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FRIDAY, JANUARY 17, 2014

Vol. 105 No. 6 • Established 1908

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20

WEEKEND EDITION

THE VOICE OF VANCOUVER NEIGHBOURHOODS

OPINION: Abbotsford vs. homeless 10/ SPORTS: Women’s hockey 24

EndowmentLands residentspush fordemocracy COMMUNITY ADJACENT TO UBC RUN DIRECTLY BY PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT NAOIBH O’CONNOR Staff writer

W photo Dan Toulgoet

CREATIVE PURSUIT: As part of the Courier’s Vancouver Special neighbourhood series we profile the

University of British Columbia, where writer Steven Galloway serves as an associate professor and acting chair of the Creative Writing Program, which enters its 50th year of nurturing aspiring writers. Scan this page with the Layar app to view a video of Galloway discussing his award-winning novel The Cellist of Sarajevo.

UBC thrives on local food and farm SANDRA THOMAS Staff writer

M

ore than 50 per cent of food served at the University of B.C.’s cafeterias and outlets is either grown, raised or processed within 150 miles of the school or certified as organic. Shannon Lambie, communications and project manager at UBC Farm, said UBC Food Services tries to use as many fruits and vegetables grown at the farm as possible. “We want to be a model for other university and institutional dining halls by showing our strong relationship with sourcing local food,” said Lambie, who completed the UBC Farm Practicum of Sustainable Agriculture last year. The UBC Farm encompasses 24 hectares of integrated farm and forest land on Ross Drive on the university’s

south campus near Westbrook Village. It’s open to the public year-round with seasonal hours and operates a Saturday market June through October. The farm is managed by the Centre for Sustainable Food Systems, which offers a wide variety of interdisciplinary learning, research and community programs at the green space. Lambie said the most famous example of the university’s food services moving towards locally grown products was the butternut squash pizza introduced to the school’s cafeterias in 2000. “During that time the movement towards locally sourced food was in a very early phase,” said Lambie. “It’s only been in the last five or six years that it’s really scaled up and the farm has been able to supply Food Services with so much more including carrots, beets, kale, arugula and squash.” See UNIVERSITY on page 5

hen Ronald Pears moved to the University Endowment Lands 25 years ago, it was by his estimate 65 per cent single-family residential, with a stable population of about 2,200 people. It was like living in the country, while only 20 minutes from downtown Vancouver. The UEL’s population now sits at about 4,150 residents and there are more multifamily than single-family properties. With new potential development on the horizon, Pears, president of the UEL’s community advisory council, thinks the unincorporated community should become a municipality. “Everybody that manages the UEL lives somewhere else — Victoria or North Vancouver or God knows where. So we’re frustrated by that,” Pears said. “The main reason [we want to incorporate] is we don’t have democracy here. We have no representative government. The advisory council can only advise and it’s very weak. It has a

real problem having an effect. So there’s no government. All we have is administration…” The unincorporated lands are managed by the provincial government’s Ministry of Community, Sport and Cultural Development headed by Minister Coralee Oakes through a small administration office on the lands. The UEL is located between the City of Vancouver and UBC and includes old single-family homes — some dating back to the 1920s, some multiple-family and commercial developments, as well as Pacific Spirit Regional Park and Block F — a 22-acre site owned by the Musqueam Indian Band, which is proposed for development. (The Musqueam own three other parcels: University Golf Course, and two undeveloped sites. Only Block F is currently being planned for development.) The UEL is not associated with UBC or its developments. The advisory council, which formed in 2007, has seven members who are elected every three years at the same time as municipal elections. See PREVIOUS on page 6


A2

THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4

Application to Participate in National Energy Board Public Hearing for Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC Trans Mountain Expansion Project The National Energy Board (NEB) has received an application from Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC for approval to construct and operate the Trans Mountain Expansion Project (Project). Description of The Project The Project would expand the existing Trans Mountain pipeline system located between Edmonton, AB and Burnaby, BC. It would include approximately 987 km of new pipeline, new and modified facilities, such as pump stations and tanks, and the reactivation of 193 km of existing pipeline. There would also be an expansion of the Westridge Marine Terminal. New pipeline segments would be added between Edmonton to Hinton, AB, Hargreaves, BC to Darfield, BC and Black Pines, BC to Burnaby, BC. Reactivation of existing pipeline segments would occur between Hinton, AB to Hargreaves, BC and Darfield to Black Pines, BC. The application can be found on the NEB website. Participation in NEB Hearing The NEB will determine if the application is complete and if so, it will hold a public hearing. Those who wish to participate in the NEB hearing must apply to participate. Applicants must clearly describe their interest in relation to the List of Issues for the hearing, which is on the NEB website and included in the application to participate. Those who are directly affected by the proposed project will be allowed to participate in the hearing and those with relevant information or expertise may be allowed to participate. The application to participate is on the NEB’s website at: www.neb-one.gc.ca select Major Applications and Projects then Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC - Trans Mountain Expansion Applications to participate in the NEB Hearing are due on or before noon on 12 February 2014. Individuals and groups applying to participate must provide enough information for the NEB to decide whether participant status should be granted. Trans Mountain ULC has until 19 February 2014 to provide the NEB with comments on Applications to Participate and must provide a copy of its comments to those applicants to whom the comments apply. Applicants who received comments from Trans Mountain ULC about their Application to Participate have until 4 March 2014 to send the Board your response to Trans Mountain’s comments. Comments and Responses should be sent to the Secretary of the Board: www.neb-one.gc.ca, select Regulatory Documents then Submit Documents. CONTACTS Information on NEB hearing processes and participant funding is available at www.neb-one.gc.ca > Major Applications and Projects > Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC - Trans Mountain Expansion. If you require additional information, the NEB has appointed Ms. Reny Chakkalakal as a Process Advisor to provide assistance. Ms. Reny Chakkalakal Process Advisor, NEB E-mail: TransMountainPipeline.Hearing@neb-one.gc.ca Telephone (toll free): 1-800-899-1265

Ms. Sarah Kiley Communications Officer, NEB E-mail: sarah.kiley@neb-one.gc.ca Telephone: 403-299-3302 Telephone (toll free): 1-800-899-1265


F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A3

news

Voluntary casino checks paid by B.C. Lotto 12TH & CAMBIE with Mike Howell

I

n my last entry, I brought you up to speed on what an “RG check” is and how it relates to the gambling world. For those of you who missed it, an RG check is the name the Responsible Gambling Council in Toronto gives to a program it runs to investigate whether casinos and other gambling facilities are being responsible in their operations. To some of you, the pairing of “responsible” with “gambling” might suggest an oxymoron. Industry types and regulators such as the B.C. Lottery Corporation will beg to differ. As promised in my previous entry, I would let you know who paid for the checks of B.C. gambling facilities, which has totalled 22 so far, including Edgewater casino. And the answer is: The lottery corporation, according to Jon Kelly, the CEO of the Responsible Gambling Council, which identifies itself as an independent, non-profit organization. So to the question: Isn’t there a conflict in the lottery corporation paying for a service that translates to perceived pressure to re-

photo Dan Toulgoet

The Responsible Gambling Council will again audit the Edgewater Casino in May. turn a positive review? Kelly’s short answer is, no. The longer answer is, well, a longer answer. First of all, Kelly acknowledged, the review isn’t set up for operators to fail, although some don’t pass the test on the initial examination. “Not everybody is accredited on the first time we do it,” he said. “But we’re not here to embarrass people or publicly say, ‘You

failed.’ We’re here to raise the bar.” So, he said, what happens is gambling facilities get the initial review and if something needs fixing, then it’s up to the casino or bingo hall to update its operations. “My experience has been that many, many venues are legitimately interested in how they stand by some external expert,” he said. “Yes, they want to do well and, yes, there is pushback. When we provide a report to peo-

ple and they disagree with it, that’s part of our process. They get to push back.” Added Kelly: “Some people are shocked, some people are unhappy — like very upset.” OK, but let’s get back to what the public should think of the lottery corporation picking up the tab for the reviews… “I guess the question in my mind would be, well, who would if they didn’t?” How about the casino operator paying for it? “In some ways, that would be more likely to lead to a pushback. At least with the gaming operator — like the B.C. Lottery Corporation — you’ve got a higher level organization than the operators. So the only other funder or payer that I could see for this would be the government itself. I could see other models but it seems right to me that the people who are running the place should be the ones who have to pay for the external reviews.” And as Kelly pointed out, casino operators aren’t forced to undergo the review. “It’s completely voluntary, nobody needs to do it,” he said, adding that the standards in the review were decided upon independently of the gaming industry. Kelly’s organization will again audit Edgewater in May. So far, Hastings Racecourse and Planet Bingo — the city’s two other gambling facilities — haven’t been audited. mhowell@vancourier.com twitter.com/Howellings

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A4

THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4

UBC

UBC tightens security after last year’s assaults team of full-time major crimes investigators on the case. Investigators continue to identify persons of interest and Thiessen wouldn’t say how many are on this list. Barry Eccleton, director of security at UBC, is leading a task force on campus security that includes representatives of staff, students and faculty. The committee is discussing security cameras, night walking routes, the Alma Mater Society’s Safewalk program, identifying where

Staff writer

T

he RCMP have received more than 200 tips since police released a composite sketch Nov. 5 of the man reported to have sexually assaulted six women at the University of B.C. The attacks occurred between April 19 and Oct. 27 last year. Sgt. Peter Thiessen says the RCMP has a

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ternities told students to knock on their doors if they wanted assistance. Lights around campus that grew dimmer as nights wore on as part of an energy-saving initiative will operate throughout the night at full capacity for the foreseeable future, said Eccleton. The AMS’s Sexual Assault Support Centre at UBC served an influx of students wanting to talk about sexual assault this fall, says the centre’s manager, Anisa Mottahed. She said students appear to be feeling less frightened but, with no new news, uncertainty remains. Sexual Assault Awareness Month is happening now for the fourth year at UBC. Events include: • a community café on creating a safer campus, Jan. 21 • a public workshop on rape culture, Jan. 23 • a talk on how participants can make a difference against sexual assault, Jan 23 • a lecture on proving masculinity on the university campus, Jan 29 • a roundtable on rape culture and politics, Jan 29 • a public workshop on drinking, consent and sexual assault, Jan. 30. To see the sketch and description of the sexual assault suspect, see ubc.ca/staysafe. For more information about Sexual Assault Awareness Month events, see gotconsent.ca. Calls to the Safewalk were not returned. crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A5

UBC

University recognized for using locally grown, organic food Continued from page 1 UBC was recognized last year with the Golden Carrot Award from Farm to Cafeteria Canada for its efforts in using as much locally processed, grown, raised or organic food as possible. Farm to Cafeteria Canada is a national organization that recognizes efforts to implement farm-to-university purchasing programs. The university’s cafeterias, restaurants and food outlets sell an average of $24 million worth of food and liquor annually. Lambie said Chef Steve Golob, who’s been with UBC Food Services for 17 years, had a large part to play in the shift to introduce sustainable and locally-grown food to the campus. Golob is also a member of the Farm to School Canada advisory board, a co-in-

vestigator with the Think and Eat Green at School research project, and the recent recipient of the UBC President’s Staff Award for Global Citizenship. Lambie will take part Feb. 7 in a panel discussion called Scaling up: Bringing Local to a Global Campus, part of the UBC Farm Symposium taking place at the Old Barn Community Centre on Thunderbird Boulevard. Joining Lambie on the panel will be Joanne Bays from Farm to Cafeteria Canada, Victoria Wakefield of Student Housing and Hospitality Services, Liska Richer from Campus Sustainability, Chef Golob and Amy Frye from UBC Farm. Opening remarks will be made by Veronik Campbell from UBC Farm, Larry Grant of First Nations House

of Learning, and Murray Isman, dean of the Faculty of Land and Food Systems. The day-long symposium is offering numerous sessions, including A Hopyard on Campus, Indigenous Lens on Kids Learning Land, Organic Foods and Organic Farms, and Practicum for Sustainable Agriculture. The symposium, sponsored by Vancity and AMS Sustainability, is free and open to students, faculty, staff and the public, but registration is required at ubcfarm.ubc.ca. The event takes place from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Old Barn Community Centre, 6308 Thunderbird Blvd. For those attending all day, lunch is available to purchase for $5. sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10

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UBC Farm’s Shannon Lambie (left) and Lisa Allyn tend to their garden.

