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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2013 Vol. 104 No. 88 • Established 1908

Taking Communion

21

WEEKEND EDITION

THE VOICE OF VANCOUVER NEIGHBOURHOODS

NEWS: Foster village 4/ OPINION: An authentic Brand 11

EastSidegroup aimstorecreate loststreamwith rainwaterrunoff MOUNT PLEASANT STUDENTS JOIN IN EFFORTS CHERYL ROSSI Staff writer

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photo Dan Toulgoet

More than 1,000 people attended the funeral of former Musqueam chief Ernie Campbell Wednesday morning at the Musqueam Community Centre. Current Chief Wayne Sparrow stands behind the coffin. Go to vancourier.com or scan page with Layar to see more photos.

Musqueam say goodbye to former chief ERNIE CAMPBELL LAID TO REST WEDNESDAY SANDRA THOMAS Staff writer

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sombre saxophone solo, singing sisters and children carrying bright sunflowers greeted the more than 1,000 mourners at the Musqueam Community Centre Wednesday morning for the funeral of the band’s former chief Ernie Campbell. The focal point of the room was a coffin adorned with red and white flowers in which Campbell was laid to rest. The tenacious former leader of the Musqueam Indian Band died Oct. 26 from complications related to diabetes. He was 72. Surrounding the coffin was a row of paddles, flowers

shaped into the word “Dad,” woven rugs and Campbell’s boxing gloves and robe. Campbell was a Golden Gloves title-holder, soccer player and coach and loved to canoe. Campbell’s large family filled the front rows of the auditorium, including his wife Carol, their children and spouses, his siblings, grandchildren, in-laws and numerous others. Attending the service were representatives from municipal, federal and provincial governments, First Nation elders and chiefs, members of the Vancouver Police Department and a large number of journalists. The emotional service began with a group of students placing the sunflowers at the foot of Campbell’s coffin. See CAMPBELL on page 4

community group wants a historic waterway in Mount Pleasant to flow again along St. George Street. The St. George group and the Vancouver Society of Storytelling are holding a Creek Forum Nov. 5 with students from Mount Pleasant elementary and money from the Vancouver Foundation. Their hope is to recreate the creek with rainwater runoff along St. George from Kingsway to East Fifth Avenue. “How are we capturing [rain water] and dealing with it properly in a way that not only enhances our urban environment with green and blue spaces, increases biodiversity and actively contributes to Vancouver becoming one of the greenest cities in the world by 2020,” said Shahira Sakiyama, community liaison for the St. George Rainway Project group. She notes permeable surfaces, rain gardens or bioswales, such as grass channels akin to those in the former Olympic Village, could collect and filter rain water and take stress off aging sewer lines and the Iona Wastewater Treatment Plant. A biofiltration plant could be established on the False Creek Flats to clean storm water before it enters False Creek.

Mount Pleasant’s steep slopes could provide potential for micro hydropower. The St. George Rainway group, an offshoot of the False Creek Watershed Society, and the storytelling society are collecting survey responses about possible designs for different blocks of St. George that they’ll share Nov. 5. One concept is a woonerf, or a space shared by cars, cyclists and pedestrians, with no one dominant mode — something more common in Europe — with a rainway featuring a wooded boardwalk surrounded by greenery along the field at Mount Pleasant elementary, between Seventh and Eighth avenues. St. George between Kingsway and 13th Avenue near Robson Park will be closed for the Nov. 5 event. That’s the location of a sinkhole the city repeatedly paves over. That’s where the St. George Rainway Project group wants the headwaters of the creek marked. Sakiyama said architectural designer Bryn Davidson’s thesis project from 2004 about St. George Creek was a finalist in a city design competition in 2004. Educator and poet Rita Wong discovered his project in 2009 and the pair organized an event with historian Bruce Macdonald in 2010 that spurred efforts to recreate the creek. See CONCERNS on page 4


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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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news Manager rejects NPA’s meeting request on bike path

CENTRAL PARK

with Sandra Thomas

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PA park board commissioners John Coupar and Melissa De Genova insist an appeal for a Nov. 4 special meeting regarding the proposed bike path for Kits and Hadden Beach parks meets the requirements of the board’s procedure bylaw dealing with such requests. But park board general manager Malcolm Bromley disagrees. In an email to commissioners, Bromley explains the request for the meeting was accompanied by a motion related to the Seaside Greenway Improvements, the related request for proposals (RFPs), and the advisory group. In a nutshell, Bromley writes that because the

photo Dan Toulgoet

NPA park board commissioner John Coupar at Kits Point. Scan page with Layar to see a short video by a local resident on the bike path. “essence of the special meeting is to rescind and amend a past decision” it is therefore out of order. All hell broke loose several weeks ago when the Courier broke the news a 12-foot wide paved bike path will be constructed through Hadden and Kits Beach parks. The $2.2 million bike lane is an extension of the Cornwall-Point Grey bike lane con-

East India Carpets D I S T I N C T I V E D E S I G N S S I N C E 19 4 8

necting False Creek to Stanley Park and Canada Place. Many residents and sports and recreation groups, including those representing thousands of basketball, volleyball and tennis players, complained they weren’t consulted prior to the decision. Hundreds of residents and park users held a rally at Kits Beach Oct. 20 to protest the

1606 West Second Avenue at Fir Armoury District, Vancouver Mon-Sat 10-6 Sun 12-5 604 736 5681 eastindiacarpets.com

decision, which the park board calls a done deal. As a result, the park board agreed to create an advisory group made up of residents and sports groups. Coupar says regardless of the fact that group has yet to meet, a request for proposal was issued by the park board with a deadline of Nov. 5. As for the special meeting, Coupar says according to the park board’s procedural bylaw, 48 hours notice is required prior to such an event. He notes their request was made days before the Nov. 4 meeting he and De Genova wanted. The motion from the NPA commissioners includes a list of reasons they feel backs their request for the meeting, including the fact Coupar requested detailed information regarding the route of the path prior to the Oct. 7 vote and was told there was none. He adds he’s since discovered a report including that information dated August and September. “I don’t understand, why not share that information?” says Coupar. “There were a lot of details missing from that Oct. 7 meeting.” That alone is reason enough the park board should allow this special meeting, says Coupar.

Other reasons and allegations included on the list include: • Commissioners were provided the opportunity for a briefing only days before a staff recommendation went to the park board for approval. • Commissioners were told a public consultation had taken place with the Senior’s Advisory Committee and the Persons with Disabilities Committee, but Coupar and De Genova say that’s not the case. • Park board chair Sarah Blyth issued a media release Oct. 18, stating that an advisory group would be formed consisting of sports groups and community members. • Under the existing RFP timeline it appears impossible that meaningful input from key stakeholders can be received in advance of the Nov. 5 deadline.

FINE FILM

By the way, Kitsilano resident David Fine has created a short video entitled Kits Bike Path: The Movie, detailing why as a cyclist he has concerns about the proposed path. It can be seen at the online version of this story at vancourier.com. sthomas@vancourier.com


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2013

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he opening of an aboriginal housing development built for foster children and their families along the Grandview Highway corridor took on a special meaning for Patrick Stewart last Friday. Not only did Stewart design the David Pranteau Aboriginal Children’s Village at Grandview Highway and Nanaimo Street, the architect is a former foster child. “I went to eight different schools in 12 years,” Stewart told the Courier after an elaborate ceremony that included aboriginal dancers and the unveiling of totems. “I didn’t have that stability of one spot. So here, for a child to be allocated a unit and have the opportunity to stay here — that’s awesome.” Aboriginal foster children are placed in units with foster parents. But if the parents and children don’t prove to be a good match, it’s the parents who have to move on — not the children, as Stewart did when he was a child. “The whole foster system needs an overhaul and this is a good start,” he said. The 24-unit building is set up so a foster child could conceivably remain a resident for many years. Some of the units are socalled transition apartments designated for children once they become adults. Counselling and support for families and children is available at the building, along with training for foster parents and respite workers. An aboriginal art mentorship program, which has welcomed celebrated artist Robert Davidson, is on site. WhileStewart isproudofthenewbuilding, he said the public should not lose sight of the fact that thousands of aboriginal people are on waiting lists for suitable and affordable housing in Vancouver and the Lower Mainland. Lu’ma Native Housing Society, which owns and manages the building, has a waiting list of 4,500 people wanting housing. Other First Nations societies such as Vancouver Native Housing Society also have long waiting lists, Stewart said. The City of Vancouver’s release last month of its March 2013 homeless count also showed aboriginal people comprised 30 per cent of the city’s homeless

photo Dan Toulgoet

Terry Azak of the Nisga’a Nation took part in the totem pole unveiling ceremony for the Aboriginal Children’s Village at Nanaimo and Grandview Highway. population, although Stewart believes the number is higher. He suggested some of those homeless were likely foster children at one point in their lives. “There’s such a high correlation between being a foster child and homelessness and something like this [building] will hopefully get people another option,” he said. But, he acknowledged, getting more housing complexes built in Vancouver is an expensive venture, noting the new building cost $17 million and took seven years of wrangling with all three levels of government to get it built. Lu’ma contributed $10.6 million, with the provincial government kicking in $5.2 million and the federal government adding $710,000. The City of Vancouver provided $240,000 in addition to levy reductions of more than $214,000. Marjorie White, the vice president of Lu’ma Native Housing Society, said the lack of funding committed to more affordable housing makes it difficult to meet the

needs of people without decent homes or living on the street. Lu’ma already has 380 apartments spread over 15 buildings. “We do have a long ways to go,” White said. “As we provide housing for individuals, there’s always new people moving in to the city. It just adds to our waiting list.” The building was named after Dave Pranteau, who was described by White and others as a tireless leader in the aboriginal community who pushed for more housing and improving social and economic conditions for aboriginal people. He died last year. “Dave was well known to many of us here in Vancouver and elsewhere in British Columbia for his leadership, teachings and compassion,” White said. “He has been by our side and we believe he still is in helping our cause to advocate for safe, culturally appropriate and affordable housing for aboriginal peoples.” mhowell@vancourier.com twitter.com/Howellings

