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FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 2014

Vol. 105 No. 4 • Established 1908

Married to the flashmob

9

WEEKEND EDITION

THE VOICE OF VANCOUVER NEIGHBOURHOODS

OPINION: Social media agogo 10 / SPORTS: Girls hockey league 26

Seniors hopeful about longawaited centre FEDS ANNOUNCE $2.5 MILLION IN FUNDING SANDRA THOMAS Staff writer

I photo Dan Toulgoet

Chad Perepelkin and Brittany Skusek received a certificate of merit from Police Chief Jim Chu Wednesday for their bravery in saving a distraught man from jumping to his death at a downtown hotel.

Acts of bravery recognized COUPLE RESCUED SUICIDAL MAN MIKE HOWELL Staff writer

P

olice Chief Jim Chu recognized a Kelowna couple for their bravery Wednesday after they saved a distraught man from plunging to his death at a downtown hotel in September 2012. Chad Perepelkin, 27, and girlfriend Brittany Skusek, 26, received a certificate of merit during a ceremony hosted by the Vancouver Police Department at the Roundhouse Community Centre. “It’s very amazing,” Perepelkin told the Courier after shaking hands with Chu and posing for photographs. The couple said they were staying at a Days Inn hotel downtown when they were awakened around 1 a.m. after

hearing screams and the sound of breaking glass. They opened the door and saw a young man in the hotel’s hallway, carrying the lid of a washing machine. Skusek, a nurse, said the man “wasn’t really making sense” and appeared to be under the influence of drugs. Perepelkin, an engineer, attempted to calm the man and got him to drop the lid. But then the man grabbed the lid and threw it through the window of a fire escape door on the third floor of the hotel. He then dove onto the fire escape, where he tried to climb over the rail and jump off. That’s when Perepelkin grabbed the man in a bear hug and Skusek, who cut her knee on the broken glass, held on to the man’s belt. See POLICE on page 18

n January 2007, community activist Lorna Gibbs helped organize a protest that saw two busloads of seniors from southeast Vancouver converge on city hall to convince council a seniors centre for their neighbourhood should be fast-tracked. The area had seen a large influx of men and women in their 40s and 50s move to the neighbourhood in the 1970s. “And now they’re all baby boomers,” Gibbs told the Courier in 2007. “That dust cloud you see down the road is them coming. These are the seniors we need to awaken. We have to mobilize.” Progress seemed slow. The next year, then-president of Killarney Seniors, John Pawluk, accused the city of being more interested in building a $31 million animal shelter than helping seniors living in isolation. But fast-forward to Jan. 7 of this year when Gibbs was met with a standing ovation by more than 100 seniors who attended an event at the Killarney Community Centre during which Wai

Young, Conservative MP for Vancouver South, announced federal funding of $2.5 million towards the long-awaited project — estimated at $7.5 million several years ago. The commitment tops up the $2.5 million promised by the city in 2011 and $1.3 million announced by Liberal Premier Christy Clark the day before the 2013 provincial election. In 2009, the park board agreed to provide land for the project adjacent to the Killarney Community Centre on Killarney Street at East 49th Avenue. Now all eyes are on the province to follow through with its commitment. B.C. Justice Minister Suzanne Anton, MLA for Vancouver-Fraserview, was out of the country and unavailable for comment. Gibbs hopes the federal funding will be the last piece of a puzzle she started putting together with other residents of the neighbourhood 15 years ago. One of her allies was Keith Jacobson, former president of the Killarney Community Centre Association. She added it’s vital the project get rolling as soon as possible. See ONE THIRD on page 7


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F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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news

Casino profits help out non-profit groups 12TH & CAMBIE with Mike Howell

H

ere’s a question: What do the Edgewater Casino and sex trade workers have in common? “Whoa,” you’re probably thinking, “where’s he going with this one?” Or, maybe you already know the answer. I found the answer in a city staff report that went to council in December. That’s when council approved three grants to support the Missing Women Commission of Inquiry recommendations and priorities outlined by a city task force report on sex work and sexual exploitation. Guess where the money is coming from for the grants? You guessed it — Edgewater. As I’ve previously reported, the city collects a fair chunk of change from the casino located at the former Plaza of Nations site. And some of the money is dropped specifically into what the city refers to as the Edgewater Social Responsibility Reserve. The city will take $100,600 from that fund and distribute the money to three organizations. They are: • Battered Women’s Support Services,

which will receive $35,000 to “create a service delivery model to support individuals engaged in sex work to transition to alternative employment and life options.” • Vancouver School Board, which will receive $30,000 to “create child and youth sexual exploitation prevention resources for non-profit service providers and teachers” in the city. • PLEA Community Services of B.C., which will receive $35,600 to “build capacity on nonprofit service providers working with children and youth at risk of sexual exploitation to provide outreach services online.” Edgewater, in case you haven’t heard, is planning to shut down its casino at the former Plaza of Nations property and build a big new one across the street, adjacent to B.C. Place Stadium. The casino, which will be spread over two floors, will be the main feature of a $535 million complex that will include hotels of 15 and 25 storeys, a conference centre, five restaurants, a gym, a spa and five levels of underground parking. Currently, the city collects $200,000 annually from Edgewater for the fund, which it has used to give grants to a variety of non-profits, including the Vancouver Area Network of Drug Users to hire a coordinator for a Downtown Eastside street market, the Strathcona Community Centre Association to expand its food programs and the Pivot Legal Society to help pay for its annual Hope in Shadows calendar. Hastings Racecourse, which is Vancouver’s only other casino, also gives $100,000 a year

photo Dan Toulgoet

The Edgewater Social Responsibility Reserve provides financing to non-profit groups. to the city for a “legacy fund.” The money has been used to fund non-profits such as Kiwassa Neighbourhood House for projects including community festivals and gardens. The funds from Edgewater and Hastings are not to be confused with the millions of dollars it gives to the city, as per a formula set by the B.C. Lotteries Corporation. The corporation says the facilities are required to turn over 10 per cent of their profits to the city. The city began collecting money from casinos in 1999, when there were a half dozen, or so in the city. Edgewater and Hastings, how-

ever, are the only ones with slots. When I checked in January 2011, the city had collected $59.2 million in casino profits. Apparently, the profits are used annually to offset costs in the city’s operating budget, including departments such as police, fire services and parks. So here’s another question: Is the City of Vancouver addicted to gambling? Heck, I don’t know — I’m just giving you the facts, here. mhowell@vancourier.com twitter.com/howellings

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 0 , 2 0 1 4

news

Problem gamblers difficult to identify, says health officer PARAGON GAMING REQUIRED TO DEVELOP HARM REDUCTION STRATEGY MIKE HOWELL Staff writer

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medical health officer’s visit to Vancouver’s two casinos and a bingo hall last month left him unable to recommend what can be done to identify or curb severe problem gamblers. Dr. John Carsley of Vancouver Coastal Health visited Edgewater casino, Hastings Racecourse, which also has slot machines, and Planet Bingo as part of a review he and a former city social planner Mario Lee are conducting on behalf of city council. Though the facilities have programs in place to deal with problem gamblers, Carsley said there is a gap in identifying those gamblers who don’t voluntarily seek help. “It is hard to identify them,” he said. “It’s one of the not insurmountable but very difficult problems when you’re dealing with gambling.” Even if a person gambled at a facility every day, their problem can go unrecognized unless their behaviour somehow causes them to be excluded from a casino or bingo hall, he said. Carsley compared gambling to alcohol use, saying the majority of people who enjoy a drink are not problem drinkers and don’t

photo Dan Toulgoet

Dr. John Carsley, seen here speaking at city hall about problem gambling, recently visited Vancouver’s three gambling facilities as part of a council-directed review. get into health or financial difficulties. Except for the acute effects of binge drinking, alcohol poisoning or injuries related to alcohol use, Carsley said it is difficult to identify a person with a chronic drinking problem. “It’s a big public health problem, and in both cases, we as a society derive a huge amount of income from both of those sanctioned, regulated activities,” he said. Carsley is the same medical health officer who recommended in March 2011 that council reject a proposal from Edgewater owners Paragon Gaming to build a mega casino adjacent to B.C. Place Stadium. Carsley based his recommendation on literature and research he reviewed on wheth-

er an expansion of gambling would create more problem gamblers. He concluded the evidence was contradictory and told council that “once you make the decision to go ahead in the hope that one theory is better than the other, you can’t really go back.” Council unanimously rejected Paragon’s request to almost triple the number of its slot machines to 1,500 and double its games tables to 150. But council gave Paragon the option to move from its site at the Plaza of Nations to property adjacent B.C. Place Stadium, as long as it kept the same complement of existing slots and tables. In December, the city’s development permit

board granted Paragon preliminary approval to proceed with a $535-million complex featuring a casino, two hotels and several restaurants. Paragon, however, has to meet two main conditions related to addressing problem gambling, including developing a harm reduction strategy, and ensuring the complex meets high environmental design standards. Some of those conditions are being incorporated into the review Carsley and Lee continue to conduct on the city’s three gambling facilities. Initially, Carsley and Lee began their review after council earlier passed a motion to have city staff conduct a public health review of the two casinos and bingo hall. The motion was brought forward in light of provincial health officer Dr. Perry Kendall’s report on problem gambling that called for government to lessen the harm caused by gambling. Kendall’s report, released in October, showed that even though gambling generally declined between 2002 and 2007, the number of people with a severe gambling problem increased from nearly 13,000 to 31,000. At the same time, the annual gross gaming revenue for the provincial government steadily increased between 2002 and 2012, going from $1.1 billion to $2.1 billion. Carsley said he didn’t know when a report will be presented to city council on his and Lee’s findings of the review. He wouldn’t speculate on recommendations. “This is a fabulous opportunity for a very interesting pilot project to help reduce the negative effect of gambling,” said Carsley, who noted all three facilities were cooperative with the review. mhowell@vancourier.com twitter.com/Howellings

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F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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news

Security concerns raised at Biltmore meeting MOUNT PLEASANT RESIDENTS OPEN MINDED ABOUT PLANS TO HOUSE HOMELESS NAOIBH O’CONNOR Staff writer

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eighbourhood safety and security were among key concerns Wednesday night at a community meeting about the transformation of the former Biltmore Hotel into temporary housing for the homeless and those at risk of homelessness. Roughly 80 people attended the event. Many were open to the new use for the building, but were worried about potential problems and how those problems will be dealt with, and questioned why the city didn’t hold the community meeting months ago. “I understand the city has to take care of the homeless, my issue is with security,” Brad Campbell told the Courier, adding “security is a hard thing to address.” Campbell lives across the street and said he’s going to suggest his strata install cameras. The hotel is expected to re-open in early February. B.C. Housing has a six-year lease for 95 rooms,

photo Dan Toulgoet

Roughly 80 Mount Pleasant residents attended a Wednesday night meeting about plans to reopen the former Biltmore Hotel as temporary housing for the homeless and those at risk of homelessness. with an option to renew the lease for up to nine additional years. The ground-floor commercial space is not part of the lease. The units will provide temporary housing to residents while more permanent housing is being constructed. B.C. Housing is providing $1.7 million in annual operating costs to the Biltmore and $535,000 to make the building more safe and secure. The City of Vancouver has contributed $1.1 million for renovation work. RainCity Housing will operate the facility and the building will follow the city’s mandated housing

mix of 50 per cent street or sheltered homeless, 30 per cent at risk of homelessness and 20 per cent from SROs or inadequate housing. Participants at the community meeting were divided into smaller groups after a short presentation and told to focus on three questions: what should project partners consider related to managing the site; what should they consider related to tenants at the site; and, what should be done to ensure a good relationship between the Biltmore and the surrounding community. The residents asked questions including whether there would be

enough support for tenants and how tenants will occupy themselves during the day, as well as raised concerns about the proximity to Nightingale elementary and a seniors residence. Suggestions included needle sweeps in a greater area than just surrounding the building and that RainCity create a website that includes contact numbers, along with statistics and information to show how well the building is being managed. Some neighbours asked how they could volunteer their services at the building, while others asked for a tour before it opens and for a

housewarming party afterwards. But concerns about security remained. Dave Romer said he’s worried about crime and disturbances in the neighbourhood. Romer said he “fully supports” getting people off the street, housed and off their addictions, so they can become productive members of society, but he also wants to feel safe in the community. David Lee shared similar sentiments. “I’m highly supportive of having supported housing in different neighbourhoods outside the Downtown Eastside,” he said. “I’m optimistic, but I also wanted to get information… I’m glad [the city is] doing these sessions, but I’m also curious what happens after it opens and ongoing engagement. I don’t want this to be a one-time thing.” Lee said he’s trying not to make assumptions about people moving in, but he’ll likely be more attentive to security. At the close of the meeting Michelle Sturino, a Residents Association Mount Pleasant (RAMP) director, slammed the city for not having the meeting “months ago.” “Where is the transparency from city hall,” she said to some applause. “You have started this project on the wrong foot by not involving the community… it did not get started on the right foot at all.” RAMP held its own public meeting Jan. 9 (after the Courier’s print deadline). The city is hosting a second community meeting at Native Education College from 10 a.m. until noon, Jan. 11. noconnor@vancourier.com twitter.com/naoibh

