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WEDNESDAY

April 18 2014 Vol. 105 No. 32

NEWS 3

City fears homeless count FEATURE 15

Aquarium alternatives SPORTS 24

Badminton to the bone There’s more online at

vancourier.com WEEKEND EDITION

TROUBLE BRUIN:

THE VOICE of VANCOUVER NEIGHBOURHOODS since 1908

Brian Hall-Stevenson of the group Friends of Athletics addresses the Vancouver School Board at the first of three public sessions on the preliminary 2014-2015 budget. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

School board hears public pleas

Parents tell how endangered programs saved their kids Cheryl Rossi

crossi@vancourier.com

You could have heard a pin drop more than two hours into Vancouver School Board’s public session on its preliminary budget Tuesday night. Silence fell after theatre artist Marc us Youssef told the board his “awesome, wonderful” son who’s in Grade 9 at Vancouver Technical secondary and 20 of his friends had become involved with drugs. “I don’t think we were doing a very good job as parents in dealing with it,”Youssef said. “We were kind of pretending it wasn’t

happening because it was our kid and he is really wonderful.” He described how Heather Charlton, a substance abuse youth prevention worker for secondary schools, phoned him and snapped him out of denial. “That phone call has had a profound impact on my family over the last six months,” he said. Youssef, co-chair of the city’s Arts and Culture Policy Council, told the board he’s advocated for more money for public education and understands the provincial government requires the board to balance its budget. But he said if he represented the

VSB he wouldn’t stop funding two substance abuse prevention workers in schools to save $127,000. He also would not eliminate the elementary band and strings program to save $630,651. “That would be my line,” he said. Patti Bacchus,VisionVancouver chairperson of theVSB, noted when colleagues in another school district refused to submit a balanced budget, the government appointed a trustee that immediately closed six schools. Hundreds of parents, educators, social service workers, advocates of music programs and students packed the gym at Mount Pleasant elementary school Tuesday

evening for the first of three nights of public input on the board’s preliminary budget for 2014-2015. Most opposed silencing the band and strings. Students told the board how learning to play instruments in elementary school exposed them to passions and experiences they might have otherwise missed. Parents and advocates noted band gave kids a place to fit in and a reason to attend school.They noted it would be difficult to reinstate a band and strings program once it was cut. see CUTS on page 7


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F R I DAY, A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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News Mayor braces for ‘worst case’ on eve of homeless count Mike Howell

mhowell@vancourier.com

Mayor Gregor Robertson’s promise to end street homelessness by 2015 seems unlikely now that new data releasedWednesday shows the city is more than 700 housing units short of its projected goal to have homes available for people. A combination of vacant single-room-occupancy hotel rooms under renovation and delays in opening interim housing and completing supportive housing sites, along with the cancellation of a federal housing program for mentally ill people, signals what could be a substantial rise in people living on the street in Vancouver. “That’s a lot of beds and units that are no longer available to us and just contribute to that sense of we’re starting to perhaps go backwards,” said city manager Penny Ballem in addressing council Wednesday. The mayor and city staff are expected to learn next week how many people are living on the street and in

shelters when the Metro Vancouver homeless count results are released. Ballem’s presentation to council, however, suggested she knows bad news is coming and showed two graphs put together last year that outlined the best and worst case scenarios related to the city’s strategy to end homelessness. The best case scenario for 2014 would see 1,327 people in shelters or temporary housing and 187 people on the street.The worst case scenario, which the mayor acknowledged is where Vancouver is likely headed, shows 938 people in shelters or temporary housing and 1,044 on the street. That number of street homelessness — 1,044 — would be unprecedented for Vancouver, with the highest being 811 in 2008. Last year’s count showed 273 people living on the street and 1,327 in shelters or temporary housing. The dire news delivered by Ballem comes less than two months after Robertson told reporters — after participating in March’s Metro

Vancouver homeless count — that he anticipated the city would see a decrease in homelessness this year. He based his assessment on the city’s purchase of the 95-room former Biltmore hotel and 57 rooms at a former Ramada hotel on East Hastings.The city also purchased another Ramada on Kingsway and is expected to open Taylor Manor on Boundary Road by the end of the year. In addition, nine of 14 supportive housing buildings built under an agreement involving the provincial government, the city and the Streetohome Foundation are now open.The remaining five buildings are expected to be completed this year. Altogether, the 14 buildings have more than 1,500 units. Robertson told reporters Wednesday the new data coupled with delays has changed his assessment of the state of homelessness in Vancouver, saying “it looks like a very disturbing situation emerging” and acknowledged “we’re trending now towards

The city is more than 700 housing units short of its projected goal. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

worst case [scenario].” “We’re going to need to make some urgent moves to keep on track to hit our goal to end street homelessness by 2015, which is still our goal,” said the mayor, noting Ballem’s update to council was spurred on by reports in the Downtown Eastside of people losing their housing and overflowing shelters.

NPA Coun. George Affleck said he was surprised by the timing of Ballem’s presentation, which was requested by the mayor only a day earlier. Affleck suggested the release of the new data was to lessen the impact of what is expected to be bad news for the mayor’s Vision Vancouver party when next week’s homeless numbers are released.

“They are putting their PR game together right now to deal with the fact that they are failing at their plank issue that won them the last election,” he told the Courier. “It’s a failure, it’s mismanagement on their part, it’s politics at its worst.This was an impossible promise [to end street homelessness] to make.” twitter.com/Howellings

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News

Gourmet food’s on at new VCC cafeteria

International students staff higher end teaching kitchen Jenny Peng

Jennypeng08@gmail.com

Students at Vancouver Community College are serving gourmet dishes like fried cod taco and pork belly sandwiches at a new cafeteria with an international flair. Quizine Kitchen, which opened at the East Broadway campus April 9, is the latest spin-off from its sister cafeteria in the downtown campus, long known for its below-market prices.The new cafeteria is “higher end” than cafeteria food with meals around $8. It’s run by a group of 24 international students from as far away as Turkey,Vietnam and Japan who are part of the culinary arts diploma program. “We thought we’d have a slow opening but the first day was brutal.We’re just trying to keep up, trying to find ourselves,” said instructor chef JC Felicella. The classroom kitchen was conceived by Felicella last summer when the school’s

VCC’s new cafeteria Quizine, Chef JC Felicella and student Titus Joseph (L) in the Culinary Arts program. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

cafeteria was run by a private company. After the company departed a month ago,

the school had a two-week window to refurbish the existing kitchen into one that’s

“conducive to learning.”The space boasts new circulators, evaporators, a blast freezer,

and smokers among other modern equipment. Felicella never planned to be a teacher, but after helping out with the college 14 years ago he’s stayed on and eventually became the program’s department head. “I had my restaurant [La Toque Blanche] at the same time for three years, and basically I had to make a choice.” Since Felicella closed the restaurant to focus on teaching, he says “it’s a learning curve daily.” “Chefs can be somewhat brutal... It’s my way or the highway, that’s the culture of being a chef. But things change when you’re with students,” he said. “Every teacher will tell you, it’s quite rewarding with the students, especially the ones who are truly dedicated to the craft. Keeping me fresh too. Sometimes, you get a little stale when you’re out of the industry. I don’t do that. I’m heavily involved. I challenge myself. ...There are so many young

cooks out there, I need to be a step above.” Student Titus Joseph, who’s from Singapore, was glad to see the positive response since Quizine Kitchen’s opening except for the hectic first day where customers complained about slow service. “I’m happy that people are appreciative,” he said. “Their response so far has been good. Of course, there are a few negative information [from customers]. Some of the students have never done this before so they’re not use to [cooking] under pressure.” With the program’s cultural diversity, Joseph has learned more than just cooking skills. “We’re all learning a little bit of each other’s culture. We also learn their different dietary habits.” After years of working in places like the Gobi Desert for a Canadian company, he says he’s ready to get to the basics again in the program. twitter@jennypengnow


F R I DAY, A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

News Safeway quietly tries focus on Asian food First outlet inWestern Canada to cater to niche market Jenny Peng

Jennypeng08@gmail.com

Safeway’s pilot effort to focus on Asian food at one of its Vancouver locations is sending ripples through the spending ecosystem of a neighbourhood loyal to locally owned grocery stores. After undergoing renovations last summer, the 3410 Kingsway location quietly became the first Safeway in Western Canada to adopt an ethnic food initiative. The pilot project was hatched in Safeway’s Calgary office a year before the program launch. Fiona Lui, Safeway’s manager of ethnic marketing initiative, says the program was a logical step, given that the neighbourhood is 70 per cent Asian. Safeway launched a similar program in Marpole last December. Lui added that if the pilot project is successful, more neighbourhoods could see

offerings tailored to community tastes. Aside from a banner draping across its store entrance advertising “Asian foods in every aisle,” Safeway is relying on customer feedback rather than marketing hype to determine the program’s longevity, says Lui. Many local shoppers have been loyal for decades to three smaller Asian markets situated within 200 metres of the Kingsway Safeway. “We prefer to go to the smaller stores. We don’t even park in the Safeway parking lot, we find [a] place on the road,” said Heather Galindo, who shops at nearby grocery store Consumers Produce. Galindo is one of the many shoppers who said they’re driven by price. “We like the fresh fruit, we like the variety, we like the price on things — mind you, we have to be selective,” she said. “We’ve also done some travelling to the East and getting those

“We prefer to go to the smaller stores.We don’t even park in the Safeway parking lot.” — Heather Galindo things here is marvelous.” The owner of K&K Farm Market, Karen Wei, says Safeway’s new introduction has affected her business. Since the program launch, Wei has stopped by Safeway and observed its Asian hot foods selections, which she says are similar to what K&K Farm Market sells. “Safeway is a big com-

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pany, maybe they have a lot of choice for customers, it’s clean, but the price is a little bit high,” she said. Lui says Safeway has competitive advantages beyond price points. “Safeway is definitely a place that customers can trust. We are a national company, and there are guidelines and regulations and we have to meet up to that. In terms of regulators and government, they hold Safeway to a higher regard,” she said. “They’re all of good quality and they all adhere to the national guidelines for food and safety.” Hama Aziz frequents Safeway two to three times a week. He says the program benefits not just Asian people, but also him as an Iraqi. He praised Safeway for its fresh offerings, but it hasn’t become a one-stop shop for him that Lui touts as Safeway’s advantage. twitter.com/jennypengnow

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Reviews mixed for cigarette recycling program Wanyee Li

li.wanyee@gmail.com

Six months after launching the world’s first cigarette recycling program, proponents have mixed opinions about whether the project is a success. The City of Vancouver launched the cigarette recycling project last November in partnership with Terracycle and United We Can. “As far as we’re concerned, the program has been a huge success,” said Gerry Martin, general manager at United We Can. “People started using the receptacles right away. Basically the receptacles went up and the next day there were cigarette butts.” Receptacles at bus stops and sidewalk corners at intersections see the most use, according to Martin. Others are less confident about the program’s success. “I certainly wouldn’t put it in the failure section yet, but it isn’t a quali-

fied success either,” said Charles Gauthier, president and CEO of the Downtown Vancouver Business Improvement Association (DVBIA). DVBIA has been keeping track of the number of cigarette butts on the ground in order to assess whether people are using the cigarette receptacles or not.The results have been mixed. “In some cases, there are fewer cigarette butts now than before the receptacles were installed, which is what we expected,” said Gauthier. “But in other cases, there are actually more cigarette butts.” Gauthier has enlisted the help of a social marketing consulting company to better understand smoker behaviour. “It’s still early days for us and we’ve been doing an evaluation.We need to better understand why some smokers are choosing not to use them in some cases,” he said. Thiago Martinelli, originally from Brazil, has lived in

Vancouver for two years and said he sometimes forgets to use the cigarette receptacles. “I hadn’t heard of recycling cigarette butts before I came to Vancouver, but I saw them and so I use it when I see it,” he said. “It’s hard because for smokers, we have short breaks you know? Sometimes there’s no time to look for somewhere to throw away your cigarette.” Martinelli admits that it’s all about copying other people’s behaviour. “But I’ve seen people using them and so because I felt bad, I started using them too.” Martin is hopeful that the city will expand the cigarette recycling program. “Then we’d definitely be hiring people specifically for collecting cigarette butts,” he said. United We Can is best known as a recycling depot for Vancouver Downtown Eastside binners and provides the workers for the

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cigarette recycling program.Two to three workers collect cigarette butts from the bins every couple of weeks.The workers are paid a rate above minimum wage.The employees are rotated with the workforce at the United We Can bottle depot. About 95 per cent of the employees at United We Can are from the Downtown Eastside. “Many people who work here probably wouldn’t be able to find work if they didn’t work here,” said Martin. Martin has not heard of any plans to expand the program so far, but he is hopeful. “I have not heard about any expansion. But I know that the city ofVancouver has been pleased with the results.” Workers have collected more than 130 pounds of cigarette butts from bins since they were installed in November. There are 110 cigarette recycling receptacles in downtown Vancouver. twitter.com/wanyeelii

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Cuts opposed by community population has decreased but feelings of isolation and problems related to poverty have increased. “I am worried that if position is cut, next year it will have a ripple effect in the Vietnamese community,” she said. An instructor and a student of Continuing Education recommended money saving and making strategies for the program that continues to run at a deficit and could be cut. The VSB faces an estimated shortfall of $12.34 million for 2014-2015. Staff expect to spend approximately 92 per cent of its $497.19 million budget on salaries and benefits. Bacchus noted the board has cut $47 million over the past 12 years so it’s a “very picked-over” budget. twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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• April 22 – Revised budget released.