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Previous attempt failed Continued from page 1 It advises the UEL manager on matters that “may have a significant effect on the cost, quality or capacity of community services in the UEL.” Last November, the council applied to the provincial government for approval to do a study, which, depending on results, could lead to a referendum on incorporation. With its application, the advisory council submitted letters from Metro Vancouver and the City of Vancouver indicating those bodies don’t object to a study. UBC said it wouldn’t comment on the matter. It’s not the first time UEL residents have considered incorporation. Almost two decades ago, in 1995, a referendum asking residents if they were in favour of becoming a municipality failed. Only 917 of 2,750 eligible voters cast ballots — 599 voted no, while 318 voted yes. “It failed for two reasons,” according to Pears. “One was there was an awful lot of longtime residents here who said it’s worked so far, we don’t want to change it, notwith-

standing the fact that some of us, including me said, well yeah, things are going to change, which they have to our detriment.” Another factor was Hampton Place residents, UBC’s first residential development, were included in the vote and “they thought they’d get stuck paying for our old infrastructure,” Pears said. [Hampton Place is no longer included in the UEL]. In recent months, the advisory council has held town hall meetings, during which the subject of incorporation was discussed, and two straw votes, in which the majority supported incorporation. Pears, who noted taxes in the UEL are lower than in Vancouver, doesn’t believe they would go up with incorporation unless residents decided to add services or build something like a community centre. A study on incorporation would look at issues such as taxation, structure and transitioning to a municipality. noconnor@vancourier.com twitter.com/naoibh

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UBC

U-Hill honours former admin assistant PAT BOUCHER WAS ‘HEART AND SOUL’ OF THE SCHOOL CHERYL ROSSI Staff writer

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Pat Boucher worked at U-hill for nearly 40 years.

Mark Pearmain, former principal of U-Hill, now one of the Vancouver School Board’s directors of instruction, initiated the idea of honouring Boucher. “She was just such a lovely presence, just a calm presence in the office and someone who was really giving to everybody, to the staff, to the students, to the parent community,” he said. “[She] was a very, very, very huge supporter of that U-Hill community and that school community for many, many years.” Boucher worked at U-Hill for nearly

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40 years, including when Pearmain’s father was principal. Boucher says Permain was “full of beans” as a five-year-old and full of energy as a principal. Both men attended her retirement. Boucher also recalls dealing with children of U-Hill graduates. “That was really a setback,” she said with a laugh. Boucher never worked at the new, larger University Hill school that opened on Wesbrook Mall at the University of B.C. last January. Instead, she worked at the crammed old school that was built for 350 students and went from accommodating 300 to 550 students in her time there, according to Aaronson. But Boucher doesn’t mind. “It was my second family there,” she said. “I really enjoyed working at that school. “I couldn’t see myself going to the new school. That was my school,” she added. “It was really sad when I went by and it wasn’t there.” Norma Rose Point elementary school is being constructed on the site of the old U-Hill secondary at 4102 West 16th Ave. and is expected to open in September. crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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eyman Servati’s passion for scientific projects including tents that store solar power and shirts that monitor heart rates paid off last week. Federal Minister of State for Science and Technology Greg Rickford featured the work of the associate professor of electrical and computer engineering Jan. 9 when he announced $43 million in research grants for 23 universities across the country at the University of B.C. The money was granted through the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. Servati’s solar cell and bio-sensing textile projects

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received $1.03 million. “This is somewhat of a passion that I have for this kind of technology. I have been working on flexible electronics for a long time,” he said. “This is a personal interest and [I have] passion about it, basically making real contributions to the life of people in both of these projects.” Servati works with Frank Ko of materials engineering who’s an expert in nanofibres. He’s working with Ko and others to develop fabric that could harvest and store solar energy to be used as electricity. A tent made of such material could be used in remote areas, the developing world, by the military and campers. Servati’s team is working with a textile company in Ontario to develop solar win-

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Peyman Servati received a $1.03-million grant for his scientific projects that include a shirt that monitors heart rates. dow coverings or curtains to produce green energy. Unlike solar panels, which are add-ons to homes, Servati, his team and international collaborators want to integrate pliable solar cells into regular building materials. “Maybe in the future we can integrate in clothing so it enables people to wear stuff that can charge mobile [devices], for example our health monitoring sensors,” he said. Servati is working with colleagues to create clothing or flexible, fine material that could be attached to one’s skin to monitor vital signs. This furthers Ko’s earlier

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work of creating a “skin” for aircraft that could sense the environment and detect small cracks on a plane’s surface. Servati’s researchers are working with ReFleX Wireless, a B.C.-based company created by three UBC undergraduates that has gained attention for it wireless health monitoring systems. Researchers are also working with medical experts that include Kendall Ho, an emergency room doctor at UBC Hospital. “What they see is a great potential for wearable electronics that can monitor the health and vital signs of patients. Suppose that somebody goes to an emergency room and they had a cardiac issue, if they wear a vest or very comfortable shirt that monitors their signs, if something, even a slight thing happens, it alerts the doctors,” Servati said. Researchers are also collaborating with Martin McKeown of the Pacific Parkinson’s Research Centre at UBC. Parkinson’s is a degenerative disease of the central nervous system typically marked by tremors. “The magnitude of tremors are not really monitored that accurately,” Servati said. “And that is important for prescription of medicine.” Servati and Ko have already created shirts with integrated sensors. Servati expects early solar products related to their research could hit the market in five to 10 years with supple sensing products arriving in five years. Ten UBC projects received $9 million in research funds from NSERC last week. Servati believes UBC received the most grants of any university in Canada. crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl Rossi


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4

THE VANCOUVER COURIER

1574 West Sixth Ave., Vancouver, BC V6J 1R2 604-738-1411 Twitter: @vancouriernews vancourier.com

Abbotsford ends crusade against the homeless

A

bbotsford may be just 66 kilometres up the Valley from our fair city, but you would think it was on another planet. It appears that the town in the heart of B.C.’s Bible Belt had a come-to-Jesus moment when its council Monday night unanimously approved a motion to get rid of a city zoning bylaw banning harm reduction facilities. But it was not quite that straightforward. For starters there was significant legal pressure on the council. Vancouver-based Pivot Legal Society, representing the much abused Abbotsford homeless folks operating as the B.C./Yukon Association of Drug War Survivors, had launched a case last spring in the Supreme Court of B.C. It alleged the zoning bylaw violated Charter and human rights by preventing access to medical services and increasing the risk of contracting life threatening diseases such as hepatitis C and HIV. In July Pivot and its clients opened their campaign on a second front when their case was accepted as a complaint by the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal. It may be hard to believe that a zoning bylaw would have an impact on someone’s health but consider the statistics gathered among injection drug users since Abbotsford introduced that restrictive bylaw in 2005. Abbotsford’s hepatitis C infection rate was 64.4 per 100,000 people in 2010 compared with the provincial rate of 54.9 and a national rate of 33.7 in 2009 according to Fraser Health Authority. Fraser Health has been pressing Abbotsford for some time now to revise the bylaw and set up a needle exchange to drive down those numbers believed to be caused by addicts sharing needles. While the Supreme Court case was proceeding with the expectation of appearing before a judge in April and the complaint to the Human Rights Tribunal was gathering steam, something else happened to push the council. Simon Gibson, one of the most hardline Abbotsford councillors on the issue of keeping the ban in place, resigned his position earlier this month to take up his role as a full-time Liberal MLA in Victoria. So after eight years council reversed itself and opened the door for a needle exchange. This comes a quarter of a century after Vancouver’s council under former mayor Gordon Campbell agreed to fund such a project and a dozen years after the provincial government, this time with Campbell as premier, introduced a needle exchange policy province wide. Abbotsford mayor Bruce Banman noted in his comments that, aside from alleviating human suffering, the council decision would save taxpayers money given that the treatment of hepatitis C can cost $75,000 per person. While this is clearly a step forward and both the Supreme Court case and the human rights complaint are now moot, that is not the end of it. The appalling treatment of the homeless population by city officials and the cops has yet to be resolved. While Vancouver was encouraging people to move off the streets by creating low barrier shelters that would accept people with their pets, their goods piled into a shopping cart and the possibility they were on drugs, Abbotsford city staff had quite a different approach. They were dispatched by their city manager to dump chicken manure on the ground where homeless people set up camp. The event was chronicled by Christian filmmaker Kevin Miller in The Chicken Manure Incident. Miller followed Ward Draper and Jesse Wegenast, two pastors with the 5 and 2 Ministries, as they provided comfort to the vulnerable and marginalized and watched in dismay as city staff dumped the manure. The city apparently informed other leaders of the faith community that populates Abbotsford ahead of their actions. None protested except the Salvation Army. And that was only after the fact. And while cops in Vancouver assist the homeless to find their way to low barrier shelters, cops in Abbotsford allegedly moved in to slash the tents of the homeless and pepper spray any of them who resisted the order to move on. The manure incident is the subject of yet another human right complaint. The destruction of the tents will be heard as a case in small claims court. In the meantime the homeless of Abbotsford and their advocates wait to see just what services will be forthcoming now that a reluctant council has changed its mind. agarr@vancourier.com

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F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

WE WANT YOUR OPINION Hate it or love it? We want to know... really, we do! Reach us by email: letters@vancourier.com

Federal attack on science reveals totalitarian streak

L

ast week, CBC’s Fifth Estate presented an excellent summary of the Harper government’s approach toward basic research in Canada. “Silence of the Labs” (viewable at cbc.ca) enumerates the many ways Ottawa is conducting a war of attrition on science. For the past five years, “more than 2,000 federal government scientists and researchers have been dismissed. Programs that monitored smokestack emissions, food inspection, oil spills, water quality or climate change, were drastically cut or shut down,” notes the Fifth Estate’s Linden MacIntyre. The CBC report found some new angles in the Harper government’s five-year long spree of knowledge-trashing. Dr. Pat Sutherland was working on a dig on Baffin Island, uncovering some of the first interactions between the inhabitants of the Old World and New. The archaeologist’s internationally recognized work was subsidized by the Museum of Civilization in Gatineau, Que., but it fell afoul of her employer’s rebranding of Canadian history. The museum had shifted its emphasis to Canada’s colonial past, sidelining the heritage of the continent’s first inhabitants. Shipman’s archaeological project, no longer in tune with the new direction, was axed. The federally run museum’s rebranding of history is in line with the welter of bicentennial advertisements from Ottawa that celebrated the War of 1812 — a national campaign that has cost taxpayers $28 million. For the Harperites, Canadian history starts with the redcoats who marched on the U.S. capital. It’s revisionism worthy of filmmaker George Lucas: call it The United Empire Royalists Strike Back. After Dr. Shipman’s dismissal in 2012, the Museum of Civilization entered into a creative partnership with a new sponsor: The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers, “the high-profile lobby group that has been influential in reshaping science, now a partner in defining history,” in the words of MacIntyre. As we know from history, the official politicization of academic disciplines comes bundled with the totalitarian impulse. In the early 20th century, Russian Stalinists insisted that science was political by nature, and they rejected entire fields of knowledge as bourgeois pseudo-science. A Marxist agronomist, T.D.Lysenko led the drive to remove geneticists from Russian academia. A leading Russian geneticist, Vavilov, was sentenced to death and perished in prison in 1943. Not just biology was under attack; quantum mechanics and relativity were also condemned as idealist fripperies. The Stalinists were also masters of erasing the past. Politburo members and apparatchiks who fell out of favour with “Uncle Joe” Stalin had their faces literally airbrushed out of official photographs. For their part, the German Nazis condemned “Jewish science,” which also included quantum mechanics and relativity theory (Einstein, seeing the writing on the wall, decided to leave Germany in 1932). Party members were parachuted into prime university positions, while the occult-crazed SS leader Heinrich Himmler launched his Ahnenerbe research institute to explore the beginnings of the Aryan race and the outer fringes of reason. Under the blessing of Hitler, the Ahnenerbe dispatched Nazi archeological expeditions in 1936 in search of The Ark of the Covenant and in 1938 to find The Holy Grail (the former theme was explored decades later in the film Raiders of the Lost Ark). The “1,000-year Reich” lasted only 12 years, in large part because the Fuhrer was not a big fan of the reality principle, which came in the form of increasingly unwelcome reports from the German High Command. Perhaps I have encountered the print version of Godwin’s Law: “As an online discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Nazis or Hitler approaches 1.” Let’s just say the German leader was a historically unique lunatic who wrecked the brush moustache for everyone. That said, totalitarianism from the left or right respects no borders or eras. One of its defining signs is a contempt for factual information and a mania for reinventing the past. As George Orwell observed in his dystopian novel 1984, “He who controls the past controls the future. He who controls the present controls the past.” The Fifth Estate episode didn’t even broach Ottawa’s recent “consolidation” of nine, world class libraries at the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, with the permanent loss of decades’ worth of scientific material. Our corporate-captured government seems determined to not let an idea get in the way of ideology, an observation in the way of an oil pipe, or a fact in the way of fracking. geoffolson.com