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

news DENTURES

Continued from page 1 Elementary students mainly from Mount Pleasant have learned about streams, created related art projects and a community parade. The St. George Rainway project is meant to be a community-building project as much as it is an engineering project. Sakiyama said the Nov. 5 event is being held on a week day at Robson Park from 10:30 to 2 p.m. to make sure it’s a child-inclusive and celebratestheworkstudentshaveachieved. “Maybe when some of these [Mount Pleasant] students are going to say Emily Carr University of Art and Design at the new campus down there, they could be walking around these ideas that they

helped bring to life when they were in fourth and fifth grade asking people in their housing places to sign this petition,” she said. So far, Sakiyama says, concerns have come from residents who face St. George between Sixth and Seventh avenues and are protective of their parking. She notes planning for a potential recreation of a creek needs to be done now before more hard surfaces are laid down in the redevelopment of Destination Auto near Robson Park, the Great Northern Way Campus and nearby residences and potential rapid transit to the UBC. For the more information about the Nov. 5 events or the surveys, see vancouverstorytelling.org.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2013

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news Templeton students win big at festival CHERYL ROSSI Staff writer

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short film made by GrandviewWoodlandstudents surpassed more than a thousand entries from around the world to win Best Original Score at the inaugural All-American High School Film Festival in New York City earlier this month. Templeton secondary student Mackie Bryson-Bucci discovered the competition. “I really wanted to know if the films we’re producing are good enough to be put on a world stage or a North American stage,” the Grade 12 student said. The students not only won best original score for their dystopian film Catharsis, which featured electronic, hiphop-inspired music headed by former Grade 12 student Zak Youssef, but their film Amelia’s Spyglass made it into the top 75 films. A group of five students made both films. Templeton submitted three films and was the only school in the competition from Canada. Students Bryson-Bucci, Nesta Toft in Grade 9 and Levi Marshall in Grade 11 and Templeton’s junior film teacher Vince Chan were the group that travelled furthest to the festival. Tanya Zambrano, a Templeton drama teacher of 17 years,

photo Dan Toulgoet

Templeton students Wolfgang Moser (l), teacher Jim Crescenzo, Jules Le Masson, Nesta Toft (headphones), Mackie Bryson-Bucci(hands) and Julian Gossen. actor Dylan McDermott and actor and director Henry Winkler were among the contest judges. “Sightseeing was cool,” said Bryson-Bucci who visited New York for the first time. “But [the festival] was just awesome.” Longtime Templeton drama and film teacher and artistic director Jim Crescenzo started the school’s film program in 1997. “We found that with the theatre program, we were getting a lot of really extroverted kids that had that desire to be in the light, on the stage,” he said. “We figured if we get a film program we’ll be able to get those writers, the guys who create the music, the ones behind camera that are just as hungry and talented but unless we develop a

program to tap into that, then we’ve got a problem.” Parents helped raise money to buy the equipment students needed to tell their stories. The students meet at lunchtime and after school every week, not including the extra time they put in after school to make their films. “These programs keep our at-risk, marginalized youth engaged,” Crescenzo said. He notes Templeton students have won more than 200 awards in Vancouver, provincial and national film festivals. Money is raised each year to offer students across the Lower Mainland bursaries to attend the Telus Summer Visions digital film program offered by Big Dream Productions at Templeton and The

Cinematheque. Templeton graduate Evan Crowe was one of the youngest students accepted to the Canadian Film Centre in Toronto. He makes films, teaches at Simon Fraser University and as with other successful graduates returns to mentor Templeton students. The program’s partners include Lionsgate pictures and Mammoth Studios. Bryson-Bucci, who directed and co-produced Catharsis and co-directed Amelia’s Spyglass, wants to be a writer and director, something he probably wouldn’t have pursued without Crescenzo’s influence. “One thing he tries to tell us is that whatever our goals are, they’re not too big,” BrysonBucci said. “That if you work hard enough anything’s possible.” The teenager didn’t subscribe to that view four years ago before he started the film program. “I thought it didn’t matter how bad you wanted it, it would just kind of happen or wouldn’t,” Bryson-Bucci said. “Going to Templeton you just kind of realize you make it happen yourself. You open your own doors. You make it happen, it’s not really a decision that someone else makes.” crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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Odd Society distils East Van Vodka CHERYL ROSSI Staff writer

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ifty-year-old Gordon Glanz uprooted his wife and one of his daughters from Vancouver in 2009 to learn the art and science of distillation in Scot-

land. “I’ve always had an interest in making booze,” said Glanz, who formerly worked as a translator and technical writer. “In high school I made wine and then I used my mom’s water distiller to make really awful stuff that I gave to my friends. And then right after high school I went to Germany for a year and I lived with a winemaker and his family. They had a still, so that’s where I had my first longer introduction to distillation.” Glanz, his wife Miriam Karp and Joshua Beach, an Ontarian Glanz met at the Heriot Watt University in Edinburgh, opened a smallbatch craft distillery called Odd Society on Powell Street near the foot of Commercial Drive Thursday in what is shaping up to be brewery and distillery district with Storm, Parallel 49, Coal Harbour and Powell Street breweries. Glanz ventured to Edinburgh with the intention of returning to Vancouver to establish a micro distillery. “There was so much happening in the States and there was nothing happening here,” the distiller and founder of Odd Society said.

Karp, Odd Society’s general manager who previously owned an online accommodation rental business, said they knew liquor laws were loosening up. Earlier this year, the provincial government approved tasting rooms for craft brewers and distillers. Karp noted Odd Society could open in B.C. because the government doesn’t require a minimum level of production. Craft distillers’ output is capped at 50,000 litres per year and they’re required to use agricultural products only from B.C. Odd Society is selling East Van Vodka in private liquor stores and to restaurants. The business will sell Crème de Cassis as soon as its labels arrive. They’ll sell Mongrel moonshine while its whiskey ages three years to be officially called whiskey and they’ll also produce gin. “Bartenders are normally so bored by vodka in cocktails and they find having a vodka with a little bit of character really a refreshing treat,” said Beach, Odd Society’s production manager and distiller. Odd Society can’t be a craft distillery and sell its products to government liquor stores because craft liquor businesses get a big tax break, Glanz said. “The government would add another $15 to $20 tax to the bottle, so we couldn’t sell it for $36, we’d have to sell it for $51.” crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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New Dentures Campbell known as or a Natural Smile? fierce negotiator Continued from page 1 For 40 years Campbell drove a school bus that picked up and delivered Musqueam children to and from school, and it was a group of these students who had asked permission to take part in the service. On the wall outside the auditorium the children had posted a hand-written sign which read, “We love and miss our Old Chief and wish he was here.” Mount Currie Indian band chief Alan Stager played a solo saxophone version of “Amazing Grace.” Turning towards the coffin, Stager addressed Campbell with, “It’s showtime Ernie,” donned a pair of sunglasses and played the popular hymn. Following Stager’s performance, five Point sisters gathered at the front of the hall to sing two songs for “Uncle Ernie,” including “Lord Help Me Jesus (Why me Lord)” and “God on the Mountain.” Campbell was known as a fierce negotiator when it came to seeking rights for the Musqueam and in 2008 negotiated and concluded two significant agreements. The first was the Olympic Legacy Agreement with the federal government that ensured the Musqueam people a share in the economic, social and cultural benefits of hosting the 2010 Winter Games. The second was the landmark

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Reconciliation, Settlement and Benefits Agreement signed with the provincial government. Campbell was fiercely protective of the band’s right to fish. In the summer of 2000, when the Department of Fisheries and Oceans placed a ban on salmon fishing, the leader took to the Fraser River in defiance of the government. As members of the Musqueam lined the river drumming and singing, a DFO officer attempted to pull in Campbell’s net from the boat from which he was fishing. Calmly repeating the words, “It is my ancestral right to fish these waters,” Campbell stood his ground and began a game of tug of war with the officer. The standoff ended only when the DFO member pulled out a large knife and hacked the net into pieces. Campbell served as chief of the Musqueam for a 14 combined years, choosing not to run in 2012. Campbell’s son-inlaw, Chief Wayne Sparrow, replaced him as leader last December. Sparrow told the Courier in an earlier interview that Campbell said at the time, “my fight was done” and he wanted to turn the leadership over to someone else in the band. sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10

RHODES TO RAILWAY

Next Friday the Vancouver Courier continues our series Vancouver Special– January 18th thejourney Vancouver Courier will embark upon anOn ambitious year-long through twenty-seven neighbourhoods that Vancouver Special—an ambitious year-long journey through make up the city of Vancouver. We will report on the character and the changforty-eight neighbourhoods that make up the city of Vancouver. ing face of each neighbourhood, what makes it unique and how it is responding Over twelve months we’ll report on the character and the changing to the challenges of being part of our rapidly changing city. Next Friday we visit face of each, what makes them unique and how they are responding Victoria-Fraserview to advertise in this special section call 604-738-1411.