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Dozens of students and parents protested the proposed elimination of the district’s athletic coordinator position, for reasons similar to music education advocates. With 92 elementary schools and annexes and 18 secondary schools, an athletic coordinator is needed to book fields and help organize tournaments, one parent coach said. “We have hundreds of volunteer coaches, teacher and community coaches,” said volunteer basketball coach Steve Anderson. “We need a district athletic coordinator to do the administrative work... It’s $72,000. It’s fractions of pennies on the dollar that you get back in return.” Delegates urged the board not to cut the number of teachers at the alternative City School, which is based out of King George secondary in the West End, from two to one. One student said she was bullied in elementary school, fell into a depression in secondary school and was on the verge of dropping out

when she found City School. “These are the people that I trust in my life,” she said of her peers and teachers. A Vietnamese-Canadian mother explained through an interpreter how a multicultural worker helped her get help for her autistic son. A South Asian-Canadian mother who needed to leave a dysfunctional home said she turned to a multicultural worker because she knew the worker understood her culture. VSB staff propose cutting a multicultural liaison worker for each community because fewer children from these backgrounds are registering through the District Resource Placement Centre. Yen Nguyen,Vietnamese youth worker at the BroadwayYouth Resource Centre, said the Vietnamese

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News

How Vancouver MLAs line up on recycling program NDP critical of MMBC plan, Liberals support it Wanyee Li

Three years ago, the B.C. Liberal government changed environmental regulation laws to shift recycling responsibility from municipalities to manufacturers.The provincial government brought in MultiMaterial B.C. (MMBC), a

li.wanyee@gmail.com

One month from today, the provincial government will launch a controversial residential recycling program.

non-profit organization, to implement the necessary changes to follow that law. It signals a transfer of recycling costs from taxpayers to producers of packaging and printed paper. Critics of the program

have warned that this expense will be put on consumers when businesses raise product prices to cover the cost of recycling. Mike Klassen, from the Canadian Federation of Independent Business has said that small

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“I’ve been contacted by businesses in the community and the general message is the same. People understand the principle that if you’re producing garbage, you should be paying for how that garbage is dealt with and that it’s going to help reduce the amount of garbage out there.This is just a really poorly implemented program that wasn’t well thought out and now local businesses and local newspapers are facing significant headache and cost.” Mable Elmore (via email) NDP MLA forVancouver-Kensington “I’ve also heard from some constituents, particularly from the print industry, who are affected by the MMBC. My colleagues in the Opposition and I share their concern that it has been brought in with little or no consultation.The B.C. Liberals decided this change was going to take place, then just handed it off to an unaccountable

organization and washed their hands of it.” George Heyman, NDP MLA forVancouver-Fairview “A number of municipalities who have signed on are having second thought as they see problems that small businesses like the newspaper industry will experience. Clearly not enough consultation was done to ensure that everyone was ready for the change.The goals may be laudable but there are serious questions about who stands to benefit and who is going to pay.” Shane Simpson, NDP, MLA forVancouver-Hastings “We’re not sure where the measurements are in terms of measuring success. Ultimately the government should have a handle on this. If you’re going to give this system to a private entity, you have to some oversight in place to ensure that they’re doing what’s in the public interest.” Moira Stilwell, B.C. Liberal MLA forVancouverLangara “A lot of thought and work has gone into the MMBC program,both from government and businesses to make it fair and reasonable for all who will participate.The Minister of Environment is continuing to meet and consult with people who will be affected by this program. I think this will result in a very solid program and once that happens it will be a leadership vision in Canada.We’re heading in the right direction.” AndrewWilkinson, B.C. Liberal MLA forVancouver-Quilchena “Small businesses are almost entirely exempt.Those who have under $1 million of revenue or those who have one point of sale will be exempt.We’re moving ahead with the plan.” Suzanne Anton, B.C. Liberal MLA forVancouver-Fraserview; Jenny Kwan, NDP MLA forVancouver-Mount Pleasant and Sam Sullivan, B.C. Liberals MLA forVancouver-False Creek could not be reached for comment. twitter.com/wanyeelii


F R I DAY, A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

News

Students switch sides Cheryl Rossi

crossi@vancourier.com

Rampant school spirit, a plethora of personal laptops, electronic tablets and smartphones in classrooms and discussions about field trips were whatVanTech student Elysha Fong noticed on her two-day exchange at Hamber secondary. “I haven’t been on a field trip in quite a while,” said the Grade 12 student who lives a seven-minute walk away fromVancouverTechnical secondary near East Broadway and Nanaimo Street. Fong was one of 105 Grade 9 to 12 students who participated in theVancouver School Board’s Sister School Exchange’s ninth year last week.The exchange pairs a student from an East Side school with a partner from aWest Side school. Fong attended classes and extracurricular activities at Hamber, between Oak and Cambie streets, and then her counterpart Crystal Lau attendedVanTech. “The main thing for me is definitely the school spirit that Hamber has,” said Fong, VanTech student council president. “I want to somehow try and capture that and bring it back toVanTech.” Six students ran for student council president at Hamber with weeklong campaigns. “Whereas we had one person run for president [at Van Tech] and it was me,” she said. While Hamber displayed more spirit and “together-

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Eric Hamber’s Crystal Lau (l)) and Van Tech’s Elysha Fong attended an English 12 class at Van Tech last week. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

ness” as a student body, Hamber students noted “chummy” relationships between students and teachers atVanTech. “AtVan Tech, I find our teachers are very open to conversation, like you can go talk to them about things other than school and they’ll be there to help you out and support you,” Fong said. “At Hamber I felt and my partners felt, actually, that it was a little bit more like we’re your teachers and you’re the students and of course they’re there to help you for school stuff but there wasn’t really that level of almost friendship.” As for the abundant use of personal electronics and field trips, Fong wasn’t sure what to say. “I’m trying to avoid saying our school’s poor,” she said. “Our school’s definitely poor, but I think we’re doing fine.” She noted Lau presented Hamber’s computer lab with a “ta-da” flourish, butVan Tech’s computer lab is similar. VanTech has refurbished auditorium, a garden and a massive wood shop while Hamber offers guitar classes.

Sister School Exchanges aim to foster friendships and break down barriers between East andWest Side schools and provide students with the experience of another school’s culture so they can potentially adopt the other school’s practices at their home school. This exchange was Fong’s third. She’d previously visited King George secondary in the West End and Lord Byng in West Point Grey. She hadn’t visited either school previously and hasn’t returned but befriended her exchange partners on Facebook. Students shared their experiences at the end of the week and student trustee Nick Milum will bring any relevant feedback to the school board. Milum led a discussion on cultural diversity at the end of the week. “Almost everybody had a perception of what their host school would look like, but once they got there and spent time going to that school their perspective completely changed,” he wrote the Courier in an email. twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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A10

THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 4

Opinion WorkSafe drops ball on mill explosions

CBC defenders define Mother Corp’s role

Les Leyne Columnist lleyne@timescolonist.com

Geoff Olson Columnist

The déjà vu Criminal Justice Branch report this week on why again no charges will be laid in another mill explosion put enormous pressure on the government to shake up WorkSafe B.C. and force improvements in its accident investigations. For the second time in four months, the CJB reviewed a WorkSafe report on a fatal accident and concluded there isn’t enough evidence to lay charges. It would be easier to take if Crown counsel were reviewing impeccable reports that looked at all the evidence and simply didn’t make a legal case. But in both cases, the Criminal Justice Branch is saying that WorkSafe came up short in its investigations into the deaths of four people, and the serious injuries to 42 others. There were two almost-identical accidents, three months apart. The Babine Forest Products mill in Burns Lake exploded and burned in January 2012, leaving two dead and a score injured. Three months later, the Lakeland mill in Prince George exploded in April, killing two and injuring 22. WorkSafe submitted two separate reports to the Criminal Justice Branch. The branch on Monday arrived at the same conclusion in the Lakeland case as it did earlier in the Babine case. No charges will be laid, because there is no substantial likelihood of conviction. It’s partly because the mill managers can prove due diligence in handling the sawdust, the cause of both explosions. And it’s partly because of deficiencies in the investigations themselves. The Criminal Justice Branch also had a few pointed remarks about how it sees its job when handling highly publicized, politically sensitive cases. Which is: the same way it handles every other case. The reminder seems to be in response to the controversy that arose after the first no-charges decision. It prompted a review by Premier Christy Clark’s office and a concerted campaign by Opposition New Democrats for a public inquiry into every aspect of the mill explosion and how it was handled by government agencies. The CJB took pains to note it has a responsibility to explain itself. “This includes identifying evidentiary difficulties that have factored into the

charging decision.” “The branch appreciates that the decision not to charge will have a significant impact on … the families, friends and colleagues of workers who were killed or injured.” WorkSafe recommended four charges under provincial safety law, but no criminal-negligence charges. “As was the case with the Babine charge assessment, Crown counsel ultimately concluded that the manner in which WSBC conducted parts of its examination of the Lakeland mill site would likely render some evidence that it gathered … inadmissible in court.” That wasn’t the sole reason not to proceed. But it’s enough to make anyone wonder about WorkSafe’s approach to major accident investigations. No search warrants were requested, so some evidence can’t be used. Major case methodology wasn’t used and “a number of areas of potentially relevant evidence were left unexplored.” Those included direct evidence about who knew what about sawdust conditions and explosion dangers. But even if the investigation had been first-rate, Crown counsel say Lakeland had a sturdy defence. It showed due diligence on dust issues and was in compliance at the time. The B.C. government has been working on an answer to the extraordinary set of circumstances for months. It wants WorkSafe fixed, but it wants the fix accomplished without a lengthy, expensive public inquiry. Labour Minister Shirley Bond unveiled the response Monday. Veteran former deputy minister Gord Macatee will step aside from the B.C. Ferry Commission and take charge of reforming WorkSafe and finding a new boss to run it properly. He’ll follow a plan outlined by Clark’s deputy, John Dyble, when he reviewed the first report into the Burns Lake disaster. As for independent public scrutiny, there’ll be an inquest or inquests. The chief coroner may roll both into one. The government has been vague on how it views WorkSafe. But Bond’s to-do list for Macatee clears things up.The first item is to “ensure future investigations are handled correctly.”That’s a remarkably embarrassing order to have to give to an agency with such important responsibility. twitter.com/LeyneLes (Allen Garr’s column will return soon.)

The week in num6ers...

30 12.3 48

The number of feet lowered from the height of the Broadway block of the Rize development to reduce the shadow impact on Broadway.

In millions of dollars, the estimated shortfall for the Vancouver School Board’s 2014-15 operating budget.

In thousands of dollars, the severance pay handed to former B.C. Lottery Corp. CEO Michael Graydon, who quit the post in order to help run a new casino next to B.C. Place.

geoffolson.com

Last week’s cuts to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation — 657 jobs across the country — followed the slashand-burn remarks from Tory Senator Leo Housakos, Conservative Vice-Chair of the Senate Standing Committee on Transport and Communications. He mused about taking the money taxpayers spend on the CBC and giving it to the private sector. “Is there a way to take the money we spend right now on a broadcaster and re-route that money to give that $1 billion-plus dollars to filmmakers and producers of Canadian content so they can make quality content and films?” Housakos asked, perhaps a bit more than rhetorically. Trial balloon or turd in the parliamentary punch bowl? It’s certainly consistent with a vision of Canada remade in Stephen Harper’s image: cut-off, controlling, and tone-deaf to public debate, scientific evidence and artistic creativity. “I’m not in favour of abolishing the government,” Republican fixer Grover Norquist once famously said. “I just want to shrink it down to the size where we can drown it in the bathtub.” Sounds like a template for the Tory approach to Canada’s public broadcaster: cut off the oxygen long enough and fewer Canadians will grieve when the last rites are read. In a thoroughly unscientific survey, I solicited opinions from people in my email contact list about the value of the CBC to them personally and Canada in general. “Rural Canada is left out of the mainstream media broadcast range, both technically and spiritually,” writes computer technician John William. “CBC goes where no private broadcaster bothers to. When we lived on Cortes Island, CBC radio was our connection with the outside human world. CBC also brings local, regional and national citizen interests together and produces some fine investigative reporting and documentaries, all spotty on the private networks. It reaches out and makes everyone who listens more integrated with Canadians around them.” William says he used to “love listening to the Ideas radio program. I remember having my neural networks re-charged by the thoughtful ideas on it.” Bowen Island singer-songwriter and author Pauline Le Bel responds: “I may

4

The total number of Vancouver homicides for 2014 after a man was stabbed Tuesday night in the 300 block of East Cordova Street.

not always agree with the hosts, guests and commentators on CBC, but I’m always challenged to keep my mind open. When American friends come to visit, they tell me how envious they are of CBC programming. CBC reminds me how lucky I am to be a Canadian.” Political cartoonist Dan Murphy writes that without CBC and Radio-Canada’s journalists, the “neocons would be even more successful drumming in their onmessage mantra.” Murphy recalls Mother Corp flameouts like Friday Night with Ralph Benmurgi, but says he’d spend 10 times the $29 per year he gives as a taxpayer to the CBC “for Terry Milewski’s dogged pursuit of politicians with questions they don’t wanna be asked, and ten times that if the Corp would give a voice to the country’s First Nations.” “I heard a CBC radio interview Stephen Quinn had with CBC prez Hubert Lacroix after the last slew of cuts — and not only would Quinn not let his boss off the hook, he used the interview to transfer Lacroix onto successively larger hooks. I remember thinking: Now that’s how it’s done,” Murphy writes. Vancouver-based journalist Hadani Ditmars responds that she misses reporting from around the world for the CBC Radio One’s Dispatches. “Such a loss,” she adds of the now-defunct program. Deborah Warren, a college professor in the B.C. Interior, tells her students to watch CBC News Network’s Lang and O’Leary Exchange “to learn all that they need to know about business.” If the crown corporation is just a groupthink forum for ’70s-era pinkos and nanny state cheerleaders — as some believe — I doubt the fire-breathing O’Leary would be a fixture on multiple CBC productions. As I wrote back in 2007, the variety of voices on Mother Corp mirrors the nation in all its off-key cussing and commiseration. Whether its Eleanor Wachtel dissecting a book, Anna Maria Tremonte cross-examining a guest, Rex Murphy consulting his thesaurus or a caller rhyming off a recipe, Canada’s public broadcaster is our nuclear strong force. It’s our agora, our forum, our national assembly. It’s the Canuck collective unconscious, yammering away with a megawatt megaphone. In sum, it’s the one thing Canadians with access to TV, radio or the Internet have in common in this country, other than their citizenship.

50 6

Up from five, the new daily average of applications by property owners for $64 permits to remove trees after the city announced a proposal for a more stringent and costly bylaw.

The Vancouver Canucks’ selection pick at the NHL draft lottery June 27 after a 25th-place finish in the overall standings with a 36-35-11 record.


F R I DAY, A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A11

Mailbox Recycling changes will cause harm

C O U R I E R A RC H I V E S T H I S W E E K I N H I S TO RY

Homegrown event debuts downtown April 20, 1995: Vancouver’s annual celebration of marijuana lights up for the first time on the 20th day of the fourth month at Victory Park Square, across the street from founder Marc Emery’s Cannabis Culture headquarters. No arrests were made at the inaugural 4/20 event — which now takes place in front of the Vancouver Art Gallery and has since grown to attract thousands of stoners every year. The term “4/20” was originally coined by a group of teenagers in San Rafael, Calif. back in the early ’70s who used to meet after school to smoke pot at 4:20 p.m. and has become shorthand for the time of day it is socially acceptable in certain circles to smoke up.

