserves a medal. It’s excellent, and gives the CTS life beneath your fingertips.

FINANCING

HURRY! INVOICE PRICING ENDS MAY 31ST Dealer is reimbursed a holdback amount included in invoice price by the manufacturer for each vehicle sold.

*

Powerful engine; great chassis dynamics; strong styling.

Stop Sign:

$14,995

Limited model shown♦ Selling Price: $23,799

OWN IT FOR

2014

ELANTRA L DEALER INVOICE PRICE:

$

16,397

$

PLUS

WITH

0%

79

$

FINANCING FOR 96 MONTHS

BI-WEEKLY PAYMENT

AND

0

2011 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS

SILVER, ALLOYS, HEATED SEATS, SUNROOF STK#HY10738

DOWN

$13,995

ELANTRA L MANUAL. DEALER INVOICE PRICE INCLUDES $1,197 IN PRICE ADJUSTMENTSΩ, FEES (UP TO $499), DELIVERY AND DESTINATION.

PLUS HST.

OR

2014

STEP UP TO THE WELL EQUIPPED ELANTRA GT FOR AN EXTRA

ELANTRA GT L

Features:

Green Light:

2013 HYUNDAI ACCENT GL

GREY, HATCHBACK, AUTO PWR GROUP,A/C STK#HY10747

HWY: 5.3L/100 KM CITY: 7.6L/100 KM▼

HWY: 5.8L/100 KM CITY: 8.5L/100 KM▼

Navigation is standard on the CTS V-Sport, as are a host of driver aids including backup camera, rear-traffic assist and blind-spot monitoring.You also get an enormous sunroof, heated and ventilated front seats and a colour heads-up display. Fuel economy is officially rated at 13.5L/100kms in the city and 8.4L/100kms on the highway. The CTS hits the highway figure without breaking a sweat.

0

%

+

*

17

$

ELANTRA GT L MANUAL. $96 BI-WEEKLY AT 0.9%† FOR 96 MONTHS WITH $0 DOWN.

BI-WEEKLY

DEALER INVOICE PRICE INCLUDES $862 IN PRICE ADJUSTMENTSΩ, FEES (UP TO $499), DELIVERY AND DESTINATION.

FEATURES INCLUDE: AIR CONDITIONING ■ AM/FM/ SIRIUS XM™/CD/MP3 6-SPEAKER AUDIO SYSTEM ■ ABS W/ ELECTRONIC BRAKE FORCE DISTRIBUTION ■ ELECTRONIC STABILITY CONTROL (ESC)

DEALER INVOICE PRICE:

SE w/ Tech model shown♦ Selling Price: $26,727

HWY: 7.3L/100 KM CITY: 10.2L/100 KM▼

19,182

$

2014

DEALER INVOICE PRICE:

SANTA FE SPORT

PLUS

OWN IT FOR

WITH

BI-WEEKLY PAYMENT

FINANCING FOR 96 MONTHS

136 0.9

$ Limited model shown♦ Selling Price: $38,448

PLUS GET

%†

AND

0

$

DOWN

2011 HYUNDAI GENESIS V6 TECH BLACK, NAVIGATION, BACK UP CAMERA STK#HY10731

PLUS HST.

$22,995

27,278

$

PLUS HST.

SANTA FE SPORT 2.4L FWD. DEALER INVOICE PRICE INCLUDES $1,316 IN PRICE ADJUSTMENTSΩ, FEES (UP TO $499), DELIVERY AND DESTINATION.

0% FINANCING FOR 96 MONTHS †

5-year/100,000 km Comprehensive Limited Warranty†† 5-year/100,000 km Powertrain Warranty 5-year/100,000 km Emission Warranty