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PM’s ideology trumps science — again

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he latest beachhead in the battle against Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s War on Drugs was launched this week by the Pivot Legal Society when hundreds gathered at Woodward’s to view a film and review the case for heroin-assisted treatment in Canada. Given the cultural context in which we find ourselves, this treatment regime is counterintuitive. How can administering a drug help anyone reduce or eliminate their dependence on that drug? Besides, heroin has been a demonized drug for the past century even though it is an opioid like morphine that shares no such reputation. But it does work. The film, a Danish documentary called Anyone for Coffee and Heroin, chronicles the lives of those who seek help for their addiction in a facility that dispenses heroin. But unlike similar time-limited clinical trials that have taken place in Vancouver, Montreal and a number of locations in Europe, the Danish facility is a permanent treatment centre and was the first of its kind in the world. Others have since been opened elsewhere in Europe. This Pivot initiative was prompted in reaction to steps taken by the federal Tories, not surprisingly, against the advice of their own public service scientists. Vancouver has had two successful clinical trials regarding heroin treatment: the first between 2005 and 2008 called NAOMI (North American Opiate Medication Initiative) and the second, SALOME (the Study to Assess Long-term Opioid Maintenance Effectiveness) which is testing whether another opioid, hydromorphone (Dilaudid) is as effective as heroin. That test is ongoing. Ironically, rather than conduct their own clinical trials, the Danes simply used the scientific evidence produced by NAOMI and SALOME and opened their permanent treatment center. What the two trials here have in common, aside from verifying that for a small group of addicts heroin is the only substance that works to effectively control their habits so they can stabilize their lives, is the stark fact that once addicts go through the trials they are left to fall off a cliff; they are cut loose to return to the streets where they are likely to spiral back into a life of crime, potential disease and frequently homelessness. To stop this cycle, or at least delay it, the medical personnel involved in these trials applied to Health Canada for permission to treat 21 graduates of their program with heroin for another three months. One month ago, Health Canada said yes. One week later, on Oct. 3, federal Health Minister Rona Ambrose reversed that decision saying that she was closing a “loophole” in the federal legislations and declared: “We know the answer is not to treat heroin addiction with heroin.” How the minister came to “know” this is a puzzle; it clearly isn’t evidence based. It’s simply the latest example of a government driven by ideology and that regularly sweeps facts aside. It’s behaviour by Harper and his crew that has caused them to bring international shame to Canada by muzzling their own scientists on a variety of matters from drug addiction to climate change and serves no other purpose than to cater to their conservative base. This is the same government that pursued its ideological crusade and fought the existence of Insite, Canada’s only publicly accessible supervised injection site which is situated, incidentally, a few blocks from Woodward’s. They took that case all the way to the Supreme Court where they lost, costing taxpayers millions of dollars. Our highest court concluded that the activities of Insite were a matter of medical health and more correctly came under provincial jurisdiction. The results in Denmark are similar to those we saw here since the establishment of Insite. Crime and public disorder have declined significantly. In Denmark among those being treated, crime rates are down by 76 per cent. Prostitution has declined by 75 per cent as addicts no longer need to resort to selling their bodies to acquire drugs. And about 13 per cent of the clients who have been served by the five clinics now operating in that country are clean. Sadly we can expect another expensive legal battle here over the Harper’s ideological fixation. As Pivot lawyer Scott Bernstein told the audience at that Danish film, “We can’t sit by and let these harmful regulations stand.” He’s right. agarr@vancourier.com. twitter.com/allengarr

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

WE WANT YOUR OPINION Hate it or love it? We want to know... really, we do! Reach us by email: letters@vancourier.com

Reedisgonebutauthenticity livesonwithRussellBrand

T

wo celebs from opposite sides of the pond, one gone and one very much alive, captured the world’s attention this past week. The late Lou Reed was a divisive figure. Upon hearing “Walk on the Wild Side,” Reed’s early ’70s anthem to the LGBT crowd, my mother commanded her teenage son to “get that filth off the stereo.” In contrast, my first girlfriend’s mother enjoyed Reed’s toetapping tales of guilt, self-loathing, and substance abuse. In his post-Velvet Underground phase, it sometimes seemed the bard of bleak was halfway making it and halfway faking it. The late, legendary arranger and guitarist Mick Ronson, who worked on Reed’s Transformer sessions, once recalled how the Long Island native couldn’t care less if his guitar was tuned or untuned for recordings. In the ’80s, Reed would shoehorn his octave-free song-speak over guitar arabesques commissioned from a lineup of stellar studio musicians. The results varied greatly from album to album. Few would describe the poker-faced rocker as sunny or subtle. “Give me your hungry, your tired your poor I’ll piss on ‘em/That’s what the Statue of Bigotry says,” he insisted in his 1989 hit “Dirty Boulevard.” Yet there were occasional hints of light and glorious shards of radiance, in tracks such as “Who Am I? (Tripitina’s Song)” from his Poe-inspired 2003 concept album The Raven. With his mini-operettas about the walking wounded — himself included — Reed played to both the mean streets and the box seats, but never with an eye to the music charts. He was a true original. The second figure of note is Russell Brand, who first rose to fame as an Essex-born comedian and TV personality. He got off drugs, went Hollywood in a string of film comedies, and married tween-queen Katy Perry for a stretch. You’d think that would be enough for your average genre-bending talent, but the 38-year-old wit had more up his sleeve. Last April, Brand penned a moving essay on Margaret Thatcher and her heritage for The Guardian. And a few weeks ago, he authored a compelling piece about an impending spiritual and political revolution for The New Statesman. It turns out the long-haired freak can write rings around most Fleet Street flacks. Yet it’s Brand’s one-man occupy movement of cable television that has really captured the public imagination. In a laugh-out-loud MSNBC “interview” from May, he took control away from a clutch of blathering newsunits, who clearly had no idea what to do with the witty, spontaneous human being in their presence. Last week Brand gave a bravura performance, with a more serious inflection, in a confrontation with BBC silverback Jeremy Paxman. The body language was telling, as you can see on YouTube. Paxman starts off with one arm thrown behind his chair, head back, and demands to know why anyone should take the comic’s political scribblings seriously when he has never voted for a politician in his life. Brand, alternately jesting and impassioned, compliments the interviewer on his “gorgeous beard” and goes on to explain that a succession of elected leaders have done absolutely nothing to address a growing global underclass and planetary eco-meltdown. Toward the end of their exchange, Brand is sitting forward in oratorical flight, while Paxman has his legs crossed and hands folded together, his brow furrowed in either consternation or bemused respect. The interview on YouTube is at eight million hits and climbing. Rightly or wrongly, Brand’s shtick has obviously struck a chord with those who feel the system, with its preselected electoral options, no longer represents their interests. Mainstream media outlets appear to have difficulty processing the mercurial comic and commentator. His messy past is an open book, which makes it impossible to smear him once his compassion offensive becomes wearisome or worrisome. As another British visionary once claimed, “the road of excess leads to the palace of wisdom,” and while William Blake’s dictum may not be the best career advice, Brand’s creative range and reach has expanded greatly since he cleaned up his act. He’s Keith Richards with a conscience — and a thesaurus. In a musical world dominated by teeny-tiny, Auto-Tuned talents, Lou Reed stood out as an authentic voice. And among predictable comics, talk show fixtures, and mainstream stenographers, the eloquent, fiercely optimistic Russell Brand is shaping up the same. www.geoffolson.com

GEOFF OLSON

LIGHT NOT THE ANSWER AT EUCLID/ EARLES CORNER

To the editor: Re: “Senior wants safer East Vancouver intersection ,” Oct. 9. I will not support a crossing light at that intersection. (1) You can’t put a light at every corner. (2) It will cost too much. (3) It will take the city too long to put one in. I have a simple solution. It will be a lot cheaper and be done today not tomorrow. In the article it has Miriam Mattila saying cars parked on the right side as she approaches Earls from Euclid. That’s wrong. It is the left side. When I’m driving I avoid that corner because you can’t see the parked vehicles there. So remove the problem. Put in no parking signs on that side for say six or seven car lengths. Done! Euclid and Rupert have more accidents but I have no idea why. Mattila also said a senior was killed eight years ago at that same place. This is wrong, too. The only senior who was killed was 18 years ago — my mother. John Laniec, Vancouver

OLSON IS ONE OF THE BEST

To the editor: Re: “On Your Mind Online, Oct. 11—Geoff Olson’s cartoons. “Cameron” has a right to his opinion, but I disagree with

his view that Geoff Olson is “the laziest cartoonist in the world.” Whatever his medium, Olson’s work displays every bit as much thought and insight as the work of cartoonists using more conventional methods. He is certainly one of the best cartoonists now working in Canada (along with Dan Murphy of the Province). Carl Rosenberg, Vancouver