Vancouver loses Stanley Cup final

April 21, 1921: The Ottawa Senators defeat the Vancouver Millionaires 2-1 to win the Stanley Cup in a best-of-five series. An estimated 12,000 fans packed the West End’s Denman Arena, setting a new world record at the time for the largest crowd to watch a hockey game, and several thousand more were turned away. No rioting ensued, although police were forced to break up an on-ice brawl between players in the dying minutes of the game. ADVERTISING

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To the editor: Re: “NDP takes aim at Multi Material BC recycling ‘failure,’” March 28. I understand that our government is planning to contract out to a new recycling provider starting this May, and that the newspaper industry is particularly concerned with this move as it will significantly add to their overhead costs. It is widely known that the newspaper business is already struggling, as traditional sources of revenue have been in decline. What is unknown is whether print media will be able to survive this latest blow at all. There is a fundamentally important issue at stake in this decision. Canada is a democracy, and democracies cannot function well without clear, reliable, and timely information being made available to their citizens on issues both local and national. A much more important question here, then, is does the newspaper, beyond its business mandate, also play a larger role as a server of the public good? I believe it does; newspapers in fact play an essential part in fostering an informed citizenry, which in turn form the bedrock of an effective democracy. For this reason, I would ask Christy Clark to either reconsider the decision to move to a multi-national recycling provider for B.C., or to exempt/grandfather newspapers contractually from covering the added costs of recycling newsprint. As citizens, we have far too much to lose collectively if we lose our B.C.-based newspapers due to this onerous new expense. This is collateral damage we cannot afford. Hilary Reid, Vancouver

Coordinator is crucial for kids

To the editor: Re: “Vancouver school board faced with cutting key athletics job,” April 9. Thank you for bringing attention to this insane idea to save money at the cost of so much. A few of the costs I can see include: • School spirit. • Lifelong interest in being active. • Opportunities to see teachers as mentors and examples of volunteerism. • Leadership roles for student managers. • Involvement of scorekeepers, referees and linesmen who often upon leaving school get involved in local sporting organization and officiating. I am so disappointed this would even be considered as an option. I will be at the rally on Tuesday with my daughter and many of her teammates. Carolyn Chan, Vancouver

Baseball story got wrong name

To the editor: Re: “Baseball game in Phoenix also a foodie delight,” April 11. I enjoyed reading about the writer’s visit to a spring training baseball game in Phoenix, which was described as “Grapefruit League” baseball. Something just didn’t seem right about this. Grapefruit from Arizona? In fact, spring training in Arizona is called the Cactus League.The Grapefruit League takes place in Florida. Nevertheless, the article has enticed me to add a visit to spring training in either location to my bucket list, although it might be rather prickly in Arizona. Richard Stevens, Vancouver

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Letters may be edited by the Courier for reasons of legality, taste, brevity and clarity. Send to: 1574West Sixth Ave.,VancouverV6J 1R2 or email letters@vancourier.com

have your say online...

vancourier.com FACEBOOK TheVancouverCourierNewspaper TWITTER @vancouriernews WEB

COURIER STORY: “West End Neighbours society wonders what is affordable,” April 11. Christopher Porter: Housing affordability needs to factor in transportation expenses, which

are highly variable depending on where you live. The average Canadian spends nearly as much on transportation expenses ($11,216 in 2012) as they do on shelter ($15,811). You can save a thousands of dollars per year if you live car-free, as most people living in the West End do. So what is more affordable — paying $1,300 to rent in the West End or $1,300 to rent in Abbotsford? COURIER STORY: “East Vancouver girls push boundaries at NASA,” April 9. Trevor Smith: I question the self-congratulatory tone of this article. What this article

indicates is that the school administration is more concerned about the interests of the girls than the boys. Despite continuing evidence of declining success rates of boys and young men in education, John Oliver makes the decision to select the success of girls over boys. “Kauldher said a lot of boys at the school complained about not being permitted to join the trip.” But the end result is the administration fully supports the girls but leaves the boys to fend for themselves against the school bureaucracy. Is this selection of one group over another even legal? The word discrimination comes to mind but was quickly brushed aside in the article.Yet this is not an isolated incident and will repeat itself many times over the boys time in school all the way up to university should they make it that far. The fair approach would have been to set up two trips, if gender segregation was necessary, so that boys and girls could be equally supported. Lets hope they do it right next year.


A12

THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 4

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Communitycalendar Get fashionable for Earth Day Sandra Thomas

sthomas@vancourier.com

Yaletown

A fashion event organized just in time for Earth Day is an opportunity to reduce, reuse, recycle and refashion, while picking up a pair of fabulous (gently worn) shoes. ReFashion Vancouver takes place April 21 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Roundhouse Exhibition Hall, 181 Roundhouse Mews. More than 60Vancouver fashionistas have emptied their closets and will be selling designer clothing and accessories at deeply discounted prices. Entrance is $3 at the door.Visit refashionvancouver.com for more information.

Downtown

TheWhole Foods on Robson is hosting a compost giveaway from 2 to 6 p.m. April 18. Bring your own pail to take home two bucketloads for free.The store is located at 1675 Robson St.

Grandview-Woodland Organized byWindermere secondary school’sYouth 4 Climate Justice Now and supported by theWilderness

Committee, the Commercial Drive Earth Day parade is an annual celebration of positive change with a focus on global warming and climate justice. Participants are encouraged to bring signs, costumes, art, bikes, friends and family.The parade starts at 11 a.m. at Commercial Drive and East Eighth Avenue before heading north to Grandview Park. Entertainment includes live music by Buckman Coe, a family tent, hands-on activities and guest speaker David Suzuki.Visit EarthDayParade. ca for more information.

Fairview

The South Granville Seniors Centre is hosting its fourth annual multicultural fair Friday, April 25 from 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Celebrate the rich cultural diversity that makes up the community. Cultural groups representing countries from across the globe will showcase their unique traditions and celebration through music, dance and food. Enjoy a jampacked program of exciting performances and check out the international food fair for a taste of delicious dishes from different cultures. As

well, participants are invited to take part in a dialogue to connect First Nations, urban aboriginal and immigrant communities at 2:30 p.m.The event is free and there’s a minimal charge for food.

Kits Point

Mellissa Fung, an awardwinning journalist and former CBC reporter will speak on her experiences after being abducted in Afghanistan in 2009. Fung, author of Under an Afghan Sky, is speaking at an event organized by the Vancouver Chapter of Canadian Women for Women in Afghanistan at the HR MacMillan Space Centre April 29 at 7 p.m. Fung will also show a short documentary film she made for CBC’s The National about her return to Afghanistan in 2013, for the first time since her abduction. Fung will also discuss her experience as a reporter covering the Canadian military mission in Afghanistan. Tickets are available through Eventbrite or at Zulu Records, 1972 West Fourth Ave. twitter.com/sthomas10


F R I DAY, A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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Garden Blueberries may need an acid trip Anne Marrison

amarrison@shaw.ca

Q. Last year I had few berries on my plants. What is the best fertilizer for blueberries? Neil,South Langley A.Your poor blueberry crop may not be caused by lack of fertilizer. In order to produce well, blueberries also need acidic soil, lots of water in dry spells, at least one other compatible blueberry nearby and (in some areas) protection from birds. But if you’re sure your blueberries need fertilizer, liquid fish fertilizer is good because it acidifies the soil. Blueberries need acidic soil to do well. Fertilizer for acid-loving plants such as rhododendrons or azaleas is also excellent for blueberries. Blueberries given too much fertilizer develop lush growth that can die in winter. High nitrogen fertilizer is especially damaging and does nothing for berry production. Wood shavings or sawdust can help acidify the soil when you plant blueberries and also makes a good mulch for them. Peat moss is a great acidifier if you dig it in when you plant blueberries, but it’s a terrible mulch because, once it gets dry, water runs off instead of soaking in. I wonder if your blueberries were short of water last summer. It was hard to keep up with watering last year because the drought went on so long. I also wonder how many blueberry plants you have. Blueberries self-pollinate but produce bigger harvests if there are three bushes of

compatible kinds but one of them must be of a different species. Compatible means the blueberries flower at the same time so that pollen can mingle. Nurseries normally sell compatible kinds together. Is it possible birds are stealing your berries? Some gardeners don’t get any berries unless they net their berries. In rural areas, bears may harvest your blueberries. Q. Is it possible to prune a Japanese maple tree without sacrificing its beautiful pendulum shape? I have a two-foot treeling (as I call small trees) on my balcony and I would like to keep it small enough to move.With bursitis in my shoulder, my new motto is “if I can’t lift it, I can’t have it.” Caroline Moore, NewWestminster A. Japanese maples need very little top-growth pruning, just the removing of diseased, broken or dead branches. In order to keep it small and weeping, it’s far more useful to keep the roots pruned.This doesn’t need to be done every year — usually every three or four years is about right. Pruning the top growth will only encourage your tree to grow faster, but pruning the roots reduces the vigor available for the tree’s growth process.This makes it easier to retain the lovely drooping shape and you should be able to keep it in the same pot for many years. Actually, what you will be trying to achieve is something similar to a bonsai tree, though less intricate.

Open House: New Park at 17th Avenue and Yukon Street The Vancouver Park Board is creating a new park on the Yukon Street bike route at 17th Avenue. The park development is in the early planning stages. Come to an open house and share your ideas on what you’d like to see at this park. Saturday, April 26, 2014 10 am – 2 pm (drop in anytime) Park site at 17th Avenue and Yukon Street To learn more about this project visit vancouver.ca. Open house materials and a questionnaire will be available online April 28 – May 11. FOR MORE INFORMATION: 604-257-8474 or joe.mcleod@vancouver.ca

Want to Compost, but Don’t Have a Backyard? Reduce your kitchen waste and help the environment by composting at home. The City has a limited number of $25 worm composters for use in apartments. Each one comes with a bin, lid, tray, worms, bedding and instructions. A one-hour workshop at the Compost Demonstration Garden is required with the purchase of your apartment worm composter. Next workshop is Saturday, April 26, 2014. To sign up for a workshop and composter, phone the Compost Hotline at 604-736-2250 or visit: cityfarmer.info/wormcomposting

May 1 - 31, 2014 Healthy, vibrant and clean neighbourhoods start with you. Lead or join a block cleanup. All cleanup teams receive garbage bags, gloves, cleanup tools and support for leading your cleanup. Sign up today: vancouver.ca/kvs or 604-871-6544 #keepvanspectacular #kvs Sponsored by:

Development Permit Board Meeting: April 22 The Development Permit Board and Advisory Panel will meet Tuesday, April 22, 2014 at 3 pm, Vancouver City Hall, 453 West 12th Avenue Ground Floor, Town Hall Meeting Room to consider this development permit application: 880 West 28th Avenue: To develop a new acute care centre including in-patient units; an emergency department; medical imaging and procedural suites; hematology/oncology, pediatric intensive care, high-risk labour and delivery suites; and a neo-natal intensive care unit for BC Children’s Hospital. Please contact City Hall Security (1st floor) if your vehicle may be parked at City Hall for more than two hours. TO SPEAK ON AN ITEM: 604-873-7469 or lorna.harvey@vancouver.ca

Visit: vancouver.ca Phone: 3-1-1 TTY: 7-1-1 Join: talkvancouver.com

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Not all water damage is covered by basic home insurance. FREE SEMINARS APRIL 22 & 24 6:30 p.m. Get tips on protecting your home at our home insurance seminar at the BCAA Kerrisdale and Broadway Service Locations. Plus, we’ll be giving away one FREE emergency preparedness kit* at each location. RSVP to reserve your seat today: Kerrisdale – April 22 Broadway – April 24 2347 West 41st Avenue • 604-268-5825 999 West Broadway • 604-268-5643 kerrisdale@bcaa.com broadway@bcaa.com *Must be in attendance to win. One emergency preparedness kit per seminar will be drawn. Home insurance is sold through BCAA Insurance Agency and underwritten by BCAA Insurance Corporation.


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 4

Millions of small acts.

One big win for our environment. By Scott Fraser President & CEO of Encorp Pacific (Canada)

The success of our system for recycling beverage containers proves that millions of small acts can add up to a big win for the environment. Whether it’s aluminum cans, juice boxes, cartons, or glass and plastic bottles, if you are a typical BC resident, you probably generate four or five empty beverage containers a week. That doesn’t sound like a lot, but do the math and it adds up to hundreds of millions of empty beverage containers a year that would end up in the landfill, if British Columbians like you hadn’t returned those containers for recycling. In fact, last year almost 1 billion used beverage containers were returned for deposit and processed into new products. That includes more than 360 million aluminum cans, 338 million plastic bottles, 195 million glass bottles and 71 million drink boxes and cartons. In total nearly 100,000 metric tons of material was kept out of BC’s landfills. If you find it hard to imagine what that means, then consider that it is the equivalent weight of 60,000 midsized cars. That’s right, the equivalent of 60,000 cars was removed from BC’s landfills, a few cans, bottles and cartons at a time. But that’s not the only benefit for BC. Recycling empty containers uses less energy than producing new ones.

The equivalent of 60,000 cars was removed from BC’s landfills, a few cans, bottles and cartons at a time. For example, used aluminum cans are turned into new cans, a process that uses only 5% of the energy it takes to make new aluminum. Drink boxes and cartons are pulped and made into tissue and cardboard, saving 17 trees for every ton of paper fiber produced. Plastic bottles are 100 percent recyclable for use in new plastic containers, and glass bottles are made into new bottles and sandblasting material. As a result, the recycling of beverage containers contributed to a reduction of 135,000 tons of carbon dioxide that otherwise would have gone into BC’s atmosphere. Keeping with the driving theme, that’s the equivalent of taking 39,000 cars off the road in BC every year. BC has one of the highest beverage container recycling rates in North America – last year 80

Nearly 100,000 metric tons of material was kept out of BC’s landfills. percent of all beverage containers sold in BC were returned and recycled. One reason for the high recovery rate is the many options that British Columbians have for returning their containers. The Return-It™ network of over 170 depots across the province is the heart of the system, collecting over 90 percent of recycled containers. Their share of returns continues to grow, in part because today’s depots are consumer friendly, clean, bright and open with large sorting tables. It is also because today many depots accept a wide range of products for recycling, making them a convenient one-stop location for your recycling needs. For example, over 90 percent of Return-It Depots accept consumer electronics, like computers, TVs and printers, for recycling. Many also accept small appliances, paint, light bulbs and more. For hotels, offices, restaurants and multi-family buildings, many Return-It Depots and specialized mobile collectors offer a pick-up program, primarily in the Metro Vancouver area. If you live in a townhouse, condominium or apartment, look for the Encorp or Return-It branded collection bins in the garbage or recycling area of your building. ADVERTORIAL

For recycling ‘on the go’, you may have noticed blue beverage container bins in various neighbourhoods in the City of Vancouver. These bins are non-locking and designed to be self-serviced by residents or people wanting to receive the deposit refund attached to the containers deposited in the bins. This successful program is now expanding to other Metro Vancouver areas and to towns around BC. Even with this extensive system, though, BC would not have one of the highest recycling rates in North America without consumers making the decision to do the right thing for the environment. That amounts to almost 3 million containers a day diverted from landfills to be made into new products – a lot of small acts adding up to a lot of good for BC.

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F R I DAY, A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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Feature

Monterey Bay makes splash as captive-free model

The aquarium’s three-storey Kelp Forest is the centerpiece of the Ocean’s Edge galleries at Monterey Bay Aquarium. PHOTO MONTEREY BAY AQUARIUM/RANDY WILDER

California aquarium says all facilities have unique approach

This is the final instalment of a three-part series.