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F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

news

One third of city’s seniors live in southeastVancouver

The province made the contribution we wanted in the spring so now everyone wants to get going on this. —Lorna Gibbs

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seniors’ centre at Killarney is great news for Vancouver, after years of advocacy by the community and council and $2.5 million committed by the city in 2011. As mayor, I would like to thank the Government of Canada for this significant commitment. I look forward to continuing work with our partners in the other levels of government to ensure construction can get started on this important new resource and community space for seniors and their families in southeast Vancouver.” Gibbs noted Vision Vancouver Coun. Raymond Louie has been a longtime advocate of the project. She is now urging all three levels of government to work together. “It doesn’t matter who wears the crown,” said Gibbs. “They now have to work together to benefit the community.” sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10

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Continued from page 1 “The province made the contribution we wanted in the spring so now everyone wants to get going on this,” Gibbs told the Courier Wednesday morning. While there are seven seniors centres located west of Cambie Street, there are none in southeast Vancouver, home to onethird of the city’s seniors — about 27,000. Young told the Courier Wednesday she got involved with the project as soon as she was elected more than three years ago. She added she worked as an outreach worker with the Ministry of Social Services years ago and was a common visitor to seniors housing complexes in the Downtown Eastside and Chinatown. “And my mom is a senior, she was at the announcement,” said Young. “So I know seniors want to have their own place where they can socialize and give back. Giving back is very important to seniors.” Young hopes the project will break ground as soon as possible. “Until now this project has been worked off the side of a desk,” said Young. “We know the city can begin projects very quickly when it wants to. Let’s move forward on this.” On Wednesday morning, Vision Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson released this prepared statement: “Today’s announcement of a federal funding contribution toward a new

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 0 , 2 0 1 4

news

Schools struggling with special needs students

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dren with special needs over the past seven years. The BCTF says 3,873 classes serve seven or more children with special needs. There are 4,636 classes with seven or more English Language Learners and 1,956 of these are kindergarten to Grade 3 classes. The BCTF contends 12 years of funding cutbacks by the Ministry of Education mean students aren’t getting the support they need. BCTF president Jim Iker notes the worsening of class size composition has coincided with cuts to learning specialist teachers who support students in small groups, pull them out of classes and provide individual help. The BCTF says since 2002, B.C. has lost approximately 700 special education teachers and more than 300 English Language Learner teachers. Using 2010 data provided by Statistic Canada, the BCTF says B.C. has the worst student-educator ratio in the country and funds education nearly $1,000 less per student than the national average. Ministry of Education representatives note the government’s Learning Improvement Fund has helped hire more than 500 new teachers and 400 new special education assistants across the province, create smaller class sizes and support professional development and training to help teachers meet complex needs in their classrooms over the last two years. The ministry will provide an additional $210 million over the next three years for school districts through the Learning Improvement Fund. But Iker said school districts are cutting teachers because they’re not receiving adequate funding from the province, so the Learning Improvement Fund only makes up for a portion of what’s been lost. Kindergarten classrooms in Vancouver serve an average of 18 students, Grade 1 to 3 classes an average of 21.9, Grade 4 to 7 classes an average of 26.4 and Grade 8 to 12 classes and average of 24.2, as of Oct. 15.

The government and the BCTF return to the bargaining table Jan. 21. “The issue of class size and composition, of course it’s also an issue at the bargaining table,” Iker said, adding the BCTF hopes to reach an agreement at the table. When a reporter asked education minister Peter Fassbender in a conference call Wednesday whether the government was committed to hiring more educational assistants or reducing what the union calls complex classes, Fassbender said: “We have significantly invested in special needs and we’ll continue to balance all of these things within the fiscal framework that we have.”

KITS FUNDRAISER Dr. Gabor Maté will speak about raising teens in the digital age at the Kitsilano secondary parent advisory council’s fundraiser, Jan. 14. Tickets are $15 in advance at kitsilanopac.ca or $20 at the door. The doors open at 6:45 p.m. and the talk starts at 7:30 in the auditorium at 2550 West 10th Ave. There will be a cash concession and Dr. Maté’s books will be on sale. For more information about the renowned speaker and best-selling author, see drgabormate.com. crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

file photo Dan Toulgoet

More than 16,000 classes across the province serve four or more children with special needs.

OPEN HOUSE You are invited to a drop-in Open House to learn about the seismic renewal of Sir Matthew Begbie Elementary School.

Sir Matthew Begbie Elementary Seismic Renewal

Monday January 13, 2014 at 3 - 7 pm 1430 Lillooet Street (in the Multi-Purpose Room) Staff from the Vancouver School Board Planning & Facilities Department, the City of Vancouver, and the project architect will be in attendance to:  Provide an overview of the project definition phase;  Present the concepts being considered;  Receive your feedback. For more information, visit the VSB’s website www.vsb.bc.ca/district-facilities/projects/begbie-elementary Vancouver School Board

Chinese Translator Available

現場將會提供中文翻譯


F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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news

Neighbourhood House adopts flashmob mentality CHERYL ROSSI Staff writer

C

edar Cottage Neighbourhood House believes it can build a more inclusive community through the power of mass dance. Olga Shcherbyna, coordinator of the provincially funded Building Welcoming and Inclusive Neighbourhoods program at the neighbourhood house, is organizing an intercultural flashmob. She’s looking for more lead dancers to volunteer to teach free community flashmob classes this month. “The goal of the project is to bring people together through the universal language of dance and celebrate our diversity,” she told the Courier in an email. Babette Santos volunteered to be a lead choreographer because she wanted the opportunity to collaborate with other choreographers and she believes an intercultural flashmob is a great way to bring neighbourhoods together. “Especially with new immigrants where language is maybe a barrier… dance is a nice starting point,” she said. “I feel that way about the arts in general, it brings people together beyond language.” Santos, youth co-ordinator at partnering organization Multicultural Helping House and artistic director of Kathara Indigenous Pilipino Arts Collective Society, will teach seniors and youth from the helping house to

photo Dan Toulgoet

Babette Santos, a youth co-ordinator at Multicultural Helping House and artistic director of Kathara Indigenous Pilipino Arts Collective Society, says intercultural flashmobs are a great way to bring neighbourhoods together. shrug their shoulders and stomp their feet to the drumbeat-heavy, electronic, bhangrainfused song “Turn Up The Stereo” by local Celtic-bhangra band Delhi 2 Dublin. Shcherbyna says six- to 12-year-old children in the Cedar Cottage Crew homework club will also learn the moves. Santos and the other choreographers will teach simplified Filipino, Vietnamese, Ghanaian and jazz-inflect-

ed dance at the neighbourhood house, the helping house and Trout Lake Community Centre. Flashmob dancer wannabes will be able to view the moves on the Cedar Cottage Intercultural Flashmob page on Facebook “I’m really happy already that there’s seniors showing up,” Santos said. “Our society does a lot to separate our generations and categorize them so there’s less intergenerational

interaction, which is really important to relate to different generations and being a healthy society… There should be more encouragement amongst community centres and the government and just everybody, in family, to encourage more intergenerational events.” The flashmob will perform at events at Cedar Cottage Neighbourhood House and Trout Lake Community Centre in February and in March to celebrate the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (March 21). Surprises will come in the form of prominent Vancouverites who’ve agreed to learn the choreography at flashmob classes and for the unsuspecting participants in Cedar Cottage, Trout Lake and elimination of racial discrimination events. The immigrant integration and multiculturalism branch, Ministry of Jobs, Tourism and Skills Training, funds the Building Welcoming and Inclusive Communities program. It is delivered by 14 neighbourhood houses throughout the Lower Mainland with the support of the Association of Neighbourhood Houses. Four free flashmob dance classes will run on Fridays at Trout Lake Community Centre starting Jan. 17 from 4:30 to 6 p.m. For more information, see the Cedar Cottage Intercultural Flashmob page on Facebook or phone 604-874-4231. crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

POWER LINE TREE PRUNING AND HAZARD TREE REMOVALS VANCOUVER When: December 2, 2013 to March 17, 2014

Property Owner’s Checklist

Time: 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Trees are a significant cause of power interruptions. Contact between trees and power lines can also create a severe danger. Over the next few months we will be pruning and removing trees in the

Have you received your 2014 property assessment notice?

V6A, V6G and V6K Postal Code area of Vancouver. Trees are pruned using the best arboriculture (tree care) practices. Skilled workers employed by BC Hydro are trained in both electrical safety and

Follow us

If not received in your mail by January 17, call toll-free 1-866-valueBC (1-866-825-8322) If so, review it carefully

tree care. Only correct and proper techniques are used to eliminate any safety hazards.

Visit www.bcassessment.ca to compare other property assessments using the free e-valueBC™ service

For more information about this work, please call Joe Taaffe at 604 528 3297. For more information on our vegetation management practices, please

Questions? Contact BC Assessment at 1-866-valueBC or online at www.bcassessment.ca 4111

visit bchydro.com/trees.