PROVINCE, OTTAWA RESPONSIBLE FOR MENTALLY ILL To the editor: Re: “Mayor sets up task force on mental health ,” Oct.30. Mayor Gregor Robertson and Vision Vancouver can not seem to grasp that the Ministry of Health and the Attorney General or Solicitor General at the federal and provincial levels are responsible for the mentally ill and their treatment under the laws. It is fine to encourage radical drug policies and rant about the beneficial effects on the street population but at the end of the day these Visionistas will assume credit for anything that turns out for the better and hide from criticism when things go awry. If you want in on the solutions, you must accept blame if the plans are not successful alternatives. In the final analysis, civic politicos are exceeding their delineated jurisdiction and tax-

payers are being asked to pay for these grandstanding activities. Rick Angus, Vancouver

PEDESTRIAN HAS RIGHT OF WAY

To the editor: Re: “Pedestrian urges drivers to slow down,” Letters, Oct. 30. My experiences when crossing at an intersection are similar to Lee Turner’s. Few Vancouver residents (drivers, cyclists and pedestrians) know that pedestrians have the right of way at every intersection — both marked and unmarked. Like Lee Turner, I often get yelled at when I cross at an intersection, by drivers who are ignorant of the law. The VPD has refused to do a public education campaign on this issue. Instead, they mix it in with other messages so that it gets lost. Are we to believe that the VPD would prefer we remain ignorant of the law so that vehicle traffic is not slowed down? And my suggestion to the city that zebra crossings be painted in all four directions at every intersection (which is successful in slowing down traffic in many cities) has been ignored. Instead, the city spends a large amount of money installing more traffic lights, which leads people to believe that they are only allowed to cross at intersections where there are lights. Mary Sherlock, Vancouver

ON YOUR MIND ONLINE COURIER STORY: “More to mental health stats than sound bite,” Oct. 28 Frances Bula @fabulavancouver: Good analysis by @Howellings in @VanCourierNews about the mental-health numbers put out by Vision/VPD COURIER STORY: “Daycare plan should be a priority for Christy Clark,” Oct. 24 Renuka Bhardwaj: My child is a teen now and I still remember being stressed about going back to work after my maternity leave was over. Luckily I was able to find Licensed childcare right on time. I think daycare plan should be priority no matter what. Premier Clark keep using current economy as an excuse but if you want to boost economy you have to support families. $10 a day childcare is well-researched option and it’s good for B.C.’s economy and families. COURIER STORY: “Senior wants safer East Vancouver intersection,” Oct. 16 Residentactivist: There absolutely needs to be a light there. I am 17 years old and used that crosswalk throughout my elementary school years, and it was always the scariest part of walking to school. I now have my license and I refuse to use that intersection because turning there is a recipe for disaster with the parked cars, it is near impossible to be safe. The city needs to understand it is not the little old people complaining, it’s the entire neighbourhood, including the children and adults. COURIER KUDOS AND KVETCHES: “Going out with a bang,” Oct. 29 CanadaGood: Having lived in other parts of Canada and the world, I think that Halloween fireworks is strictly a Vancouver thing. Growing up here, blowing things up was a great childhood rite of passage. (Of course it was dangerous but it taught us not to afraid of the night). I am 90 per cent sure that the reason for this tradition on the BC coast is due to Halloween’s proximity to Guy Fawkes Day on November 5th. It is colonial thing.

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community

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2013

EVENT OR COMMUNITY NEWS WE SHOULD KNOW ABOUT? 604-738-1411 | sthomas@vancourier.com

Getyourgeekonatpopculturefair COMMUNITY CALENDAR with Sandra Thomas

MARPOLE Geeks, Trekkies, hipsters and Star Wars fans rejoice — the Pop Culture Collectibles Fair and Computer Swap takes place Saturday, Nov. 9, at the Scottish Cultural Centre, 8886 Hudson St. from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The event promises a great selection of rare toys, current and vintage comics (early DC and Marvel), Warhammer figures, coins, action figures, crafts, Transformers, all kinds of cards, Hot Wheels, eight-track tapes, diecast models, art, jewelry, Star Wars items, movies, video games, records, CDs, DVDs, and all kinds of collectibles. As well, there will be numerous dealers on hand, selling and swapping electronics, computer items, printers, monitors, cellphones, memory, and more. Entrance is $3 and children 12 and under get in free. Parking is also free. For more information visit fun-promo.com.

KITSILANO Relive Expo 86 with the Oscar-nominated Rainbow War during the Vancouver Heritage Foundations third of its four night film series Architecture & Design: Film Night at the Hollywood. It’s all about Vancouver. On Tuesday, Nov. 12, the foundation will offer three films, from poignant to campy, that tell the tale of mid-century Vancouver, including the campy film Rainbow War shown during Expo 86. The foundation will also take a look at Vancouver’s perceived ability issues in the 1960s with To Build a Better City, a National Film Board production with Canada Mortgage and Housing and the City of Vancouver, which highlights mid-century negativity surrounding Strathcona and the east side of Vancouver that led to the demolition of many blocks of historic homes. The third film follows the

triumphant story of the Asahi Baseball team with Sleeping Tigers: The Story of the Asahi Baseball Team. The pride of the Japanese community, the Asahi played out of Oppenheimer Park right up until the internment of Japanese Canadians during the Second World War. Entry is by donation and the films start at 7:30 p.m. at the Hollywood, 3123 West Broadway. Check out vancouverheritagefoundation.org for more information.

COMMERCIAL DRIVE While you’re still trying to figure out what to do with that old Halloween pumpkin, others have already turned their attention to Christmas. The Commercial Drive Business Society’s Christmas on the Drive festival takes place in Grandview Park Nov. 30 from 1 to 5 p.m. with Santa (BYO camera), horse and carriage rides, ice sculptures, a photo booth, and performances by Vancouver Opera. There will also be lots of kids activities, goodie bags for the first 200 attendees and the lighting of a huge Christmas tree in the park at sunset. All activities are by donation with proceeds going to the Kettle Friendship Society.

YALETOWN What’s better than Yaletown on a Friday night before a Canucks game? It’s Yaletown complete with horse and carriage rides, face painting, crafts, balloon twisting, ice sculptures and a visit from Santa. The Yaletown Business Improvement Association is hosting the second annual CandyTown event, described as downtown Vancouver’s only free outdoor Christmas festival, Nov. 23 from noon to 9 p.m. Festival-goers will also enjoy roaming musicians and street characters, buskers, music tents, food vendors and the All I Want For Christmas Gift Market. As well, Christmas trees will be for sale from the Yaletown Rotary lot.

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Collectible comics, old and new, will be available for sale at the pop culture fair at the Scottish Cultural Centre in Marpole. Scan the page with Layar to see video content. Argentina, with a stop this weekend in Vancouver. Dirk Spits’ goal is to raise money for charities in Argentina, while making the process as transparent as possible. To that end, Spits and crew will videotape all the good they do once they arrive in Ushuaia. To help raise awareness and funds for the 99% Ride, Spits is inviting Vancouveri-

tes to meet with the crew and show them the city by bicycle this weekend. The ride begins at Tandem Cafe, 3195 Heather St., and finishes at Musette Cafe, 1262 Burrard St. For more information and times visit 99%RIDE on Facebook. sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10

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community briefs BALLET B.C. JOINS MAYOR IN CHINA Ballet B.C. executive director Branislav Henselmann will join Mayor Gregor Robertson and the Vancouver Economic Commission during the Vancouver-China Business Mission 2013, from Nov. 4 to 12. The delegation will visit Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Hong Kong with the goal of attracting investment to Vancouver, promoting cultural ties and building long-term strategic partnerships with one of Canada’s most important trading partners. “As the largest dance company in B.C., and the only professional performing arts organization in this delegation, we are honoured to be invited to join Mayor Robertson and the VEC,”

said Henselmann in a prepared statement. “We look forward to launching the cultural component of this mission with the National Ballet of China’s gala performance in Beijing. Meeting with key stakeholders of major performing arts organizations and festivals in China and Hong Kong during this mission will enable us to enhance our existing relationships and build new cultural and artistic partnerships in this very important market, ultimately building bridges between our countries.” Earlier this year, Ballet B.C. presented the National Ballet of China in its first-ever performances in Canada with its production of Swan Lake. This was a historic milestone in cultural exchange between the two countries and organizations.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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Saturday, October 26th to Tuesday, December 31st

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Come to an open house to review the overall Master Plan and planned improvements to the parks in 2014 and share your thoughts. Thursday, November 7, 5 - 8 pm Hillcrest Centre, 4575 Clancy Loranger Way, Games Room (upstairs) Open house materials and comment forms will be available online after November 7 at vancouver.ca. FOR MORE INFORMATION: 604-257-8402 or steve.wong@vancouver.ca

Marpole Community Plan A community plan provides direction on land use, housing, transportation, parks and public spaces, community amenities, heritage and more. For the past 18 months, we’ve been busy working with residents, businesses and other stakeholders on a new community plan for Marpole. In June 2013, we received your feedback on a draft Marpole Community Plan. Since then, we’ve made some changes and want to continue to work with you on creating a new plan for your community. To learn more about the draft Marpole Community Plan, join us at any of the following events: COFFEE TALKS Drop in for a one-on-one discussion with the planners: Wednesday, November 13, 4 -7 pm Marpole-Oakridge Community Centre Friday, November 15, 10 am -1 pm Marpole-Oakridge Community Centre Wednesday, November 20, 4 -7 pm Marpole-Oakridge Community Centre Friday, November 22, 10 am -1 pm St. Augustine’s Church Tuesday, November 26, 10 am -1 pm St. Augustine’s Church Wednesday, November 27, 4 -7 pm Marpole-Oakridge Community Centre Tuesday, December 3, 4 -7 pm St. Augustine’s Church Wednesday, December 4, 10 am - 1 pm St. Augustine’s Church Marpole-Oakridge Community Centre is located at 990 West 59th Avenue. St. Augustine’s Church is located at 8680 Hudson Street.