Sandra Thomas

sthomas@vancourier.com

When the idea for the Monterey Bay Aquarium was first conceived in 1977, the plan was, and has remained, the creation of an attraction to showcase the marine environment of the waters surrounding it. Hank Armstrong, vicepresident of communications for the aquarium, said four marine biologists developed the idea for the Monterey, California-based facility, which opened in 1984. “They wanted to interpret Monterey Bay and its habitat and animals,” said Armstrong. “The site is a former cannery that wouldn’t allow for the space to exhibit marine mammals so it was never considered.” The Monterey Bay Aquarium is an example of a popular aquarium that has never exhibited cetaceans — whales or dolphins. It’s also the model some local animal advocates use as an example when arguing the Vancouver Aquarium no longer needs to keep cetaceans in captivity. In recent weeks severalVancouver politicians, includingVisionVancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson, have spoken out against the aquarium’s use of whales and dolphins in exhibits. Armstrong said while Monterey Bay Aquarium staff closely watched a recent attempt by Los Angeles–

area state assembly member Richard Bloom to introduce legislation banning the use of whales for entertainment and breeding in California, the facility takes no official position on the issue. Last week a hearing committee recommended the bill be subject to a detailed study before it goes to a vote. “We have other unique exhibits at Monterey Bay, there is no cookie cutter model,” said Armstrong. “But I will say the Vancouver Aquarium and SeaWorld [San Diego] do a lot of great things.” Armstrong said another reason the aquarium never considered keeping whales and dolphins is that it sits on a bay where 27 species of marine mammals live or pass through. He noted on some days whales and dolphins can be seen from the deck of the aquarium. Monterey Bay is part of a National Marine Sanctuary stretching from near San Francisco to south of San Simeon — a distance of about 5,300 square miles. Armstrong said one of the most popular exhibits at Monterey Bay is the threestorey, living kelp forest — the centerpiece of the Ocean’s Edge galleries.The milliongallon Open Sea exhibit includes dozens of species of sea life, including green sea turtles, a scalloped hammerhead shark, Pacific bluefin tuna and moon jellyfish. “Monterey Bay has a very regional focus,” said Armstrong. “That was very innovative at the time and a

novel approach to the standard strategy of exhibiting one species.” As reported in the Courier earlier this month, the city’s bylaw surrounding the keeping of cetaceans in captivity is up for review next year.That and the ongoing expansion of theVancouver Aquarium has many residents and animal advocates pushing the park board to hold a public referendum on the issue as a ballot question in the November civic election. OutgoingVision park board vice chair Constance Barnes and commissioner Sarah Blyth started the most recent public debate when they announced they want the aquarium phase out its use of whales and dolphins for breeding and exhibition. Since thenVisionVancouver’s official position is not to hold a referendum, but rather to work with the aquarium in phasing out cetaceans But animal advocate Janos Maté, coordinator with Whale Friends, is determined to continue pushing for that referendum. In an email to the Courier, Maté said he’s been involved with this issue since 1990, at a time when the Vancouver Aquarium captured three belugas from Churchill, Manitoba. “At that time three of us locked ourselves in a cage in front of the aquarium and held a beluga vigil.We fasted for 36 hours in empathy for these poor beings that were kidnapped from their

families — and because typically these animals do not eat for a long time due to the shock of their abduction,” Maté said. According to the book People,Fish andWhales:The Vancouver Aquarium Story written by Dr. Murray Newman with aquarium president John Nightingale, the three belugas were saved from a quota of about 800 whales First Nations people were permitted to kill that year. Maté, a long time Greenpeace International campaigner, held another caged protest in 1999 in support of Bjossa, the last remaining orca at the aquarium. Maté stayed in the cage for six days and was joined for part of the time by other protesters. On June 10, 2000, Maté and other animal advocates organized a concert at theVogueTheatre called “Born to beWild: Concert for Bjossa.” Attending that concert was Libby Davies, who now sits as the NDP MP forVancouver East. Davies said she supports Barnes’ and Blythe’s public stand against keeping cetaceans in captivity. Davies noted she has unsuccessfully submitted a motion to Parliament more than once during her time in office, which reads: “That, in the opinion of this House, the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans should decree an immediate moratorium on the live capture and trade of cetaceans (whales, dolphins and porpoises).”

“The motion is not in the House this time,” Davies told the Courier. “But I’m thinking of reintroducing it.” Maté said the aquarium has never made any changes to its cetaceans programs without pressure from the public, which is why he argues a referendum is important.The aquarium adopted a policy in 1992 to stop collecting killer whales from the wild. According to People, Fish and Whales, the killer whale program at the aquarium was largely responsible for the ban on capturing wild orcas in B.C. and Washington waters. Maté said a public poll on this highly contentious issue is long overdue and added the aquarium has always opposed the idea of a referendum for fear of the results. “In 1996, the park board decided that should the aquarium request permission to expand in Stanley Park, a city-wide referendum would be held,” Maté wrote. “In 2005, the park board decided the question of phasing out cetacean captivity in Stanley Park should be put to a citywide referendum.Then in 2006, the park board, led by the nose by the aquarium, rescinded both of those earlier decisions… Holding a plebiscite or referendum to gauge public opinion is a first step. If the public votes against captivity, then that sets a clear direction for the politicians and the aquarium.” twitter.com/sthomas10

Visitors enjoy the million-gallon Open Sea exhibit at Monterey Bay Aquarium. PHOTO MONTEREY BAY AQUARIUM/RANDY WILDER


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 4

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F R I DAY, A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A17

Community D E N T A L Christians of all stripes $85 united at Easter

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In a rare occurrence, Easter this year falls on the same day for Roman Catholics and the Orthodox Christians who adhere to the Russian, Greek and other “eastern” churches. Because Roman Catholic holy days are determined by the Gregorian calendar while the Orthodox cycle is based on the Julian calendar, these sacred days rarely coincide. This decade, in fact, has been almost unparalleled. In addition to this year, Easter coincided in 2010 and 2011, a phenomenon that will not be repeated for another 800 years. Not quite as rare as the calendar coincidence, but still unusual, is the celebration that will take place this weekend in a modest church just off Commercial Drive. St. John of Shanghai is the only English-language

Orthodox church in Vancouver. Ancient traditions will unfold and ancient hymns sung, but all in the tongue most Vancouverites know. Because of the accessible language, St. John is a magnet for converts to Orthodoxy, including its priest, Father Justin Hewlett, who estimates about 90 per cent of his congregation originated in another tradition. Just as the calendars diverge and converge, so do traditions in the two oldest branches of Christianity, which broke apart 960 years ago. It may be symbolic of their respective places in Canadian society that the Orthodox parishioners of St. John of Shanghai will celebrate Pascha, Easter, in a former convent rented from the far grander St. Francis of Assisi Roman Catholic church across the street. For observant Christians of all stripes, Easter Sunday is the culmination of 40 intense days of spiritual

preparation and, in many cases, intermittent fasting and self-denial. From the commemoration of Jesus’s crucifixion on what the Orthodox call Great and Holy Friday through the highlight of the Christian calendar on Sunday, the dichotomy of grief and joy that defines Easter weekend may be most starkly comprehended in the sudden change from solemn darkness to jubilant illumination that parishioners at St. John of Shanghai Orthodox Church will experience at midnight on Sunday. At 11:30 Saturday night, the congregation will gather in darkness, singing solemn hymns and praying. Some will have spent the day at church, chanting the entire Psalter, all 151 Psalms.They will proceed into the spring night, bearing a shroud representing Jesus that they symbolically entombed the day before. continued on next page

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 4

John Oliver Secondary Renewal Open House You are invited to a drop-in open house as we plan for the renewal of John Oliver Secondary School.

Thursday, April 24, 2014 3:00pm - 7:30pm The Vancouver School Board will be renewing John Oliver to improve earthquake safety and, as part of this process, we are consulting with the local neighbourhood. This open house will provide details on our plans and give you a chance to share your ideas.

If you cannot attend please visit: www.vsb.bc.ca/districtfacilities/projects/johnoliversecondary

WHERE:

John Oliver Secondary (Learning Commons)

530 E 41st Avenue Vancouver BC V5W 1P3 41st Ave.

Fraser St.

WHEN:

St. George St.

A18

43rd Ave.

For further information: Tim McGeer, John Oliver Principal 604-713-8938 tmcgeer@vsb.bc.ca

Community Easter is celebrated continued from previous page

Then they will circle the church three times, carrying the shroud atop the Gospel. They will approach the closed door of the church, proceeding under a canopy created by the shroud, where they will sing “Let God arise. Let His enemies be scattered” before Father Justin knocks. As the door opens, the priest will incant, “Christ is risen!” Congregants will reply “Indeed, he is risen.” As they enter the church, they will encounter a world transformed. From darkness, the church has been decorated in white and is illuminated in the flames of countless candles.The tone of gravity that has defined the previous weeks, and especially the previous three days, changes to triumph and jubilation as the parishioners receive the Eucharist, the communion, before breaking into a party likely to last well into the early hours of the morning. Most of those present will have brought a Paschal basket, filled with the foods they have denied themselves

For Christians, this Sunday signifies the miracle at the core of the faith.

PHOTO JIM FOREST

through the Lenten period — meat, fish, cheese, eggs and especially a sweet Paschal bread.Wine will flow freely. For Christians worldwide, this Sunday signifies the miracle at the core of the faith: that Jesus, the son of God, died at Calvary, carrying the sins of those who believe, and was resurrected on the third day, before ascending to heaven to sit at

the right hand of God. In scores of languages, in almost every country on earth, employing rituals, prayers, hymns and traditions that differ vastly, more than one billion people will be united in belief and celebration. In Vancouver, which is home to Christians from around the world, both unity and diversity will be reflected in the way Easter is celebrated.

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F R I DAY, A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Arts&Entertainment

A19

GOT ARTS? 604.738.1411 or events@vancourier.com

April 18 - 22, 2014 1. Get your geek on as Vancouver’s answer to Comicon, Fan Expo Vancouver, spreads its nerdy cape, cloak of invisibility and talons across the Vancouver Convention Centre April 18 to 20.The third annual family-friendly celebration of comics, sci-fi, horror, anime and gaming gives fans a chance to leave their parents’ basement, dress up as their favourite superhero and mix and mingle with such celebs as Bruce Campbell, Jon Heder (Napoleon Dynamite) Giancarlo Esposito (Gus on Breaking Bad!) and StephenYeun who plays Glenn on TheWalking Dead.Why not that kid who plays Rick’s petulant son Carl? Because he’s annoying and deserves to get eaten by a walker. Just saying. For more info, go to fanexpovancouver.com. Or, if you’re inclined, “use the force” and see where that gets you. 2. A fixture on Vancouver theatre stages, actor Jeff Gladstone puts on his singersongwriter hat and celebrates the release of his debut album, Hell of a Girl. Gladstone and his band the Bad Ideas join forces with the 30-member Kingsgate Chorus for a theatrical concert and record release show April 19 at the Rio Theatre that’s described as “part cowboy opera, part film noir and part Moulin Rouge.” It’s also inspired by the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice… naturally. Details and tickets at riotheatre.ca. 3.Venezuelan-born,Toronto-based singer Eliana Cuevas brings her Latin jazz stylings to Pat’s Pub of all places, April 19, in support of her most recent album, Espejo. Details at patspub.ca.

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4. A U.K. garage band that will restore your faith in the rejuvenating powers of rock and roll, the Jim Jones Revue returns to Vancouver for a highly anticipated show at the WISE Hall April 21. Plus they look like they were pulled from a casting call for Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels. Local yokel Cousin Harley opens.Tickets at the WISE Lounge, Red Cat Records, Highlife Records and brownpapertickets.com. Details at wisehall.ca. 5.The classic Sherlock Holmes adventure The Hound of Baskervilles gets turned on its ear in Bad Dog Productions’ comedic spoof, directed by Ellie King. It runs April 22 to May 3 at Granville Island’s Studio 1398.Tickets at sherlockholmes.bpt.me. More info at baskervilles.org.

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For video and web content, scan page using the Layar app.


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 4

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Arts&Entertainment At the risk of pointing out the obvious, K&K would like to draw your attention to the fact that Easter Sunday falls on April 20 this year. As many of you are equally aware, the 20th day of the fourth month (a.k.a. 4/20) is like Christmas for stoners. Lore has it the number 420 first gained significance in the early 1970s thanks to a group of California teenagers who regularly smoked up at 4:20 p.m. From those burning embers wafted the North American-wide observance of April 20 as a marijuana Mardi Gras.Why not the fourth day of the 20th month you might be asking?That is a very good question that we’ll let you ponder. The last time Easter fell on April 20 was in 2003. The only thing significant we were able to find out about that day was there was a bench clearing brawl between the Arizona Diamondbacks and the St. Louis Cardinals — major league baseball teams named after a poisonous snake and a red bird, which

would make a wicked wilderness battle if you ask us. The next time Easter Sunday falls on 4/20 will be 2025, and by then we suspect there will be smartphone apps to get you high… if there even are such things as smartphones. Maybe we’ll all have tiny cellular chips implanted in our earlobes that can also turn reality into a simulated, multiplayer war game where users fight the ghosts of their past in order to achieve some semblance of truth in the now. Or maybe we’ll all be dead by then. But we’re trying really hard not to go down that rabbit hole. Incidentally, 420 years from now Easter Sunday will fall on March 26, which is Robert Frost and Leonard Nimoy’s birthday. Frost, of course, was a poet famous for taking “the road less travelled,” probably because that’s where he stashed his weed, and Nimoy is best known for playing Spock on StarTrek, which we’re told is a lot more enjoyable when you’re stoned.Why is it called getting stoned, anyway? We remember a story we had to read in high school called “The Lottery” where these old-timey people gathered in the town square

to stone to death a random person selected from a lottery, kind of like Hunger Games but without an attractive young woman as the protagonist.We’re not even sure if there was a protagonist in “The Lottery,” unless the protagonist was society as a whole with its extremes of conformity, because when you really think about it, at the end of the day aren’t we all just cogs in a vast machine where we wake up every day, put on our meat masks and perform a series of tasks that we’ve been groomed for since the day we were born? Have you ever seen pictures of someone giving birth?That is some crazy stuff. And why don’t babies cry when they’re in the womb instead of only after they come out? How freaky would that be if you were pregnant and you could hear your baby crying inside your belly — just a bunch of muffled non-words like the sound of parents talking in a Charlie Brown cartoon. Man do we love Charlie Brown cartoons.They’re always so sad, but in a good way because sometimes it feels so good to feel so sad, right? Apples. Honey Crisps are the best. twitter.com/KudosKvetches

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F R I DAY, A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A21

Arts&Entertainment

Shaw still in demand STATE OF THE ARTS Cheryl Rossi

crossi@vancourier.com

A play that was banned for 30 years is coming to the Rickshaw April 22 to 27. Director Marisa Smith wanted to produce Mrs. Warren’s Profession in the Downtown Eastside because it resonates with what’s happening with sex work today. Smith was working the night shift at the Downtown Eastside Women’s Centre when she read the 121-yearold George Bernard Shaw play that raises questions about prostitution and indicts gender inequality. “There’s a speech at the end of Act 1 where Mrs. Warren talks about why she started in prostitution and it basically came down to that she had no other options in terms of feeding herself and clothing herself,” Smith said. “And many of the women that I was working with at the shelter, that’s what they were going through, they’re surviving.” Shaw’s play became even more relevant to modern times after the Supreme Court struck down Canada’s prostitution laws in December. “Now we’re going through a period of examining what the next set of laws should be… that becomes more of a question of