Don’t forget...if you disagree with your assessment, you must file a Notice of Complaint (appeal) by January 31, 2014


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 0 , 2 0 1 4

THE VANCOUVER COURIER

1574 West Sixth Ave., Vancouver, BC V6J 1R2 604-738-1411 Twitter: @vancouriernews vancourier.com

Social media activists increasingly effective

M

oments after Shireen Soofi was led out the door of the Fairmont Pacific Rim Hotel by one of Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s security contingent, she texted a message to Brigette DePape: “We have done it.” DePape immediately clicked “send” on her computer screen to dispatch a news release to journalists across the country with the subject line: “Harper’s Speech Disrupted by Climate Activists.” (I should tell you I had a front row seat to the action. I was one of the hundreds of suits in the hotel ball room, there in my role as a director of Vancity Credit Union, at the Vancouver Board of Trade event to hear Harper.) Exactly four minutes earlier Soofi and her colleague Sean Devlin had slipped past security in their Value Village waiter outfits and walked up on the stage behind Harper and Board of Trade CEO Iain Black. But even faster, within seconds of Soofi and Devlin entering stage left and unfurling their signs protesting Harper’s failure to deal with climate issues, the Twitter-verse sprang to life as the phalanx of journalists at the back of the hall realized what was going on. First to tweet was the Vancouver Observer with “Protesters walk on stage at #VBOT. Sign says Take Climate Change Seriously.” Then there was the Globe and Mail’s Gary Mason with “Wow! Protestor gets on stage with Harper before being tackled by security. Jeezuz. That easy to get through to the PM. Scary.” Between the form of the protest — non-violent direct action which breached the most expensive security blanket any Canadian prime minister has had — and the content of the message, it was enough to knock whatever Harper had to say off the front page. At least for a day. Welcome to the world of social media and some of its most skilled operators. The four co-conspirators who pulled off the Harper caper are mostly twentysomethings and they are university educated. They connect globally through websites, blogs, Twitter and Facebook. They raise funds for their causes through crowd sourcing. And they are definitely not the folks who are invited in to meet the editorial boards of major daily newspapers. Soofi graduated from McGill with a major in political science. You can find her on Facebook and also on LinkedIn, “the world’s largest business network.” She more likely suits the crowd she comes in contact with on PowerShift.ca, which offers young organizers committed to environmental justice “a platform to share resources.” Soofi met Devlin on one of those shared resources activities. Devlin is a local comedian and creative director of Truthfool Communications. He has been on Harper’s case for years. He created the website “Sh*t Harper Did” or SHD.ca and was last busted a year ago when he and his buddies crashed a National Energy Board hearing in Vancouver into the Northern Gateway Pipeline proposal. Also handcuffed and hauled off that day was DePape. The University of Ottawa grad got national coverage in 2011 when, while working as a Senate page, she walked into the centre of the Red Chamber during the speech from the throne and pulled out a sign from under her skirt that read “Stop Harper.” That got her fired and on Evan Solomon’s Power and Politics CBC TV show where she declared, “Canada needs an Arab spring.” She was subsequently offered jobs by the Public Service Alliance of Canada, the Council of Canadians and satirist and filmmaker Michael Moore. Moore said: “For a young person to do that and to do it peacefully and quietly and with grace, I thought was a very powerful moment.” The fourth member of the organizing team was Anjali Appadurai. She’s a climate justice activist and part of a group called “Earth in Brackets.” Appadurai made waves with her critical comments when she was invited to speak as the youth delegate to the United Nations Climate Change conference in Durban, South Africa in 2011. When she was barred from the 2012 conference in Doha, Qatar she launched what she called a “Twitter storm.” She was finally let in. She is, not surprisingly, followed on Twitter by social media fans Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson and one of Vision’s biggest financial backers, Joel Solomon. We can expect more from them all. agarr@vancouvercourier.com twitter.com/allengarr

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letters

F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

WE WANT YOUR OPINION Hate it or love it? We want to know... really, we do!

Reach us by email: letters@vancourier.com

The heroes Canada deserves but doesn’t need right now

I

’m an aficionado of questionable federal spending. Not that I like tax dollar bonfires and boondoggles more than anyone else, it’s just that I find them useful for satirical material. And surely nothing is more worthy of satire than a recently revealed program by the Canadian Department of Defence. A short study from October asked 150 subjects whether superheroes can “fly through the air, see through walls, hear whispers from miles away, become invisible, and walk through walls.” Approximately $14,000 was spent to “help the Canadian Forces win the hearts and minds of the local populations it faces when deployed overseas, such as recently in Afghanistan.” “This work will not only allow cultural scientists to better understand the spread of non-natural and religious concepts but also allow the Canadian Armed Forces ... to design messages that are more memorable for their target audiences,” according to summary of the study. Considering most of the world already consumes American pop culture like GI-dispensed candy bars, your guess is as good as mine about how this psychological operations monkeywrenching is supposed to work. (Wolverine figures painted on the sides of Halliburton trucks?) This brings me to a scoop of my own. A little bird just forwarded me an internal memo from the PMO to Tory insiders: To: Conservative Contact List From: The Privy Council Subject: Confidential Survey — Superheroes as Federal Appointees, Members of Parliament, Contractors, and Temporary Foreign Workers Please answer all of the following questions to the best of your ability. MR. FANTASTIC: Assume that Reed Richards, leader of The Fantastic Four, actually exists. If the scientific genius agreed to stay away from oceanography and anything fishy, would you like to see him head the National Research Council? Should he invent a sleeping gas for use in the parliamentary press gallery? (Mr. Fantastic’s stretching powers are not under consideration, as the Wright/ Duffy debacle has demonstrated the PM’s unparalleled elasticity.) AQUAMAN: Once more assume this superhero, a fixture of DC comics, is real. Would you like to see him lead the privatization of the defunct Kitsilano Coast Guard operation on the West Coast? (Aquaman is based in the Atlantic, but he has weak telepathic command over Pacific jellyfish and sea cucumbers). MAGNETO: Do you think it’s wise or unwise for us to deal with supervillains as government contractors? If the truly evil are properly compensated, do you believe their lack of conscience will make them less inclined to be whistleblowers? In any case, X-Men arch-enemy Magneto has telekinetic power over metal objects. If the government were to spend billions on F-35 jets that turned out to be tarmac installation art, do you believe Magneto could direct them safely in flight? THE INVISIBLE GIRL: After Pamela Wallin’s failure to fade into the wallpaper during the expenses scandal, do you think Senator Sue Storm could use her powers of invisibility to good effect on Parliament Hill? TWO-FACE: Considering the double digit percentage of Torontonians who still support mayor Rob Ford, how many do you think would vote for a mayoralty candidate with literally two faces? THE INCREDIBLE HULK: The state of Israel has no finer friend than Foreign Minister John Baird, who regularly turns red with rage at United Nations decisions. But what about a diplomat who turns green with rage, batting jets like whiffle balls and crushing minarets like Triscuits? Imagine it: “Hulk smash Iran! Hulk smash Syria! Hulk share bottle of Cristal with Benjamin Netanyahu!” STORM: Let’s say Halle Berry’s bootylicious mutant became Conservative Member of Parliament for Gander-Nippleworth. Would she be too distracting to the Opposition during Question Period? Would that be such a bad thing from a Tory perspective? DR. DOOM: Would you approve of the brilliant, disfigured psychopath as Minister for Industry? Or would his legendary rivalry with Mr. Fantastic cause too many problems in First Class during junkets to Europe? BIZARRO SUPERMAN: Since many Canadians believe the federal government is already operating from Bizarro World, would you support Bizarro Superman as the next Conservative candidate for Prime Minister? geoffolson.com

GEOFF OLSON

ASPERGER’S SUFFERER SPEAKS UP ON HOUSING

To the editor:

Re: When NIMBYism and social housing collide,” Dec. 18 It’s interesting to see how some local residents/NIMBYs, have brainwashed themselves into believing that people with mental health disabilities and those who are homeless are so downright evil and any non-profit supported housing developments for marginalized mental health patients are automatically rejected with screaming protests of how the lives of everyone in the community will be in mortal danger. Yet many homeless people with varied mental health disabilities are often victims of violence and exploitation who are afraid to venture outside of their homes and any other safe places where they receive services. Providing safe and clean housing with adequate supports for the most vulnerable and often neglected population of society is a humane obligation of our greater community. While there are many laws to protect and uphold the rights of people with mental health disabilities, I often think about those dark periods in history when people with mental health and developmental disabilities were burned at the stake, tortured and murdered by frightened townsfolk and locked up in

dungeons and eventually large institutions where they were completely forgotten about and subject to horrific abuse and medical experimentation. As a society we need to ask ourselves, are we making the world a better place for everyone or are we making it worse for people who don’t have the ability to fight for themselves? As a person with a developmental disability known as Asperger syndrome, I fear what harm might come to me if those same NIMBYs targeted me with the same level of hatred as they have for people with mental health disabilities.

Leslie Benisz, Vancouver

GIRLS’ RUNNING CLUB IS A RIP-OFF To the editor: Re: “Running club good for a girl’s soul,” Dec. 18. I am writing in utter disbelief that any parent can believe that spending $295 (plus taxes) for eight trail-running sessions for their 8 to 12-year-old daughters is empowering anyone other than the organizer’s bank account. Parent, empower yourselves! Stop believing that other people know better than you how to raise a confident, happy, healthy daughter. Get off the couch, help your daughter plan a simple route through your local park or the

woods, gather some of her friends (and their parents), and then go have a fun run/walk together — everyone benefits and it’s free! Exploring the outdoors together is a wonderfully simple way for you and your daughter to build your own confident, happy, healthy family.

Hilary Anderson, Vancouver

TENDER IS THE RIGHT WAY TO AWARD CONTRACTS To the editor:

Re: “Citizen polling website contract awarded without tender,” Jan. 2. Hats off to your reporter Bob Mackin for exposing Vision Vancouver’s awarding of a contract worth over $150,000 without tender. This is in spite of the fact that contracts more than $75,000 require a public tender, not the casual Christmas party conversation with Mayor Robertson referred to in the article. This is just one more example of Vision Vancouver using the public’s money to pay their friends — ensuring return donations to Vision’s war chest at election time from those very same friends. It’s time we replaced Vision Vancouver with an honest government at 12th and Cambie. Tim Louis, COPE internal co-chair.

ON YOUR MIND ONLINE COURIER STORY: “City approves pre-paid parking meter,” Jan. 2 Paul LeBlanc @PaulLeBlanc: Good idea. COURIER STORY: “Development and dissent,” Dec. 24 Ryan McLaughlin: I feel the dissent by neighborhood groups over development is highly worrying. We really can’t let Vancouver get stuck in stasis, or our economy, housing affordability, and standard of living will suffer. We must resist the NIMBYism. COURIER STORY: “Residents want more ‘community’ in DTES plan,” Dec. 31 BlindHorse: It should be the goal of the DTES community to contribute to the city as much as they expect from the city. Tomservua: No one wants to see the DTES remain a free trade zone for drug dealers and pimps, drug addicts and prostitutes. New leadership is essential. The old leadership of the DENC squandered goodwill, and hundreds of hours, trying to shut down restaurants and throw waitresses out of work. They failed miserably. Today the Cuchillo and Pidgin restaurants prosper, and the picketers are stumbling around seeking new targets for old ideology. The new leadership of the DENC needs to learn from those failures. From the chronic blunders of their predecessors. They cannot expect public support. They have to earn it. Here’s hoping they do.

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Letters may be edited by the Courier for reasons of legality, taste, brevity and clarity. To be considered for publication, they must be less than 300 words, signed and include the writer’s full name (no

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initials), home address, and telephone number (neither of which will be published), so authorship may be verified. Send to: 1574 West Sixth Ave., Vancouver BC V6J 1R2 or email letters@vancourier.com


community

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 0 , 2 0 1 4

EVENT OR COMMUNITY NEWS WE SHOULD KNOW ABOUT? 604-738-1411 | sthomas@vancourier.com

RetiredcopsharestalesatPenthouseforum Monday of every month at Cafe Deux Soleils, 2096 Commercial Dr. And save the date for the next Youth Poetry Slam, which takes place Jan. 27. This will be the second-to-last chance for young poets to qualify for the youth slam playoffs taking place in March. The youth slam is open to poets aged 13 to 22 and will include an open mic, the poetry slam and feature poet Toronto-based Lishai Peel.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

with Sandra Thomas

DOWNTOWN This year’s version of Heritage Vancouver’s ongoing Secrets of the Penthouse series includes first-hand stories from retired Vancouver Police Department officer Grant McDonald, who was involved in several raids on the nightclub during the 1960s and ‘70s. But even before then, when the Penthouse Night Club first opened in the late 1940s, spotters would stand on the roof to keep an eye out for cops preparing for one of the nightly raids frequent during that era. Because the club couldn’t get a liquor licence, customers would bring their own booze, which the VPD took great offence to. Not surprisingly, tables from those early days had secret compartments in which to stash liquor bottles. As it turns out, McDonald even worked undercover at the club to infiltrate crime syndicates, which if you think about it is pretty cool. McDonald will share some of his stories during backstage tours of the nightclub Jan. 16 at 6:15 and 7:15, followed by an Italian buffet served up with Mama Filippone’s original spaghetti and meatball recipe. Also on hand will be Penthouse owner Danny

KITS POINT

file photo Dan Toulgoet

Courier contributor Aaron Chapman, whose book Liquor, Lust and the Law focused on the history of the Penthouse, will be on hand for the Heritage Vancouver event. Filippone and author and popular Courier contributor Aaron Chapman. For ticket information, visit forbiddenvancouver.ca.