COMMUNITY DIALOGUE SESSIONS Come to a presentation by staff and dialogue session: Saturday, November 30, 1 -3:30 pm or Saturday, December 7, 1 -3:30 pm Register online at: vancouver.ca/marpoleplan KITCHEN TABLE TALKS Staff are also available to meet with small groups of residents, businesses or organizations (e.g. 10 -15 people) in your community.

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If you’d like to arrange an informal small group session with the planners, please email us at marpoleplan@vancouver.ca. FOR MORE INFORMATION: vancouver.ca/marpoleplan marpoleplan@vancouver.ca Phone 3-1-1 or @marpoleplan

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EQUALITY

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2013

Vancouver Rape Relief & Women’s Shelter needs volunteers like you!

Call us now 604.872.8212 to interview. www.rapereliefshelter.bc.ca

Bitcoin putsVancouver in virtual money RETAILERS LIKE NO-FEE TRANSACTIONS JARED GNAM Contributing writer

T

he world’s first bitcoin ATM is helping Vancouver make financial history. The machine, which went into operation Tuesday inside Waves Coffee House at Howe and Smithe streets, converts

bitcoins into dollars and dollars into bitcoins, an anonymous digital currency that is distributedonline,peer-to-peer without any central authority and can be used at a growing number of Vancouver retailers and online merchants around the globe. “This is the first bitcoin ATM in the world and it’s just an-

other step forward to making bitcoins accessible to as many people as possible,” said Mitchell Demeter, co-founder of Bitcoiniacs, a Vancouver-based bitcoin exchange store responsible for bringing the machine to the city. The kiosk asks users to have their palms scanned to exchange their dollars into the

FROM VAGABOND TO POWER SMART NEW HOME OWNER. ROB MICKELBERRY’S JOURNEY TO THE HIGHEST LEVELS OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY After nearly a year travelling on a “rock star” bus from one end of North America to another, Rob Mickelberry, his wife and three children were ready to re-establish permanent roots back home in Victoria.

sign up and where they can get their hands on the technology on a retail level.” Vancouverites can make bitcoin purchases at the Waves coffee shop among other cafes and restaurants, as well as No Limit Landscaping, the Pacific Bliss Massage spa and Krystal Fit Studio. For Gurmeet Gupta, owner of India Gate restaurant, the opportunities with using the virtual currency were to good too pass up. “We’ve seen some big growth in our clientele base just because we accept bitcoins, which has been really good for business,” said Gupta who started accepting bitcoins in May and added clients come from all over B.C. just because they heard they can use their digital currency as cash. Gupta said some other advantages include the next-tozero transaction fees that run anywhere from two to eight per cent with credit card and debit card purchases. The success of offering customers bitcoins as another way to pay even rubbed off onto fellow restaurateur Doug Taylor, owner of West End’s Central Bistro. He just started taking the virtual currency. “For us it’s fairly easy,” Taylor said. “We have a young staff that are very tech-savvy and we have a tablet set up with the ability to make the transactions — it’s just like a credit card with an extra step.” jared_jg@hotmail.com

ARTHRITIS

“We bought a property while we were on the road,” says Rob, “then lived in the old house while we sub-divided the lot and built a new home that would be ours.” Because Rob wanted the home – completed in May 2013 – “for the long haul,”

virtual currency with a limit of up to $3,000 per day in accordance with Canadian federal anti-laundering laws. The bitcoins can either be transferred toa“bitcoinwallet”application used on smartphones or other online devices, or the user can opt for a paper receipt that represents the transaction. Demeter, 27, runs Bitcoiniacs along with two high school friends Jackson Warren and Cheyne Mackie from the Sunshine Coast. The store operates as a bitcoin exchange by charging customers three per cent for each transaction. He said the trio has four more ATM machines coming in December, which they plan on spreading across to major Canadian cities. “We’re thinking Toronto, Montreal, Calgary and Ottawa, but nothing’s set in stone just yet,” he said. But for Demeter it was a nobrainer to launch the first ATM here in Vancouver. “The bitcoin community has grown here in Vancouver exponentially,” he said. “Back in January there were only a few people talking about it and now there’s regular meet ups with 50 to 70 people attending each one.” Demetersaidhisemailinbox hasbeenfloodedinthelastfew months as interest among Vancouver retailers is rising. “There are more and more merchants contacting us every day asking us how they can

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Rob Mickelberry

he was determined it would not cost a fortune to run. By calling in certified energy advisors City Green Solutions early in the design process, Rob was able to build-in

Featuring Arlaina Waisman, Registered Dietitian, join us and learn more about the various types of arthritis, the relationship of diet and weight management to arthritis, and healthy eating strategies.

a number of refinements – including an air source heat pump, triple glazing, a heat recovery ventilation system and extra insulation – that resulted in the home achieving a remarkable EnerGuide 88 rating from Natural Resources Canada. That makes it, says Mike Young of City Green, “approximately 59 per cent more energy efficient than if this home

DATE: Thursday, November 14, 2013 TIME: 7:00 pm – 9:00pm LOCATION: Trout Lake Community Centre

had been built to BC Building Code standards.” It will also save Rob an estimated $1,500 to $1,800 a year on his energy bills. Icing on the cake: the high EnerGuide rating also qualified Rob for $2,000 in incentives from the BC Hydro Power Smart New Home Program, and he’s eligible for the ENERGY STAR® Package incentive of $150 per home

Grandview Room, Main Floor 3360 Victoria Drive, Vancouver

for installing qualified energy-efficient lighting and appliances. To find out more about buying or building a Power Smart new home, please visit bchydro.com/pshome.

COST:

FREE

To register please call 604.714.5550 We’re working with FortisBC to help you save energy. A13-413

www.arthritis.ca


city frame

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Public Open House - Nov 14

UBC’s Transportation Plan

Add your voice to the development of UBC’s Transportation Plan! In April 2013, we reached out to and heard from the university community on issues related to on-campus transportation. Your feedback has helped us identify opportunities to better address how we get around on campus, whether by foot, on wheels or by public transit. Join us at one of our public open houses to learn more about the planning process to date. Give us your thoughts and ideas on the proposed transportation policies and how to make on-campus transportation even better!

Join us at either of our two identical public open houses taking place on November 14, and share your thoughts and ideas on how to improve on-campus transportation: Date: Thursday, November 14, 2013 Time: 10:30am – 1:30pm Place: SUB Foyer, 6138 Student Union Boulevard Date: Thursday, November 14, 2013 Time: 4:00pm – 7:00pm Place: MBA House, 3385 Wesbrook Mall

Can’t attend in person? No problem. A quick and convenient online questionnaire will be available from November 13 to 27. For more information on UBC’s Transportation Plan or to participate online, please visit: planning.ubc.ca For more information on the consultation process, contact: melissa.pulido-gagnon@ubc.ca This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.

photo Dan Toulgoet

HELLO DOLLY: Robert Bangay gets exercise while bottle collecting along Terminal

Avenue recently. On his cart is the Little Joey Stivic doll from the ’70s sit com All in the Family, says Bangay, who dresses it up with a wig and calls it “Dolly.”

Make Your Home Safe for Independent Living Are you a low-income senior or a person with a disability who wants to live safely and independently in the comfort of your home? Do you have difficulty performing day-to-day activities? Does your home need to be adapted to meet your changing needs? If so, you may be eligible for financial assistance under the Home Adaptations for Independence (HAFI) program. Find out today if you are eligible and if you meet all of the requirements as a low-income homeowner or as a landlord applying on behalf of an eligible tenant.

To apply or learn more, visit www.bchousing.org/HAFI You can also contact BC Housing: Phone: 604-646-7055 Toll-free: 1-800-407-7757 (ext. 7055)

HAFI adapts homes for B.C. seniors and people with disabilities Brenda has always been an active woman. However, recent health issues including osteoarthritis in her left knee and losing kidney function have slowed her down. Her mobility is limited and she is now on dialysis three days a week. To adjust to her changed circumstances, Brenda sought help with her daily living activities. Part of that help came from the Home Adaptations for Independence (HAFI) program offered through BC Housing. Launched in January 2012, the HAFI program provides financial assistance to help eligible low-income seniors and people with disabilities adapt their homes so they can continue to live independently. Brenda applied for a new walk-in bathtub because she couldn’t safely get out of the tub on her own. Walk-in tubs include additional safety measures such as anti-slip floors, grab bars, and a very low step in. Home adaptations may also include handrails in halls or stairs, ramps for

H O U S I N G M AT T E R S

easier access, easy-to-reach work and storage areas in the kitchen, lever handles on doors or faucets, walk-in showers, and bathtub grab bars and seats. Brenda is a strong advocate for the program and has even shared HAFI brochures with nurses in the renal unit where she undergoes dialysis. If you or someone you know is having difficulty performing day-to-day activities safely and independently – the HAFI program may be able to help. For more information about the eligibility requirements or to obtain an application guide and form, visit www.bchousing.org/HAFI.