Director Marisa Smith wanted to produce George Bernard Shaw’s 121year-old play Mrs. Warren’s Profession because it raises questions about prostitution and gender inequality that are relevant to what’s happening in the Downtown Eastside today. PHOTO KAARINA VENALAINEN

values. Shaw was playing with that, too,” Smith said. “What he was trying to articulate is that it’s society in general that’s proposing these economic laws that allow women to be so marginalized that they end up doing this, so it’s a much bigger issue.” Smith, artistic producer of Alley Theatre, decided the production should be presented not only in a way that entertains with live music and costumes mixing vintage-style corsets with exposed zippers, studs and PVC, but also informs with

an interactive website that includes five mini documentaries. Smith, who won the Joanna Maratta Award for displaying promise to affect theVancouver theatre community, wants visitors not only to have a good time but also to feel more informed when conversations about sex work arise. Along with the website, the production will host a panel discussion with representatives of two organizations that serve sex workers following the matinee performance on April 26. Continued next page

vancourier.com

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A22

THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 4

FROM

BY INS CHOI

A SOULPEPPER PRODUCTION

the cast. photo by bruce monk

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K I M ’S C O N V E N I E N C E

“A rollicking comedy...in a Korean– Canadian corner store” —The Globe and Mail PLAYING AT

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Arts&Entertainment Old play explores oldest profession Continued from page 21 Linda Quibell plays “Kitty”Warren, who has secretly worked as a prostitute and brothel owner to put her daughter, played by Melissa Oei, through the best boarding schools. But when Vivie learns of her mother’s profession, the two strong-willed women battle over what it means to be a modern woman. Shaw’s play, which he

wrote in 1893, explores capitalism and politics.“And then it’s embedded in this witty, light, fun piece,” Smith said. She has ditched the oldschool dialect and “Britishisms” to keep the production accessible to modern audiences. Visitors to the Rickshaw can grab a drink at the bar, perhaps a special whisky concoction, soak in the live classical music that’s going

to be updated with more contemporary sounds by cellist Shanto Acharia of Fond of Tigers, violinist Meredith Bates and harpist Elisa Thorn, and respond to texts that will be projected on a large screen.The play will unfold in four different locations in the Rickshaw. AlleyTheatre enjoys toying with the conventions of traditional theatre. It presented Lost in Place under the big

yellow crane on Granville Island, Wicked Shorts and Confessions in cafes. The Rickshaw is making free tickets available to members of the Downtown Eastside community through the Carnegie Community Centre and $3 from every ticket will be donated directly to WISH Drop-In Centre and PACE Society. Details at mrswarrens.ca. twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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F R I DAY, A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A23

Community

RAISIN’ HOPE: Twenty years ago Judi Miller Knapp began a small fundraiser in her home for breast cancer research in honour of family members lost to the disease.The numbers outgrew her home. She took her party to a local Richmond hotel and Nite of Hope was born. Since its inception, more than $3.7 million has been raised for the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation, B.C. andYukon Region.Yours truly emceed the 16th running at Richmond’s River Rock Show Theatre. Chaired by Rob and Richelle Akimow, and featuring Canada’s Queen of Punk, Bif Naked, a breast cancer survivor, $180,000 was raised for a new ultrasound unit at Richmond Hospital’s breast screening centre. PARTY TIME: Omega hosted a party of Olympic proportions at their downtown boutique. Canadian athletes who struck gold recently in Sochi were the guests of honour at the exclusive meet and greet. Back-to-back gold medalists Charles Hamelin (speed skating) and Heather Moyse and Kaillie Humphries (bobsleigh) were joined by the captain of the Canadian women’s curling team Jennifer Jones for a special event in celebration of their achievements. In addition to the commemorative watches received from the games official timekeeper, Hamelin, Jones and Humphries look to add more Olympic hardware come 2018 in South Korea.

Judi Miller Knapp’s house party has grown to become of the largest fundraisers in the province for breast cancer research. Since it’s inception, $3.9 million has been raised for research, initiatives and equipment.

Space man Chris Hadfield touched down in North Van to take a photo with actor Paul Duchart and speak at the Summit Negotiations Society conflict and peace studies program benefit at Centennial Theatre.

Curlers, from left, Shelly Werboweski, Bryan Hope, Grant Hurle and Jennifer White surround Jennifer Jones, captain of the Olympic gold medal Canadian women’s curling team.

Chairs Rob and Richelle Akimow flanked rocker Bif Naked at the Nite of Hope fundraiser. Over $180,000 was raised for a new ultrasound unit at Richmond Hospital’s breast screening centre.

SNOW BALL: In 2006, Olympian Manuel Osborne-Paradis started the Get Up and Go bursary offering a boy and girl funds to become better skiers.The following year Mike Janyk joined in and helped support four more young athletes. Their efforts seeded the Mike and Manny Camp, a unique ski camp for aspiring International Ski Federation racers — aged 16 and 17 — from across the country who might not otherwise be able to afford a top-level training program to reach their potential.The alpine stars hosted their third annual fundraiser — a kitchen party — at the Miele Showroom in downtown Vancouver.

email yvrflee@hotmail.com twitter @FredAboutTown

Olympians and world cup ski racers Mike Janyk, left, and Manuel Osborne-Paradis, right, welcomed the Canucks’ new president of operations Trevor Linden to their kitchen party in support of aspiring young racers.

Jon Paul Holt and Viktoria Langton fronted the Mike and Manny camp fundraiser set to raise $60,000 for under privileged and under financed future ski prospects.


A24

THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 4

Sports&Recreation

Unbeaten Trojans hand Cougars their first loss of the season David Thompson clings to 5-0 record BADMINTON DAVID THOMPSON KILLARNEY

06 05

Megan Stewart

mstewart@vancourier.com

Led by bantam ace MichelleYeung and senior Martin Low, the David Thompson Trojans leapt to a 5-0 record and handed the Killarney Cougars their first defeat of the season in badminton April 16 at Killarney. The East Division clash

between the undefeated teams Wednesday afternoon was the toughest of the season for the rivals who will likely hold the top two spots in the East Division heading into the city championships in three weeks. “They are our biggest rivals of the past four years,” said Trojan coach andThompson grad, JulianWong. Between the two teams, eight student-athletes have competed at the Canadian junior national championships, including Low and his brother Michael, Yeung and Rocky Ken from

Thompson as well as Simon Chang, Felix Law, Jeffrey So and HaydnYee from Killarney. “All the national level players on our team can play singles, doubles and mixed [doubles],” said Cougars co-coach Ringo Tang, a Killarney graduate. The Trojans’Yeung, 13, is B.C.’s second-ranked player in her age group and trains with the Vancouver club Ace Badminton. She won her singles match 21-13, 21-10 by smartly toying with her opponent. “I moved her around the

court,” saidYeung. “It feels awesome to win.” Low and his doubles partner won both their doubles matches in three sets, including a gripping game against Cougars Law andYee, who won the final four points of the second set to force a tiebreaker.TheTrojans won 21-15, 17-21, 21-18. Killarney held on for a seven-game winning streak last year and won last year’s meeting with Thompson on their way to the city finals, where they lost 6-5 to Prince of Wales. “I have been coaching

for four or five years,” said Killarney’s Tang. “I never won city’s as a player and I want that for them.” This year however, the Trojans are the team to beat.The coaches,Wong and Anthony Li, both graduated from Thompson and want the city title for their alma mater. “We have a lot of graduates this year and we want them to have the opportunity to win a banner,” saidWong. In the West Division, undefeated Prince of Wales (3-0) has a game in hand but is tied at six points with

Churchill (3-1) and Point Grey (3-1). The team that wins the city championships, held May 6 to 9, qualifies directly for provincials May 29 to 31 in Richmond.The secondand third-place teams from Vancouver, Richmond and Burnaby advance to Lower Mainland playoffs along with the winner of the private school league. At provincials, the hybrid team of St. George’s and Crofton House have won the B.C. title twice in the past three years. twitter.com/MHStewart

VSSAA SENIOR BADMINTON STANDINGS EAST DIVISION TEAM DAVID THOMPSON KILLARNEY VANCOUVER TECHNICAL CHARLES TUPPER BRITANNIA GLADSTONE WINDERMERE TEMPLETON JOHN OLIVER

GP W 5 5 4 3 5 4 4 4 4

5 4 3 2 2 1 1 1 0

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0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

10 8 6 4 4 2 2 2 0

W5 L1 W1 W1 L1 L1 L3 W1 L4

WEST DIVISION TEAM PRINCE OF WALES WINSTON CHURCHILL POINT GREY ERIC HAMBER UNIVERSITY HILL LORD BYNG MAGEE KITSILANO

GP W 3 4 4 4 2 4 3 2

3 3 3 2 1 1 0 0

L

T PTS STRK

0 1 1 2 1 3 3 2

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

6 6 6 4 2 2 0 0

W3 W3 W2 L2 L1 L1 L3 L2

Killarney’s Juan Karamoy returns a shot in a boys doubles match. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

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F R I DAY, A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A25

Sports&Recreation

Best online resources for cyclists fitness recommendations and even a section where you can get answers to your bike-related questions.

Bike Commuter Cabal

Cyclists race in the inaugural UBC Grand Prix in July 2011. The race is scheduled for July 8, 2014. PHOTO DAN TOULGOET

WHEEL WORLD Kay Cahill

kay@sidecut.ca

Finally, it’s spring. Finally, the weather is warm enough to put away our heavy winter cycling layers and log some miles in sunnier conditions. It was a pleasure to be on the bike in the warm weather last weekend. Now’s the time when fairweather riders look forward to bringing out their bikes after a winter of cycle hiber-

nation. I was asked several questions about what online resources I’d recommend for riders who are returning to regular biking after the break. It’s almost too hard to know where to start with this one. There is so much great information online for cyclists, whether you’re looking to ride a new route, buy a new bike, or start doing your own maintenance. After taking a long, hard look at my favourites list, these are my top three recommended websites.

UBC Cycling Route Planner

cyclevancouver.ubc.ca I’ve mentioned this before but it’s hard to overstate just how useful this resource is for Vancouver cyclists. Google now also provides reasonable cycling directions, but the route planner offers a host of additional options, including the ability to restrict your ride to designated bike routes or choose the route with the least elevation gain. You can even use the location of water fountains as a route parameter!

BikeRadar

bikeradar.com This is a fabulous site with a wealth of information on almost every cycling related topic you can imagine. It started life as a site for gear reviews and remains great for researching bikes and accessories, but there’s far more to it than just the reviews. There are illustrated guides and videos that show common maintenance tasks, news about all kinds of biking from cyclocross to commuting, a guide to riding for beginners, forums,

plus.google.com/ +bikecommutercabal Contrary to popular opinion, Google+ isn’t a social media wasteland. It’s actually home to some thriving cycle communities, and this is the best of them. Filled with friendly folk from all over the world who are drawn together by a love of bikes, it’s a fantastic place to share stories and photos, ask for tech tips, and maybe plan a HIRL (hangout in real life) with cyclists in your neck of the woods. I love reading about other people’s rides and bikes, and I particularly enjoy being a part of a community that — while all kinds of bike discussion is welcome — does maintain a primary focus on commuting and its related issues. These are my top choices. But what do you think? Can you recommend other resources that I haven’t included here? I’d love to hear your suggestions and know what you find useful. The best will be featured in a future column. Kay Cahill is a cyclist and librarian who believes bikes are for life, not just for commuting.

B.C.’s super week Registration is now open for B.C. Superweek, the more-than-a-week week in July when national and international pro cyclists return to the Lower Mainland for nine races in 10 days. Held in seven different cities from July 4 to 13, B.C. Superweek starts with the Tour de Delta and then hits Vancouver streets for two criterium races. The UBC Grand Prix, sponsored by Mahony & Sons Public House, is held on a very technical course on July 8. There are races for professional men and women and Cat 3/4 men and, for the first time, Cat 3/4 women. Organizers promise the purse will be a minimum $10,000. The Gastown Grand Prix, whose title sponsor is Global Relay, became a member of the prestigious championship series, USA CRITS, in February. The men’s and women’s races, held this year on July 9, counts the highest single-day purse for a Canadian criterium. That prize is $50,000. The cobblestone streets and crowds are also fantastic. Register at bcsuperweek.ca. — Megan Stewart

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A26

THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 4

STAY CLASSY, SAN DIEGO by May Globus

Social editor May Globus shares her San Diego hot spots in our latest travel itinerary. With sun and surf, good cuisine and fine folk in spades, this place is much more than your average sleepy beach town. Planning a trip to San Diego? Visit www.vitamindaily.com to learn more.

TRAVEL & LEISURE

SLEEPING BEAUTY by Elizabeth Hewitt

Not only does the Organic Sleepy Hat score major points in the cute department, the clever fold-down mask blocks light and visual stimulation, making it much easier for tired tots to remain restful while you’re out and about. Sweet dreams!

MOMS & KIDS

Available at Hip Baby, 2110 W. 4th Ave., Vancouver. Read more at www.vitamindaily.com

GROUP EFFORT by Adrienne Matei

When it comes to art, together is definitely better. Winsor Gallery’s latest exhibition demonstrates the long reach of Vancouver’s artistic community by asking 18 artists to each invite another artist to show alongside them—concurrently, if you will. Read more at www.vitamindaily.com

ARTS & CULTURE

BLACKTAIL FLORIST by Adrienne Matei

Don’t go to Blacktail Florist looking for a spring arrangement. For food made from the best B.C. has to offer, however, this brand-new Gastown eatery should be your next dining destination. Our recommendations plus a nifty drink recipe can be found at www.vitamindaily.com

DINING & NIGHTLIFE

Visit us ONLINE at www.vitamindaily.com for upcoming contests and giveaways!

START NOTHING: 4:21 p.m. to 9:18 p.m. Monday, 9:10 a.m. to 11:55 p.m. Wednesday, and 1:03 p.m. Friday to 3:01 a.m. Saturday. PREAMBLE: Harry Dent, a newsletter writer, says 2014 should bring a devastating crash in North American stock markets. In a long-range view, I’m inclined to agree, somewhat. (I’ll republish my detailed economic forecast next week, if I remember.) Even in the short-term, last week brought sudden declines in tech and bio-tech stocks, and the NASDAQ officially went into a correction: a 10 per cent fall. Dent says the crash will start this April. (He originally said March. Nobody’s perfect.) HOWEVER: I’m worried that we’ll see dangerous markets this week (Sunday to Wednesday, April 20-23). If the Dow falls more than 500 points now to mid-week, I’d sell — Thursday or early Friday, when the market’s bouyant. Or put “stops”” under your equities, if you own them. (But be active, also, for a sudden dip might be followed by a sudden upward surge — more likely Thursday/Friday. If your stop sells you out, then the market rebounds, you lose.