GEOFF OLSON

PAY RAISES DRAW A RISE FROM READER

To the editor: Re: “Vancouver mayor, councillors to get pay raise,” Jan. 8. I recently read an article in your paper about the councillors voting themselves in a raise. I’m so against this I have to find somebody to write to or find a group who thinks just the same. For them to say their raise should reflect what a full time employee earns in a year to me is moneygrubbing and cheap. I was a full time employee for the city and I had to walk the picket line to get those raises. A lot of employees faced financial difficulties for it too while those councillors still collected their cash.. Paul Doiron, Vancouver

ANTI-HARPER PROTESTERS ARE INEFFECTIVE

To the editor: Re: “Social media activists

increasingly effective,” Jan. 9. How are social media activists increasingly effective when they have no power? Angrily crashing events attended by the prime minister or creating a website called “Sh*t Harper Did” merely irritates potential supporters. And calling for an Arab Spring in Canada just shows how removed they are from reality. I don’t recall global warming being a main topic of conversation in Tahrir Square. Until environmentalists can enter mainstream political life, they will remain a loud voice in the wilderness. This is a shame as the planet is certainly in trouble. John Clench, Vancouver

YOU GOT TO KNOW WHEN TO FOLD ‘EM To the editor: Re: “Problem gamblers difficult to identify, says health officer, says health officer,” Jan. 9. The fact is, casinos are exploiting the often-debilitating weak-

nesses of many of its consumers — especially those suffering with OCD (obsessive-compulsive disorder) — sometimes to the point of appalling callousness. There’s much post-secondary psychology literature stating that addict gamblers purposely, though unconsciously, play and lose money on games of chance — indeed, they will not or even cannot get themselves to leave until all funds in their possession for that day is lost — and then kick themselves around the proverbial block afterwards just to mentally punish themselves. Sadly, it’s basically a form of psychological masochism. Such is a very good reason why all means of gambling, be it lottery tickets to poker tables, should be (along with all tobacco and alcoholic beverages, for that matter) entirely governmentowned, so that 100 percent of monetary proceeds remains in public coffers, to be utilized only for the benefit of all Canadians — especially those requiring gambling-addiction counseling. Frank G. Sterle, Jr., White Rock

ON YOUR MIND ONLINE COURIER STORY: “Vancouver mayor, councillors to get pay raise ,” Jan. 8. Its_like_that: Just a reminder that Gregor promised to end homelessness to get elected. Betcha he’ll gladly spend the extra money on himself. COURIER STORY: “Hansen says no to NPA, Louie says yes — again — to Vision,” Jan. 8. Linda Jones: First and foremost let’s determine who is best suited to challenge outdated policies, who is up for the task to make the kind of reforms that serve common everyday people, who will dare to stand up to developers who don’t understand sociology and how the lack of wisdom negatively impacts the life of our citizens. The lack of vision party needs to go. When we are in desperate times, it calls for desperate measures — stop and smell the roses, blocking our historic mountain views must be stopped at all cost. COURIER LETTER: “Girls running club is a rip-off,” Jan. 9. Sole Girls @sole_girls: All girls are encouraged to participate no matter their financial situationthere are scholarships and donations every term. COURIER STORY: “Don’t raise your glass to supermarket booze yet,” Jan. 14. Jacob K @Political_jacob: I don’t think booze in supermarkets is a super awesome idea. [I’m concerned about] the ease of getting alcohol. If a grocery store is open 24 hours, it means booze can be bought 24 hours/day. COURIER STORY: “Developing Story: Brian Jackson reflects on 2013,” Jan. 14. Southlands Voice @SouthlandsVoice: Gotta ask: what good is a Community plan if @CityofVancouver disregards it — re: #CasaMia rezoning? COURIER STORY: “Hollywood Theatre wins reprieve,” Jan. 14 Redwood Hospitality @RedwoodLtd: What a great site for a retro style pub or dinner theatre. Aaron Chapman: Perhaps never in recent Vancouver history has 10 feet been so important. .

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4

news

photo Sandra Thomas

HANDS-ON APPROACH: Eleven-year-old Lee-Ann Tait Bee was part of a group of children and youth from the Canadian National Institute for the Blind who took part in a hands-on sensory tour of Cavaliaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Odysseo Wednesday afternoon. The blind and visually impaired kids were able to smell, feel and hear the horses and interact with some of the cast members. Visit vancourier.com to read the full story or scan this page with Layar see more photos.

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community EVENT OR COMMUNITY NEWS WE SHOULD KNOW ABOUT? 604-738-1411 | sthomas@vancourier.com

Skinny dipping at Lord Byng Pool COMMUNITY CALENDAR with SandraThomas

WEST POINT GREY The Wreck Beach Preservation Society holds its monthly swim at Lord Byng Pool this Saturday, Jan. 18, from 7 to 9:30 p.m. The nude swim takes place every third Saturday at the pool, located at 3990 West 14th Ave. Appropriate behaviour is expected and swimmers have an opportunity to socialize at a nearby restaurant following the swim. The event promises water volleyball, an Olympic-sized swimming pool, a large hot tub and sauna. Participants must bring their own towels, change for a locker and government photo ID. Kids 10 and younger can swim for free, while the cost for members is $10 and non-members is $12. For more information visit wreckbeach.org.

SOUTH HILL South Hills Neighbourhood Society is holding a community dance Feb. 1, at

the Moberly Arts Centre, 7646 Prince Albert St. If you haven’t seen the arts centre, this is a great opportunity to check out the renovated hall with its sprung dance floor. This free party is an event where the entire family can learn dance moves from around the world. Light refreshments will be served. The party runs from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Email southhill.neighbours@gmail. com for more information.

OAKRIDGE A February art show at the Vancouver Unitarian Church will honour and celebrate African grandmothers caring for a generation of children orphaned by the AIDS pandemic. Gogo groups from Vancouver, Richmond, Delta and New Westminster, supporters of the Stephen Lewis Foundation’s Grandmothers to Grandmothers Campaign, invite the public to be inspired by the 40 pieces selected for the show, Celebrating African Grandmothers, heroes of the continent. “Gogo” is the Zulu word for grandmother. The show is a juried art exhibition organized by the Royal City Gogos, based in New Westminster. The call for entries brought 83 submissions from artists across Canada, the United States and Europe. The pieces selected by the jury tell stories of hope and triumph of African grandmothers, who

work to turn the tide of HIV and AIDS in their communities. The exhibition launched in New Westminster last May and has since been on display at 13 locations across Western Canada. Celebrating African Grandmothers, heroes of the continent, will be on display in the sanctuary of the church, 949 West 49th Ave., from 12:15 to 2 p.m. on Sundays for the month of February. A gala art auction and reception takes March 7 in New Westminster. Special showings for groups of five or more are possible on weekdays between 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. by contacting welisagogos@ gmail.com. The art show will also be open during two special events, including a reception tea and craft fair Feb. 8, from 2 to 4 p.m., and a special hot chocolate tasting evening Feb. 21, from 6:30 to 9 p.m. with a no host bar. For ticket information, email richmondgogos@gmail.com.

F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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Based on the Arthritis Self-Management Program, our Chronic Pain ManagementWorkshop will teach you effective arthritis self-management skills and the principles of pain management.

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SHAUGHNESSY The Society for the Museum of Original Costumes presents Tales and Treasures from the SMOC Collection, Jan. 19 from 2 to 4 p.m. at Hycroft, 1489 McRae Ave. The show will feature the star attractions of the society’s recent acquisitions and will be hosted by the incomparable Ivan Sayers. For ticket information visit SMOC.ca. sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10

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COST:

Saturday, February 8, 2014 1:00 – 3:00 pm Hillcrest Community Centre 4575 Clancy Loranger Way Vancouver FREE

To register please call 604-257-8680 or in person at the Community Centre

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Grandview-Woodland Citizens’ Assembly Workshops

View my video with

The Grandview-Woodland Community Plan is being developed to make sure future growth in the neighbourhood meets the needs of the community. This includes planning for everything from affordable housing, community services and land use to transportation needs, businesses and public spaces. A new community plan will help manage change and set out a course for the long-term growth of the neighbourhood.

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To help with the community planning process, the City of Vancouver is creating a Citizens’ Assembly in Grandview-Woodland. Come to a workshop to share your ideas on how it might work. Your input will help in the design of the Citizens’ Assembly. We want to hear from you about how we can work together to shape the future of Grandview-Woodland. Events are free, but please register and indicate which date you would like to attend. Saturday, January 25, 2014, 12 - 3 pm or Tuesday, January 28, 2014, 6 - 9 pm

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TO REGISTER AND FOR MORE INFORMATION: vancouver.ca/gw or phone 3-1-1 Can’t make the workshop? You can also share your ideas online at vancouver.ca/gw


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4

VOTE FOR YOUR BEST OF VANCOUVER* IN OUR STARS OF VANCOUVER READERS’ CHOICE AWARDS AND BE IN WITH A CHANCE TO WIN A WEEKEND FOR TWO IN WHISTLER. Simply enter your favourites in the categories below and mail your completed ballot to us at 1574 West 6th Avenue, V6J 1R2 or alternatively, vote online at vancourier.com/stars, before January 31, 2014.

Eat & Drink

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Restaurant Wine List

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New Restaurant (opened in 2013)

Street Food Cart

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Bar with best beer selection

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F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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UNIVERSITY OF B.C. a journey through our city’s neighbourhoods Vancouver Special is a year-long journey through each of Vancouver’s unique neighbourhoods. Join us every two weeks in our weekend issue for another look at a different community in our city.

MFA students write their own tickets to success

THE NEIGHBOURHOOD AT A GLANCE The University of British Columbia is considered one of the most attractive post-secondary schools to attend in the country. This is partly due to its reputation for academic excellence and also because many Canadian students like the idea of going to a university that won’t be covered in snow for the majority of their stay. It doesn’t hurt that the UBC campus is so stunning. Located at the western tip of a peninsula beside the forested University Endowment Lands and boasting ocean and mountain views, the sprawling, four-square-kilometre campus features numerous tree-lined pedestrian boulevards and an eclectic mix of architectural styles. Not to mention a nearby clothing-optional beach. The province’s first university was founded in 1908 as the McGill University College of British Columbia, an outpost of the Montreal school located on the grounds of what is now the Vancouver General Hospital. The current Point Grey location was chosen two years later although it wasn’t until 1922 when students, fed up with overcrowded classes and the slow pace of post-war development, marched en masse through the downtown and then to the campus in what became known as “the Great Trek,” commemorated today by an annual 10-km run and relay. They presented then premier John Oliver with a petition of 56,000 signatures demanding construction continue in earnest. It worked. UBC has been criticized over the years for being a remote commuter school with little school spirit and little to do when class is out of session. This is rapidly changing as the area sees increasing new development, including five growing neighbourhoods run by private entity UBC Properties Trust Ltd., whose mandate is “to acquire, develop and manage real estate assets for the benefit of the university.” People now joke that UBC could instead stand for “University of Building Construction,” and the growing campus — which is technically not part of the City of Vancouver — is fast becoming a bustling community in its own right with many new shops, restaurants and other amenities.

photo Dan Toulgoet

Write stuff: Creative writing students work on their laptops in the department’s student lounge on the fourth floor of Block E of the 1950s-era Buchanan Building. ANDREW FLEMING Staff writer

T

he phrase “publish or perish” was coined to describe the perennial pressure professors find themselves under to keep careers afloat by having their work appear in academic journals. At UBC’s Master of Fine Arts program in Creative Writing, the make-or-break maxim applies to students just as much as their teachers, although their own published material isn’t limited to dry academic circles and instead runs the literary gamut from short stories to screenplays, magazine features, comic books and even the occasional bestselling novel.