WEST END Open auditions for the CBC series Dragon’s Den take place Saturday, Jan. 25, at the Century Plaza Hotel, 1015 Burrard St. The cross-country, audition tour welcomes participants of all ages, with no prior TV experience required. Aspiring entrepre-

neurs should be prepared to pitch their concept to Dragon’s Den producers in five minutes or less. If they can demonstrate to the producers they have what it takes to land financial backing for their business venture, they could be invited back to brave the Dragons. For more information, visit cbc. ca/dragonsden/auditions.

GRANDVIEW-WOODLAND The Vancouver Poetry Slam continues each

0 0 5 , 3

R VE O

Absolute Final Weekend to get tickets!

TO S E IZ R P

! IN W

Vancouver New Music, in partnership with the Vancouver Academy of Music, is presenting a free interactive and educational music program open to children eight to 12 years. The four-hour workshop, designed as an introduction to sound improvisation techniques, includes a series of fun confidence-building games and sonic awareness exercises, all conducted in a group setting. Participants are encouraged to freely produce sound using traditional musical instruments, as well as their voice and body, and noise-making toys attendees are invited to bring to the session. These auditory approaches are meant to provide a solid base in sonic communication and musical language. Sonic Playground takes place Jan. 26 at 10 a.m. at the centre, 1270 Chestnut St., with Vancouver-based musicians and educators Justin Dervies and Robyn Jacob of Devised by Sound Out Loud. sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10 $

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F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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Seaside Greenway Completion:

Construction on Point Grey Road between Trafalgar and Alma begins. Effective January 18, 2014 Construction will start on January 18, 2014 to provide the final link in the 28 km Seaside Greenway between Jericho Beach and Kitsilano Beach including converting Point Grey Road (between Macdonald Street and Alma Street) to a local street. These improvements will: • Improve safety for all road users by reducing the speed and volume of vehicles along Point Grey Road. • Provide a safe, convenient and comfortable connection between Burrard Bridge and Jericho Beach for people of all ages and abilities to walk and cycle. • Provide better access for everyone to the many parks located along this stretch of Point Grey Road.

Businesses and services along Cornwall Avenue, York Avenue, Yew Street, 1st Avenue, and Point Grey Road will remain open as usual.

This work is being coordinated with current construction work to improve the south end of Burrard Bridge at the intersection of Burrard Street and Cornwall Street.

Access to local destinations will be maintained. We will work to minimize delays as much as possible. Motorists travelling through the area to another neighbourhood are advised to plan an alternate route. Cyclists should also expect delays and/or detours during this construction period.

Starting on January 18, 2014, motorists will no longer be able to drive directly through Point Grey Road between Macdonald and Alma. During construction, motorists passing through the intersection of Macdonald Street and Point Grey Road can expect traffic changes, lane restrictions, and intermittent delays.

Various Locations

FOR MORE INFORMATION: Phone: 3-1-1

TTY 7-1-1

vancouver.ca

Public Hearing: January 23

Thursday, January 23, 2014 at 6 pm City Hall, 453 West 12th Avenue Third Floor, Council Chamber

Vancouver City Council will hold a public hearing on January 23 to consider zoning amendments for these locations: 1. Miscellaneous Text Amendments to the Zoning and Development By-law and to the CD-1 By-laws for 1388 Continental Street and 4320 Slocan Street (see on map) To amend the text of Section 11.24 (Laneway House) of the Zoning and Development By-law and to the CD-1 By-laws for 1388 Continental Street and 4320 Slocan Street. The amendments would achieve the intent of the initial rezoning approvals and correct inadvertent errors.

Public Hearing: January 21

Tuesday, January 21, 2014 at 6 pm City Hall, 453 West 12th Avenue Third Floor, Council Chamber Vancouver City Council will hold a public hearing on January 21 to consider zoning and sign amendments for these locations: 303 East 8th Avenue (Western Front) To rezone 303 East 8th Avenue from RM-4 (Multiple Dwelling) District to CD-1 (Comprehensive Development) District to accommodate the existing artist-run centre (Western Front) operating on site, including accessory and dwellings uses. The existing building would be retained at a floor space ratio (FSR) of 1.98. There is no intent to create any new floor area as part of this rezoning application. 8175 Cambie Street, 519 Southwest Marine Drive and 8180-8192 Lord Street To rezone 8175 Cambie Street, 519 Southwest Marine Drive, 8180-8192 Lord Street, and the adjacent portion of the lane from C-1 (Commercial) District and RS-1 (Residential) District to CD-1 (Comprehensive Development) District. Two residential towers at 31 and 12 storeys are proposed, with 368 residential market strata units and a two-storey podium containing 1,365 square metres (14,700 square feet) of commercial space. A 37-space childcare facility and family place are proposed in a separate three-storey building on the northwest corner of the site. A floor space ratio (FSR) of 6.14 and maximum height of 86.9 metres (285 feet) are proposed. 639 Commercial Drive (York Theatre) Sign By-law Amendment To amend the Sign By-law for 639 Commercial Drive (York Theatre) to permit one fascia sign containing reference to their corporate sponsor, and two canopy signs over the main entrance containing automatic changeable copy and reference to their corporate sponsor. The Vancouver East Cultural Centre (VECC), who will operate the theatre, has requested amendments to the Sign By-law to address aspects of the signage which the by-law would otherwise not permit, e.g. thirdparty advertising (reference to corporate sponsor), sign location and size, and use of changeable copy.

2. Riverside East (see

on map)

To amend CD-1 (247) By-law No. 6533 for Riverside East to add a provision to exclude floor area in residential storage, delete the minimum parking requirement and increase the building height in sub-area 2 from 10 metres (32.8 feet) to 11.54 metres (37.9 feet). These amendments would result in a CD-1 By-law that reflects up-to-date provisions for residential storage, parking and flood-proofing. 3. West End Zoning Amendments (see

on map)

The West End Community Plan was approved by Council on November 20, 2013. As part of the implementation of that plan, zoning amendments will be considered by Council at the Public Hearing of January 23. The proposed amendments are to the: Zoning and Development By-law, Section 2 (definitions); RM-5, RM-5A, RM-5B and RM-5C (residential) District Schedule; C-5 and C-6 (commercial) District Schedule; Downtown Official Development Plan; and Rental Housing Stock Official Development Plan. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THESE APPLICATIONS: vancouver.ca/rezapps or 604-873-7038 Anyone who considers themselves affected by the proposed by-law amendments may speak at the Public Hearing. Please register individually before 5 pm on the day of the Public Hearing, by emailing publichearing@vancouver.ca or by calling 604-829-4238. You may also register in person at the door between 5:30 and 6 pm on the day of the Public Hearing. You may submit your comments by email to mayorandcouncil@vancouver.ca, or by mail to: City of Vancouver, City Clerk’s Department, 453 West 12th Avenue, Third Floor, Vancouver, BC, V5Y 1V4. All submitted comments will be distributed to Council and posted on the City’s website. Please visit vancouver.ca/publichearings for important details. Copies of the draft by-laws will be available for viewing starting January 10, 2014 at the City Clerk’s Department in City Hall, 453 West 12th Avenue, Third Floor, and in the Planning Department, East Wing of City Hall, Third Floor, Monday to Friday from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. All meetings of Council are webcast live at vancouver.ca/councilvideo, and minutes of Public Hearings are available at vancouver.ca/councilmeetings. (Minutes are posted approximately two business days after a meeting.) FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PUBLIC HEARINGS, INCLUDING REGISTERING TO SPEAK: vancouver.ca/publichearings


THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 0 , 2 0 1 4

Amica VITALIS™ Assisted Living Suites and Services with a Hospitality-Plus Attitude! When daily living activities such as bathing or dressing take a little more energy or agility than you once had, or if you would enjoy life a little easier knowing that a friendly face and helping hand is just outside your door, then it's time to consider the VITALIS™ way of life. Our VITALIS™ Assisted Living Suites are pleased to offer customized care throughout each day for assistance with activities of daily living. Call or visit today to learn more about our Independent Rental Retirement Living and our VITALIS™ Assisted Living Suites & Services. ~ Open House Week ~ Wednesday, January 8th to Tuesday, January 14th, 2014 10:00 am to 4:00 pm daily Call today for a tour and stay for lunch compliments of our Chef de Cuisine Robert!

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F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

news

Tis the Season! photo submitted

Friends and family created a social justice scholarship in the name of the late Danielle (Dani) Horwitz. The second benefit event Jan. 18 features Juno-Award winning musicians Jim Byrnes and Shari Ulrich.

Transit service changes begin Monday, December 16

Scholarship honours social worker’s passion for justice CHERYL ROSSI Staff writer

H

er work and warmth touched so many people that 500 attended Danielle (Dani) Horwitz’s memorial at the provincial criminal court on Main Street in 2012. Friends and family are furthering Horwitz’s passion for youth and social justice with the Danielle Horwitz Social Justice Award. JunoAward winning musicians Jim Byrnes and Shari Ulrich will perform at the second annual benefit for the scholarship Jan. 18. Rick Craig, executive director of the Justice Education Society where Horwitz worked for 17 years, knew Horwitz’s work before she moved to Vancouver. He heard of Horwitz when he visited her homeland of South Africa in the early 1990s, where Horwitz worked with disenfranchised youth in the townships and volunteered with anti-apartheid forces. In 1986, Horwitz, a social worker, arrived in Vancouver to enter a master’s program in criminology at Simon Fraser University. She subsequently worked as regional coordinator at the Justice Education Society and helped disadvantaged youth and adults learn about and navigate the justice system. Craig recalled Wednesday how effectively Horwitz brought judges and people living on the street together for an education session. “And made everyone feel really comfortable,” he said. “If we would deal with aboriginal youth she

HOHO North Pole

would get aboriginal Crown, or aboriginal lawyers or even aboriginal judges. She would try to create more role models to say to people listen, this system’s a human system and you can dream to [these positions] if you want to.” Horwitz’s husband, Phil Moses, said someone at the court suggested a scholarship and he ran with it. Craig said the mother of two, who was 50 when she died with cancer, was deeply loved. “She was the kind of person that never said a bad word about people,” he said. “She’d come out, she’d smile and I’d be in a cranky mood and she’d console me. She was very, very special and [maintained] just an incredible empathy for people and just went the extra mile.” Mayor Gregor Robertson proclaimed April 6, 2013 Danielle Horwitz Day and the inaugural benefit raised nearly $50,000. Rita Steele, former vice president of the Vancouver District Student Council, received the first $12,000 scholarship. She had initiated a forum to discuss the Stanley Cup riots, led anti-racism and anti-discrimination workshops and organized an anti-homophobia and anti-bullying press conference. The second annual Artists for Education benefit starts at 7 p.m. at the Jewish Community Centre of Greater Vancouver, 950 West 41st Ave. Participants could win a Hornby Island holiday, Canucks tickets and jerseys and a boat cruise. “I’m there for sure,” Craig said. For more information, visit daniellehorwitzaward.org or email info@philandani.com. crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 0 , 2 0 1 4

JANUARY 2014

home garden Colour me 2014

PANTONE’S EXCITING COLOUR OF THE YEAR: RADIANT ORCHID

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undertones, Radiant Orchid inspires confidence and emanates great joy, love and health. It is a captivating purple, one that draws you in with its beguiling charm.”