This won’t be an easy week, Aries — though everything lightens up the second half. A month of money, earnings, spending and possessions has just begun. Your earnings might be affected by your career output, which is impacted quite strongly Sunday/Monday. Higher-ups might have something to say about your innovativeness or your headstrong character.

Various cudgels fall, various blows rain down now through Wednesday. Like Cancer, Aries and Capricorn, you face a gauntlet of problems, but in many cases you are the one who instigated or triggered this mess (or this face-off, conflict) so your first and best defense is to admit you aren’t innocent. (Russia’s Putin is a Libra.)

Major conflicts surround you Taurus, but most of these deflect off you and they concern others much more deeply. Still, be aware, alert, compassionate and diplomatic Sunday to Wednesday. Wisdom, international affairs, far travel, higher education and all intellectual/cultural pursuits “colour” Sunday/ Monday. Talk, gossip (or a secret you’re hiding) can undermine your position, might even lead to a lawsuit.

The accent lies on relationships, opportunities, new horizons and dealing with the public for several weeks. This is a “green zone” for you now for at least a decade, meaning success is very possible. Sunday to Wednesday bring many long-standing frictions, conflicts and imbalances to a climax. Expect problems in communications, legalities, travel, international affairs, education, driving, work, health and with civil servants.

Like Taurus’ experiences, this week’s conflicts might roll off you like water off a duck. Still, dangers exist: protect your investments, your secrets and your health. Generally, you’re in a hibernation cycle, so rest, contemplate, observe, plan and stay out of the hustling, bustling crowd. Sunday/Monday bring secrets and mysteries, sexual lures and financial crises (which you might be able to grab as opportunities: e.g., stocks fall, you buy).

The accent lies on health and work for several weeks ahead. This will be followed by a period of opportunity, some of it resting on what you manage to accomplish now to late May. Sunday/Monday focus on earnings, spending, possessions, memory, and sensual desires. Tuesday/Wednesday bring casual friends, communications, visits and errands, paperwork.

Like Aries, you can face the full brunt of this week’s problems, Cancer. Remain cheerful, optimistic, and steadfast. Realize you’re the luckiest of the “problem signs” (Aries, you, Libra and Cap) this year. Still, brace yourself: Sunday/Monday bring crises in career (which is changing) and relationships and the biggest problem occurs where career meets relationship.

You start this week with high energy and effectiveness, charisma and clout – which helps you handle the gauntlet of barriers and problems life flings your way Sunday to Wednesday. Allies refuse to co-operate; opportunities smash against the reality of those who don’t like you; parents and bosses, VIPs and authorities refuse your requests or actively attack your projects, and your fiefdom (family, employees, etc.) rebels.

Crises and conflicts are in the air Sunday to Wednesday but they tend to happen to your friend or neighbour and to deflect off you. Still, take care with work and health Sunday/Monday and with relationships Tuesday/Wednesday. All four days can trigger legal, international, educational, cultural, love, publishing or insurance problems, work or health difficulties.

Retreat, rest, contemplate and plan Sunday/Monday. All around you, the world is in conflict: friends, neighbours, perhaps nations. Handle only imminent crises — perhaps a car problem, illness, gossip or intrusive noise, communications snafus. Your energy rises late Monday night through Wednesday, when the second tranche of troubles stumbles in.

A tough week, Virgo but mostly for others. Still, remain cautious Sunday through Wednesday, when various factors (some of them having slowly risen for weeks, months) interfere with your friendships, popularity, romances, creative works, children, intimate relations, secrets, earnings, possessions and finances. On the one hand, crisis brings opportunity (to the brave, they always leave that part out) but it also brings danger. Be very careful with investments, put stops on your stocks, etc.

The main accent now to late May lies on chatter, communications, emails, short trips, errands, paperwork and casual acquaintances/siblings. Don’t take off on wild goose chases, which could be very possible Sunday to Wednesday when various alarms are raised. Be thankful that the problems that sail all around you are not, at core, yours. Still, you need to face certain problems: romance or creative projects run into a lack of money.

Monday: Queen Elizabeth II (88). Tuesday: Jack Nicholson (77). Wednesday: Michael Moore (60 ). Thursday: Barbra Streisand (72), Friday: Al Pacino (74). Saturday: Carol Burnett (81). Sunday: Ace Frehley (63).


F R I DAY, A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A27

Today’shomes Vancouver aims to improve city’s development climate

Developers upset over what they say are unpredictable and complex processes Glen Korstrom

gkorstrom@biv.com

The City of Vancouver is responding to developer complaints that its development approval process is unpredictable, complicated and time-consuming. For developers who believe that the city plays favourites and is uneven in how it treats applicants, however, it will take more change before they embark on projects in the city. “Vancouver has become one of the most horrible places to do business imaginable, unless you’re one of a few developers,” said Macdonald Development Corp. owner Robert Macdonald. “It’s virtually impossible to get the same margins unless you’re one of the insiders.” Macdonald has developed Vancouver projects such as the $200 million Hudson Condominiums and the $250 million Capitol Residences on his former Capitol 6 site on Granville Street in tandem with Wall Financial Corp. He vows to stay away until there’s a shakeup at city hall, even though city staff stress that they are fair. “The city treats everyone the same as applicants,” said Vancouver’s general manager of planning, Brian Jackson.

He said applications from developers who understand the city’s economic, social and environmental goals are likely to move faster than others because staff provide reports to council only when all aspects of a development are complete. Those “aspects” include addressing how the project contributes to Vancouver’s aim to be the world’s greenest city by 2020. Jackson is aware of longstanding complaints from developers over what they say is Vancouver’s arbitrary process for extracting community amenity contributions (CACs).Vancouver has two sets of charges that it requires developers to pay: • Development cost levies are set out in legislation and allow the city to collect money for infrastructure upgrades, transportation and affordable housing. • CACs, which are more controversial because they have historically been negotiated and are not required by law, pay for additional amenities such as daycare spaces, heritage restoration and parkland. Jackson describes them as “voluntary,” but projects don’t proceed if a developer refuses to pay CACs. “They really want to extract big CACs when they rezone,” said Anthem Prop-

Vancouver is following the example of cities such as Burnaby, by moving toward fixed price-per-square-foot targets for CAC contributions.. PHOTO WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

erties owner Eric Carlson. “There are huge off-site construction costs such as exterior landscaping. In the old days, you provided asphalt, a curb, sidewalk and the building. Now, there are bioswales [fancy drainage systems that often involve mini-gardens] and little perimeter parks and things like that.” Carlson is not opposed to the city wanting to improve infrastructure, but he believes it makes development in Vancouver more expensive than in other parts of the Lower Mainland.

Vancouver is, however, following the example of cities such as Burnaby, by moving toward fixed priceper-square-foot targets for CAC contributions. That has been the case in the Norquay and Little Mountain neighbourhoods, and Jackson said the city intends to do the same thing along the Cambie corridor. The city’s general manager of planning is also trying to placate developers who financed heritage restoration projects in exchange for bonus density and have thus far been

unable to sell that density. Bonus density is square footage that can be sold to other developers so that they can use it on future projects to build taller or bigger buildings than the city would otherwise authorize. Developers that own bonus density say the city has been a laggard in allowing other developers to buy and use bonus density as a CAC. But Jackson said that’s changing. He added that the city is buying $4.8 million worth of density in an auction, the bidding deadline for

which was earlier this month. Despite controversy over Vancouver’s bonus density program, Burnaby and other Lower Mainland cities have increasingly started selling extra density for a fixed amount that would be a contribution to a community amenity. “A lot of municipalities are charging for bonus density,” said Bosa Development Corp. owner Nat Bosa. “It’s good for both municipalities and for developers in that you don’t have to take the density if you don’t want it.”

Scenery, climate driving foreign investment in Vancouver real estate Emma Crawford Hampel

ecrawford@biv.com

Home sales in the Greater Vancouver area have been healthy thus far this year, due in no small part to the city’s attractiveness to foreign investors and newcomers. Re/Max’s Spring Market

Trends Report 2014 shows that the lifestyle the city offers have contributed to a 5.4 per cent increase in home sales pricing to $804,742 in March 2014 when compared with one year ago, when the average price was $763,319. “Vancouver’s temperate

climate, its social, cultural and economic links to mainland China and stunning scenery have driven a market that is considerable healthier compared with the same time last year,” the report said. The market is now balanced between inventory and demand, and has been

since the beginning of the year. Re/Max expects this trend to continue. “Modest growth in sales is projected, with prices anticipated to rise by two per cent this year,” said the report. Inventory levels will drop, Re/Max predicts, even in spite of stricter

lending criteria. Younger buyers — mostly first-time buyers and those upgrading to larger spaces — are driving increased sales, and this is leading to new types of requirements for the homes they are looking for. “Hardwood floors and tiles are common expecta-

tions, and there is now a whole generation of buyers who have to look up “linoleum” on the Internet,” said the report. Re/Max also found that more women than men have made up the majority of first-time home buyers so far this year.

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##

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ON YOUR SERVICE

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SE LL IN GOM PA CT SU BC CA R IN BC

HERE’SHOWITWORKS:

2014 FIT DX

Lease for

67

$

£

0.99% APR €

0 down

$

freight and PDI included.

Bi-weekly on a 60 month term with 130 payments. MSRP $16,130** includes freight and PDI Model shown: GE8G2EEX

# 2014 CIVIC DX Lease for

85

$

* 1.99% APR #

1

G S E LL IN PA T C O M BCC IN R A C †

WITH WITH GENUINE GENUINE HONDA HONDA OIL OIL CHANGE CHANGE

freight and PDI included. Bi-weekly on a 60 month term with 130 payments. MSRP $17,185** includes freight and PDI Model shown: FB2E2EEX

2014 CR-V LX Lease for

134

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Ω

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0 down do

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freight and PDI included. luded.

You spend: $500.00-$599.99, You save $50.00 You spend: $600.00-$699.99, You save $60.00 You spend: $700.00-$799.99, You save $70.00 You spend: $800.00-$899.99, You save $80.00 You spend: $900.00 or more, You save $100.00

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Bi-weekly on a 60 month term with 130 payments. yments. MSRP $27,685** includes freight and PDI Model shown: RM3H3EES

• Oil & filter change. Check for fluid leaks • Battery load/charging test • Inspect coolant level and freezing point • Check cooling system, inspect hoses and clamps • Inspect all brakes for wear % and condition • Inspect brake calipers, wheel cylinders and parking brake • Inspect tire wear and pressure and tire rotation • Inspect drive belt condition (if applicable)

$

88

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Reg $169.95

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bchonda.com †The Fit, Civic and CR-V were the #1 selling retail subcompact car, compact car, and compact SUV respectively in BC in 2013 based on Polk 2013 Dec YTD report. ‡In order to achieve $0 down payment, dealer will cover the cost of tire/battery tax, air conditioning tax (where applicable), environmental fees and levies on the 2014 CR-V LX, Accord LX, Civic DX and Fit DX only on behalf of the customer. £Limited time bi-weekly lease offer based on a new 2014 Fit DX model GE8G2EEX. €0.99% lease APR on a 60 month term with 130 bi-weekly payments O.A.C. Bi-weekly payment, including freight and PDI, is $67.49 based on applying $1,100.00 lease dollars and $4 dealer contribution (which are deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes); and $1,000.00 consumer incentive dollars (which are deducted from the negotiated selling price after taxes) Down payment of $0.00, first bi-weekly payment and $0 security deposit due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $8,773.70. Taxes, license, insurance and registration are extra. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometers.*Limited time bi-weekly lease offer based on a new 2014 Civic DX model FB2E2EEX. #1.99% lease APR on a 60 month term with 130 bi-weekly payments O.A.C. Bi-weekly payment, including freight and PDI, is $84.63 based on applying $600.00 lease dollars (which is deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes). Down payment of $0.00, first bi-weekly payment and $0 security deposit due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $11,001.90. Taxes, license, insurance and registration are extra. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometers. Ω Limited time bi-weekly lease offer based on a new 2014 CR-V LX 2WD model RM3H3EES. ¥1.99% lease APR on a 60 month term with 130 bi-weekly payments O.A.C. Bi-weekly payment, including freight and PDI, is $133.83 based on applying $1,000.00 lease dollars (which is deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes). Down payment of $0.00, first bi-weekly payment and $0 security deposit due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $17,397.90. Taxes, license, insurance and registration are extra. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometers. **MSRP is $16,130 / $17,185 / $27,685 including freight and PDI of $1,495 / $1,495 / $1,695 based on a new 2014 Fit DX model GE8G2EEX / new 2014 Civic DX model FB2E2EEX / 2014 CR-V LX 2WD model RM3H3EES. License, insurance, registration and taxes are extra and may be required at the time of purchase. ¥/£/€/Ω/#/* Prices and/or payments shown do not include a PPSA lien registration fee of $30.31 and lien registering agent's fee of $5.25, which are both due at time of delivery and covered by the dealer on behalf of the customer on the 2014 CR-V LX, Accord LX, Civic DX and Fit DX only. ‡/#/*/Ω/€/¥/£/** Offers valid from April 1st through 30th, 2014 at participating Honda retailers. Dealer may sell/lease for less. Dealer trade may be necessary on certain vehicles. Offers valid only for British Columbia residents at BC Honda Dealers locations. Offers subject to change or cancellation without notice. Terms and conditions apply. Visit www.bchonda.com or see your Honda retailer for full details.

* All offers are effective until May 15, 2014. Not applicable to tire sales. Taxes not included. Environmental levies extra. °Not to be combined with other offers. January 11,2014. Please consult Kingsway Honda for more details. Please present coupon during write-up. Valid at Kingsway Honda only. Limit one per person. Coupon does not apply to prior purchases.

12th and Kingsway, Vancouver CALL 604-873-3676

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Dealer # D8508


F R I DAY, A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

today’sdrive drive dr driv r e 20 Lexus RX 350 14

A33

Your journey starts here.

F-Sport

The RX line is designed to appeal to as broad a range as possible and clearly succeeds

BY BRENDAN McALEER brendanmcaleer@gmail.com Tweet: @brendan_mcaleer

The concept of the corporate grille, as far as I can make out, is that it should allow passersby to immediately know what brand you’re driving, no matter whether sedan or SUV. Thus, we have BMW’s ever-broadening twin-kidney grilles, propeller-sized Mercedes-Benz three-pointed stars, and now this. This is what Lexus refers to as their spindlegrille, a wasp-waisted design that adorns everything from the IS sedan up to the popular RX-series crossover. Its purpose appears to be frightening small children. Yikes! That’s quite an angry looking mug for such a formerly laid-back cruiser. Clearly, Lexus is anxious to inject some personality into their somewhat-vanilla people hauler. It looks like it might actually bite you. But on the other hand, the RX was always the prescription for pillowy softness and has the addition of the F-Sport designation transformed it into a combat cushion? Let’s find out. Aside from the Predator/Cylon/Darth Vader front-end, the rest of the RX350 remains relatively pleasing in its anonymity. The F-Sport designation adds 19” gunmetal alloys, LED strip-lighting up front, some minor sporty-looking trim and, of course, badges.