It’s been 50 years since Canadian poet and novelist Earle Birney sold university administrators on the idea of creating a special program where aspiring writers could hone their craft through workshops and peer review instead of by the usual solitary trial and error. The first creative writing program in the country has since become Canada’s biggest and most successful, regularly producing a wide variety of awardwinning writers, which in recent years include Zsuzsi Gartner (Better Living Through Plastic Explosives), Kevin Chong (My Year of the Racehorse), Lee Henderson (The Man Game), Madeleine Thien (Dogs at the Perimeter) and Lynn Coady, who last November won

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the $50,000 Giller Prize for her short story collection Hellgoing. The program’s instructors and guest lecturers, many of them former students, includes names more likely to be found in a Contemporary Can Lit aisle of a Chapter’s bookstore than a faculty directory. Acting department chair Steven Galloway says some of the credit is due to the policy of making writers study in at least three different disciplines. Options range from specializing in fiction, non-fiction, poetry, children’s literature, screenwriting, playwriting, translation, writing for radio, songwriting and libretto, manga and graphic novels, and new media. Continued on next page


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4

UBC

Program offers a literary twist to academic writing “One of the things we do here that is very hard for a writer to get out in the world is the multi-genre thing,” said Galloway, a boyish, bespectacled 38-year-old who first came to UBC two decades ago and never left. “I took poetry when I was an undergrad and I hated it and I’ve never written another poem again, but it made me a better writer. Most writers, left to their own devices, do the thing they are good at and avoid the thing they are not good at. Forcing people to eat their vegetables, so to speak, really does help them become a better writer and we have a pretty wide buffet to choose from.” Classes are located on the top floor of an ugly four-storey building with wonky heating where rooms facing east are generally too warm in the winter and the ones across the hall too cold. Out of nearly 200 applications each year, only 25 are accepted, although there are also numerous writing courses offered

photo Dan Toulgoet

A sign claiming “poetry is necessary” likely wouldn’t get posted on a bulletin board inside UBC’s Sauder School of Business. at the undergraduate level and through distance education. While it’s not easy to make the final cut, Galloway said students are encouraged to leave their egos at the door.

“It is competitive to get in, but once you’re in we work really hard to foster a non-competitive environment. You never do well as a writer because someone else didn’t do well. Just because I got

a book published, it doesn’t mean you won’t and vice-versa. Sometimes we get students who come here because of the perception that it is a fast-track to publication or for networking and those students tend to be disappointed.” The program also has its critics. Coady famously charged several years ago that UBC was taking a bit too much credit for its graduates’ literary accomplishments (she politely declined to comment when contacted by the Courier) while others say the emphasis should be on mastering the craft of writing rather than trying to score lucrative book or movie deals. “I love it here but I sometimes feel like I’m in that old TV show Fame,” said a young BFA student who didn’t want to give her name. “There were all these super-talented kids going to this big artsy school but you only ever got to know the names of a few of the

main ones. Everybody else just sort of toiled away in the background hoping to get noticed.” Writers, who tend to be anti-authoritarian by nature, also sometimes chafe at the formal academic structure. Galloway, a Giller nominee for his 2008 bestseller The Cellist of Sarajevo, says being open to learning from others — teachers and fellow students alike — is crucial to gaining the most from the program. “We can help writers who have hit a wall with their writing and are trying to get through that, we can provide them with opportunities to help them, but we can’t make anyone a better writer. The analogy is like coaching elite athletes. You can’t turn me into Sidney Crosby, nothing on earth can do that, but I guarantee you Sidney Crosby is better because he was coached.” afleming@vancourier.com twitter.com/flematic

Thank you for helping BC Women’s Hospital improve the health and well-being of BC’s women, newborns and families.

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THANK YOU BC Women’s Hospital Foundation thanks the generous sponsors of the 14th annual Illuminations Fundraising Luncheon PRESENTED BY

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Join us for your free lunch & tour Bill Rankin, General Manager, and the entire Tapestry at Arbutus Walk team would be delighted to welcome you personally and give you a tour through our vibrant seniors community.

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F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Find Independence with the perfect fit

MOBILITY

DAYS % 25 Saturday, January 11th to Saturday, January 25th

photo Dan Toulgoet

Orchard Commons will be built on the site of a campus community garden.

OPEN HOUSE

For more photos of the Orchard Commons grounds , scan this page with

Property: Orchard Commons It’s probably safe to say that future residents of Orchard Commons won’t conform to the starving student stereotype of surviving on pizza, Kraft dinner and bad coffee. A 12-month stay at the planned $125.9 million mixed use housing facility, featuring twin 18-storey towers with a total of 1,048 available beds, won’t come cheap. The complex will be home to the newly minted Vantage College, formerly known as the Bridge to UBC program, which will launch in August and cater to students from overseas who don’t meet the university’s English language requirements. Students (or more likely their parents) will pay $30,000 to attend the customized first-year-equivalency program meant to prepare them for eventual study at a Year 2 level, as well as another $8,400 to rent a 350-square-foot room in Orchard Commons and $6,450 more for the meal plan. Located on the current parking lot at northeast corner of West Mall and Agronomy Road and expected to be completed by June 2016, the LEED Gold certified sustainable complex will feature meeting spaces, a 350-seat dining hall, a large event space, convenience store, childcare facility and bicycle storage area. The two-storey Orchard House treasury building will be knocked down to make way and Orchard Garden, a fruit and vegetable garden currently supplying the student-run Agora Café and used to teach students about urban agriculture, will also be lost. The project is part of outgoing UBC president Stephen Toope’s goal of recruiting more international students to the school. According to the Ubyssey student paper, the number of non-Canadian students increased by 15 per cent last year, and $5 million of the school’s projected $8 million in overall revenue growth for the 2013/14 fiscal year is due to increased international tuition fees.

neighbourhood numbers

2 54 12 7 78 26 2.2

UBC’s ranking in MacLean’s most recent annual evaluation of Canada’s major research universities. In thousands, the approximate number of students currently studying at the Point Grey campus. Another 8,000 attend the school’s Okanagan campus in Kelowna. In feet, the height of a wall students attempt to climb over as part of Storm the Wall, an annual campus relay race also involving swimming, running and cycling. The total number of Nobel Prizes won by graduates. Alumni have also won 68 Rhodes Scholarships and 64 Olympic medals.

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In kilometers, the combined length of trails running through Pacific Spirit Regional Park. In metres, the length of a reconstructed blue whale skeleton dangling from the ceiling of the Beaty Biodiversity Museum. In millions, the number of YouTube hits for an elaborate UBC LipDub video featuring music by Pink and Marianas Trench. * Offer valid from Saturday, January 11th to Saturday, January 25th, 2014. Not valid in conjunction with custom or special ordered items, previously purchased merchandise, rentals and any other offers. 25% discount is based on our regular prices for selected mobility products. Some exclusions apply. See cashier for details.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4

feature

Then and now... UBC

Above: The view looking east along University Boulevard in 1954. Then photo: Photographer/studio: Artray, courtesy of the Vancouver Public Library, 82454.

Above: The Irving K. Barber Learning Centre in 1929. Then photo: Philip Timms, courtesy Vancouver Public Library, 18614. Right: The Irving K. Barber Learning Centre in 2014. Now photo: Dan Toulgoet

Left: The view looking east along University Boulevard in 2014. Now photo: Dan Toulgoet

For more photos, scan this page with your smartphone or tablet using the Layar app.

See more Then and Now photos at vancourier.com

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F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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GOT ARTS? 604-738-1411 | events@vancourier.com

2

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OUR

PICKS JAN. 17-21, 2014

For video and web content, scan page using the Layar app.

1 2 3 4

Pierre-Paul Savoie’s DANSE LHASA DANSE brings together seven dancers, four singers and five instrumentalists to pay tribute to Montreal folk singer and musician LHASA DE SELA, who lost her voice and ultimately her life to cancer. DANSE LHASA DANSE takes place Jan. 18 at the Chan Centre for Performing Arts as part of the PUSH PERFORMING ARTS FESTIVAL. Details at pushfestival.ca. Winner of Best Canadian First Feature at last year’s TIFF, ASPHALT WATCHES is billed as a “hilarious, grotesque, and utterly original adult animated feature” about hitchhiking across Canada. It screens Jan. 17 as part of the Cinematheque’s CANADA’S TOP 10 2013 series. Details at thecinematheque.ca.

German hornblowers RASCHER SAXOPHONE QUARTET perform as part of the inaugural NEW MUSIC FESTIVAL Jan. 17 to 20 at the Orpheum Theatre. Launched by VSO music director Bramwell Tovey, the festival also includes Australian composer and violist Brett Dean and Vancouver ensemble Standing Wave. For tickets and details, go to vancouversymphony.ca or call 604-876-3434.

Battery Opera Performance and Unit/Pitt Projects present WALKING PROJECTS: “VANCOUVER, CRAWLING, WEEPING, BETTING” Jan. 17 to March 1 at Unit Pitt Projects (236 East Pender). It’s a guided walking tour of the city, a late night improvised art salon, a chance to “join the conversation about this city, your place, our past and its spirits” and a whole bunch of other stuff that we had a hard time gleaning from the press release. More details at batteryopera.com.


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4

UBC

The World in Music

Songs of Many Lands

8pm Saturday, January 25, 2014 Ryerson United Church (Kerrisdale) Vancouver Chamber Choir | Five Symposium Conductors Stephen Smith, piano | Jon Washburn, conductor

screenshot Michael Kissinger

BAND OF BREWERS: Every Sunday afternoon the hop heads at the UBC Brewing

Club gather to talk shop, get their barley on, bottle beer and sample their wares. As part of the Vancouver Special neighbourhood series on UBC, the Courier dropped by the upstairs kitchen of the UBC Student Union Building where “scholars, gentle people, rapscallions and co.” gather in the name of beer. To watch a video of our sudsy adventures, go to vancourier.com/entertainment or scan this page with your smartphone or tablet using the free Layar app.

Explore the world of choral music with Jon Washburn and five conductors from the National Conductors’ Symposium, with many new discoveries from Europe, Asia, South America and Canada.

KUDOS& KVETCHES

www.vancouverchamberchoir.com 1-855-985-ARTS (2787)

SEEING THINGS

If there’s one thing K&K enjoys more than stories about weird sports injuries, it’s stories about weird sports hallucinations. According to an online wire story from United Press International, Canadian tennis player Frank Dancevic had an unusually tough time coping with the heat during a match against France’s Benoit Paire at the Australian Open earlier this week. With temperatures in Melbourne rising above 40 degrees Celsius, Dancevic passed out during the match and was unconscious for about a minute. However, the most fascinating part of the story is what he saw just before conking out. “I was dizzy from the middle of the first set and then I saw Snoopy and I thought, wow Snoopy, that’s weird,” Dancevic said. “I couldn’t keep my balance anymore and I leaned over the fence and when I woke up people were all around me.” Needless to say, Dancevic went on to lose the match, followed, presumably, by the plaintive jazz piano of Vince Guaraldi as the defeated athlete walked head down out of the stadium. All of which begs the question, why Snoopy? Why not Charlie Brown, Woodstock or some other Peanuts character? Moreover, why not a more psychedelic kids

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show such as The Banana Splits Adventure Hour or H.R. Pufnstuf? Heck, The Smurfs would have made more sense. This, of course, raises another concern. How can we expect our elite Canadian athletes to succeed on the international stage if their predilection is to hallucinate wimpy, non-lethal dogs that hang out with birds and can’t speak? What if Sidney Crosby passed out during a surprisingly intense game against Latvia and started hallucinating that he was eating spaghetti in that scene from Disney’s Lady and the Tramp only to discover he was really kissing teammate Chris Kunitz (not that there’s anything wrong with that)? Or what if the Canadian Olympic luge team gets food poisoning in Sochi and starts to hallucinate Strawberry Short Cake or My Little Pony? Those kinds of images do not exactly instill confidence or strike fear in opponents. Which is why we’d like to suggest that Canadian athletes do some self-exploration, test the doors of perception, expand their minds, ride the snake. This way, they’ll know what to expect if they ever pass out during competition and hopefully learn to train their minds to hallucinate in a more high performance manner. There was a time in university when K&K was tripping balls during an intense game of hacky sack, and for a few minutes we believed we were Odin, the one-eyed Norse god, flanked by a wolf and raven, and balancing earth on our sandaled foot one moment and kicking it in the air the next. We’ve never hacky sacked so well in our entire lives. Just saying... twitter.com/KudosKvetches

online


F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

FRED

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EMAIL: yvrflee@hotmail.com TWITTER: @FredAboutTown

UNLEESHED

READY, SET, EAT: Lower Mainland restaurants will once again tempt our palettes with delicious, three-course prix fix menus of $18, $28 and $38 for Dine Out Vancouver. A far cry from its humble beginnings when 57 establishments participated in 2003, a record 263 restaurants have signed up for the gastronomic good times. SAVE-THE-DATE: Coast Mental Health executive director Darrell Burnham and awards chair Lorne Segal kicked off the 16th annual Courage to Come Back Awards honouring British Columbians who have overcome adversity to make a difference in the lives of others. The pair welcomed guests to the nominations reception held at Scotiabank Tower. Always a tearjerker, recipients will be feted May 8 at the Vancouver Convention Centre. COMMUNITY HERO: The first major party of 2014 saw more than 200 guests gather at the Four Seasons Hotel to celebrate the distinguished career of longtime banker and community leader David Poole. Family and friends joined the retiring Scotiabank senior vice-president of B.C. and the Yukon for an impressive toast and roast chronicling the business leader’s four decades of banking.

Tourism Vancouver’s Lucas Pavan and Rick Antonson front Canada’s largest restaurant festival. The 17 days of frenzied feasting runs until Feb 2.