“While the 2013 colour of the year, Pantone Emerald, served as a symbol of growth, renewal and prosperity, Radiant Orchid reaches across the colour wheel to intrigue the eye and spark the imagination,” said Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Colour Institute.

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F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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home garden Switching it up

GET PREPARED AS HOME LIGHTING MAKES A BIG CHANGE THIS YEAR providing adequate illumination. Choosing the right lighting, however, isn’t always easy. Lighting has evolved significantly in recent years with the introduction of energy-efficient compact fluorescent bulbs, low-voltage light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and even with Edison-inspired design bulbs. These new methods shed light onto a whole new world of possibilities for energy conservation and style in your home.

G

reat lighting in your home is not just practical. It’s also a way to embellish your décor and showcase your colour scheme. From the entryway to the kitchen, lighting helps guests feel welcome and creates ambiance while

At the beginning of 2014, the federal government, in its efforts to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, began phasing out the production of incandescent light bulbs, starting with those delivering 75- and 100watts. The 40- and 60-watt bulbs will be phased out starting next December, so now would be the right time to think about new lights for your home. To get us started, the lighting experts at Rona offer their insights and tips on the best ways to use energy efficient bulbs:

• Compact fluorescent lights (CFLs) use as little as 25 per cent of the energy consumed by regular incandescent bulbs and last up to 10 times longer. Replace incandescent bulbs in the most commonly used areas of your home, such as the kitchen or living room. A CFL can save you more than five times its purchase price in electricity costs over its lifetime. • Light emitting diodes (LEDs) use as little as 15 per cent of the energy of traditional bulbs and produce no heat. Use these bulbs in places where heat could be a problem or fire hazard, such as in shade lamps. • Halogen lights are an incandescent light that uses halogen gas, which increases its longevity and allows it to operate at a higher temperature. Because of their small size, halogens can be used in fixtures such as pot lights and desk lamps.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 0 , 2 0 1 4

Working on Your Balancing Act

news

A Free Seminar on Fall Prevention

January 23, 1pm – 2pm Whether it was for your first steps, first bike ride or first successful tree pose, balance is something we rely on throughout our lifetime. Join Tapestry at Wesbrook Village for this informative seminar on balance improvement to help keep you standing tall. Presenters from West Point Grey Physiotherapy Clinic will discuss their holistic approach to strength and balance treatment, training and education. And Tapestry’s own Raychel Bouwman, PrimeFit Instructor, will demonstrate balance and core strength exercises. Increase your confidence and decrease the fear of falling with the guidance of these experienced professionals. This is a free seminar open to seniors and their families. Please RSVP to 604.225.5000 by January 22 to ensure your spot.

DiscoverTapestry.com Tapestry at Wesbrook Village 3338 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver

604.225.5000

Notice of Development Permit Application - DP 14001

Public Open House

photo Dan Toulgoet

Const. Colleen McKitrick (centre), a police negotiator, was awarded a chief constable’s commendation for her “outstanding level of service” over her 16-year career.

Police, citizens honoured Continued from page 1 “At first I was just trying to slow him down because I knew he had already caused damage,” Perepelkin said. “But then I realized afterwards, he was trying to jump off, so I just hung on.” Skusek said two police of-

CHOICES MARKETS Wellness Library

Let Choices be your partner in wellness with our

Quantum Matter Institute

SERIES OF HEALTHY LIVING GUIDES.

You are invited to attend an Open House on Monday, January 20 to view and comment on a DP14001 for a building addition to the Brimacombe Building for the Quantum Matter Institute.

Available at any Choices location for $11.95 plus applicable taxes.

Find us on

Facebook

Date: Monday,January20, 2014 Time: 3 - 5 PM Place: Atrium, Fred Kaiser Building, 2332 Main Mall

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Plans will be displayed for the new 4-storey addition to the Brimacombe Building. Representatives from the project team and Campus + Community Planning will be available to provide information and respond to inquiries about this project. For further information: Please direct questions to Karen Russell, Manager Development Services karen.russell@ubc.ca 604-822-1586 For more information on this project, please visit: www.planning.ubc.ca

This event is wheelchair accessible.

ficers showed up to help the couple pull the man back in the hallway. “It was just instinct,” she said, when asked why she and her boyfriend helped the man. “You don’t want somebody trying to hurt themselves.” The couple was among

facebook.com/ChoicesMarkets twitter.com/ChoicesMarkets

several citizens and police officers recognized Wednesday for bravery, diligence and expertise. Other courageous acts by citizens included downtown McDonald’s staff and a customer wrestling a knifewielding man to the ground who demanded free food. Two men tackled a purse snatcher, another two men subdued a restaurant customer armed with a knife and another man captured a burglar on parole. Const. Colleen McKitrick, a police negotiator, was awarded a chief constable’s commendation for her “outstanding level of service” over her 16-year career. Over the past five years, McKitrick has been the prime negotiator on 105 police calls. In one case, she kept a 280pound woman, who tried to pull McKitrick over a railing, from plunging to her death. In another case, McKitrick was assigned to find two missing 12-year-old girls who had a suicide pact. She stuck with the case for weeks and discovered 23 other children were involved in the pact. None committed suicide. Several officers were recognized for their work in the Stanley Cup riot investigation, including members of the VPD’s forensic video unit. Others received awards for busting a meth lab, capturing a serial child rapist and the execution of a successful project in the Downtown Eastside that led to the arrest of two men, drugs and guns. mhowell@vancourier.com twitter.com/howellings


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 0 , 2 0 1 4

travel Gauging Dublin’s mood swing THE IRISH CAPITAL REDISCOVERS ITS MOJO AFTER FIVE YEARS IN REHAB ADRIAN CUNNINGHAM Contributing Writer

I

reland’s still in a state of PTSD as a result of the gender-altering kick in the shamrocks it received following 2008’s global crash. Almost overnight the country dropped from its position as poster child of the European Union to one of an economic basket case run from a back office in Berlin. Now, five years later, though the pain of austerity persists, the country’s finally out of intensive care. On a recent trip to Dublin, my first in four years, I sensed a changing mood in the city. There’s a buzz in the air, a new optimism, restaurants are full again because eating out is cheaper, and tourist numbers are up due in part to “The Gathering” — a government-inspired marketing initiative that gave Brand Ireland a much-needed kick in the lederhosen. I checked out some old haunts and discovered some new ones — here are a few I’d recommend: GRAND CANAL SQUARE A kilometre east of the city centre, on the south bank of the River Liffey sits Grand Canal Square — an ambitious redevelopment of the city’s long-neglected waterfront. Marketed as a “vibrant, new business and cultural quarter” this two-acre space built on Dublin’s historic gasworks site goes against the grain by living up to its billing. The unpredictable weather and lack of defined seasons can affect all outdoor experiences. Here, you can stroll the beautifully designed plaza, relax and enjoy some al fresco dining throughout the year, then tend to your mild hyperthermia by taking in a show at the new Bord Gáis (pronounced Bored Gosh) Energy Theatre. History blends with creativity and innovation in this neck of the woods. Windmill Lane recording studio, most associated with U2, is located nearby while Facebook, Google and Twitter’s European operations are all headquartered here. No surprise then that restaurants are aplenty and always busy. Indulge in some social networking over a bite to eat at the Ely Gastro Bar followed by a cocktail on the rooftop garden of the adjacent Market Hotel where you can tweet and Instagram jaw-dropping views of the city. GLASNEVIN CEMETERY & MUSEUM There are two ways to end up in Glasnevin Cemetery — the second way is to take the tour. Situated a few kilometres north of Dublin’s downtown, the award-winning Glasnevin Cemetery and Museum Tour (glasnevintrust.ie) constantly tops the list as one of Ireland’s most popular tourist attractions. Since opening for business in the 1830’s this, the country’s largest cemetery, has served as the final resting place for 1.5 million souls. The tour is riveting and emotional, a crash-course in Irish history, for here you’ll find Ireland’s Gods — its presidents, prime ministers, revolutionaries, statesmen (and stateswomen) lying side-by-side with Brendan Behan.

photos Tourism Ireland

Glasnevin Cemetery & Museum (top) and a thronged parking lot at Dalkey’s Coliemore Harbour (above).

photos Tourism Ireland

A busy watering hole in downtown Dublin (top), watersports on the plaza at Grand Canal Square (left) and a brisk Monday evening at Fade Street Social (right). FADE STREET There was a time when a three-course dinner in the city could cost as much as a lipectomy but now post-recession Dublin is all about great food at affordable prices. New restaurants are opening everywhere and this “new deal” is evident in the cluster of eateries and bars that have sprung up in and around Fade Street, a short stroll from Grafton Street, the city’s main shopping thoroughfare. Fade Street’s unofficial mayor is Dylan McGrath, Ireland’s über-talented but unsmiling celebrity chef and owner of the bustling Fade Street Social (fadestreetsocial. com), and its culinary cousin, Rustic Stone. McGrath fell from grace when Mint, his Michelin Star restaurant went belly-up in 2009. Now he’s back with a bang, if not a smile. With a trimmed down menu, locallysourced ingredients, and yes, you guessed it — great food at affordable prices, Dubliners can’t get enough of it. Across the street is the recently opened

Drury Buildings. A more chic alternative to Fade Street Social, it has become known for its killer cocktails, confident cooking and slick decor. Bar manager Paul McDonald boasted of having the largest whisky collection of any restaurant in Dublin, while pointing out that the bar’s fixtures and fittings were flown in specially from New York. After my fourth Glenfiddich I started to believe him. A DART TO DALKEY Dublin’s version of the SkyTrain, the optimistically named DART, runs in a north/ south direction along the city’s picturesque east coast. My favourite leg of this trip is the 40 minute ride south, from Dublin to Dalkey (pronounced Dawh-key). This, the oldest section of rail line in Ireland, remains above ground until you reach the ferry port of Dunlaoghaire (pronounced Done Leery) when suddenly it sinks underground for about half a kilometer before sur-

facing again. The reason is that at the time of construction in 1834, Dunlaoghaire’s aristocratic families, in a blatant act of early nimby-ism, insisted that their view of the sea shouldn’t be hampered by passing trains. Their wish was granted. Dalkey is a small, charming village, home to some great bars, top-class restaurants and some very big names. Don’t be surprised to catch Van Morrison, Bono or Enya dropping by the local bakery, or Chris DeBurgh and Neil Jordan lamenting the passing of that other great local, Maeve Binchy. From Dalkey’s Coliemore Harbour you can take in the scenic views across Dublin Bay but resist the temptation to take a dip — the temperature’s likely to induce a bout of Tourette’s, or erectile dysfunction, depending on which part of your anatomy hits the water first. A PERFECT PINT IN A PERFECT PUB Much imitated but never bettered, the Irish Pub (that is, a pub in Ireland) is coming under threat on its own turf from a decline in custom (recession-hit drinkers doing it at home) and the growth of North Americanstyle sports bars where TV monitors outnumber punters and the downing of shots followed by bellicose roars takes the place of good conversation. The perfect pint in the perfect pub? Some say it’s a myth but the Irish know better. The best pints of Guinness in the world are being served nightly in establishments like Kehoe’s, McDaid’s, O’Donoghues and Neary’s, all within a stones throw of Dublin city centre but easy does it — last year’s incident when a tourist from Saskatchewan was arrested for groping the Blarney Stone when it didn’t respond to a bout of heavy petting highlighted the dangers of sinking the black stuff on an empty stomach. Dublin-born Adrian Cunningham is a writer and art director living in Vancouver.