2012 HYUNDAI SANTA FE GL 3.5 BLACK, ALLOYS, A/C, PWR GROUP STK#HY10751

$23,995

HyundaiCanada.com

The Hyundai names, logos, product names, feature names, images and slogans are trademarks owned by Hyundai Auto Canada Corp. †Finance offer available O.A.C. from Hyundai Financial Services based on a new 2014 Elantra L 6-Speed Manual/Elantra GT L 6-Speed Manual/Santa Fe Sport 2.4L FWD with an annual finance rate of 0%/0.9%/0.9% for 96 months. Bi-weekly payments are $79/$96/$136. $0 down payment required. Cost of Borrowing is $0/$711/$1,009. Finance offer includes Delivery and Destination of $1,595/$1,595/$1,795, fees, levies, and all applicable charges (excluding HST). Finance offer excludes registration, insurance, PPSA and license fees. Delivery and Destination charge includes freight, P.D.E. and a full tank of gas. ‡Dealer Invoice Price of 2014 Elantra L 6-Speed Manual/Elantra GT L 6-Speed Manual/Santa Fe Sport 2.4L FWD are $16,397/$19,182/$27,278. Prices include price adjustments of $1,197/$862/$1,316 and includes Delivery and Destination of $1,595/$1,595/$1,795, fees, levies, and all applicable charges (excluding HST). Finance offer excludes registration, insurance, PPSA and license fees. The customer prices are those reflected on the dealer invoice from Hyundai Auto Canada Corp. The dealer invoice price includes a holdback amount for which the dealer is subsequently reimbursed by Hyundai Auto Canada Corp. Price adjustments are calculated against the vehicle’s starting price. Price adjustments of up to $1,197/$862/$1,316 available on in stock 2014 Elantra L 6-Speed Manual/ Elantra GT L 6-Speed Manual/Santa Fe Sport 2.4L FWD. Price adjustments applied before taxes. Offer cannot be combined or used in conjunction with any other available offers. Offer is non-transferable and cannot be assigned. No vehicle trade-in required. Price of models shown (with Price Adjustments): 2014 Elantra Limited/Elantra GT SE Tech 6-Speed Automatic/Santa Fe 2.0T Limited AWD are $23,799/$26,727/$38,448. Prices include Price Adjustments of $1,445/$1,667/$2,446, Delivery and Destination charges of $1,595/$1,595/$1,795 fees, levies, and all applicable charges (excluding HST). Prices exclude registration, insurance, PPSA and license fees. Fuel consumption for new 2014 Elantra L Manual (HWY 5.3L/100KM; City 7.6.L/100KM); 2014 Elantra GT L Manual (HWY 5.8L/100KM; City 8.5L/100KM); 2014 Santa Fe Sport 2.4L FWD (HWY 7.3L/100KM; City10.2.L/100KM) are based on Manufacturer Testing. Actual fuel efficiency may vary based on driving conditions and the addition of certain vehicle accessories. Fuel economy figures are used for comparison purposes only. †‡ Offers available for a limited time. Dealer may sell for less. Dealer order may be required. Visit www.hyundaicanada.com or see dealer for complete details. The SiriusXMTM name is a registered trademark of SiriusXM Satellite Radio Inc. All other trademarks and trade names are those of their respective owners. ††Hyundai’s Comprehensive Limited Warranty coverage covers most vehicle components against defects in workmanship under normal use and maintenance conditions. TM

BLUE, ONLY 32,300kms, NAVIGATION, BACKUP CAMERA STK#HY10752A

Infotainment can frustrate; not as spacious as others.

The Checkered Flag: A leather-lined rocket: V stands for victory.

445 Kingsway, Near 12th in Vancouver CALL 604-292-8188 | Service 604-292-8190 www.destinationhyundai.ca /DestinationHyundaiVancouver

@Destinationhyun

your journey begins here

2011 HYUNDAI SONATA HYBRID PREMIUM

$24,995


A38

THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4

today’sdrive 20 14

Your journey starts here.