Foodies Judith Lane (l) and Margaret Gallagher set out to sample some of the Dine Out Vancouver menus at the annual dine around.

Wines of B.C.’s Lindsay Kelm and alumni UBC’s Nicola Schuck team up for The Grape Debate: “Is wine made in the vineyard or in the winery?” — one of 31 special Dine Out events.

Courage to Come Back recipients Curtis Miller Joe and Andy Fiore, former drug addicts, shared their stories of triumph at a reception held at Scotiabank Tower.

Eight-time awards chair Lorne Segal and Coast Mental Health executive director Darrell Burnham invited nominations for the 16th annual Courage to Come Back Awards.

Retiring Scotiabank senior vice-president of B.C. and the Yukon David Poole escorted his wife, Mary Beth, to his retirement party at the Four Seasons Hotel.

David Poole’s dedication to community were echoed by Boys and Girls Club of South Coast B.C.’s CEO and president Carolyn Tuckwell, and his daughters Rosemary Tinney and Marjorie Poole.

One of Dal’s Gals, Dawn Chubai, helped Canada’s King of Swing usher in his 96th birthday. The legendary big band leader was feted at a surprise birthday party held in his h


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4

arts&entertainment

Joyless Ride Along not worth taking RIDE ALONG

Now playing at Scotiabank Theatre hen an unstoppable force meets an immovable object you get Ride Along, the seldom-funny buddy movie starring Kevin Hart and Ice Cube. Hart is the unstoppable force, naturally. He has more or less trademarked the fasttalking, high-pitched tan-

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trums made famous in his standup routines, whether he’s gabbing about fighting a much larger club bouncer or storming out on his wife, emasculated by the diaper bag over his shoulder. Here he plays Ben, a high school security guard with dreams of entering the police academy. Ben might want to become a cop or he just might really need a means to impress his future brother-in-law James (that’s Ice Cube, a.k.a. immovable object). James is a seasoned Atlanta P.D. detective who is very protective of his sister (Tika Sumpter) and refuses to give the couple his almighty blessing. “I pictured you with someone who plays for the Braves or the Hawks, not the mascot,” says James. (Right! because major-league players have such a good track record when it comes to fidelity.) Sure, he’s short (Hart is 5’2”) but apparently Ben makes up for it in the bedroom. His nickname with his girl and his online gaming friends is “BlackHammer.” But James won’t quit, calling Ben “a weenie”

and “one chromosome short of being a midget.” When Ben gets his acceptance letter from the police academy, James suggests a “ride along” to give Ben the chance to prove himself worthy of his sister’s hand. “ShowandProve,”isJames’ mantra: “Show me you’re worthy of her, and prove you’ve got what it takes.” It’s really an opportunity to make fun of Ben for the day. James is a hard man. The movie opens with a shootout in a busy public place, with James ignoring all the rules of engagement. He commandeers a vehicle, but is ticked when it’s a Prius and waits for the Dodge Viper truck instead. Hmm, what else? He wrecks a public market and causes panic just to prank Ben; he fantasizes about shooting Ben, and barely blinks when another suspect is shot accidentally; he ignores all orders from his stereotypically taciturn sarge; he breaks in to Ben and his sister’s apartment on several occasions. Creepy. We’ll put aside the irony

of former N.W.A. band member Ice Cube playing someone who would trump up a charge of assaulting an officer. His character isn’t cool, he’s just cruel. He’s unlikable. And even a hasty exposition about growing up in foster care can’t justify James’ attitude problem. Because of this, Hart has to work overtime to give the movie some character. Sometimes he’s annoying and sometimes Ben’s earnestness is endearing, but at least he’s working at it. The physical comedy is decent; the welltrod cop scenario is not. The boys stumble on some real criminals, some of the good guys are really bad guys, and so it goes. Action is cliché and supporting actors like John Leguizamo are handed regrettable dialogue. “You ain’t going to like how this movie ends,” James says at one point. No kidding. You won’t like much of the rest of it, either. Let’s hope they can get the balance right for Ride Along 2, already in the works. —reviewed by Julie Crawford


F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

I was wrong about the CPP (Canada Pension Plan) last column – they do an inflation adjustment for decadesearlier contributions, which makes most of my complaint unjustified. So my apologies to CPP, and my thanks to Dan Anders, the financial planner who sent me the “true facts.” Here’s another thing I might be mistaken about: I’m neither mathematician nor physicist, nor even terribly bright. So I might have this all wrong, or perhaps I just don’t know the “additional processes.” But, that said, here’s my concept of time: that we can “advance through” a distant object’s time/existence/experience, simply by moving toward or away from it. For instance, let’s say a “new” star has appeared in our Earth’s sky. If this new star is eight billion light years away from the Earth, the light we’re seeing right now from this star is eight billion years old; so we are “seeing” a star eight billion years younger than it actually is. But if we move halfway to that star, the light from it will only take four billion light years, not eight, to reach us; therefore we’ll “see” the star as it was four billion years ago, instead of eight.

The month ahead brings popularity, wish fulfillment, light romance and flirtations, friendship delights, entertainment, and a glowing optimism about your future. (Many of you have faced difficulty in career since 2008; but others have soared up the career ladder, same period. The risers rose because they kept hope and eagerness, and eschewed resentment.

Relationship feelings have intensified since early December (and will through July). Now, the few weeks ahead add a romantic note for singles, and a renewed love for your kids, if you’re attached. The prospects of a serious development are high, very high — but money factors, or home/family/security interests, could interfere. So love might demand sacrifice.

Be ambitious during the few weeks ahead, Taurus. But be aware that a slow-down exists during most of February. If you start a project now, be sure you can complete it before Feb. 6 (when the delays begin) or that it can “leapfrog” February and will survive to grow March onward. Your performance will be observed, so reject temptations, laziness, etc. Show your skills to higher-ups, approach VIPs, watch for and grasp opportunities.

Relax over the weeks ahead, Scorpio. Settle into family, home, garden and property. This is not a significant year for your home, so putter and repair rather than launching, for example, a huge renovation project. Your hopes rise Sunday/Monday — have fun, flirt, take in some entertainment. Retreat midweek — now the “home” influence begins strongly. Lie low, get plenty of rest, contemplate and plan.

You’ll love the four weeks ahead, Gemini. You’ll feel mellow, loving. You’ll learn things, you could travel afar, or meet success in publishing/media, education, legal affairs, and cultural involvements. You could find love, or move love up a step into longer-lasting zones (e.g., turn an affair into a wedding). All this happens in the middle of a longer phase that is already intensifying your creative and romantic leanings.

The month ahead is filled with errands, paperwork, details, communications, variety, new and old acquaintances, travel and visits. In this, avoid gossip, and defer from or be cautious with governmental, institutional or head office communications/paperwork. Otherwise, enjoy these weeks: travel, explore, be curious. Your money picture continues to look bright, and bargains abound — but if you intend to purchase a large item.

Life’s depths rise to the surface over the weeks ahead, Cancer. Generally, you like depths: intimate depths, deep feelings, mysteries. These are also weeks of finances, of investments, debts, retirement goals, etc. Take care here, for not all investments and financial manoeuvres will work, some might even cost, then fail. If intimacy seems to be blocked with someone, step back and become more romantic.

The month ahead holds money favours — but you could also impede your money luck or financial production by socializing. Or you might consider chasing a new life goal to be more important now than tarrying just to collect a few more bucks — and you could be very right. Don’t doubt yourself or your actions until February (when doubt will be unavoidable).

Chase money (or shop) Sunday/Monday, Leo — all’s smooth, good here. Midweek triggers errands, calls, emails, visits, trips, paperwork and curiosity. Step lightly, avoid arguments or unconsidered opinions Tuesday to Wednesday morning. Wednesday pm goes smoothly, happily — phone someone you like midafternoon. Head home Thursday afternoon to Saturday: embrace family, start landscaping, etc., Thurs./Fri.

At last, drudgery and weariness end! Your energy, charisma, clout and effectiveness soar over the weeks ahead – with one provision: by Feb. 6, Mercury turns retrograde, which cautions that mistakes and slowdowns will be rife. So start significant projects now and next week, approach important people, and tackle chores that formerly intimidated you. But time yourself, pick only projects/tasks that you can complete before February.

Chores fill the month ahead, Virgo. As Mercury retrogrades most of February, tackle the important or complex tasks/projects right away, so you’ll get a running start before delays and mistakes set in (February 6 onward). If you’re planning to buy machinery, tools, cars, computers, etc., do so now (Wednesday afternoon to 7:50 pm PST, Thursday eve, or January 30 best) NOT in February. In general, neither Jan. nor Feb. supports expanding your job nor major money outlays for equipment.

Use the weeks ahead to take a breather, Pisces. Nap, rest, protect your health. Avoid competitive situations. Plan, rather than strive for a goal. Contemplate, meditate, reconnect with your spiritual side. Be charitable. Deal with government agencies or institutions. An important relationship (and several others, representing opportunities) confronts you Sunday/Monday. Be diplomatic, receptive: luck is in the air.

Monday: Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin (84). Tuesday: Geena Davis (58). Wednesday: Linda Blair (55). Thursday: Mariska Hargitay (50), Friday: Neil Diamond (73). Saturday: Alicia Keys (34). Sunday: Wayne Gretzky (53).

MORE AT ASTRALREFLECTIONS.COM

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4

GOT SPORTS? 604-738-1411 | mstewart@vancourier.com

UBC women’s hockey T-Birds taking flight VETERAN DUBE ADDS VOCAL LEADERSHIP TO TEAM JENNIFER THUNCHER Contributing writer

T

he UBC women’s hockey team is quickly proving last year’s recordbreaking season was no fluke. By all accounts, last season was one for the ages. After a dreadful 2011-2012 showing in which they won only one game, 2012-2013 was an unbelievable turnaround for the team, with the Thunderbirds finishing 17-7-4 in the regular season and silencing all doubters by taking the Canada West championship. From loser to winner in one season, it was the most remarkable turnaround ever in the history of Canadian Interuniversity Sport. Fast-forward to 2014 — the 100th anniversary of hockey at UBC — the T-Birds are well on their way to making this their winningest season ever. They currently stand at 16-3-1 with eight regular season games left to play. The T-Birds need just two more wins to top last year’s victorious record. Head coach Graham Thomas attributes the team’s success to the character and work ethic of the players as well as to the family feeling that permeates from the coaches on down. “We are just creating an environment right now where we are accountable to each other,” he said.

photo Rich Lam/UBC Thunderbirds

Former Team Canada puckstopper Danielle Dube now tends the net for the T-Birds. They also don’t think a lot about the scoreboard,butmoreabouttheirplayandpractice. “We work really hard and we just focus on the process and it is a process of every single day of working on getting better and achieving everybody’s best,” he said. Another undeniable bonus for the team the last two seasons has been veteran Dani-

elle Dube in net. In her first game in goal at the start of last season, the team won 4-0 against the Regina Cougars and showed her younger teammates that winning was possible. She is a boon both on and off the ice by showing in her actions and attitude that hard work pays off, said Thomas. At 37, Dube brings a wealth of hockey and

life lessons to the dressing room. She has played for the Canadian National Women’s hockey team (from 1994-1998 and again from 2000-2002), is a full-time firefighter and mom of two. She said she was not a vocal player early in her career, but as her confidence has grown she has found her voice. “I don’t let all the little stuff get to me so I think they see that calmness and I think that brings a lot to the dressing room. And when I do speak, they really listen,” she said. Dube also credits the head coach for the team’s newfound success. “In the past they had just gotten so used to losing and not putting the preparation and the time in, and he made it very clear that you are going to work hard and you are going to do well in school, just raising everyone’s level and their expectations,” she said. The best reward for the team’s hard work would be to win the CIS National Championship at the end of the season. Thomas said it is too early to be overly focused on the national crown, one of the toughest championships in women’s hockey, but he thinks his team could come out on top come March. “We do have what it takes to win — excellent goaltending, skill and energy in our forwards and solid depth on the blue line. We compete really hard, are willing to make the selfless sacrifice for the team and are full of character and a never give up attitude,” he said. The Thunderbirds next chance for a win comes in Alberta Friday against the University of Alberta Pandas in Edmonton. thuncher@shaw.ca twitter.com/Thuncher