F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 0 , 2 0 1 4 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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GOT ARTS? 604-738-1411 | events@vancourier.com

1 2 3

4

OUR 2

1

Seats will be filled, minds will be blown and shawls will be worn. THE PUSH INTERNATIONAL PERFORMING ARTS FESTIVAL celebrates its 10th year Jan. 14 to Feb 2, with a slew of provocative plays, pieces and performances, including GOB SQUAD ART COLLECTIVE’s SUPER NIGHT SHOT, Jan. 14 at the Vancouver Playhouse. In what is billed as a “magical journey through the nighttime streets of a not too distant city,” Vancouver becomes the film set for an impromptu movie full of surprises, with the unsuspecting public as co-stars. They’ll also be serving cake and ice cream. Boo ya! Details and tickets at pushfestival.ca.

PICKS 3

Things get “fantastico” at Vancity Theatre as it hosts its inaugural ITALIAN FILM FESTIVAL, showcasing five new films from Italy and five films from Italy’s historical repertoire of cinema, including Federico Fellini’s 1973 classic Amarcord, John Turturro’s Passione and the 1963 Sophia Loren star-maker YESTERDAY, TODAY AND TOMORROW. Details at viff.org.

We’re not exactly sure how Inglourious Basterds is going to turn out, but burlesque impresario BLUE MORRIS presents an evening of TARANTINO BURLESQUE, Jan. 10, 8:30 p.m. at Vancouver FanClub. With nods to everything from Pulp Fiction to Death Proof, the show combines burlesque and theatre inspired by the movies of Quentin Tarantino, all performed to a live band playing music from Tarantino’s well-chosen soundtracks. Tickets at tarantinoburlesque.brownpapertickets. com. Details at bluemorris.com.

JAN. 10 - 14, 2014 For video and web content, scan page using the Layar app.

4

TJ DAWE returns to his monologue-ing ways, with another dose of his acclaimed solo show MEDICINE, Jan. 14 to 25 at the Firehall Arts Centre. Dawe shares his experience joining a retreat led by famed addictions physician Dr. Gabor Maté, where participants ingest the Amazonian psychotropic plant medicine ayahuasca to confront their demons. Maté will also take part in audience talkbacks at selected shows. For tickets and information, call 604-689-0926 or go to firehallartscentre.ca.


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 0 , 2 0 1 4

arts&entertainment KUDOS& KVETCHES RELEASE THE FOOD HOUNDS With Tourism Vancouver’s annual Dine Out Vancouver event just around the corner, the culinary connoisseurs and gremolata goons at K&K thought you’d want to know what are the hottest, most-under-the-radar dining deals to be had this year. • The Vancouver Courier’s Downstairs Fridge a.k.a. Ol’ Stinky Cost: by donation. What to order: “This is the year of fermentation, bacteria cultures and hard-to-discern aromas of neglect, apathy and fridge amnesia,” says one of several anonymous chefs behind the Courier’s ongoing lunch room “experi-

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ence.” Treat yourself to a sweaty package of aged blue cheese, which didn’t start off blue; an assortment of Tupperware containers filled with what appears to be edible Jackson Pollock paintings; a six-month-old chicken tortellini Lean Cuisine, which we’re pretty sure is still consumable thanks to the miracles of preservatives and over-microwaving; and a slushy bag of grapes that can now be considered wine. Talk about mouth feel! For the truly adventurous, just open the grimy door, stick your head in and take a huff. You’ll wake up in no time. • Downtown Costco Cost: yearly membership fee (or ride the coattails of someone with a card), plus ongoing guilt for destroying the fabric of community so near and dear to Vancouverites. What to order: While the Costco cafeteria’s fresh-breath-destroying $2 hot dog and pop combo is a surefire hit with members

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FRED

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EMAIL: yvrflee@hotmail.com TWITTER: @FredAboutTown

UNLEESHED

BEST IN SHOW!: What a memorable year it was. Putting the fun back in fundraising, here is my annual list of 2013’s best and brightest and most noteworthy. GALA OF THE YEAR: More than 400 guests raised $2 million at B.C. Children’s Hospital Foundation’s 27th Crystal Ball, chaired by Arya Eshghi. Thirteen-year-old Casey Wright, who received treatment for a brain tumour at the children’s hospital was ringmaster at the Circus-themed black-tie benefit. Monies realized from the extraordinary night helped conclude the five-year, $200-million campaign to build a new children’s hospital.

EVENT OF THE YEAR: The spectacular tribute to businessman and philanthropist Joe Segal in three musical acts drew 1,500 business titans, power players and community builders to the Convention Centre for a celebration dinner for the ages. Segal’s son Lorne fronted the stunning fundraiser that had gala-goers generate $2.1 million for Coast Mental Health, one of many charities supported by Segal and his wife of 65 years, Rosalie. SMALL GALA OF THE YEAR: Lorne Segal and his wife, Melita, would also front the year’s best small gala. With the assistance of brand LIVE productions, the couple converted their indoor pool into a party palace where 140 guests dined atop the posh pool ensuring the Life Commitment Dinner benefitting the Dr. Peter AIDS Foundation was a swish splash.

BEST SMALL GALA: Lorne and Melita Segal converted their indoor pool into a party palace ensuring the $250,000 Life Commitment Dinner benefitting the Dr. Peter AIDS Foundation.

PARTY OF THE YEAR: Casey Wright, who received treatment for a brain tumour at B.C. Children’s Hospital, was ringmaster at the Circus-themed Crystal Ball fundraiser.

BEST HOUSE PARTY: Jacqui Cohen’s Face the World Gala at her Point Grey abode continues to be a hot ticket, which this year attracted author Jackie Collins.

BEST POP UP: Courier publisher Dee Dhaliwal and her main squeeze, Amar, were among the lucky 2,500 whiteclad guests at the Social Concierge’s Diner en Blanc event.

MOST UNUSUAL: Hollyburn Country Club turned fight club for the Athletics for Kids fundraiser, with former B.C. Lion Sean Millington squaring off with Martin Dupasquier.

EVENT OF THE YEAR: Lorne Segal, right, chaired the $2.1 million Coast Mental Health Gala fundraiser in honour of his parents Joe and Rosalie Segal.

BEST PDA: At the Queer Film Festival opening gala, Everett Blackwell, Yogi Omar and others puckered up at the largest public display of affection to protest anti-gay laws in Russia.

NEWCOMER OF THE YEAR: Mark Brand felt the love at the inaugural fundraiser and launch of his A Better Life Foundation, which helps feed the hungry in the Downtown Eastside.


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arts&entertainment

Dine Out, Fish Counter and a new Chewies

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ine Out Vancouver (Jan. 17 to Feb. 2) looms large this year with a wider selection of events than ever. Hot tickets include Plated and Paired at the Public Market (Jan. 17), The Grape Debate 2014 (“Is wine made in the vineyard

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or the winery?” Jan. 31), Secret Supper Soirée (Jan. 17, 24, 31) and more. Dine Out had its genesis as a budget-based promotion where diners could eat a bargain-priced fixed menu at an upscale restaurant while eateries received a welcomed bump in business during the notoriously slow month of January. However, I think it speaks to the maturing of our dining scene (speaking for both restaurants and diners) that it’s moved beyond that. You’ll find plenty of excellent values at all three-menu levels — even though the $28 point is still the most hotly contested. Worthy picks include a spread of local ingredients at Salt Tasting Room Kits (with well-priced wine flight option) and a tempting prix fixe at Le Parisien, including superb duck confit and pomme purée and budget wine offerings, which we got to preview this week. We’d also be tempted by the bistro’s classic bouillabaisse,

And the fact that all the seafood sold or cooked is sustainable is also key. “We love hearing people ask if it’s Ocean Wise,” adds McDermid, who pioneered the program with Clark. All this, plus superb fish ‘n’ chips, bode well for the future.

CHEWIE CHEWIE

photo Tim Pawsey

Things at Mike McDermid and Robert Clark’s Fish Counter are going swimmingly. or grilled flank steak frites. Our big discovery turned out to the delightful, nononsense, burger-centric Cannibal Café (1818 Commercial Dr., 604-558-4199), where you’ll find decent pints from Parallel 49, as well as a diet-defying dessert doughnut. It’s all about the house-made burgers though. And the amazing wall of indie band posters. There’s great Dine Out value to be found here for $18. As there is at PICA-Bistro 101. Not only can you play a valuable role in the training of Canada’s next great chefs and sommeliers, you can do it with taste on an amazing budget. Also just $18. Book early at dineoutvancouver.com.

SOMETHING FISHY

Things have settled down somewhat at the Fish Counter (3825 Main St., 604876-FISH), since I stopped by on its first day. It was hopping then and it’s hopping now. Business is still booming at former C chef Robert Clark’s combo sustainable fishmonger/diner, opened with marine biologist and former Vancouver Aquarium program manager Mike McDermid. McDermid says the community response has been “incredible,” and he and Clark are busier than they ever expected to be. What’s driving it? “Well, people are really happy to finally have a fish store in their area,” says McDermid.

There’s no shortage of marine tastes (including quite a few Ocean Wise offerings) at the newly minted downtown sibling of Chewie’s Oyster Bar (1055 West Hastings, 604- 620-7634). The soaring ceilings, expansive glass and dramatic, modern lines offer quite the contrast to the popular, more homey Kits location. But the Creole and Cajun-influenced fare is similar, with many proven faves replicated. Portions are more than generous. And even if the deep fryer gets a workout, there’s no shortage of steamed and grilled options. Not to mention a serious fresh shucked bivalve bonanza. Good wines by the glass, including the now familiar “big glass” option, and fun cocktails complete the picture, with high energy staff and a real buzz that’s already taken hold. Not to be missed: Dale Klippenstein’s remarkable brass instrument sculpture that hangs over the newly built north east entrance. info@hiredbelly.com


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Get your FREE daily dose of beauty, fashion, culture and dining:

CANADA’S PREMIERE ONLINE GUIDE TO THE GOOD LIFE by Sarah Bancroft, Editor-in-chief & May Globus, Social Editor

Have Yoga Mat, Will Travel You’re on and off the Canada Line with your faithful yoga mat strapped to your Herschel backpack, so why not at YVR?

Some readers have been asking me about Bitcoin, the Internet currency. Actually, Bitcoin is not the first such currency. For at least a decade, maybe two, online fantasy or quest games have used an in-game currency, which could be earned by achieving levels, killing trolls, etc. Over time, players began to trade these in-game currencies for dollars, partly because some players wanted to buy their way to higher levels or increased powers/weapons. Some analysts, such as Robert Prechter, think Bitcoin will eventually replace national currencies such as the U.S. dollar.Bitcoin was launched (a reader, Victor, tells me, so blame him if this is wrong) Jan. 3, 2008. During 2010, it had a value of six cents per “coin.” Since then, like the 1700’s tulip craze, the coins have soared — to a peak of $1,240 U.S. per coin. As I write this, a coin is worth $ 950 U.S. I might be wrong (Lord knows I’ve been wrong before!) but I’d dump Bitcoin now. It’s name, a “B,” hints that a “nova” phenomenon is occurring, from 2012 to February 2014. By “nova” I mean things expand hugely, then deflate, capturing many in the claws of loss.

It’s your last week of ambition, Aries, so work hard and hopefully. Relationships continue to be of paramount importance — “reality definers.” You can either cooperate and gain loyal allies, or you can attack, disagree, and gain some very active — or at least vocal — enemies. It’s a significant time, now to late July — a time to explore new avenues, even new cities and countries.

This is your last week of home-based activities and decisions, Libra. This area offers affection this winter, family members are sweet, but it is also, these years, a place of slow but constant change. Now to July, you have the ability to change domestic, property, security and retirement situations, mainly by your assertiveness toward your spouse or other links. Sunday/Monday are wise and mellow.