Honda Civic Coupe

PLEASE READ THE FINE PRINT: Offers valid until June 2, 2014. See toyota.ca for complete details on all cash back offers. In the event of any discrepancy or inconsistency between Toyota prices, rates and/or other information contained on toyotabc.ca and that contained on toyota.ca, the latter shall prevail. Errors and omissions excepted. 2014 Corolla CE 6M Manual BURCEM-A MSRP is $17,544 and includes $1,549 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, and battery levy. *Lease example: 2014 Corolla CE 6M with a vehicle price of $17,269 (includes $275 Toyota Canada Lease Assist, which is deducted from the negotiated selling price after taxes, and $1,549 freight/PDI) leased at 0.9% over 60 months with $0 down payment equals 120 semi-monthly payments of $87 with a total lease obligation of $10,715. Lease 60 mos. based on 100,000 km, excess km charge is $.07. **Finance example: 1.9% finance for 84 months, upon credit approval, available on 2014 Corolla CE 6M. Applicable taxes are extra. 2014 RAV4 Base FWD LE Automatic ZFREVT-A MSRP is $25,689 and includes $1,819 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning federal excise tax. †Lease example: 3.9% Lease APR for 60 months on approved credit. Semi-Monthly payment is $139 with $1700 down payment. Total Lease obligation is $18,380. Lease 60 mos. based on 100,000 km, excess km charge is $.10. ††Finance example: 1.9% finance for 48 months, upon credit approval, available on 2014 RAV4. Applicable taxes are extra. 2014 Tacoma Double Cab V6 4x4 Automatic MU4FNA-A MSRP is $33,289 and includes $1,819 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning federal excise tax. ‡Lease example: 3.9% Lease APR for 60 months on approved credit. Semi-Monthly payment is $165 with $3,150 down payment. Total Lease obligation is $22,890. Lease 60 mos. based on 100,000 km, excess km charge is $.10. ‡‡Finance example: 0.9% finance for 48 months, upon credit approval, available on 2014 Tacoma. Applicable taxes are extra. ‡‡‡Up to $1000 Non-Stackable Cash Back available on select 2014 Tacoma models. Non-stackable cash back on 2014 Tacoma Double Cab V6 4x4 Automatic is $1,000. Applicable taxes are extra. Down payment, first semi-monthly payment and security deposit plus GST and PST on first payment and full down payment are due at lease inception. A security deposit is not required on approval of credit. Non-stackable Cash Back offers may not be combined with Toyota Financial Services (TFS) lease or finance rates. If you would like to lease or finance at standard TFS rates (not the above special rates), then you may be able to take advantage of Cash Customer Incentives. Vehicle must be purchased, registered and delivered by June 2, 2014. Cash incentives include taxes and are applied after taxes have been charged on the full amount of the negotiated price. See toyota.ca for complete details on all cash back offers. ‡‡‡‡Semi-monthly lease offer available through Toyota Financial Services on approved credit to qualified retail customers on most 24, 36, 48 and 60 month leases (including Stretch leases) of new and demonstrator Toyota vehicles. First semi-monthly payment due at lease inception and next monthly payment due approximately 15 days later and semi-monthly thereafter throughout the term. Toyota Financial Services will waive the final payment. Semi-monthly lease offer can be combined with most other offers excluding the First Payment Free and Encore offers. First Payment Free offer is valid for eligible TFS Lease Renewal customers only. Toyota semi-monthly lease program based on 24 payments per year, on a 60-month lease, equals 120 payments, with the final 120th payment waived by Toyota Financial Services. Competitive bi-weekly lease programs based on 26 payments per year, on a 60-month lease, equals 130 payments. Not open to employees of Toyota Canada, Toyota Financial Services or TMMC/TMMC Vehicle Purchase Plan. Some conditions apply. See your Toyota dealer for complete details. Visit your Toyota BC Dealer or www.toyotabc.ca for more details. Some conditions apply; offers are time limited and may change without notice. Dealer may lease/sell for less.

Honda pulls off a coupe de grâce with new Civic

Follow us at:

Red Tag Days are ending. $

0 D OWN PAYMENT*

(COROLLA SPORT MODEL SHOWN)

LEASE FROM *

FINANCE FROM **

semi-monthly/60 mos.

84 mos.