MEC runs aim for no-frills, family spirit JENNIFER THUNCHER Contributing writer

W

hether you are a cashstrapped advanced runner or a runner-wannabe looking for a fun event on a flat course to get you started, the MEC Vancouver’s 2014 Run Race Series might be the series for you. Thissecondannualsetofracesincludesseven 5k and 10k runs at different locations throughout the Lower Mainland, including three within Stanley Park. Each race has an entrance fee of between $15 and $20 depending on how close to each run a participant commits. These are meant to be no-frills, community races with 300 to 500 health-minded neighbours, said Mountain Equipment Coop outreach coordinator Mallory Holmes. Last year the series started out with 100 runners putting on sneakers and taking to the initial course. By the last run of the series, 300 participants, including everyone

from competitive elite racers to entire families out for their first run, crossed the finish line, she said. The addition of chip timing this year for each race on the seven certified racecourses will give athletes an accurate measurement of their achievements. Runners can expect everything they would get at other more established and expensive races in the city, but without the unnecessary bells and whistles, said Holmes. “They are not getting T-shirts, it is not that kind of swag [race], where you are going to get a gift bag and all kinds of flyers, that is not what we are about. But we want to make sure that the race you are getting is a great race,” she said. There are medals awarded for the top three in each male and female category. Medals are given to all kids who complete each race. Linda Wong, a 37-year-old experienced runner and community running group leader, ran the series last year. The routes are fairly well contained which is less intimidating for beginners, she said. “The races have a really low barrier of en-

try,” she added. There isn’t a lot of running in traffic and the courses are fun, with variety in the types of running surfaces and views. Some courses veer onto dirt or gravel trails while others weave along scenic routes, she said. And while the races are not fancy, they have everything a runner needs including free coffee, bananas and snacks waiting at the end of the race, Wong said. The first run, called the Rust Buster, is on Jan. 19 in Richmond, beginning at the Biennale sculpture, Water #10 — one block from the Aberdeen station on the Canada Line — at the corner of Cambie Street and River Road, and then winds along the Dyke Trail. The series is structured so runners who complete the series can cap off all their training with the first ever MEC marathon in October, and unlike many such events with entrance fees upwards of $100, they won’t have to break the bank for this one — the entrance for the marathon is $25. Register online at events.mec.ca, instore at MEC Vancouver at 130 West

photo Jensen Gifford

Runners will be lacing up this Sunday for the first run of the 2014 MEC run/race series.

Broadway, or on race day for $20 between 8– 8:30 a.m. Last day to register online is Jan. 17. You can still register in store until Jan. 18. thuncher@shaw.ca twitter.com/Thuncher


F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

sports&recreation

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Sleep essential to fitness goals RACER’S EDGE

S

with Kristina Bangma

leep could be the one factor preventing you from achieving your fitness, weight loss or training goals. Even professional athletes with the best training program could be kept off the podium for not getting their zzz’s. Why is sleep so important? When we train in the gym, at the track, in a game or on the bike, we are damaging our muscles with minor micro tears, using glycogen and fat stores as well as stressing our entire system. But contrary to what most people think, we don’t get faster or stronger simply from training. Our results are dependent on how quickly we can repair and regenerate from our training. This regeneration only happens while we sleep, specifically during the Rapid Eye Movement (REM) phase of sleeping. There are five phases of sleeping. Each phase lasts for a certain amount of time allowing your body to fall deeper and deeper into unconsciousness. One full sleep cycle typically takes 90 minutes, so your body will continue to repeat the cycle for as many hours as you sleep. The REM sleep cycle isn’t until phase four so if your sleep quality is poor,

you may never make it to the REM phase or the cycle may be interrupted, forcing your to start the cycle over from the beginning. Since most people only spend about 30 minutes in the REM phase, the length and the quality of your sleep determines how quickly you can regenerate and recover. Why is the REM phase of sleep so important? All of the magic happens in this phase. One of our bodies’ most powerful hormones, the human growth hormone (HGH) is produced in the REM phase of sleep. The main function of HGH is to repair and regenerate but it also has several other beneficial functions such as: increasing calcium retention which helps maintain bone mass, promotes fat loss, reduces fat storage, supports your immune system, improves mental and cognitive functions and keeps your organs operating smoothly. That is a lot of work that needs be done in a very short period of time. How does lack of sleep lead to obesity? HGH isn’t the only hormone affected by sleep. During sleep, the body also balances two hunger-controlling hormones called ghrelin and leptin. A study in the journal PLoS Medicine showed a strong correlation between limited sleep and high levels of hunger-inducing ghrelin with low levels of the satisfaction inducing hormone, leptin. With hormones both making you hungry and not allowing you to feel satisfied you can understand why they have linked obesity with a lack of sleep. For the full version of this column, go to vancourier.com/sports.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4


today’shomes

F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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INTERESTED IN ADVERTISING IN TODAY’S HOMES? Contact Linda Garner:

604-738-1411 | lgarner@vancourier.com

Luxury home sales surge in last half of 2013 HIGH-END HOUSES SEE AN OVERALL INCREASE OF 19 PER CENT FROM PREVIOUS YEAR GLEN KORSTROM biv.com

C

onfidence returned to Vancouver’s luxury home market in 2013 with sales for homes priced more than $1 million surging in the last half of the year, according to a Sotheby’s International Realty Canada report released Jan. 9. Sotheby’s counted 2,505 Vancouver homes that sold in 2012 and were priced in the seven figures. That’s a 19 per cent increase compared with 2012. Sales in the last half of the year, however, surged 74 per cent compared to the same six-month period one year earlier. Calgary led the country with a 33 per cent jump in sales for homes priced above $1 million whereas sales for homes in Toronto in that price range rose 13 per cent. Montreal was the only major urban centre in Canada to

post negative sales growth for homes priced more than $1 million as sales for those homes in Quebec’s largest city dipped 8 per cent compared with 2012. “2013 proved to be a year that defied many analyst predictions,” said Sotheby’s CEO Ross McCredie. “We expect to see continued growth in western Canada’s high-end housing market, specifically in attached and single family homes in Vancouver and Calgary.” The high end of Vancouver’s luxury home market was the part that rose last year, according to Sotheby’s. Vancouver homes priced above $4 million had sales 48 per cent more than in 2012. The most expensive home in B.C. is Lululemon founder Chip Wilson’s mansion at 3085 Point Grey Road, which BC Assessment earlier this month estimated is worth $54 million. gkrostrom@biv.com twitter.com/glenkorstrom

photo Sotheby’s International Realty Canada

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4

THE BEST OF METROTOWN 48 more storeys of Metrotown’s most highly anticipated community are coming this April. 4670 Assembly Way is the next phase at Station Square – the very best of Metrotown. More shopping, more dining, more amenities, more transit options – everything at your doorstep: that’s what it means to live in Downtown Metrotown.

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F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

WE ARE PROUD TO OWN IN THE BEST PLACE ON EARTH Westside living in one of the most desirable cities in the world. Binning Tower on the Park, at Wesbrook, UBC features breathtaking panoramic views of protected forests and fresh ocean breezes.

Being active and outdoors is important to us and spending less time commuting means more time with my family! GRAHAM THOMAS

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Selling homes is my business so I know great neighbourhoods. I chose Binning Tower at Wesbrook for the location and views! MAGGIE ZHOU

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dashboard A30

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2014DodgeDart:Thefreshfaceofanoldname

T

hankstoFiat,Chrysler has begun to emerge from bankruptcy and is quickly paving a path to success. In this important journey, every auto manufacturer needs to have a strong presence in the

DAVID CHAO

compact sedan segment. Dodge hasn’t had a winner in this market in quite some time — they hope to change that by reviving a historic name: the Dart. Not only is the Dart Chrysler’s re-entry into the compact

segment, but it is also the first all-new car developed under Fiat’s leadership. Needless to say, a lot is riding on its success. It joins the Ford Focus and Chevrolet Cruze as domestic alternatives to the long standing leaders from

GOODBUY2013 $ 11,995 ACCENT OWN IT FOR

DESIGN

2013

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ALL-IN PRICING INCLUDES PRICE ADJUSTMENTSΩ, DELIVERY & DESTINATION.

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GLS model shown

2013

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12,995

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SAY HELLO TO THE 2014’s 2014

2014

TUCSON GL

abroad, namely the Toyota Corolla and Honda Civic. To be honest, I am puzzled by the selection of the name. The new Dart has ties to Fiat’s Alfa Romeo products but the name suggests “American” — something I can’t quite grasp yet.

SANTA FE SPORT

‘13 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GL CERTIFIED • STK# HY10628.

$15,995

The new Dodge Dart enters the fray with sporty exterior and high tech features. The fresh look is one of the most dynamic in this segment. It’s based on an Alfa Romeo platform, but looks vastly different than the Alfa Romeo Giulietta cousin on which it is based. The Dart retains the Dodge “crosshair” grill, making it somewhat recognizable as an “all-American.” With a wide front end and its cabin pushed rearward, the Dart certainly looks athletic. The grill is narrower than on other Dodge models and the lower air intake is more prominent. Behind it, optional active shutters may be seen, helping to aid aerodynamics. In a welcomed deviation from the norm, Dodge decided to use piano-black accents instead of the traditional chrome mouldings. The optional Charger inspired, LED “racetrack” taillights dominate the rear of equipped models. The Dart’s exterior dimensions are larger than the Giulietta in every way, which also translates to a roomier interior as well. More soft-touch materials

are used in the cabin than in previous Dodge compacts. While a few hard surfaces remain, thankfully they are not in places the hand touches often. Customers of the Dart are blessed for choice with six trim levels to choose from. The base model is known as the SE and the line-up moves up through SXT, Rallye, Aero with Limited and GT models at the top. Each model has a couple packages and stand alone options to further customise each customer’s Dart.

PERFORMANCE With Dodge focusing on customization, there are three powerplants to choose from. Most models come with either the 2.0-litre Tigershark I-4 or the 1.4-litre MultiAir Turbo. It’s debatable which powerplant is more fun to drive as they both produce 160 horsepower. The 1.4 does create more torque, 184 ft-lbs verses 148, but the turbo lag certainly delays the time it all kicks in. The turbo is certainly more fuel efficient however. It uses only 4.9 litres per 100kms of highway driving verses the 5.4 needed by the Tigershark. The2.4-litreTigersharkwith MultiAir is only available on the GT model. It makes 184hp and 171 ft-lbs of torque. A six-speed manual is standard on all models except the Limited. An optional six-speed auto is available, with the transmission mated to the 1.4-litre Turbo Continued on next page

‘10 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GLS TOURING! SPORT! CERTIFIED • STK# HY10690.

Limited model shown Limited model shown

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For more details, visit destinationhyundai.com The Hyundai names, logos, product names, feature names, images and slogans are trademarks owned by Hyundai Auto Canada Corp. †Finance offers available O.A.C. from Hyundai Financial Services based on a new 2013 Accent 5 Door GL 6-Speed Manual/ 2013 Elantra GL 6-Speed Manual/2014 Tucson 2.0L GL FWD MT/2014 Santa Fe 2.4L FWD with an annual finance rate of 0%/0%/1.9%1.9% for 72/84/96/96 months. Bi-weekly payments are $113/$111/$119/$139. $0/$0/$250/$1,500 down payment required. Cost of Borrowing is $0/$0/$1,811/$2,114. Finance offers include Delivery and Destination of $1,550/$1,550/$1,760/$1,760. Registration, insurance, PPSA, fees, levies, charges, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. Delivery and Destination charge includes freight, P.D.E., dealer admin fees and a full tank of gas. Financing example: 2014 Tucson 2.0L GL FWD MT for $23,259 at 1.9% per annum equals $119 bi-weekly for 96 months for a total obligation of $25,070. $250 down payment required. Cash price is $23,259. Cost of Borrowing is $1,811. Example price includes Delivery and Destination of $1,760. Registration, insurance, PPSA, fees, levies, charges, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. ♦Price of models shown: 2013 Accent 5 Door GLS 6-Speed Manual/2013 Elantra Limited/ 2014 Tucson 2.4L Limited AWD/2014 Santa Fe 2.0T Limited AWD are $19,249/$2 4,849/$35,359/$40,659. Prices include Delivery and Destination charges of $1,550/$1,550/ $1,760/$1,760. Registration, insurance, PPSA, fees, levies, charges, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. Price adjustments are calculated against the vehicle’s starting price. Price adjustments of up to $3,340/$4,540 available on 2013 Accent 5 Door L 6-Speed Manual/2013 Elantra L 6-Speed Manual (on cash purchases only). Price adjustments applied before taxes. Offer cannot be combined or used in conjunction with any other available offers. Offer is non-transferable and cannot be assigned. No vehicle trade-in required. †♦Offers available for a limited time, and subject to change or cancellation without notice. See dealer for complete details. Dealer may sell for less. Inventory is limited, dealer order may be required. ††Hyundai’s Comprehensive Limited Warranty coverage covers most vehicle components against defects in workmanship under normal use and maintenance conditions

TM

submitted photos

The new Dodge Dart boasts a sporty exterior and high tech features.