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A17

Vancouver

BUNKBEDS Specialists

Just between friends

CHILDRENS’ AND MATERNITY CONSIGNMENT

$199, Good for Kids or Adults

COMPILED BY HELEN PETERSON

I

f you care about moms and babies (and who doesn’t?) or are an expectant mom yourself, then bookmark this important event taking place Nov. 14 to 17. The first ever Canadian version of Just Between Friends (JBF) children and maternity consignment event is a four-day extravaganza run by volunteers. Shoppers will enjoy a 50 to 90 per cent discount off original retail prices on a huge selection of new or gently used items.

Items include clothes, books, toys, strollers, furniture and more. This family event will also feature local businesses, and exclusive pre-sales for volunteers, firsttime parents, grandparents and teachers.

604.677.2337 4502 Main St. (at 29th Ave.)

• Since 2003•

Consignors who want to take the opportunity to sell all their baby, children’s and maternity items can earn up to 70 per cent back. JBF is accepting consignors for items from newborn to ages 15. All sold items are paid two weeks after the sale. LOCATION: Hellenic Community Centre; Address: 4500 Arbutus St.;

For youth living on the streets, there is no home for the

Phone: 604-628-2017. If you are interested in becoming a consignor, vendor, or volunteer visit http:// vancouverbc.jbfsale.com/. MORE GENEROSITY: Unsold items benefit local charity BabyGoRound (as profiled by Cheryl Rossi in the Oct. 18 edition of the Courier.) Visit babygoround. ca for info. on its Nov. 16 and 23 Donation Drives at Kitsilano Community Centre.

Volunteering opportunity: FSGV WORKSITE: 3995 Fraser Street, Vancouver TIME-FRAME: 3.5 hours per week (September - July) HOURS PREFERRED: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday from 9am – 12:30pm and 12:30pm - 3:15 pm. LENGTH OF COMMITMENT: Volunteers should intend to commit to a minimum three-month time period for consistency with client families.

holidays...

Vancouver’s problem with homelessness is at an all time high, with many of those with no home of their own being under the age of 24. At the Courier, we decided to provide an opportunity to our readers to give a little cheer and kindness to the youth on our streets this holiday season.

Please note that we ask that all items be NEW! (please, no used goods at this time)

Here’s how you can help:

When out shopping for those stocking stuffers this holiday season, see what’s on special and grab an extra something on top of your usual purchase.

SUGGESTED GIFTS INCLUDE: Socks, underwear, mittens, gloves, scarfs, toques, boots, jackets, blankets or sleeping bags, toothpaste, toothbrushes, dental floss, deodorant, soap etc... Transit tickets, grocery vouchers or restaurant/fast-food/coffee shop gift certificates. Directions to Youth Services centre, operated by Family Services of Greater Vancouver is our partner in this endeavour, and will distribute the goods to youth who are homeless or living in at risk situations. Anything you can give will help make the holidays a little easier for the youth on our streets.

Thank you for your support!

Happy Holidays!

Simply drop your items off in the big box situated in the Courier lobby at 1574 West 6th Ave., near Fir St. between November 13th and December 18th. Hours are Mon-Fri, 8:30 am to 4:30pm.

JOB START DATE: Ongoing CONTACT: Jeanne at 604-324-9951. WEBSITE: Fsgv.ca for faxable forms and more information.

V

ancouver Family Preservation Services, an initiative of Family Services of Greater Vancouver (FSGV), is in need of volunteer child minders to look after children ages 0 – 5 while parents are attending parent education groups. The organization will provide a $5 honorarium to help with transportation costs. Details:

QUALIFICATIONS SOUGHT: Experience working with children, plus a calm and friendly demeanour, ability to engage children, good problem solving skills, reliable. (Criminal Record Check required at no cost to volunteer.)

We make a living by what we get; we make a life by what we give.

Birthday Club WINNER

– Sir Winston Churchill

turns 8 on November 21

FSGV is also in need of several volunteers to prepare lunches for parents and children who are attending the Family Day program and parenting education groups. The organization will provide a $5.00 honorarium to help with transportation costs. Qualifications sought are Interest in cooking and nutrition and enjoying meeting new people. The Criminal Record Check and Food Safe Certificate will be at no cost to volunteer.

JENNA PASILIAO NOVEMBER 1

NOVEMBER 12

NOVEMBER 4

NOVEMBER 21

ELENA ANN BONNYAI 1 ARJAN BUNWAIT 9

NADIA SAFARI 7

JENNA PASILIAO 8

We’ll publish your birthday for FREE plus you’re entered into the monthly prize draw sponsored by H.R. MACMILLAN SPACE CENTRE Email us your name, phone number, and the name & birth date of the child celebrating the birthday. If you choose to add a photo, email that too! (you will be charged $9.95 + tax for photo publication.) Email: jstafford@vancourier.com (deadline is Wednesday, Nov. 27th). Next Birthday Club publishes on Friday, Dec. 6th.


A18

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2013

exotic courier

CHOREOGRAPHY

JEAN GRAND-MAÎTRE MUSIC

SARAH MCLACHLAN

SETS SCOTT

REID

COSTUMES PAUL

HARDY

PROJECTIONS ADAM

LARSEN

LIGHTING PIERRE

LAVOIE

SOUND CLAUDE

LEMELIN

Courier readers: Russell Wolansky and Wendy Krasovec Destination: Amalfi Coast, Italy Favourite memories: While on the Amalfi Coast, Russell and Wendy visited the ruins of Pompeii, where, in 79 AD, Mount Vesuvius (in the background) buried the town in ash and soot. Pompeii is an excavation site, where many details of the town have been preserved in detail — everything from jars and tables to paintings and people. But their favourite memory was the bus ride from Sorrento to Amalfi. (Send your Exotic Courier submission to fhughes@vancourier.com)

Olympic Legacy Cabins Mid-Week Special Only $99/night +tax

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ARTISTS OF ALBERTA BALLET WITH SARAH MCLACHLAN. PHOTO BY PHIL CROZIER.

Featuring the Music of Canadian Icon Sarah McLachlan

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Minimum 2 Night Stay Monday - Thursday November 1st - 30th

Call or Email to Reserve info@seatoskyparks.com 604.986.9371 www.seatoskyparks.com SEA TO SKY PARKS


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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GOT ARTS? 604-738-1411 | events@vancourier.com

1

3

2

4

OUR

PICKS NOV. 1-5

For video and web content, scan page using the Layar app.

1 2 3 4

Turns out three African-American teenagers invented punk rock several years before anyone had heard of the Sex Pistols or the Stooges. Who knew? Newly unearthed recordings have made overnight sensations of the now middle-aged DEATH, who hit the Rickshaw Theatre Nov. 1. Tickets are $22, available from Red Cat, Zulu, Neptoon, Highlife Records, and liveatrickshaw.com.

A card-carrying member of Canadian folk music royalty, MARTHA WAINWRIGHT (daughter of Loudon Wainwright III and Kate McGarrigle, sister of Rufus) carries on the family business with a special evening covering songs by Edith Piaf. 8 p.m. Nov. 2 at the Fel Milton Wong Experimental Theatre. Tickets are $20-25, available at lecentreculturel.com. The lion, the witch, the scarecrow and the rest of the gang from classic 1939 musical THE WIZARD OF OZ ease on down the road to the Queen Elizabeth Theatre starting Nov. 5. The curtain rises at 8 p.m. and the show runs until Sunday. Ticket prices start from $50. More info at vancouver.broadway.com

Make a resolution to check out the fine elocution of BABA BRINKMAN and his hip-hop contribution to grasping Darwin’s biological solution in his show THE RAP GUIDE TO EVOLUTION, running at the Cultch until Nov. 10. Tickets start from $18. More info at thecultch.com.


A20

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2013

“Irresistible! A fresh fountain of youth that will make many a grown-up feel like a kid again” —USA Today

STARTS NOVEMBER 7

MOVIE MOVIE LISTINGS

PLAYING AT

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arts&entertainment KUDOS& KVETCHES FALLBACK POSITION While it’s always nice to have a readymade excuse for being late for work on a Monday morning due to once again “accidentally” confusing the expression fall back/spring forward with fall forward/ spring back, the clock watchers of K&K have never had much time for the idea of Daylight Saving Time. And it’s not just because everybody knows that only Superman has the power to turn back time by flying really fast around the planet a few times. It’s more to do with the fact Daylight Saving Time (and no, technically there isn’t an S at the end of the word “saving”) makes absolutely no sense. Ben Franklin — he of “early to bed and early to rise” fame — was the first to fly the idea while serving as the U.S. ambassador to France and noticed the sun rises over there a bit earlier than he liked. Presumably he would’ve preferred to spend a bit more time in bed with the Parisian prostitutes he was so fond of. The Americans first made it law in spring of 1918 during the First World War as a means to save energy — the rationale being pushing daylight back later in the day would translate to fewer lights turned on at night — and the Canadian government, in typical fashion, politely agreed

to go along with it. It could also have something to do with the fact that Type-A lawmakers tend to be morning people. Recent penetrating studies into the obvious have shown, however, that changing the clocks back doesn’t actually save energy at all because people simply use more power in the now-dark evenings. And messing with people’s circadian rhythms, even by just a mere hour, comes with surprisingly disastrous results, mainly because stressed out North Americans are already typically operating on an hour-anda-half less sleep than we were a century ago. The number of heart attacks goes up by nearly 10 per cent on the first three days after the time change, way more people crash their cars or injure themselves on the job, and economists estimate that screwups by sleep-deprived traders on Wall Street cost billions of dollars each year. There’s more. The date to switch back the clocks used to be in mid-October but this changed to early November in 2007 when the U.S. Congress passed the Energy Policy Act after heavy lobbying by, among others, the candy industry. Turns out Big Candy earns a sweet $2 billion or so annually on Halloween and they wisely figured out that adding an extra hour of light would be good way to boost profits even more. It’s up to you to decide if dragging yourself home from work in the dark instead dragging yourself out of bed in the dark is a trick or a treat. twitter.com/kudoskvetches