87

2014 COROLLA

1.9%

$

CE 6M MODEL $17,544 MSRP includes F+PDI

When the 2012 Honda Civic emerged as a new, less-expensive, de-contented model, the critics were unequivocal in their denigration. “This isn’t a proper Civic!” they cried and scurried to their keyboards to BY BRENDAN McALEER ladle out the vitriol. brendanmcaleer@gmail.com The public was aghast and Tweet: @brendan_mcaleer recoiled in horror. Like ripples in a pond, the effects of the criticisms quickly spread, and soon the Honda Civic was still the bestselling car in Canada, by a landslide, for like the sixteenth year in a row. Wait. What? Yep, even if the Emperor does occasionally doff his undergarments, Canadians still can’t get enough of the efficient Honda Civic. We’ve been smitten since the days of the CVCC, and the love affair continues even when the big H makes a gaffe. Honda, to their credit, responded to the finger-pointing with admirable rapidity and now brings out a face lifted and updated version of their perennial bestseller. Here, in the coupe, the Honda fan can find a marriage of a bit of personal style with that same sensible efficiency and durability. But has Honda done enough here to make sure they aren’t just resting on their laurels?

Design:

(RAV4 - XLE MODEL SHOWN)

2014 RAV4

FWD LE $25,689 MSRP includes F+PDI

LEASE FROM

FINANCE FROM ††

2014 TACOMA

139 1.9

$

%

semi-monthly/60 mos.

4x4 Double Cab V6 $33,289 MSRP includes F+PDI

30692

GRANVILLE TOYOTA VANCOUVER 8265 Fraser Street (604) 263-2711 6978

18732

6701

48 mos.

1,000 CASHBACK

Environment:

Learn why we're better than bi-weekly at: ToyotaBC.ca

LANGLEY TOYOTATOWN LANGLEY 20622 Langley Bypass (604) 530-3156

JIM PATTISON TOYOTA SURREY 15389 Guildford Drive (604) 495-4100

semi-monthly/60 mos.

OR UP TO ‡‡‡

% $

SEMI-MONTHLY SAVES YOU UP TO 11 PAYMENTS!

FREE FIRST OR LAST PAYMENT

. Monthly or Semi-Monthly payment options . Standard or Low Kilometre Lease . No Security Deposit

JIM PATTISON TOYOTA NORTH SHORE 849 Auto Mall Drive (604) 985-0591

FINANCE FROM ‡‡

$

‡‡‡‡

JIM PATTISON TOYOTA DOWNTOWN 1290 Burrard Street (604) 682-8881

LEASE FROM ‡

165 0.9

48 mos.

9497

OPENROAD TOYOTA RICHMOND Richmond Auto Mall (604) 273-3766

OPENROAD TOYOTA PORT MOODY 3166 St. John’s Street (604) 461-3656 7826

7825

To y o t a B C . c a

DESTINATION TOYOTA BURNABY 4278 Lougheed Highway (604) 571-4350 9374

PEACE ARCH TOYOTA SOUTH SURREY 3174 King George Highway (604) 531-2916 30377

SUNRISE TOYOTA ABBOTSFORD Fraser Valley Auto Mall (604) 857-2657 5736

REGENCY TOYOTA VANCOUVER 401 Kingsway (604) 879-8411 8507

Redesigned sheet metal might not seem like a big deal to you or me, but when we’re talking about a volumeselling car with thousands made around the globe, a dollar or two per car soon skyrockets into the millions. Happily, that’s apparently a cost Honda is willing to pay. The new 2014 Civic coupe gets an entirely new front end and a reworked rear treatment. It now looks even more differentiated from the sedan, and why else would you be buying the less-practical two-door except for stylistic reasons? Where the old one had more than a passing resemblance to a four-wheeled Dustbuster, the new Coupe looks more like a scaled-down version of the Accord Coupe. Sixteen-inch alloys are standard on this EX midrange model, and while there’s a lot of faux grille up front, the overall effect is a more aggressive little car. It’s sleek, and just a little bit interesting.

WEST COAST TOYOTA PITT MEADOWS 19950 Lougheed Highway (866) 910-9543 7662

VALLEY TOYOTA CHILLIWACK 8750 Young Road (604) 792-1167 8176

SQUAMISH TOYOTA SQUAMISH 39150 Queens Way (604) 567-8888 31003

WESTMINSTER TOYOTA NEW WESTMINSTER 210 - 12th Street (604) 520-3333 8531

Inside, the Civic Coupe’s compromises might outweigh the style benefits for the practically-minded consumer. That cut-down roof certainly shrinks the headroom, and the rear seats are for emergency use only. Still, the trunk remains a useable size, and the cabin space for the front passengers is really quite reasonable. The forward view is just as good as the sedan, although the same cannot be said for the shrunken rear window, which restricts visibility to pillbox levels. Continued on next page