F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

dashboard

Continued from previous page

The Dart was created to fit underacertainpricepoint,but Dodge managed to squeeze-in decent level of features. Front seats are quiet comfortable for a compact sedan and provide good lateral support. The A-pillars are relatively thin and the dash is set low, giving you a great view out of the cabin and limits blind spots. In the back, there’s a surprising amount of room. It boasts plenty of legroom and enough headroom for someone over six-feet tall. However, only expect to comfortably carry two passengers in the rear seats. Wind noise is limited making the cabin fairly quite and relaxing, but some road and tire noise does creep in. The standout feature inside the Dart is the 8.4-inch touchscreen running Chrysler’s Uconnect infotainment system. This is standard on all but the base model SE. The Uconnect system is user friendly and centralizes all of the interior controls, tidying the cabin of a lot of needless buttons. Safety is another of the Dart’s strong suits as it comes standard with 10 airbags, including side curtains.

FEATURES The Dart ranges in price from $15,995 for the SE to $23,245 for the Limited. Standard equipment includes projector headlamps, LED taillamps, and keyless entry.

THUMBS UP The Dart represents high value with an excellent infotainment system, good handling and contemporary looks.

THUMBS DOWN While the Dart has respectable character, its name and its heritage are “mismatched” — the overall feel has been compromised too much towards “American.”

THE BOTTOM LINE The new Dodge Dart is a youthful compact sedan that deserves a fair look in this extremely competitive segment.

The standout feature inside the Dart is the 8.4-inch touchscreen running Chrysler’s Uconnect infotainment system.

A FAMILY OF OVER-ACHIEVERS. THE NEXT GENERATION OF AWARD-WINNING MAZDA VEHICLES WITH SKYACTIV TECHNOLOGY AND BOLD KODO DESIGN. 2014 MAZDA3

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AUTOMOBILE JOURNALISTS ASSOCIATION OF CANADA

2014 MAZDA3 Sport AUTOMOBILE JOURNALISTS ASSOCIATION OF CANADA

2014 MAZDA CX-5

Winner of the best new small car (over $21,000)

Compact utility of the year

COMPETITORS Toyota Corolla The Corolla recently received a massive refresh which makes it look much younger and feel more upscale. Toyota has become an industry leader on its reputation for quality and strong resale values. The ride and handling too, is vastly improved. The Corolla ranges in price from $15,995 to $20,250. Honda Civic Competition in the compact sedan market is so fierce; it forced Honda to make a significant revision to the Civic just one year after debuting an all-new model in 2012. The new Civic possesses all of the refinement and performance expected of a perennial segment leader. With a starting price at $15,440, the Civic is one of the most affordable in this segment. Chevrolet Cruze When the Cruze was introduced a few years ago, it boasts decent looks, a comfortable ride and impressive fuel economy. Fuel economy receives an even bigger boost with the addition of a turbo diesel model. It has roots in German engineering. The Cruze starts at $15,995 for the LS, and the Clean Turbo Diesel starts at $24,945.

GT model shown from $33,990

GT model shown from $27,650

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††No Payments for 90 Days (payment deferral) offer is available on new in-stock 2014 CX-5 models and only applies to purchase finance offers on approved credit. No interest will accrue during the first 60 days of the finance contract. After this period interest will begin to accrue and the purchaser will repay the principal and interest monthly over the term of the contract. Offer available Jan 3-31, 2014. †0% APR purchase financing is available on select new Mazda vehicles. Other terms available and vary by model. Based on a representative example using a finance price of $31,045 for 2013 MX-5 GS (L2XS53AA00)/$24,890 for 2014 CX-5 GX (NVXK64AA00)/$26,190 for 2014 Mazda6 GX (G4XL64AA00) at a rate of 0%/2.99%/3.49% APR, the cost of borrowing for an 84-month term is $0/$2,726/$3,367, bi-weekly payment is $131/$152/$162, total finance obligation is $31,045/$27,616/$29,557. Taxes are extra and required at the time of purchase. **Lease offers available on approved credit for new 2014 Mazda3 GX (D4XK64AA00) with a lease APR of 2.49% and bi-weekly payments of $79 for 36 months, the total lease obligation is $7,757, including down payment of $1,600. PPSA and first monthly payment due at lease inception. 20,000 km lease allowance per year, if exceeded, additional 8¢/km applies. 25,000 km leases available. Offered leasing available to retail customers only. Taxes extra. *The starting from price for 2014 Mazda3 GX (D4XK64AA00)/2014 CX-5 GX (NVXK64AA00)/2014 Mazda6 GX (G4XL64AA00) is $17,690/$24,990/$26,290. Cash discounts vary by model. $7,000 cash back only available on 2013 MX-5. All prices include freight & PDI of $1,695/$1,895 for Mazda3, Mazda6/CX-5. PPSA, licence, insurance, taxes, down payment and other dealer charges are extra and may be required at the time of purchase. Dealer may sell/lease for less. Dealer order/trade may be necessary on certain vehicles. Lease and Finance on approved credit for qualified customers only. Offers valid Jan 3 - 31, 2014, while supplies last. Prices and rates subject to change without notice. Visit mazda.ca or see your dealer for complete details.

ENVIRONMENT

Additional features, available as options or on higher trims, include dual exhaust, heated front seats, heated steering wheel, 7-inch TFT reconfigurable display, rear cross traffic alert and blind spot monitoring. Fuel efficiency numbers (L/100km) for the 1.4-litre MultiAir Turbo with the manual transmission are 7.4 city, 4.9 highway. The 2.0-litre Tigershark with a manual sees 8.1 city and 5.4 highway.

Boundary Rd

a dual dry clutch unit. The manual transmission has a natural-feeling gate and a solid clutch. However, the ratio setup means you constantly have to change gears at lower speeds. The automatics obviously sort that whole process out for you. Since the Dart is based on an Italian car, some may be expecting spirited handling; and they’re not wrong, in a sense. The engineers at Dodge have softened the ride a little to match the tastes of North American drivers but managed to keep confident road-holding ability. This is the first Chrysler with electric power steering. A good first effort as it is quick and well weighted with a tight feel. Overall, the car feels confident though it no longer feels “Italian” and resembles more of an Americanderived vehicle.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4

dashboard General Motors fumbles ‘Vette unveiling Unfortunately, the Internet happened. As part of the lead-up to the launch, GM faithfully created a special launch site, and prepared to release the pertinent information to ‘Vette fans everywhere at a later date. Sadly, whoever was in charge of the meta data — the keywords and identifying phrases that Google uses to locate sites — decided to plug in hush-hush details like horsepower and torque figures. Anyone who searched for “Corvette Stingray Z06” or similar would see the brief blurb under the link, and it basically let the cat out of the bag. So how much power are we talking about? Oh, a lot. Really a lot. Unofficially, of course, GM’s new trackspecial will have a supercharged V-8 en-

BRAKING NEWS

with Brendan McAleer

CORVETTE Z06 DETAILS LEAK OUT

PLEASE READ THE FINE PRINT: Offers valid until January 31, 2014. See toyota.ca for complete details on all cash back offers. In the event of any discrepancy or inconsistency between Toyota prices, rates and/or other information contained on toyotabc.ca and that contained on toyota.ca, the latter shall prevail. Errors and omissions excepted. 2014 Corolla CE 6M Manual BURCEM-A MSRP is $17,540 and includes $1,545 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning federal excise tax. *Lease example: 2014 Corolla CE 6M with a vehicle price of $16,440 (includes $1,100 Toyota Canada Lease Assist, which is deducted from the negotiated selling price after taxes, and $1,545 freight/PDI) leased at 2.9% over 60 months with $0 down payment equals 120 semi-monthly payments of $89 with a total lease obligation of $10,680. Lease 60 mos. based on 100,000 km, excess km charge is $.07. $0 security deposit and first semi-monthly payment due at lease inception. Price and total obligation exclude license, insurance, registration, fees and taxes. Dealer order / trade may be necessary. **Finance example: 1.9% finance for 60 months, upon credit approval, available on 2014 Corolla CE. Applicable taxes are extra. 2014 RAV4 Base FWD LE Automatic ZFREVT-A MSRP is $25,685 and includes $1,815 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning federal excise tax. †Lease example: 4.9% Lease APR for 60 months on approved credit. Semi-Monthly payment is $139 with $2,300 down payment. Total Lease obligation is $18,980. Lease 60 mos. based on 100,000 km, excess km charge is $.10. Applicable taxes are extra. Down payment, first semi-monthly payment and security deposit plus GST and PST on first payment and full down payment are due at lease inception. A security deposit is not required on approval of credit. ††Finance example: 0.9% finance for 60 months, upon credit approval, available on 2014 RAV4. Applicable taxes are extra. 2014 Tacoma Double Cab V6 4x4 Automatic MU4FNA-A MSRP is $32,965 and includes $1,815 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning federal excise tax. ‡Lease example: 4.9% Lease APR for 60 months on approved credit. Semi-Monthly payment is $165 with $3,980 down payment. Total Lease obligation is $23,720. Lease 60 mos. based on 100,000 km, excess km charge is $.10. Applicable taxes are extra. Down payment, first semi-monthly payment and security deposit plus GST and PST on first payment and full down payment are due at lease inception. A security deposit is not required on approval of credit. ‡‡Finance example: 0.9% finance for 36 months, upon credit approval, available on 2014 Tacoma. Applicable taxes are extra. ‡‡‡Semi-monthly lease offer available through Toyota Financial Services on approved credit to qualified retail customers on most 48 and 60 month leases (including Stretch leases) of new and demonstrator Toyota vehicles. First semimonthly payment due at lease inception and next monthly payment due approximately 15 days later and semi-monthly thereafter throughout the term. Toyota Financial Services will waive the final payment. Semi-monthly lease offer can be combined with most other offers excluding the First Payment Free and Encore offers. First Payment Free offer is valid for eligible TFS Lease Renewal customers only. Not open to employees of Toyota Canada, Toyota Financial Services or TMMC/TMMC Vehicle Purchase Plan. Some conditions apply. See your Toyota dealer for complete details. Visit your Toyota BC Dealer or www.toyotabc.ca for more details. Some conditions apply; offers are time limited and may change without notice. Dealer may lease/sell for less.

Last year saw the seventh generation Corvette take its bow at the annual North American International Auto Show in Detroit, Mich. General Motors planned to recreate the excitement with the unveiling of the high performance track-special version, their Z06.

gine producing 620 h.p. and a colossal 650 foot-pounds of torque. With pundits already agog over the latest ‘Vette’s handling and acceleration improvements in the basic version, the new Z06 should be even more giant-killing-ey.

AUDIS TO COME EQUIPPED WITH LASERS It sounds like something an eight-yearold came up with, or perhaps a nefarious plan cooked up by Dr. Evil: at this year’s consumer electronics show, Audi took the wraps off a version of their Sport Quattro Concept with laser beams for headlights. While the immensely heavy Sport Quattro is more mutated sea bass than shark,

strapping a laser beam to its forehead has worked wonders for long distance illumination. Essentially, the laser lights work as the high beams, and the signature Audi LEDs function as low beams. The frickin’ lasers provide greatly improved illumination of the road ahead with a pair of tightly controlled beams. Sadly, flashing your brights at a fast-lane-hogging, slow-moving Corolla doesn’t cause it to explode as if zapped by the Death Star. Pew pew pew. Nope, nothing. Sounds great, and Audi will be putting their (literally) brilliant technology into both their R18 LeMans endurance racer and eventually into production form. However, whether the new tech passes Canada’s ill-tempered safety standards is another thing entirely.

Palm Springs, Anyone?

by Samira Hodania

With Modernism Week just around the corner (February 13-23) and a particularly arctic Canadian winter underway, the desert seems just about perfect right now.

LEASE FROM ‡

stay

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Conveniently located in the heart of the uptown design district, Alcazar is all about the sleek and modern ABC’s (Alcazar, Birba and Cheekys). Appointed with local art, Alcazar is the youngest of the triangle, mastering comfort by spoiling their guests with imported Italian linens and townie bikes. Attracting a diverse crowd, Birba serves a creative menu with Italian wood fired pizzas and locally-sourced, hand-crafted cocktails. In the morning, refuel with the breakfast quesadilla and a freshly squeezed kale smoothie at Cheeky’s and you’ll be ready to hit the town. From $120/night, www.alcazarpalmsprings.com

per month/36 mos.