A week of mellow understanding, Taurus. You can sum up now, see where you’ve been, where you are, and where you’re going, whom you should love, and what you should learn over the months/years to come. (Travel, lawsuits, university attendance, cultural involvements, love — all are “learning.”) Do examine your life — one unexpected benefit will be that you realize you’re a better person than you thought.

This is an easy week, Scorpio. Run errands, clear up paperwork, return calls and emails, travel and converse. Seek variety, follow your curiosity — especially Sunday/ Monday, when secrets almost beg to reveal themselves. If you’re seeking work or buying machinery, do so before 1:30 p.m. PST Sunday. Also a good time to invest in industrial companies, stocks. A wise, mellow mood flows over you Monday night through Wednesday.

This is your last week (for awhile) of intimate urges, a willingness to change your lifestyle, of research and investment opportunities. I wouldn’t jump into these with last minute desperation, but do continue and deepen whatever has already developed. Or is rooted in the past — e.g., a former successful investment might prove profitable again. If you’re looking for work, a former job/position might prove rewarding.

Continue to chase money, Sage. Buy and sell, pursue clients, etc. Through July, life is “teasing you” with light touches of romance, friendly flirtations and an air of promise in love zones. Sunday brings this promise once again and if you treat it lightly, if you’re willing to flirt, you could meet a good love prospect. If you’re seeking romance before August, join groups, clubs, befriend those who give dinner parties or organize group affairs.

Relationships fill this week and at last you get to speak up for your own position (midweek). This first half of 2014, relations can be under some stress. Pluto keeps changing how you have to deal with others. At the same time, Mars brings domestic friction, quick words at home. One way to overcome this is to focus on the romance of your marriage or affair — in this area, wisdom and serenity prevail.

Your energy, effectiveness and charisma remain high, Cap. Use these this week to cement relationships and agreements, or to form new ones. Others find you charming, indecisive and stubborn. Tackle chores and protect your health Sunday/Monday. (Only routine chores Monday.) Insight into a relationship comes Monday night.

One last week of work, health concerns and general drudgery, Leo. Soon, the doors will open on fresh opportunities and horizons. (Until then, at least your work scene remains pleasant, even affectionate. Don’t speak impulsively or sharply about delays.) Sunday/ Monday bring optimism, friends, entertainment, perhaps light romance. (Though all these will blossom much more powerfully after July.)

This is your last week of weariness, of solitude and quietness. Next week, you’ll burst forth with new energy and interests. The more deeply you rest now, the more vitality you’ll have next week into February. This is a good time to plan, to have your health checked or tuned up, and to deal with administrative offices, both in government and private sectors. Romance — or notions of it — attract you Sunday/Monday.

It’s your last week of “pure romance” for a while, Virgo — enjoy it, don’t fret about duties or work, you’ll plunge into those next week. (And before then, no major projects — at least no major successful ones – will be started in the workplace.) The one you love might remain indecisive, or circumstances might keep you apart — either way, delays in love, creative projects, children’s progress, and speculative ventures, will end as January does.

Your future is great, Pisces, no matter what you think of it presently. The next 12 years will empower you, make you your own person; you will believe that your thoughts are correct, that you deserve to speak, that you deserve love. This new courage will make you more honest and more ready to reject unhealthy affairs. Your optimism is high, your romantic passion remains high, and now to July a sensual spark is nudging you to chase anything in skirts or pants.

Monday: Orlando Bloom (37). Tuesday: Dove Cameron (18). Wednesday: Armando Perez (33). Thursday: Kate Moss (40), Friday: Muhammad Ali (72). Saturday: Jason Segel (34). Sunday: Dolly Parton (68), Drea de Matteo (42).

MORE AT ASTRALREFLECTIONS.COM

Lululemon’s travel-sized Un-Mat lets you take your downward dog on the road, so that even if afternoons are spent sipping mojitos poolside, you can be true to your sun salutations in the morning. Thinner than a regular mat, and quite a bit lighter, you’ll now feel virtuous all vacation long. $48 at www.lululemon.com

Rapid D-Tox

This Is How We Roll

Fresh and fast food - anything is possible. If the idea of a pricey week-long detox retreat subsisting on spiritual chants and Kombucha has you shaking in your yoga pants, fear not: the new D-Tox Spa has arrived. At the petite new spot near the Olympic Village, we tried the 30-minute MicroZone Mini Facial which was as effective as it was relaxing, and easy on the post-holiday wallet at just $30. Follow that with a Shellac manicure (ours lasted two weeks and counting, $45) combined with a 50-minute foot reflexology session to boost circulation and immunity. Grab a green juice from sister company Aqua Sushi + Juice Bar just down the road and you are in-and-out in less time than it takes to do a Lagree class. ’Cause that’s next week. D-Tox Spa, 1780 Manitoba St., Vancouver, 604-559-7488, www.dtoxspa.ca

Recently opened in the Olympic Village, Aqua Sushi + Juice Bar offers both brown rice sushi and fresh-pressed juices for those on-the-go. All sushi here is brown rice or low-carb, and the salmon used is only of the wild sockeye variety. The real crab California mango ($10) and veggie ($6) rolls and kale goma-ae ($4) are made from the freshest ingredients, as are the five juice options ($6 for 16oz). Cleanse your system with the pineapple-apple-ginger-mint, or rejuvenate with the carrot-orange-grapefruitsginger-cayenne combinations — either way, each one is delicious. Being healthy never tasted this good. 1764 Manitoba St., Vancouver, 604-559-9766, www.aquajuicebar.com

Mighty Oak

Fine Vine

Fashion favourite Oak + Fort recently reopened in a new shop a few blocks up the street from its original location.

Whistler getaways are good for the soul, thanks to fresh mountain air — and to all the culinary spots that keep us well-fed after a day on the hill.

Everything we’ve all come to know and love about the brand is here, and this airy woodand-white space truly feels like a reflection of the clothing: simple and clean, well-thought out and beautiful. The eponymous collection has even more pieces for us to covet now. We’ll be making room in our closet for quilted front black leather skirts ($68), cozy mottled mustard scarves ($38), staple Simona leggings ($38), Neutra tunics ($78) and Lottie knit hats ($24.75). Sister line Loft 82 makes an appearance, too, in the form of warm shearling jackets ($188) and Alex sweaters ($88). Although the Hanwha sweatshirt ($104) with square logo and side pockets is for men, we easily see ourselves, ahem, borrowing it from our fella’s drawer. Oak + Fort, still as mighty as ever. 355 Water St., Vancouver, 604-566-9199, www.oakandfort.com

Grill & Vine is the latest addition to The Westin Resort & Spa Whistler, a contemporary but casual space with upscale food offerings. Open for both breakfast and dinner, every menu item is made from fresh ingredients, coming by way of local suppliers such as Pemberton’s North Arm Farm. For starters, the crispy quail ($15) is a savoury twist on traditional chicken and waffles. Mains come straight from the grill and stone hearth oven; you can’t go wrong with the light Louis Lake steelhead ($30) or the hearty wild board lasagna ($26). Sides here are the definition of comfort food — think chorizo tater tots ($6) and truffle mac & cheese ($8). The wine list of local and international labels is just as phenomenal, and available by the glass, carafe or bottle. Après-ski just got a whole lot swankier. 4090 Whistler Way, Whistler, 604-905-5000, www.westinwhistler.com

subscribe for free to WIN Visit www.vitamindaily.com to subscribe to the free Vancouver edition and you will be automatically entered to win 1 of 5 blo Blow Dry Bar gift cards (valued at $35/each). Terms and conditions apply. Contest closes Jan 31st, 2014.


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 0 , 2 0 1 4

GOT SPORTS? 604-738-1411 | mstewart@vancourier.com

High school girls are picking up sticks MEGAN STEWART Staff writer

E

mma Lin was dropping by the ice rink almost every week to skate with friends when she was recruited to the Kitsilano hockey team. The social skating was just for fun and she traded in her toe picks for hockey blades to play competitive sport. “Hockey always seemed really fun to me,” said 17-year-old Lin. She tried out for the Blue Demons in November 2012 and played the first season on defence. Now the Grade 12 student is in net. “When I first started, I didn’t know how to do anything with a stick and puck,” she said. “Skating with all the hockey equipment was definitely weird at the beginning, especially my first time wearing the equipment was during try outs. I have become a better skater through the practices every week.” The girls league launched in the 1995-96 season when club hockey was rapidly expanding to give girls and women more mainstream access to Canada’s national winter sport. The high school league counted five teams — Vancouver Technical, Point Grey, Kitsilano, John Oliver and Killarney. J.O. has since folded but Churchill and Eric Hamber have added teams. The league still welcomes first-time players like Lin. Many of the rosters also include athletes who have left other sports to play hockey although they have never skated before. “We’ve got some girls who play rep hockey in the city leagues and those girls are pretty

photo Dan Toulgoet

Van Tech skater Emily Primerano (in green) reaches for the puck controlled by Hamber’s Zoe Luke in an exhibition game Jan. 6 at Britannia Ice Rink. good and then we have others, it’s their first time playing and may be their only opportunity to play because of the cost to play,” said Jonathan Lai, who coaches at Van Tech alongside Michael Borason. Three returning Trojans started their hockey at Van Tech and this season they count 10 rookies and about six more who play for city clubs like the Vancouver Angels.

The Trojans train at the Agrodome, but since ice time is limited, they have only three to five practices in a 10-game season. Their first game was Monday against Hamber at the Britannia Ice Rink. They lost 42. Players bring their own sticks but those who don’t have their own gear can rely on the school for equipment such as skates and pads.

Theresa MacLeod is the only woman who coaches in the high school league and said it’s key to see even first-time skaters as athletes with potential. Athletes who leave other sports bring one of those key intangibles that make their success in hockey very likely, even if it’s difficult at first. “There’s that confidence where they know they can do it,” said MacLeod. “They feel it’s not their sport and you’re always going to get a brand new girl coming around. You have to take them by the hand and be very encouraging. “It’s definitely a challenge but I tell you, when they get it, they get it. I love the enthusiasm they show.” MacLeod remembers one player — a former gymnast named Katie Schertzer — who came out for the team. She’d never played hockey but eventually joined a minor hockey association and then competed for the UBC Thunderbirds as a goaltender. “She had never played until later in life [but] she was good at all these acrobatic tumbling moves. It really worked for her,” said MacLeod. “You need to be flexible as a goalie. She caught on really well.” MacLeod grew up with seven brothers who played hockey but she only picked up the sport as an adult. “I want girls to get involved being active,” she said. “I tell the girls I’m jealous. I wish I had this when I was in high school.” She’s not the only one. mstewart@vancourier.com twitter.com/MHStewart

Urquhart a cautionary tail for B.C. transfers

JOCK AND JILL

with Megan Stewart

T

he eligibility committee of the high school athletic association in Washington state ruled Wednesday that former Vancouver athlete Drew Urquhart is ineligible to play basketball at Seattle’s Eastside Catholic. The committee upheld the decision of the school, whose president made the initial decision re-

garding eligibility. The Urquhart family can appeal the decision, which then means a hearing officer would sit down with everyone involved, including the school, family and their lawyers, before making a recommendation to the executive director of the Washington Interscholastic Activities Association (WIAA), Mike Colbrese, who then makes a final decision. The school’s lawyer said the Urquharts have five days to file an appeal. We’ve dedicated a fair amount of coverage to this story because Drew was a prominent player in B.C. whose star shone even brighter when his family moved to Vancouver so he could pursue his athletic career. He has since committed to play for the NCAA Div. 1 University of