The RX line is designed to appeal to as broad a range as possible and clearly succeeds. Fully half of all Lexuses (Lexii?) sold in Canada are RX crossovers, either in hybrid trim as the 450h, or V6 , as here. The styling may be conservative but it works, and the larger wheels pair nicely with the sheet metal. Strong accent lines run along the belt-line, and the folded-paper crispness of some of the angles is very Japanese. While it might not look radically different from something like a Venza in profile, it’s a pretty good-looking rig. It should be noted that this shape has been with Lexus for some time — it’s a face lifted version of the model that debuted in 2008 — but it has aged nicely.There’s a reason the Lexus brand retains their value, and any subsequent model that will replace this car in the near future is unlikely to get wild and crazy curves.

Environment:

Regrettably, the inside of the RX350 hasn’t aged quite as nicely as the exterior. When compared to brand-new offerings like BMW’s redesigned X5 or Acura’s fresh MDX, the RX can be a little dated. For instance, there is more hard plastic than you find in competitors, although Lexus does a pretty good job of hiding most of it out of sight.The forward-mounted gated shifter is not a very modern-looking device — it’s a bit old school in here. Continued on next page

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A34

THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 4

today’sdrive continued from previous page

The RX350 F-Sport comes loaded with Satellite navigation, a 15-speaker Mark Levinson sound-system, heated and ventilated front seats, and pushbutton start. PHOTO SUPPLIED

+

0

%

FINANCING *

YOU PAY WHAT THE DEALER PAYS †

On select models. *Dealer is reimbursed for holdback included in invoice price. 2014

GLS model shown ♦ Selling Price: $19,140

ACCENT 4-DOOR L DEALER INVOICE PRICE:

OR

WITH

BI-WEEKLY PAYMENT

FINANCING FOR 96 MONTHS

0%

$ HWY: 5.3L/100 KM CITY: 7.5L/100 KM▼

WHITE, LOCAL, WARRANTY, AUTO STK# HY10718

OWN IT FOR

69

2013 HYUNDAI ACCENT GL

14,220

$

$13,995

AND

0

$

DOWN

ACCENT L 4-DOOR MANUAL. DEALER INVOICE PRICE INCLUDES $779 IN PRICE ADJUSTMENTSΩ, DELIVERY AND DESTINATION.

2014

Limited model shown♦ Selling Price: $23,754

ELANTRA L DEALER INVOICE PRICE:

OR

OWN IT FOR

WITH

BI-WEEKLY PAYMENT

FINANCING FOR 96 MONTHS

79

0%

$ HWY: 5.3L/100 KM CITY: 7.6L/100 KM▼

Performance:

16,352

$

$

2010 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GL GREY, WARRANTY, PWR GROUP STK#131110A

AND

0

$11,995

DOWN

ELANTRA L MANUAL. DEALER INVOICE PRICE INCLUDES $1,197 IN PRICE ADJUSTMENTSΩ, DELIVERY AND DESTINATION.

Limited model shown♦ Selling Price: $38,225

2014

SANTA FE SPORT DEALER INVOICE PRICE:

27,053

$

OR

OWN IT FOR

WITH

BI-WEEKLY PAYMENT

FINANCING FOR 96 MONTHS

135 0.9%

$

AND

0

$

2011 HYUNDAI GENESIS V6 TECH

DOWN

BLACK, NAVIGATION, BACK UP CAMERA STK#HY10731

SANTA FE SPORT 2.4L FWD. DEALER INVOICE PRICE INCLUDES $1,306 IN PRICE ADJUSTMENTSΩ, DELIVERY AND DESTINATION.

HWY: 7.3L/100 KM CITY: 10.2L/100 KM▼

GLS model shown ♦ Selling Price: $27,000

$24,995

2014

TUCSON GL DEALER INVOICE PRICE:

OR

22,797

$

OWN IT FOR

WITH

BI-WEEKLY PAYMENT

FINANCING FOR 96 MONTHS

118 1.9%

$

$

AND

0

DOWN

TUCSON 2.0 GL FWD MANUAL. DEALER INVOICE PRICE INCLUDES $462 IN PRICE ADJUSTMENTSΩ, DELIVERY AND DESTINATION.

HWY: 7.2L/100 KM CITY: 10.0L/100 KM▼

2012 HYUNDAI SANTA FE GL 3.5

YOU PAY THE INVOICE PRICE

PLUS GET

BLACK, ALLOYS, A/C, PWR GROUP STK#HY10751

0% FINANCING FOR 96 MONTHS

$23,995

5-year/100,000 km Comprehensive Limited Warranty †† 5-year/100,000 km Powertrain Warranty 5-year/100,000 km Emission Warranty

HyundaiCanada.com

TMThe Hyundai names, logos, product names, feature names, images and slogans are trademarks owned by Hyundai Auto Canada Corp. †Finance offer available O.A.C. from Hyundai Financial Services based on a new 2014 Accent 4-Door L Manual/Elantra L 6-Speed Manual/Santa Fe Sport 2.4L FWD/Tucson 2.0 GL FWD Manual with an annual finance rate of 0%/0%/0.9%/1.9% for 96 months. Bi-weekly payments are $69/$79/$135/$118. $0 down payment required. Cost of Borrowing is $0. Finance offer includes Delivery and Destination of $1,550/$1,550/$1,760/$1,760. Registration, insurance, PPSA, fees, levies, charges, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. Delivery and Destination charge includes freight, P.D.E., dealer admin fees and a full tank of gas. ‡Dealer Invoice Price of 2014 Accent 4-Door L Manual/Elantra L 6-Speed Manual/Santa Fe Sport 2.4L FWD/Tucson 2.0 GL FWD Manual are $14,220/$16,352/$27,053/$22,797. Prices include price adjustments of $779/$1,197/$1,306/$462 and includes Delivery and Destination of $1,550/$1,550/$1,760/$1,760. Registration, insurance, PPSA, fees, levies, charges, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. The customer prices are those reflected on the dealer invoice from Hyundai Auto Canada Corp. The dealer invoice price includes a holdback fee for which the dealer is subsequently reimbursed by Hyundai Auto Canada Corp. Price adjustments are calculated against the vehicle’s starting price. Price adjustments of up to $779/$1,197/$1,306/$462 available on in stock 2014 Accent 4 Door L 6-Speed Manual/Elantra L 6-Speed Manual/Santa Fe 2.4L FWD Auto/Tucson 2.0 GL FWD Manual on cash purchases. Price adjustments applied before taxes. Offer cannot be combined or used in conjunction with any other available offers. Offer is non-transferable and cannot be assigned. No vehicle trade-in required. ♦Price of models shown (with Price Adjustments): 2014 Accent 4 Door GLS/Elantra Limited/Santa Fe 2.0T Limited AWD/Tucson 2.4 GLS FWD are $19,140/$23,754/$38,225/$27,000. Prices include Price Adjustments of $1,109/$1,445/$2,434/$1,659, Delivery and Destination charges of $1,550/$1,550/$1,760/$1,760. Registration, insurance, PPSA, fees, levies, charges, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. ▼Fuel consumption for new 2014 Accent 4-Door L (HWY 5.3L/100KM; City 7.5L/100KM); 2014 Elantra L Manual (HWY 5.3L/100KM; City 7.6.L/100KM); 2014 Santa Fe Sport 2.4L FWD (HWY 7.3L/100KM; City10.2.L/100KM); 2014 Tucson 2.0 GL FWD Manual (HWY 7.2L/100KM; City10.0L/100KM) are based on Manufacturer Testing. Actual fuel efficiency may vary based on driving conditions and the addition of certain vehicle accessories. Fuel economy figures are used for comparison purposes only. †‡Ω♦Offers available for a limited time, and subject to change or cancellation without notice. Dealer may sell for less. Inventory is limited, dealer order may be required. Visit www.hyundaicanada.com or see dealer for complete details. ††Hyundai’s Comprehensive Limited Warranty coverage covers most vehicle components against defects in workmanship under normal use and maintenance conditions. Dealers are licensed under the Fair Trading Act.

2013 HYUNDAI SANTA FE LUXURY

445 Kingsway, Near 12th in Vancouver CALL 604-292-8188 | Service 604-292-8190 www.destinationhyundai.ca /DestinationHyundaiVancouver

However, there are a few things the RX350 does very well. First, it’s extremely easy to get in and out of, hitting the Goldilocks driving position even for shorter drivers. Next, the infotainment system may not have the flash of next-gen systems found elsewhere, but it’s very simple to use. Lexus’s track ball-based interface system takes some time to feel natural, but the menu and sub-menu layout are easy enough to navigate. You might never need to refer to the manual. It’s also, despite the declared sporting intent, a very comfortable vehicle. The seats are great up front, and while the rearseats aren’t perfect for passengers with longer legs — legroom is fine, but they’re mounted a bit low — there’s plenty of space for kids to spread out. The trunk is plenty big, and points must be awarded for seats that fold properly flat. All in all, it’s a usefully-sized machine that’s good for families — although a minivan would probably be better.

@Destinationhyun

your journey begins here

SILVER, LOCAL, SPORT, AWD STK#13867A

$28,995

But then, what minivan features sport-tuned suspension and paddleshifters? Along with the lower-profile tires and suspension tweaks, the F-Sport designation also gives the RX350 a unique eight-speed transmission. However, somewhat disappointingly, there isn’t any more power on tap. The engine, a silkysmooth 3.5L V6, still pumps out 270hp and 248lb/ft of torque. With a curb weight of nearly 2000kgs, that qualifies as adequate power, but nothing overwhelming. What’s more, the eight-speed transmission shifts in a leisurely fashion if left to its own devices. The result is a drive that’s no less smooth and refined than that of the ordinary RX350, but not one that grabs you by the lapels on a twisting mountain road. It’s very competent, handling bad weather with ease, and the steering is actually quite good. Engage the paddle shifters to help spur the eight-speed into a bit more zippy behaviour, and it’s the quickest feeling RX350 you can buy. Up on the Sea-to-Sky highway, in a driving downpour, the RX350 impressed with composure,

shrugging off the sheets of spray, and handling the long highway sweepers with aplomb. It would clearly make for a very comfortable long-distance touring ride. Get on the side-roads and it all comes apart a little. Body roll is controlled but pronounced, and the V6 works a bit hard with modest torque-to-weightratio. Considering this crossover is supposed to share DNA with madcap tarmac-shredders like the LFA and the IS-F, not to mention the delightfully sporty IS350 F-Sport, it’s not quite the performance advertised. Even the Acura MDX, a larger and heavier three-row car, can be better to drive here. Essentially, any wildness of character extends only as far as the scarylooking grille up front, and the blingy rims. It’ll still be very popular, with broad appeal, but the RX350 gets only a very mild dose of that F-Sport hot sauce.

Features:

On the other hand, this truck is crammed with value. The RX350 F-Sport comes loaded with Satellite navigation, a 15-speaker Mark Levinson sound-system, heated and ventilated front seats, and push-button start. While it doesn’t have multi-camera systems like some competitors, it does have a very clear rear-view camera that’s well placed and doesn’t get fogged out when driving in the rain. Unlike some of the German competition, everything you need is all bundled together here at a single price. Fuel economy is decent, at 11.2l/100kms in the city and 7.7l/100kms on the highway. This is about 0.5l/100kms better than the standard car in both cases, and as the RX encourages a relaxed driving style in all its trims, you may well see figures like this in regular use.

Green Light:

Strong value; reliability and resale; smooth, comfortable ride; good steering.

Stop Sign:

Not very sporty; slowshifting automatic transmission; only-adequate acceleration.

TheCheckeredFlag:

Sporty-looking outside, same smooth cruising personality inside.


F R I DAY, A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Brendan McAleer

brendanmcaleer@gmail.com

While automotive enthusiasts are always excited about the latest high-powered, stick-shift, wagon-bodied car that probably won’t even make it to North America, here’s a Canada-only original that gets me all excited in a different way. It’s the return of the plucky little Nissan Micra. My university roommate had one of the originals. We named it “Mikey” and it was extremely slow. Seriously, you couldn’t pick a fight with a kid in a Power Wheels Jeep. It was, however, almost comically fuel-efficient: “I gotta go put gas in Mikey.” “What, is it March again already?” Also, it was a fun little thing to drive, easy to park and ideally suited for the urban environment. The new one, based on the Nissan March, looks fantastic, with some of that old Nissan spunkiness. It’s got a perky little 1.6-litre engine, an available five-speed manual and it costs less than $10,000 for the base model. It also marks the demise of theVersa Sedan, which wasn’t really a bad car at all, just a little less sensible than buying a small hatchback. The Micra is also cheaper than theVersa Sedan, so visitors to Nissan showrooms will be able to have their pick of two economical hatchbacks — go for the Versa Note for more space and comfort, or keep an eye on the bottom line with the Micra. Last, just because I always have to throw out the request for something with a little more sporting prowess, it should be noted that you can get the March in a Nismo variant overseas. While I’d argue that we keep power levels the same for frugality, it’d be pretty neat if Nissan offered suspension and exhaust tuning

packages for cheapskates who want to speed skate.

Venom is the world’s fastest car

The Hennessy Venom GT, if you haven’t heard of it, is a Lotus Elise with a twin-turbo V-8 swapped in that makes 1,244 horsepower. It has a manual gearbox and, as you can imagine, is a tad tricky to drive. Imagine an angry rhinoceros attached to one of those harness racing buggies and you get the general idea. Now, Hennessy performance can claim the much vaunted title of world’s fastest production car, having run down the tarmac at the Kennedy Space Center at more than 435 kilometres per hour (270 miles per hour). For the record, that’s quicker than Bugatti has been able to get their cars to run. Unfortunately, this was only a one-way run, and because just 29Venoms are being built, that’s one run and one car short of the necessary limits required to go down in the Guinness Book ofWorld Records.The Venom does have a standing record as the fastest car to 300 km/h, so should you be hanging around in a pub with aVeyron owner, there’s always that argument to be made. However, let me throw down a gauntlet here, as unlikely as it is that John Hennessy is going to find himself reading a community newspaper in British Columbia. I have a challenge for you, good sir, and it’s one for the history books. Last year, Hennessy ran a nitrous-powered Stingray Corvette past the 320 km/ h mark on a new Texas toll road. Don’t worry - the road wasn’t open yet, and the cops were on hand to clock the speed, not to hand out a whopping ticket. #

Lease for

2014 FIT DX

67

$

£

0.99% APR $

0 down‡

freight and PDI included.