F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A39

today’ toda t to tod oda o d sdrive Like all Civics, the Coupe continues its splitlevel instrumentation, which some love and some hate. Benefits include a high-mounted speedometer that removes the need for a heads-up display, and two colourchanging strips that provide instant feedback on the gas-sipping grade of your driving style. The bigger news here is the sheer level of available technology at a mid-range level. All Civic Coupes have things like heated seats, Bluetooth and streaming audio, but the volume-selling mid-range model comes with stuff like a power moonroof, leather-wrapped steering wheel, USB input, and Honda’s HondaLink system for infotainment. Then there’s stuff like the LaneWatch blind spot display. Debuting in the Accord sedan, this camerabased system shows a highresolution view of the right side of the car every time the right indicator is put on, helping to show cyclists or other obstacles lurking in your blind spot. It’s not a substitute for vigilant shoulder-checking or properly setting your mirrors, but it is a handy assist. Beyond that, the trunk is usefully-sized, though not as gargantuan as that of the Scion tC’s hatchback, and the rear seats fold with a 60/40 split.The cloth seat covering is grippy and durable and, similar to that found in the Civic Si, it’s very comfortable after hours of highway travel.

Performance:

A new exhaust system gives the Civic Coupe a very mild performance bump. The 1.8L VTECequipped four-cylinder engine now makes 143hp, and it makes it fairly high up the rev range. The major powertrain change is the addition of a CVT as the option for the automatic transmission. Honda claims that their CVT actually improves both acceleration as well as fuel economy, but often these belt-driven transmissions can sap the last vestiges of fun out of any car.

Not here though. It you’d prefer to shift your own gears, the Civic Coupe comes equipped with paddle-shifters mounted to the steering wheel and an optional S-mode for the automatic transmission. It’s no replacement for the manual transmission, which is only available as a 5-speed on base and EX models, but it does provide a little more control over proceedings. Besides that, this is a willing little car that’s a bit let down by its overly light steering. Improvements to the chassis include a new firmed-up rear stabilizer bar, and the CVT does its best to keep the engine in its modest 143hp powerband. It’s actually quite good, though not quite as much of a driver’s car as all Hondas seemed to be in the heyday of the early 1990s. Having said that, the Civic is easily capable of effortless high-speed highway travel and the light steering removes most elements of fatigue from racking up the miles. If you want zippy performance, you’re pretty much going to have to skip right up to the Si model, but the standard Civic Coupe does manage to do a good job of re-introducing some of the zip and verve that was missing from the 2012 models.

Green Light:

Improved styling; nippier handling; excellent on-board tech.

Stop Sign:

Low headroom; over boosted steering.

The Checkered Flag:

The Civic Coupe includes heated seats, Bluetooth, and front USB and auxiliary inputs.

A two-door Canadian favourite, now improved.

%

PURCHASE FINANCING

ENJOY THE DRIVING SEASON IN A NEW AWARD-WINNING MAZDA. 2014 MAZDA 3

BEST NEW SMALL CAR (UNDER $21,000)

2014 MAZDA 3 SPORT

2014 MAZDA CX-5 COMPACT UTILITY OF THE YEAR

GT model shown from $27,650

2014 M{ZD{3

$

2015 CX-5

STARTING FROM $24,990*

79 at 1.99 **

%

APR

BI-WEEKLY LEASE OFFER

2014 M{ZD{5

**

%

APR

$17,683!

2015 M{ZD{6

139 at 0.99 **

129 at 2.49

STARTING FROM $26,290*

STARTING FROM $20,490*

$

$

For 48 months. $1,550 down. Taxes extra.

For 48 months. $1,150 down. Taxes extra.

BI-WEEKLY LEASE OFFER

2012 MAZDA 3 GS

METEOR GREY, SKYACTIV, WARRANTY,WAS $18,995 STK# MP1343

GT model shown from $35,245

STARTING FROM $17,690* BI-WEEKLY LEASE OFFER

ON ALL 2014 AND 2015 MODELS

BEST NEW SMALL CAR (OVER $21,000)

%

For 48 months. $1,050 down. Taxes extra.