TACOMA

do

Book the architectural tour with Palm Springs Modern Tours (make sure to see Robert) to experience some of the most posh and elite neighborhoods of Palm Springs. The driving tour takes you through the desert’s most notable architecture and gives you the inside scoop on who lived there during the Rat Pack era and which Hollywood stars are vacationing there during Coachella. 3 hour tour, $85/person, www.palmspringsmoderntours.com

4x4 Double Cab V6 $32,965 MSRP includes F+PDI

hike

LEASE FROM †

Turn your phone off for a morning and hike the Indian Canyons to experience some breathtaking views of the desert. We conquered the Andreas Canyon (don’t worry if you and your gym aren’t speaking, it’s just a 1-mile loop) where you’ll see more than 150 species of plants, some which were used for medicine and preparing food centuries ago. Trails can be hiked with a ranger or solo, www.indian-canyons.com Read our full Palm Springs itinerary at www.vitamindaily.com www.Visitpalmsprings.com

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Shampoo Be Gone

Ski Bunny Facial

We’ve heard a lot about the “No poo” movement (people swamping shampoo for natural ingredients or daily shampooers giving it up for a few weeks to detox the hair) and have to admit we’re intrigued.

Skiing Peak-to-Peak is exhilarating, but the whipping wind, reflecting sun, and sub-zero temperatures can wreak havoc on your face.

by Sara Samson

2014

per month/60 mos.

by Sarah Bancroft

RAV4

FWD LE $25,685 MSRP includes F+PDI

‡‡‡

FREE FIRST OR LAST PAYMENT

. No Security Deposit . Monthly or semi-monthly payment options . Standard or Low Kilometre Lease

Purely Perfect has recently come out with the ultimate “unshampoo” Cleansing Crème that could be a game changer. Used on wet hair, the crème takes the impurities out of your hair but leaves the good stuff like essential oils to make your hair shiny and keep colour vibrant. There’s also no need for conditioner because your hair’s natural conditioners are still intact. Rinse, and repeat (eventually).

$54.95 at Murale stores nationwide, www.murale.ca

Something to Cheer About

Cold-weather Kicks

“Go play” doesn’t quite do the trick when there’s a sugared-up posse gathered in the living room.

We’re stoked to start our running resolution… just as soon as we gear up.

0

89

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per month/60 mos.

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To y o t a B C . c a

30692

JIM PATTISON TOYOTA NORTH SHORE 849 Auto Mall Drive (604) 985-0591

GRANVILLE TOYOTA VANCOUVER 8265 Fraser Street (604) 263-2711 6978

by Christine Laroche

Corolla S - Sport model shown

$

JIM PATTISON TOYOTA DOWNTOWN 1290 Burrard Street (604) 682-8881

That’s right, now hide it on your ski boot.

$40 at www.purelyperfect.com

by Maria Tallarico

Follow us at:

Pre- and post-piste, make sure to slather your visage with Pure by Dr. Roebuck’s, an Australian dermatologist whose ski bunny daughters have taken up the brand. While we love all the products in the range (which we’ve been testing all fall), Pure is the winner when it comes to long-lasting skin protection that’s non-greasy and smells cleans and fresh.

18732

LANGLEY TOYOTATOWN LANGLEY 20622 Langley Bypass (604) 530-3156

JIM PATTISON TOYOTA SURREY 15389 Guildford Drive (604) 495-4100 6701

9497

OPENROAD TOYOTA RICHMOND Richmond Auto Mall (604) 273-3766

OPENROAD TOYOTA PORT MOODY 3166 St. John’s Street (604) 461-3656 7826

7825

DESTINATION TOYOTA BURNABY 4278 Lougheed Highway (604) 571-4350 9374

PEACE ARCH TOYOTA SOUTH SURREY 3174 King George Highway (604) 531-2916 30377

SUNRISE TOYOTA ABBOTSFORD Fraser Valley Auto Mall (604) 857-2657 5736

REGENCY TOYOTA VANCOUVER 401 Kingsway (604) 879-8411 8507

WEST COAST TOYOTA PITT MEADOWS 19950 Lougheed Highway (866) 910-9543 7662

VALLEY TOYOTA CHILLIWACK 8750 Young Road (604) 792-1167 8176

SQUAMISH TOYOTA SQUAMISH 39150 Queens Way (604) 567-8888 31003

WESTMINSTER TOYOTA NEW WESTMINSTER 210 - 12th Street (604) 520-3333 8531

Get them out of the “I’m bored” mood (and into the play room!) with a Pom Pom Maker kit ($8). Great for a group activity (like, if you were having a party), cut the pieces out and let the kids go crazy wrapping yarn. No glue, no paint, nothing that can be used as a weapon - it’s a sweetly simple craft for everyone. Bonus: pom poms actually look adorable when finished and can be strewn about the house or hung on a string for decoration. Hear that? It’s the sound of peace and quiet. Order the Clover Pom Pom maker ($8) from Collage Collage, http://shop.collagecollage.ca

First on the shopping list is a pair of kicks that can stand up to a Canadian winter, like Nike’s Air Pegasus+30 Shield ($139 at MEC). These beauties are water-repellent, highly reflective (will we ever see the sunshine again?) and lined in (comfy cozy) microfleece. And did we mention that they’re purple leopard with a neon accent? In case the running thing doesn’t get off the ground, we’ll just move to our plan B resolution: Adopt the athletic fashion trend. $139 at MEC stores nationwide, www.mec.ca


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SAVE $20

IF YOU SPEND OVER $100 bchonda.com

*Limited time lease offer based on a new 2014 Civic DX model FB2E2EEX. #2.99% lease APR for 60 months O.A.C. Bi-weekly payment, including freight and PDI, is $87.64. Down payment of $0.00, first bi-weekly payment, environmental fees and $0 security deposit due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $11,393.20. Taxes, license, insurance and registration are extra. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometer. Ω Limited time lease offer based on a new 2014 CR-V LX 2WD model RM3H3EES. ¥2.99% lease APR for 60 months O.A.C. Bi-weekly payment, including freight and PDI, is $147.62. Downpayment of $0.00, first bi-weekly payment, environmental fees and $0 security deposit due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $19,190.60. Taxes, license, insurance and registration are extra. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometer. £Limited time lease offer based on a new 2014 Odyssey LX model RL5H2EE. €3.99% lease APR for 60 months O.A.C. Bi-weekly payment, including freight and PDI, is $185.30. Downpayment of $0.00, first bi-weekly payment, environmental fees and $0 security deposit due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $24,089.00. Taxes, license, insurance and registration are extra. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometer. **MSRP is $17,185 / $27,685 / $31,685 including freight and PDI of $1,495 / $1,695 / $1,695 based on a new a 2014 Civic DX model FB2E2EEX / 2014 CR-V LX 2WD model RM3H3EES / 2014 Odyssey LX model RL5H2EE. PPSA, license, insurance, taxes, and other dealer charges are extra and may be required at the time of purchase. ¥/£/€/Ω/#/* Prices and/or payments shown do not include a PPSA lien registration fee of $30.31 and lien registering agent’s fee of $5.25, which are both due at time of delivery. #/*/Ω/€/¥/£/** Offers valid from January 3rd through January 31st, 2014 at participating Honda retailers. Dealer may sell for less. Dealer trade may be necessary on certain vehicles. Offers valid only for British Columbia residents at BC Honda Dealers locations. Offers subject to change or cancellation without notice. Terms and conditions apply. Visit www.bchonda.com or see your Honda retailer for full details.

FREE SERVICE SHUTTLE (DOWNTOWN CORE) COURTESY CAR WASH FOR ALL SERVICE CUSTOMERS * All offers are effective until February 8,2014. Not applicable to tire sales. Taxes not included. Environmental levies extra. °Not to be combined with other offers. Please consult January 11,2014. Kingsway Honda for more details. Please present coupon during write-up. Valid at Kingsway Honda only. Limit one per person. Coupon does not apply to prior purchases.

12th and Kingsway, Vancouver CALL 604-873-3676

Coupon

www.kingswayhonda.ca

Dealer # D8508


A36

THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 7 , 2 0 1 4

GLUTEN FREE 100% BC Owned and Operated Prices Effective January 16 to January 22, 2014.

We reserve the right to limit quantities. We reserve the right to correct printing errors.

Grocery Department Gluten Freeda Instant Oatmeal assorted varieties

Nuts to You Organic Peanut Butter smooth or crunchy

28%

Wedderspoon Manuka Raw Active Organic Honey 12+

SAVE from

32%

SAVE

23%

250g product of New Zealand

assorted varieties

25%

34%

3/3.99

30%

23-113g • product of USA

assorted varieties

assorted varieties

3.29

SAVE

5.49

! New

6.49

Natur-A Almond Beverages

Glutino Gluten-Free Snack Crackers

assorted varieties

assorted varieties

product of Italy

946ml • product of Canada

2/4.98

Health Care Department Prairie Natural Hemp Force Protein Powder

19.99

400g

Hemp Protein delivers superior quality protein containing every one of the essential amino acids our body needs.

575g

Innovite Magnesium Citrate

11.99

2.99-5.99

Gluten Free

250ml

Cruicial to a well functioning cardiovascular system.

Vega One Nutritional Shake

Crazy for Coconut or Nuts and Honey Breakfast Bread

340g

20% off regular retail price

mini or regular

San Zanone Organic Rice and Corn Pasta

2/4.98

400g product of Canada

2 pack

All Muffins

740ml

product of Canada

6.99

Bulk Department bags only

reg 7.99 each

3.99

3.99

assorted varieties

3/3.00

Wholesome Country Sourdough Bread

assorted varieties

33%

Fair Trade Organic Mexican Grown Avocados from Pragor Coop

Choices Sorghum Flour (Stone Ground)

Zorbas Gluten Free Spanakopitas

Marinelli Pasta Sauce

SAVE

each

product of Canada

Bakery Department

156g

product of USA

25%

25 pack product of Belgium

assorted varieties

2.99

from

750g product of Canada

Glutino Gluten-Free Pretzels

3/5.97

5.49

500ml • reg 6.99

Amy's Gluten-Free Frozen Burritos

Ecover Zero Dish Tabs

SAVE

50g product of Canada

from

15 count product of USA

Liberte Classic Yogurt

SAVE

Happy Planet Canadian Inspired Soups

3/2.97

from

1.98lb/ 4.37kg

6.99lb/ 14.41kg

assorted varieties

SAVE

5.99

product of Canada

BC Grown Organic Red Bulk Beets

Deli Department

assorted varieties

1.48lb/ 3.26kg

value pack

Enjoy Life Plentils Chips

Two Leaves Organic Tea

33%

250g – 430ml product of Canada/USA

Organic Granny Smith Apples from Sundance Farm Cawston, BC

Boneless Skinless Chicken Breasts

3/7.50

Hardbite Potato Chips

14.99

SAVE

product of USA

assorted varieties

Produce Department

6.99lb/ 14.41kg

40g

Old Dutch Restaurante Chips and Salsa

500g product of Canada

35%

3/4.98

SAVE

5.49

SAVE

32%

assorted varieties

300g product of USA

31%

Local Lean Ground Beef grass fed, grass forage finished

Kind Fruit & Nut Bars

4.49

SAVE

SAVE

Meat Department

54.99

2.99-3.99

150g

120g • product of Canada

from 828g

Vega One Nutritional Shake is an all-inone, plant-based supplement, packed with 50% daily intake of vitamins and minerals, protein, fibre, Omega-3, plus antioxidants, probiotics and greens.

Gum it Down

with Red Seal Baker Lisa Wagner and Dietitian Nicole Fetterly January 25 & 26th, 11:00am – 11:45am at the Vancouver Gluten Free Expo Learn how to change your gluten-free baking for the better with Choices’ Own Lisa Wagner and Nicole Fetterly, RD. Find out how to use more nutrient-dense grains and other whole food-based ingredients like chia, coconut and rice bran in place of costly chemically derived gums and binders typically found in gluten-free baking. This is your chance to increase wholesomeness without sacrificing taste and texture. Visit www.glutenfree expo.ca for full details and ticket information.

2010 - 2013 Awards. Your loyalty has helped Choices achieve these awards. Thank you!

Find us on Facebook: facebook.com/ChoicesMarkets Best Organic Produce

Best Grocery Store

Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/ChoicesMarkets

2010-2013

www.choicesmarkets.com Kitsilano

Cambie

Kerrisdale

Yaletown

Rice Bakery

South Surrey

2627 W. 16th Ave. Vancouver 604.736.0009

3493 Cambie St. Vancouver 604.875.0099

1888 W. 57th Ave. Vancouver 604.263.4600

1202 Richards St. Vancouver 604.633.2392

2595 W. 16th Ave. Vancouver 604.736.0301

3248 King George Blvd. South Surrey 604.541.3902

Burnaby Crest

8683 10th Ave. Burnaby 604.522.0936

Kelowna

Floral Shop

1937 Harvey Ave. Kelowna 250.862.4864

2615 W. 16th Vancouver 603-736-7522

Vancouver Courier January 17 2014  

Vancouver Courier January 17 2014

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