Vermont, realizing an ambition of thousands of Canadian teens. He had his mind set on attending Eastside Catholic by the spring of 2012 but instead of moving to the U.S. at 16 years old, enrolled at St. George’s, a private school much like the American prep schools that can funnel money, coaches and other resources into sports. Lucky them. Drew wanted an American academic and athletic experience in his graduating year so he could make the best possible transition to NCAA competition. In the meantime, he stayed at Saints for one season and then followed through on his ambition to play in the U.S. Drew has come under fire for not staying in Kelowna to play at the high school he’d have attended after middle school. And then

he put up with the same you-betrayed-us accusations when he left St. George’s. His critics say he is using schools to advance his career and no one likes to be played. But Drew has talent to trade. Schools, such as St. George’s and others like White Rock Christian Academy, draw from the region — the province, really — and aren’t hindered by catchment restrictions that apply to public schools. They have an advantage in this transfer game. Drew, one of the most promising basketball players of his class, applied for financial assistance at St. George’s and got it. Recruitment is not allowed and I’m certainly not implying that happened in this or any case, but some schools have other muscles to flex. Saints would have been a top 5 AAAA team this year if

Drew were still in their uniform. Of his would-be Kelowna team, who knows what was possible. Instead, he’s benched. Eastside Catholic faces strict (and enforced) WIAA eligibility restrictions. If B.C. athletes believe their transfers aren’t scrutinized, they should consider the fact Drew is not able to play the sport he loves in his final year of high school. I also want to expand the story we ran in the Jan. 8 issue that reported Sister Mary Tracy was absent from the first day of hearing on Monday. I was unable to reach the school before deadline but have since heard from their lawyer and learned he was present to answer questions and that Tracy had submitted a sworn statement. mstewart@vancourier.com twitter.com/MHStewart


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sports&recreation

Ride the trails with friends in 2014 WHEEL WORLD with Kay Cahill

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ith 2014 newly upon us, it’s a great time to set your cycling plans for the coming year and determine the personal goals you’d like to achieve on your bike. We all cycle for different reasons, and individual goals range from something as simple as going for your first bad-weather ride to a serious mileage challenge like registering for a GranFondo. The important thing is that by setting out your goals for the year, you give yourself something concrete and achievable to work towards. With that in mind, here are some ideas to get the ball rolling. • Cycle to work Haven’t commuted before? With the downtown core now fully accessible by both north/south and east/west separated bike lanes, as well as the hundreds of kilometres of bike routes and lanes that cover the rest of Vancouver, there’s never been a better time to start. Use UBC’s fantastic online Cycling Route Planner to find a route that sticks to bike lanes, or that minimizes elevation gain.

•Watch a bike race live Bike racing is fast, furious and intense. If you’ve never been to a live race, you’ll be amazed by the noise the peloton makes and the ferocious wind that whips around as it speeds by. With breakaways, crashes and sprints for the finish guaranteed, it’s a compelling experience. Check out the B.C. Superweek schedule for races in Vancouver, Surrey, White Rock and Burnaby. The UBC Grand Prix, held around a very technical course, is set for July 8 and the exhilarating, challenging criterium that is the Gastown Grand Prix returns July 9. •Go on a group ride Not all group rides are focused on racing techniques like pacelines and drafting. There are lots of laid-back, beginner-friendly options for group riding around Vancouver that will introduce you to new routes and provide you with new riding buddies to share the experience. Check out meetup. com and search for cyclists or visit mec.ca for more options. •Learn how to change a flat tire (and do other minor bike repairs) Bike repair is one of those things that seems daunting until you try, and then surprises you with how easy it really is (for the most part, anyway). YouTube offers scores of helpful tutorials if you want to teach yourself how to change a flat tire, switch a cassette or put on a new chain. Or you can learn the basics in person

file photo Dan Toulgoet

Challenge yourself to bike more. Start with UBC’s online Cycling Route Planner that helps two-wheeled commuters pick routes that stick to bike lanes and avoid elevation gains. with one of HUB’s great bike maintenance workshops. •Ride on the dirt Never been trail riding before? There’s something really special about getting away from traffic and tarmac on a bike. Start off gently in Pacific Spirit Park, where smooth dirt trails wind through groves of oldgrowth hemlock. Or check out Fisherman’s Trail in North Vancouver’s Seymour Conservation Reserve.

If you’re feeling a little more adventurous, the Richard Juryn trail network, also in North Vancouver, is great for learning and practising the skills needed for technical downhill riding. I wish you all many happy kilometres of riding in 2014. Kay Cahill is a cyclist and librarian who believes bikes are for life, not just for commuting. Read more at sidecut.ca, or send a comment to kay@sidecut.ca.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 0 , 2 0 1 4

sports&recreation

Fitness World closes women’s-only space WEST END GYM GOES CO-ED IN RESPONSE TO CLIENTS BUT NOT ALL ARE PLEASED MEGAN STEWART Staff Writer

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yms and weight rooms haven’t always been the most welcoming, comfortable place for women. But over the last 30 years, health clubs worldwide introduced women’s-only sections to cater to their expanding clientele and induce new members to adopt a healthier lifestyle that included weights and treadmills.

But now a West End Fitness World is eliminating the section used exclusively by women to accommodate the neighbourhood’s demographic and because clients have complained the gym should be completely co-ed. The company, which along with 12 other Fitness World locations in the Lower Mainland is owned by Steve Nash, could not provide the percentage of male and female clientele at the West End gym. Nevertheless, one female member is irate with this change. Karen Tankard signed up at the Howe and Davie

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view more with

Fitness World 27 years ago to exercise in a place designed to spare her any muscle-bound machismo. In an irate rant she posted Wednesday on her blog Tank’s Travels, Tankard said Fitness World was deceiving the female members who’d bought passes in order to use the women’s-only section. “Shame on Steve Nash Fitness World for selling memberships based on women’s-only sections then quietly eliminating them,” she wrote. “This company doesn’t understand women have unique needs and wants. […] Fitness World doesn’t deserve to keep its women members.”

Shame on Steve Nash “ Fitness World for selling

membership based on women’s-only sections and then quietly eliminating them. — Karen Tankard

Tankard, a former CBC reporter, noticed the smaller equipment in the section she used was replaced over a year ago with new, larger weight machines. She got mixed messages from staff but eventually confirmed the women’s section was being eliminated. In the meantime, she wrote that signs had come down and the area was effectively co-ed, which caused discomfort for women like Tankard who thought the space was only theirs to use. “Lots of women don’t want to work out in the company of men, their sweat and their grunting,” she wrote. “Sorry guys, you’re not always the best workout partners.” Colleen Kirk, a spokeswoman for Fitness World, said the gym is responding to requests from what it considers the changing needs of its clients. “That part of the women’s-only location is not used a lot and our members have come to us and said, ‘We want more space that is gender-neutral.’” She said the dozen other Fitness World locations, including Kitsilano, have dedicated women’s sections and there are no plans to eliminate them. “The thing to remember is that fitness in general is always evolving,” said Kirk. In Britain, a reporter who covers men’s issues is fighting a municipal council that allows a public gym to open only to women for several hours a week. In 2005, a Burnaby man took the private gym Just Ladies Fitness to the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal after staff refused to sell him a membership. He lost his case. Not only was he not prevented from working out at other affordable fitness centres near his home, but the ruling determined women should have the option to exercise “free of the male gaze” or otherwise might not exercise at all. mstewart@vancourier.com twitter.com/MHStewart


A32

THE VANCOUVER COURIER F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 1 0 , 2 0 1 4

WEEKLY SPECIALS 100% BC Owned and Operated Prices Effective January 9 to January 15, 2014.

We reserve the right to limit quantities. We reserve the right to correct printing errors.

Grocery Department Rogers Granola

Meat Department

SAVE

assorted varieties

from

SAVE

Jordan’s Cereal

SAVE

34%

SAVE

4.99

SAVE

3.49

from

26%

2 varieties

SAVE

30%

13.99

SAVE

24%

200g • reg 6.49

assorted varieties

2.79

3.99

from

27%

3.99

3/5.49

68g • product of USA

Bioforce Echinforce

18.99

100ml

Helps relieve symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections, such as the common cold. Take at the first sign of infection.

530g

Progressive Vegessential

54.99

840g

Vegessential™ combines the benefit of an entire cupboard full of supplements with the ease of consuming a single smoothie.

Botanica Cleanse Kit

39.99

Buttermilk Soda or Sourdough Rice Bread

520ml • +deposit +eco fee

product of Thailand

2/5.98

Health Care Department

Gluten Free

4 pack

Botanica Restorative Cleanse is a gentle 2-week program.

1.50 off

assorted varieties

assorted varieties

regular retail price 400g bags

retail price

Pearls Frozen Perogies

Clif Builder’s Bars

20% off

1.00 off regular

product of USA

assorted varieties

Organic Psyllium Husk Powder

All 12 Pack Cookies

2-3pack

Thirsty Buddha Coconut Water

Bulk Department

Organic 100% Wholewheat Bread

product of Canada

3lb bag

product of Canada

Bakery Department

454g

assorted varieties

3/4.98

2/7.98

115g

from

SAVE

2.95L product of USA

180g • product of Canada

Tre Stelle and Dofino Cheese Slices

Mama Mary’s Pizza Crusts assorted varieties

4.98

710ml

reg 6.49 each

product of USA

Old Dutch Potato Chips

4/10.00

4.49

product of USA

assorted varieties

Prairie Harvest Organic Whole Wheat Pasta

1-1.1kg product of Canada

Seventh Generation Laundry Detergent

2/4.98

127g

4.99

Organic Ambrosia Apples from Cawston,BC

Choices’ Own Fresh Soup

Annie’s Homegrown Organic Bunny Fruit Snacks

500g product of U.K.

product of USA

Deli Department

43%

product of Canada

assorted varieties

19%

product of USA

assorted varieties

500g

Rogers Porridge Oats

SAVE

360-496g

from

23%

2/4.00

13.99lb/ 30.84kg

3.99

SAVE

5.99

Organic Black Kale

value pack

assorted varieties

from

assorted varieties

3.98lb/ 8.77kg

Wild Sockeye Salmon Pin Bone Fillets

Crunchmaster Crackers

assorted varieties

4.99lb/ 11.00kg

946ml or 3 pack product of USA

La Tortilla Wraps

500-750g product of Canada

Elias Honey

30%

47%

3.99

from

25%

2/3.98

SAVE

700-750g product of Canada

Liberté Méditerranée or Greek Yogurt

SAVE

assorted varieties

3.99

27%

Organic Red, Yellow and Orange Peppers from Mexico

Whole Organic Chicken

Dream Beverages assorted varieties

Produce Department

regular retail price 525-625g

600g • product of Canada

3 DAY VEGGIE CHALLENGE 9 cups of vegetables a day for 3 days

Challenge yourself. Join us at www.facebook.com/ChoicesMarkets 2010 - 2013 Awards. Your loyalty has helped Choices achieve these awards. Thank you!

Find us on Facebook: facebook.com/ChoicesMarkets Best Organic Produce

Best Grocery Store

Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/ChoicesMarkets

2010-2013

www.choicesmarkets.com Kitsilano

Cambie

Kerrisdale

Yaletown

Rice Bakery

South Surrey

2627 W. 16th Ave. Vancouver 604.736.0009

3493 Cambie St. Vancouver 604.875.0099

1888 W. 57th Ave. Vancouver 604.263.4600

1202 Richards St. Vancouver 604.633.2392

2595 W. 16th Ave. Vancouver 604.736.0301

3248 King George Blvd. South Surrey 604.541.3902

Burnaby Crest

8683 10th Ave. Burnaby 604.522.0936

Kelowna

Floral Shop

1937 Harvey Ave. Kelowna 250.862.4864

2615 W. 16th Vancouver 603-736-7522


Vancouver Courier January 10 2014