APR

BI-WEEKLY LEASE OFFER

$

129 at 0.99 **

%

APR

For 48 months. $1,550 down. Taxes extra.

2014 MAZDA6 CANADIAN CAR OF THE YEAR AWARD

Features:

As mentioned, the Civic Coupe includes heated seats, Bluetooth and front USB and auxiliary inputs. Move up to the EX and you get a power moonroof and the HondaLink connectivity which can use your iPhone to provide navigation functions. It’s all handled through a great-looking touchscreen, though I did find myself wishing for a volume knob. The LaneWatch blind-spot system is nicely high-resolution and points the way for great camera coverage in compact cars. Fuel economy is better than ever, thanks to the CVT, with official ratings at 6.9L/100kms city and 5.1L/100kms on the highway. More realistically, highway mileage hovers in the high fives at best.

0

UPGRADE DRIVE THIS SPRING YOUR

Continued from previous page

2010 MAZDA CX-7 GX RED, SUV, WARRANTY, WAS $18,995 STK# MP1344

$16,386!

GT model shown from $33,990

GT model shown from $26,800

REVOLUTIONARY FUEL-EFFICIENT SKYACTIV TECHNOLOGY IS CHANGING THE GAME.

Visit NEWMAZDA.CA today to browse our NEW & USED inventory.

2 TO CHOOSE FROM

ZOO}-ZOO}

†0% APR purchase financing is available on all new 2014/2015 Mazda vehicles. Other terms available and vary by model. **Lease offers available on approved credit for new 2014 Mazda3 GX (D4XK64AA00)/2015 Mazda6 GX (G4XL65AA00)/2015 CX-5 GX (NVXK65AA00)/2014 Mazda5 GS (E6SD64AA00) with a lease APR of 1.99%/0.99%/2.49%/0.99% and bi-weekly payments of $79/$129/$129/$139 for 48 months, the total lease obligation is $9,938/$14,970/$14,978/$15,537, including down payment of $1,150/$1,550/$1,550/$1,050. PPSA and first monthly payment due at lease inception. 20,000 km lease allowance per year, if exceeded, additional 8¢/km applies. 24,000 km leases available. Offered leasing available to retail customers only. Taxes extra. *The advertised price of $17,690/$24,990/$26,290/$20,490 for 2014 Mazda3 GX (D4XK64AA00)/2015 CX-5 GX (NVXK65AA00)/2015 Mazda6 GX (G4XL65AA00)/2014 Mazda5 GS (E6SD64AA00) includes a cash discount of $0/$0/$0/$3,500. The selling price adjustment applies to the purchase and is deducted from the negotiated pre-tax price and cannot be combined with subsidized purchase financing or leasing rates. All prices include freight & PDI of $1,695/$1,895 for Mazda3, Mazda6/CX-5, Mazda5. PPSA, licence, insurance, taxes, down payment and other dealer charges are extra and may be required at the time of purchase. Dealer may sell/lease for less. Dealer order/trade may be necessary on certain vehicles. Lease and Finance on approved credit for qualified customers only. Offers valid May 1 – June 2, 2014, while supplies last. Prices and rates subject to change without notice. Visit mazda.ca or see your dealer for complete details. ♦The Mazda3 2.0 Litre won the Canadian Green Car Category Award for the most efficient internal combustion engine.

2013 MAZDA 3 GX

GREY, UNDER 36,000 kms, WARRANTY, WERE $17,995 STK# MP1342 OR MP1339 FROM

$15,785!

Vancouver's Only Mazda Dealer

1595 Boundary Road, Vancouver, BC V5K 5C4 Sales: 1 (888) 513-3057 Service: 1 (866) 942-0009

newmazda.ca your journey begins here.


A40

THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, M AY 1 6 , 2 0 1 4

LONG WEEKEND SAVINGS Prices Effective May 15 to May 21, 2014.

While quantities last. Not all items available at all stores. We reserve the right to correct printing errors.