Bi-weekly on a 60 month term with 130 payments. MSRP $16,130** includes freight and PDI Model shown: GE8G2EEX

1

today’sdrive Offers valid until April 30, 2014. See toyota.ca for complete details on all cash back offers. In the event of any discrepancy or inconsistency between Toyota prices, rates and/or other information contained on toyotabc.ca and that contained on toyota.ca, the latter shall prevail. Errors and omissions excepted. 2014 Corolla CE 6M Manual BURCEM-A MSRP is $17,540 and includes $1,545 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning federal excise tax. *Lease example: 2014 Corolla CE 6M with a vehicle price of $17,265 (includes $275 Toyota Canada Lease Assist, which is deducted from the negotiated selling price after taxes, and $1,545 freight/PDI) leased at 0.9% over 60 months with $0 down payment equals 120 semi-monthly payments of $87 with a total lease obligation of $10,715. Lease 60 mos. based on 100,000 km, excess km charge is $.07. $0 security deposit and first semi-monthly payment due at lease inception. Price and total obligation exclude license, insurance, registration, fees and taxes. Dealer order / trade may be necessary. **Finance example: 1.9% finance for 84 months, upon credit approval, available on 2014 Corolla CE 6M. Applicable taxes are extra. 2014 RAV4 Base FWD LE Automatic ZFREVT-A MSRP is $25,685 and includes $1,815 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning federal excise tax. †Lease example: 3.9% Lease APR for 60 months on approved credit. Semi-Monthly payment is $139 with $1700 down payment. Total Lease obligation is $18,380. Lease 60 mos. based on 100,000 km, excess km charge is $.10. Applicable taxes are extra. Down payment, first semi-monthly payment and security deposit plus GST and PST on first payment and full down payment are due at lease inception. A security deposit is not required on approval of credit. ††Finance example: 1.9% finance for 48 months, upon credit approval, available on 2014 RAV4. Applicable taxes are extra. 2014 Tundra Double Cab SR5 4.6L 4x4 Automatic UM5F1T-A MSRP is $37,025 and includes $1,815 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning federal excise tax. ‡Lease example: 0.9% Lease APR for 60 months on approved credit. Semi-Monthly payment is $175 with $3,100 down payment. Total Lease obligation is $24,040. Lease 60 mos. based on 100,000 km, excess km charge is $.15. Applicable taxes are extra. Down payment, first semi-monthly payment and security deposit plus GST and PST on first payment and full down payment are due at lease inception. A security deposit is not required on approval of credit. ‡‡Finance example: 0.9% finance for 72 months, upon credit approval, available on 2014 Tundra. Applicable taxes are extra. ‡‡‡Up to $4000 Non-Stackable Cash Back available on select 2014 Tundra models. Non-stackable cash back on 2014 Tundra Double Cab SR5 4.6L 4x4 Automatic is $4000. Non-stackable Cash Back offers may not be combined with Toyota Financial Services (TFS) lease or finance rates. If you would like to lease or finance at standard TFS rates (not the above special rates), then you may be able to take advantage of Cash Customer Incentives. Vehicle must be purchased, registered and delivered by April 30, 2014. Cash incentives include taxes and are applied after taxes have been charged on the full amount of the negotiated price. See toyota.ca for complete details on all cash back offers. ‡‡‡‡Semi-monthly lease offer available through Toyota Financial Services on approved credit to qualified retail customers on most 48 and 60 month leases (including Stretch leases) of new and demonstrator Toyota vehicles. First semi-monthly payment due at lease inception and next monthly payment due approximately 15 days later and semi-monthly thereafter throughout the term. Toyota Financial Services will waive the final payment. Semi-monthly lease offer can be combined with most other offers excluding the First Payment Free and Encore offers. First Payment Free offer is valid for eligible TFS Lease Renewal customers only. Toyota semi-monthly lease program based on 24 payments per year, on a 60-month lease, equals 120 payments, with the final 120th payment waived by Toyota Financial Services. Competitive bi-weekly lease programs based on 26 payments per year, on a 60-month lease, equals 130 payments. Not open to employees of Toyota Canada, Toyota Financial Services or TMMC/TMMC Vehicle Purchase Plan. Some conditions apply. See your Toyota dealer for complete details. Visit your Toyota BC Dealer or www.toyotabc.ca for more details. Some conditions apply; offers are time limited and may change without notice. Dealer may lease/sell for less.

Micra returns, Venom churns

A35

Follow us at:

Red Tag is in full bloom. $

0 D OWN PAYMENT*

(COROLLA SPORT MODEL SHOWN)

2014 COROLLA

LEASE FROM *

FINANCE FROM **

semi-monthly/60 mos.

per month/84 mos.

87

1.9%

$

CE 6M MODEL $17,540 MSRP includes F+PDI

(RAV4 - XLE MODEL SHOWN)

2014 RAV4

FWD LE $25,685 MSRP includes F+PDI

LEASE FROM

(4X4 DOUBLE CAB LIMITED 5.7L MODEL SHOWN)

2014 TUNDRA

FINANCE FROM ††

139 1.9

$

%

semi-monthly/60 mos.

DCab SR5 4.6L $37,025 MSRP includes F+PDI

LEASE FROM ‡

FINANCE FROM ‡‡

OR UP TO ‡‡‡

semi-monthly/60 mos.

per month/72 mos.

CASHBACK

175 0.9% $4,000

$

per month/48 mos.

‡‡‡‡

SEMI-MONTHLY SAVES YOU UP TO 11 PAYMENTS!

FREE FIRST OR LAST PAYMENT

. Monthly or Semi-Monthly payment options . Standard or Low Kilometre Lease . No Security Deposit

JIM PATTISON TOYOTA DOWNTOWN 1290 Burrard Street (604) 682-8881 30692

JIM PATTISON TOYOTA NORTH SHORE 849 Auto Mall Drive (604) 985-0591

GRANVILLE TOYOTA VANCOUVER 8265 Fraser Street (604) 263-2711 6978

18732

LANGLEY TOYOTATOWN LANGLEY 20622 Langley Bypass (604) 530-3156

JIM PATTISON TOYOTA SURREY 15389 Guildford Drive (604) 495-4100 6701

Learn why we're better than bi-weekly at: ToyotaBC.ca

9497

OPENROAD TOYOTA RICHMOND Richmond Auto Mall (604) 273-3766

DESTINATION TOYOTA BURNABY 4278 Lougheed Highway (604) 571-4350

7825

OPENROAD TOYOTA PORT MOODY 3166 St. John’s Street (604) 461-3656

SUNRISE TOYOTA ABBOTSFORD Fraser Valley Auto Mall (604) 857-2657

9374

PEACE ARCH TOYOTA SOUTH SURREY 3174 King George Highway (604) 531-2916

7826

To y o t a B C . c a

30377

5736

REGENCY TOYOTA VANCOUVER 401 Kingsway (604) 879-8411 8507

WEST COAST TOYOTA PITT MEADOWS 19950 Lougheed Highway (866) 910-9543 7662

VALLEY TOYOTA CHILLIWACK 8750 Young Road (604) 792-1167

SQUAMISH TOYOTA SQUAMISH 39150 Queens Way (604) 567-8888 31003

WESTMINSTER TOYOTA NEW WESTMINSTER 210 - 12th Street (604) 520-3333

8176

8531

SE LL IN G CT SU BC OM PA † CA R IN BC

#

1

They can’t leap tall buildings in a single bound, but there are plenty of reasons the Fit, Civic and CR-V are best-sellers† in BC.

# G SEELLLLIINNG CO M PA CT† BC IN CA R

2014 CIVIC DX

Lease for * $

85

1.99% APR $

#

0 down

freight and PDI included.

Bi-weekly on a 60 month term with 130 payments. MSRP $17,185** includes freight and PDI

1

G SEELLLLIINNG CO M PA CT† BC IN V SU

2014 CR-V LX

Lease for

134

$

Ω

1.99% APR $

#

0 down

freight and PDI included.

Bi-weekly on a 60 month term with 130 payments. MSRP $27,685** includes freight and PDI

Model shown: FB2E2EEX

Model shown: FB2E2EEX

†The Fit, Civic and CR-V were the #1 selling retail subcompact car, compact car, and compact SUV respectively in BC in 2013 based on Polk 2013 Dec YTD report. ‡In order to achieve $0 down payment, dealer will cover the cost of tire/battery tax, air conditioning tax (where applicable), environmental fees and levies on the 2014 CR-V LX, Accord LX, Civic DX and Fit DX only on behalf of the customer. £Limited time bi-weekly lease offer based on a new 2014 Fit DX model GE8G2EEX. €0.99% lease APR on a 60 month term with 130 bi-weekly payments O.A.C. Bi-weekly payment, including freight and PDI, is $67.49 based on applying $1,100.00 lease dollars and $4 dealer contribution (which are deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes); and $1,000.00 consumer incentive dollars (which are deducted from the negotiated selling price after taxes) Down payment of $0.00, first bi-weekly payment and $0 security deposit due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $8,773.70. Taxes, license, insurance and registration are extra. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometers.*Limited time bi-weekly lease offer based on a new 2014 Civic DX model FB2E2EEX. #1.99% lease APR on a 60 month term with 130 bi-weekly payments O.A.C. Bi-weekly payment, including freight and PDI, is $84.63 based on applying $600.00 lease dollars (which is deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes). Down payment of $0.00, first bi-weekly payment and $0 security deposit due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $11,001.90. Taxes, license, insurance and registration are extra. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometers. Ω Limited time bi-weekly lease offer based on a new 2014 CR-V LX 2WD model RM3H3EES. ¥1.99% lease APR on a 60 month term with 130 bi-weekly payments O.A.C. Bi-weekly payment, including freight and PDI, is $133.83 based on applying $1,000.00 lease dollars (which is deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes). Down payment of $0.00, first bi-weekly payment and $0 security deposit due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $17,397.90. Taxes, license, insurance and registration are extra. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometers. **MSRP is $16,130 / $17,185 / $27,685 including freight and PDI of $1,495 / $1,495 / $1,695 based on a new 2014 Fit DX model GE8G2EEX / new 2014 Civic DX model FB2E2EEX / 2014 CR-V LX 2WD model RM3H3EES. License, insurance, registration and taxes are extra and may be required at the time of purchase. ¥/£/€/Ω/#/* Prices and/or payments shown do not include a PPSA lien registration fee of $30.31 and lien registering agent's fee of $5.25, which are both due at time of delivery and covered by the dealer on behalf of the customer on the 2014 CR-V LX, Accord LX, Civic DX and Fit DX only. ‡/#/*/Ω/€/¥/£/** Offers valid from April 1st through 30th, 2014 at participating Honda retailers. Dealer may sell/lease for less. Dealer trade may be necessary on certain vehicles. Offers valid only for British Columbia residents at BC Honda Dealers locations. Offers subject to change or cancellation without notice. Terms and conditions apply. Visit www.bchonda.com or see your Honda retailer for full details.


A36

THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 4

HAPPY EASTER Prices Effective April 17 to April 23, 2014.

While quantities last. Not all items available at all stores. We reserve the right to correct printing errors.

100% BC Owned and Operated PRODUCE

MEAT Organic Roma Fair Trade Tomatoes

Organic Sweet Baby Broccoli from Josie’s Organics

2.98

Johnstone Whole Bone In Hams

1.98lb/ 4.37kg

each

product of USA

2.29lb/ 5.05kg

product of Mexico

3.99lb/8.80kg

Organic Lemons from California

Honey Belle Pears

Happy Chicken Specialty Roasting Chickens

1.98lb/ 4.37kg

2.98

2lb bag product of USA

Ocean Wise Boneless Sturgeon Fillets

never frozen

product of Australia

4.49lb/ 9.90kg

15.99lb/ 35.25kg

GROCERY

HEALTHCARE Liberte Méditerranée Yogurt

Salt Spring Organic Fair Trade Coffee

28%

product of Canada

SAVE

33%

400g • roasted in Canada

Lindsay Black Olives

1.99

SAVE 2/7.00

27%

product of Britain/Canada

assorted varieties

2/4.00

SAVE

398ml product of USA

37%

Simply Organic Glass Spices

9.99 each

assorted varieties

SAVE 3.996.99 %

11%

FROM

33

5.69

500ml

product of Canada

22%

34%

355ml

BULK

product of USA

6.99

assorted varieties

skim, 1, 2 or 3.25%

3/4.98

4.59

Easter Milk Chocolate Carrots

Dairyland Organic Milk

20% off regular retail price

2L • product of Canada

xxx BAKERY

DELI

GLUTEN FREE

xxx • product of xxx

Choices’ Own

Choices’ Own Family Sized Quiches

2.49/100g

3.99

assorted varieties

package of 3

5.99-10.99

11.99 A Delicious Easter Ham Option Freybe's Emperor Ham

Hot Cross Buns

Pies 6 or 9”

assorted varieties

Choices’ Own Provencal Potato or Tomato Arugula Bocconcini Salad

Easter Cupcakes, Cookies or Hot Cross Buns

1.29-1.49 /100g

package of 2 to 6

www.choicesmarkets.com

64.99

1 pack

assorted varieties

12-18 pack product of Canada

300-400g • product of USA

1.65L product of Canada

SAVE 4.99

Stahlbush Island Farms Frozen Vegetables

946ml • +deposit +eco fee • product of USA

Inno-Vite Yeast Buster Kit

Brianna’s Dressings

R.W. Knudsen Just Juice assorted varieties

9.99- 10.99

assorted varieties

SAVE 3.99FROM

assorted varieties • Flower and vegetable extracts. • Grown in Quebec. • Certified organic, GMO-free rarm

SAVE 4.49-5.59

product of Canada

Nature’s Farm Omega-3 Free Run Eggs

assorted varieties, sizes

Devas Hair and Body Care

Island Farms Frozen Yogurt or Ice Cream

Sara’s Frozen Ice Cream Cakes

assorted varieties

25% off

product of Canada

assorted varieties

125-184g

assorted varieties

425-454g

Earth’s Choice Organic Salsa

assorted varieties

29%

33%

FROM

Carr’s Crackers

FROM

2/6.00

SAVE

500g

44%

SAVE

assorted varieties, made with organic corn

3/7.98

SAVE

SAVE

Sibu Beauty Facial Care

Que Pasa Tortilla Chips

assorted varieties

assorted varieties

10.99-11.99

J.D. Farms Grade A Turkeys

Easter Cupcakes or Cookies

1.99-3.99

2.99-3.99

/ChoicesMarkets

package of 2-4

@ChoicesMarkets

Kitsilano

Cambie

Kerrisdale

Yaletown

Gluten Free Bakery

South Surrey

Burnaby Crest

Kelowna

Floral Shop

2627 W. 16th Ave. Vancouver

3493 Cambie St. Vancouver

1888 W. 57th Ave. Vancouver

1202 Richards St. Vancouver

2595 W. 16th Ave. Vancouver

3248 King George Blvd. South Surrey

8683 10th Ave. Burnaby

1937 Harvey Ave. Kelowna

2615 W. 16th Vancouver

Best Organic Produce


Vancouver Courier April 18 2014