Book Your Company Christmas Party at

Brock House Restaurant

A Quiet Place

Healing Series CD Release Concert 8pm Friday, November 15, 2013 Ryerson United Church (Kerrisdale)

Vancouver Chamber Choir | Cris Inguanti, clarinet Linda Lee Thomas, piano | Jon Washburn, conductor Mark the release of A Quiet Place, the third CD in the Vancouver Chamber Choir’s outstanding Music for Healing series, with this wonderful music of reflection and introspection - the entire repertoire from the new recording.

www.vancouverchamberchoir.com 1-855-985-ARTS (2787)

November Entrée Special: Tenderloin ‘Oscar Style’ $25

6oz beef tenderloin topped with crab meat, shrimp, asparagus, Béarnaise sauce served with a baked potato & vegetables

December Specials Holiday Brunch Buffet ADULTS $39.95 / KIDS 6-12yrs $18.95 (available Sunday, December 1st, 8th, 15th & 22nd)

Christmas Eve Dinner Buffet Adults $54.95 / Kids 6-12 yrs $24.95

Please visit our website to view all our menus www.brockhouserestaurant.com Reservations: 604-224-3317 or catering@brockhouserestaurant.com. Please inquire about our New Year’s Eve Murder Mystery Dinner 3875 Point Grey Rd, Vancouver (3 blocks west of Alma at Jericho Beach)

RESERVE YOUR TABLE NOW!


arts&entertainment

galafabrics.com BE INSPIRED.

Big ideas shared in Communion At Pacific Theatre until Nov. 9 Tickets: pacifictheatre.org

C

anadian playwright Daniel MacIvor gets under the skin of his characters Leda, Annie and Carolyn with such intensity that Communion brought me close to tears. Some of us have been both a daughter and a mother so the estranged relationship between the mother, Leda (Diane Brown, co-founder and artistic director of Ruby Slippers Theatre), and the daughter, Annie (Marcie Nestman), can be overwhelmingly painful — at times excruciating — if you’ve been on either side of that mother/daughter equation even briefly. But there’s a lot to laugh at, too. Leda, a recovering alcoholic and cancer patient, has a corrosive sense of humour and a caustic wit that cuts through sorrow like a knife. That counterpoint ups the emotional ante considerably. And despite the fact that we may not be a rehabilitated drunk or swept up in a cult-like religious organization (like Annie) or feeling useless in our work (like Leda’s therapist Carolyn), we know, at times, the sense of being lost, of waiting for life to happen, of feeling like a failure. When Leda, sobbing, on her knees and at the end of her rope cries out to Carolyn, “How can you stand me?” there was probably not a soul in the audience who didn’t know that feeling. When audiences and actors come together, that’s communion. Under Roy Surette’s intelligent and sensitive direction, these are three superb performances. Longer and lankier than ever, Brown is so raw and emotionally naked you’ll swear you can see her heart beat. Her intelligence and feistiness are also at play and that makes Leda multi-dimensional, brave and human. Fairly early in the play, Brown has a mile-a-minute monologue, a spewing of pain, anger and frustration that leaves us breathless. Those who were fortunate enough to see Brown in A Beautiful View will know that Brown

photo Tim Matheson

Marcie Nestman (left) and Diane Brown star in Ruby Slippers’ production of Daniel McIvor’s Communion. Scan page with Layar to see more photos. is made for MacIvor. Or vice versa. No one does serene, elegant and caring like Kerry Sandomirsky. Her beautifully modulated voice, her smile, her very presence speaks of consideration and kindness. As the therapist Carolyn in this play, the softness is there but it’s hidden behind the character’s professionalism. Or, as Leda insightfully says, “It’s evasive dressed up as serene.” There was probably no one on opening night who wasn’t fervently willing Carolyn to get up and take Leda in her arms. Instead, she coolly offers a box of Kleenex. Young Marcie Nestman returns to the stage, after a brief hiatus, in the role of Leda’s troubled daughter Annie (who calls herself Ann now she’s hooked up with the Fellowship and

boyfriend Bud). All three of these women are grappling with life’s complexities but no one as furiously as Annie, who harbours deep resentment against Leda who was drunk and absent throughout Annie’s childhood. In the second of the three scenes, Nestman appears in a cotton dress over trou-

sers, woolly sox, braids and boots; she is a hurt little girl turning to Bud and prayer for solace. In the third scene, the little dress is gone, the hair is down and scared little Annie has become angry, defiant Annie. Nestman will break your heart but by the end of the play a small gesture opens the door just a crack to let a little light shine through. Light is always an important element in a MacIvor play. John Webber designed the lights for MacIvor’s Beautiful View (with the dynamite duo of Brown and Colleen Wheeler) and he designed the lights for Communion, too. Doorways and the framework of the room are illuminated with glowing tubes of light — like the skeleton of a space. It’s clean and effective and deceptively simple. Presented by Pacific Theatre, this Ruby Slippers Theatre production is courageous in its exploration of what it means to live — and die — consciously. —reviewed by Jo Ledingham More theatre reviews can be found at joledingham.ca.

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VANCOUVER 3135 Granville / 604.731.7815 VICTORIA 1483 Douglas / 250.389.1312 Open 7 days a week

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A21

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Sandi Johnson

Love, War & Searching for Peace 280 E CORDOVA

Nov 2 to 16

Half Price Previews! Nov 2, 3 & 5 firehallartscentre.ca or call 604.689.0926

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Thursday to Saturday at 8:00pm Sunday Matinees on Nov. 17 & 24 at 2:30pm Tickets: Adults $25 or Student/Seniors $22 1370 SW Marine Drive, Vancouver www.metrotheatre.com

Reservations • Box Office: 604-266-7191 SPECIAL OFFERS

ANY THURSDAY performance: Present this ad and receive 2 regular admissions for $32

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A22

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2013

FRED

EMAIL: yvrflee@hotmail.com TWITTER: @FredAboutTown

UNLEESHED

GLITZ & GLAMOUR: Richmond was party central for two of its venerable fundraisers. A capacity crowd gathered at the Radisson Airport Hotel for The Heart of Richmond AIDS Society’s 11th Heart & Soul soiree, sponsored by the Vancouver Courier. Vancouver’s top drag divas kicked up their stiletto heels at the cabaret style dinner yours truly emceed. Proceeds support the society’s multitude of services, including its grocery and HIV 101 student education programs. At River Rock Show Theatre, singer Chantal Kreviazuk headlined Richmond Hospital’s 15th Starlight Gala. The posh party raised a record-breaking $460,000.

SUITE RESULT: A TELUS suite for the upcoming Beyonce concert fetched a jaw-dropping $190,000 at the Gift of Time Gala. The live auction result catapulted party chairs Zahra Mamdani and Cathy Trimble’s Canucks Place Children Hospice fundraiser over the $1 million mark. Other highlights included a show-stopping performance by eight-year-old Elias Tyson Venegas and heartfelt words from 18-year-old Sadie Lourenco, who spoke of her twin sister who passed away from cancer. GEARING UP: More than 400 luxury car enthusiasts converged at the Porsche Centre Vancouver for the grand opening of The Dilawri Automotive Group’s new state-ofthe-art facility on Terminal Avenue. Yours truly hosted the impressive show and shine featuring Vancouver’s top chefs, Bella Electric and the dealership’s hot wheels.

Singer Chantal Kreviazuk, right, headlined the Starlight Gala at River Rock Show Theatre. Guests helped raise $460,000 for priority equipment at Richmond Hospital.

Alan Sack’s skills and spills competition attracted helped generate more than $20,000 for the B.C. Hospitality Foundation.

Artistic associate Clea Young (l) and executive director Camilla Tibbs (r) welcomed author Amber Dawn to the Writers Festival’s Literati Gala.

B.C. Lion’s Keron Williams huddled with Keira and Mahta Williams at the Kids Up Front fete. Proceeds provide access to sports and arts and culture activities for kids.

The Growing Chefs Farm to Forks Gala raised $18,000 for Maenam chef Sean McQuire and others to go to schools and teach young chefs like Ella Kaweski and Jenson Alex.

Amanda Macpherson, centre, welcomed drag queens Symone, Vivian Von Brokenhymen and Connie Smudge to the Heart & Soul cabaret dinner and auction.

The Dilawri Group’s Ajay Dilawri, left, and Porsche Canada CEO Alexander Pollich opened the new Porsche Centre Vancouver facility.

Cathy Trimble, Marg McNeil and Zahra Mamdani (l-r) fronted the Gift of Time Gala. The black-tie affair raised over $1 million for Canuck Place Children’s Hospice.