100% BC Owned and Operated PRODUCE

MEAT Blueberries from Homegrown Organic Farms, California

Organic New York Striploin Grass Fed Forage Finshed Beef Steaks

3.98

170g product of USA

Ocean Wise Wild BC Spot Prawn Tails

49.99lb/ 110.21kg

19.95lb/ 43.98kg

Organic Fair Trade Red Seedless Grapes

Asparagus from Tim Jeppesen, Armstrong, BC

3.98lb/ 8.77kg

3.98lb/ 8.77kg

product of Mexico

Ocean Wise Wild Coho Salmon Fillets

Boneless Rib End Pork Roasts

value pack

3.99lb/ 8.80kg

12.99lb/ 28.64kg

product of Canada

GROCERY

HEALTHCARE

Rogers Granola

SAVE

17%

1% or 2%

17%

assorted varieties

36%

product of Canada

Annie Chun’s Roasted Seaweed Snacks

36%

SAVE

10g

45%

product of USA/Korea

product of USA

assorted varieties 48-68g product of USA

34%

34% 2/6.98

142-213g

product of USA

28%

175-200g product of Finland

Chapman’s Ice Cream Novelties

assorted varieties 1.5L

4.59

474ml

+deposit +eco fee • product of USA

4-18 packs

product of Canada

Summer Fresh Dip

Slider, Hotdog or Hamburger Buns

variety pack

assorted varieties,

5.99

3.99 6 - 12 packs

500g

4.99

BULK

Gluten-Free Hamburger Buns assorted varieties

4.49

390-420g

Apple Squares or Nanaimo Bars

Choices’ Own Moroccan Chickpea Salad

8" Gluten-Free Frozen Pies

4.99

1.49/100g

assorted varieties

9.99

package of 3

www.choicesmarkets.com

500ml

GLUTEN FREE

xxx • product of xxx

3.99-6.99

Nature clean is completely vegetable based, without perfume, dyes or harsh preserving agents.

20% off regular retail price

440ml

xxx BAKERY

Cucina Fresca Pasta and Sauce

Nature Clean Liquid Soap Pump

Organic Whole Wheat Cous-Cous

product of USA

DELI

500ml

FROM

Santa Cruz Organic Chocolate Syrup

assorted varieties

120 capsules

This is made with the methylcobalamin form of B12 & the P5P form of B6, along with optimal levels of vitamins B5, B12, folic acid & biotin.

4.59SAVE 5.99

22%

+deposit +eco fee product of Canada

Hint Essence Water

2/3.00

2.79-3.29

FROM

60 capsules

Prairie Natural Liquid B Complex

29.99 assorted varieties

SAVE

.99

SAVE 2/7.00

SAVE

796ml product of Canada

Finn Crisp Thins

2 varieties

assorted varieties

2.49

38%

156g

Happy Planet Organic Lemonade

Annie’s Homegrown Snacks

assorted varieties

SAVE

Clif or Clif Luna Bars

assorted varieties

12.99 21.99

454g • roasted in Canada

Thomas Utopia Organic Tomatoes

SAVE 2.79

750g

SAVE 3/4.98

25

assorted varieties

SAVE 2/6.98

Designed to support liver and gallbladder function, improving your ability to digest this high quality fish oil.

SAVE 11.99-12.99 %

2L product of Canada

Way Better Tortilla Chips

Liberté Classique Yogurt

Progressive Omegessential

assorted varieties

SAVE 4.99

4.99

700-750g product of Canada

21%

Kicking Horse Organic Fair Trade Coffee

Natrel Lactose Free Milk

assorted varieties

/ChoicesMarkets

@ChoicesMarkets

Kitsilano

Cambie

Kerrisdale

Yaletown

Gluten Free Bakery

South Surrey

Burnaby Crest

Kelowna

Floral Shop

2627 W. 16th Ave. Vancouver

3493 Cambie St. Vancouver

1888 W. 57th Ave. Vancouver

1202 Richards St. Vancouver

2595 W. 16th Ave. Vancouver

3248 King George Blvd. South Surrey

8683 10th Ave. Burnaby

1937 Harvey Ave. Kelowna

2615 W. 16th Vancouver

Best Organic Produce


Vancouver Courier May 16 2014