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A23

CANADA’S PREMIERE ONLINE GUIDE TO THE GOOD LIFE

A Well Oiled Machine

May Globus

It was a life-altering trip to Morocco and an ensuing romance (with both hammam spas and a fellow) that gave rise to Vancouver-based skincare line Saadia Organics.

Mike Duffy is currently in a fight to the death with Prime Minister Steven Harper. Harper’s a Taurus with an Aquarian Moon ‚ as my friend Diana says, a “real control freak.” Duffy was a journalist and is Gemini, with an Aries Moon. Usually, Taurus defeats Gemini. Round one to Harper. But Duffy’s Aries Moon defeats Taurus. Round two to Duffy. Duffy’s sun is in 5 degrees Gemini — so he loves money (which is why he’s in trouble) and he burns his bridges without hesitation. Well, he’ll never be invited to Thanksgiving dinner at Harper’s place. Duffy also has Pluto and Mars (the two “killer planets”) opposite Harper’s moon — Round three to Duffy. At present, the lunar south node of difficult karma is travelling through Harper’s Taurus Sun sign — Round four to Duffy. I think Duffy will win this fight. Harper, who has squelched dissent with an iron fist, who sports a baby-face in public but is a fierce fighter in private, has, it seems, finally met his match. His only hope for survival (or for reputation) is to shut Duffy up, take away his public stage – which is why Harper is trying to remove Duffy from the Senate.

The secret weapon — and our new one — is their vegan Argan oil (from $12 for 10ml). While most versions available on the market are machine-pressed at high temperatures that often boil away nutrients, this one is cold-pressed by hand in Essaouira, Morocco, retaining all the good ingredients. There is an element of social good in its production, too, with the company employing and empowering local women through ethical co-op programs. While it’s only natural to think oil worsens skin issues, Argan oil actually cleanses and detoxifies, meaning pesky pimples and dry dermis can be fixed with just a few drops. Did we mention it also takes care of stuck zippers? Put some on a cotton swab, dab away and voila.

An aura of mystery flows around this week. Sunday accents those hidden matters, as well as lifestyle changes, health, research, large finances and sexual desires. Any or all of these face good luck, especially if you’re knocking on a door you’ve entered before. You should not start anything new, but life might — if so, it will be a slog, a slow-grower, that eventually reaches a splendid, bountiful result

Chase money this week but without starting a new project. Respond quickly to bosses, clients, bills, etc., but if they bring you a new proposal or project, diplomatically delay implementing any part of it until next week. A former sensual partner might re-connect – if Sunday, good. If any other day, the relationship won’t have a big future. Don’t chase a new romance (or any partnership, even in business) before Dec. 7.

Oil, oil, take away our troubles.

Relationships fill the weeks ahead, especially this Sunday, which might start slow, but builds to a lucky evening. Speak of love, or embrace a business partner’s (or spouse’s) desires/ideas. If you’re single, and an old flame or ex appears, don’t hesitate – say yes, seize, embrace the opportunity. Ditto re a returning opportunity in business, relocation, negotiation, litigation, or public interfacing.

Your charisma, energy and clout remain at a yearly high, Scorpio. The “max” occurs this Sunday, when everything goes your way – and a lucky late-day stroke could drop a money plum in your lap! Still, don’t start brand new projects nor relationships before November 10. You remain popular with co-workers and your job is “uplifting” to Dec. 7.

No, Johnny Depp doesn’t come with it but Xoxolat (pronounced sho-sho-la) provides plenty to be thankful for.

The emphasis lies on work and health this week and the next two, Gemini. Sunday might even start a new health trend (for the better, due to another person’s guidance or influence) or a new job – but let life start these. You should not start anything, especially in these zones, before Nov. 10. A former job role – or simply a pile of overdue tasks – could confront you. Be diplomatic on the home front, until early December.

Continue to conserve energy and emotional reserves, Sage. Protect your health and reputation. Rest often, dress and eat sensibly. Enjoy sweet solitude, contemplate, meditate, be spiritual, charitable. Make a list of enemies and forgive everyone on it. Don’t make plans, though, and don’t start anything new before Nov. 10. These themes of solitude and recuperation are strongest Sunday

The weeks ahead emphasize romance, creativity, pleasure, speculative winnings, beauty and raising or teaching kids – charming kids, at least for a few weeks. These drip with luck Sunday. The cosmos might start a new trend or development here. If so, let it out. An old flame might appear (or you might hanker to chase one) this week, especially Sunday, Wednesday or Thursday.

Wishes can come true, especially Sunday. (And, perhaps, Wednesday/Thursday.) This entire month is oriented toward the future, toward making plans and forming goals. But you should not start anything new, not even form a new plan, before Nov. 10. So use this week to study the past, and how you arrived at your present place. This will give you a lot of information about your future.

The weeks ahead focus on home, furniture, kids/ parents, security, garden, soul, stomach and nutrition. That goes doubly Sunday, when life might begin a lucky new phase in these – you might receive a notice that affects your home life, or you might have to redo something at home. Monday p.m. to Wednesday noon brings romantic notions, creative urges, and pleasure forays.

Your “commitment and consequence” area remains intense through early December — you’ll be tempted to commit in several ways: sexually, financially, lifestyle-wise, perhaps to a health regimen or mortgage. Don’t chase these this week, and even after that, talk (or read all information) before you commit — acting impulsively could be dangerous.

This isn’t an important month, Virgo. You’re very busy, but the stakes aren’t high. So charge forth without pressure. Communications, short trips, visits, paperwork, details, siblings and casual friends fill your days (especially this Sunday) – doublecheck addresses, billed amounts, etc. for mistakes. Though casual friendships are accented, your sexual magnetism radiates powerfully (until early December) so a friendship might become intimate.

The accent remains on intellectual, far travel, cultural, legal, educational and love matters, especially Sunday. Be understanding; don’t let anyone restrict your view. You’re in a very good romantic, child-raising, creative and speculative year (to next summer) — but these go into a mild “reverse gear” now to early March. Until then, stick with attractions already formed, ventures already begun.

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A24

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2013

GOT SPORTS? 604-738-1411 | mstewart@vancourier.com

Killarney’steambondingreshapesx-country MEGAN STEWART

Staff writer

Run. Eat. Sleep. Repeat.” On Wednesday at Killarney secondary, Owen Li wore a sweatshirt that just about summed up the life of a cross-country runner at the school. The team motto this year is ripped from a Nike marketing campaign but missing from the mantra is the most important word of all. “Family. This team is like family,” said Li, a Grade 12 student and one of two boys captains. “We spend so much time together, especially during the main part of our season when we spend mornings and after school with each other. We’ve built this bond.” For the past six years, the Cougars crosscountry team has increased in size each season, and the committed, supportive athletes are changing the competitive scene at high schools across the city. They warm up before races and cool-down afterwards. They go through a series of dynamic stretches to loosen and limber muscles. They chat and laugh and wear matching sweatshirts customized with their names. Alumni return to cheer along the racecourses and grads drop by after school to train. The roots of this family go deep. “I essentially grew up in the program at Killarney since Grade 8,” said Janice Leung, a 2011 Killarney graduate who studies kinesiology at SFU and attended every race this season as the team’s trainer. “Everyone is given the same opportunity to work hard and excel in the program.”

photo Dan Toulgoet

The Killarney cross-country team warms up on Wednesday afternoon before practice. The provincial championships are Saturday in Langley. Cross-country competition begins in September but Killarney runners start each season after track and field ends in June. They cover long distances at a slow pace to build their endurance. As the months go by, they introduce interval training to increase speed and strength. Before races, they taper. Coaches Bob Solmes and Don Chang offer 10 practices — one each morning at 7:30 a.m. at one more after school at 3:30 p.m. — each day during the school week. At the height of the season, most committed athletes also run

two two-a-days, which means they train twice in the same day two times each week. They also run on Sundays. “It’s a good feeling that our work pays off,” said Aran Rafie-Pour, 17, who finished in the top two each race this season and co-captains the boys team with Li. “Definitely every one of my teammates helps me every time I run.” Because athletes’ interest and abilities have advanced so swiftly, the coaches have introduced more sophisticated training. “They made me want to be a better coach,”

said Solmes. He and Chang first coached crosscountry together in 2008. “Our genius is being here. They do the rest,” he said. The numbers show how “opening the door,” as Chang put it, is drawing more students to cross-country. In 2006, were eight dedicated runners, two girls and six boys, attended three practices a week. Two years later the team counted 28 runners and by 2010 its ranks had rise to 38. This year there are 52 Cougars. The coaches recognize the efforts of the athletes. The athletes thank their coaches. “A lot has to do with their dedication and the time they invest in us. It makes a huge difference,” said Li. Chang attributed the team’s success to senior athletes and alumni. “Veteran members take newer ones under their wing,” he said. “They work very hard for any success they have had, but more than that they work for and with each other, cheer for each other, help each other and are a real team. They grow their own and the newer ones then become the veterans, and the process continues.” Yomi Wong, 17, was once new to the team and is now a senior who plans to return after graduation. “It’s given us an opportunity. If it weren’t for running, I would never have talked to Owen or Aran because we hang out in totally different groups outside of school,” said the girls’ team co-captain who met her boyfriend after she joined the team. “I feel like it’s the best thing that’s ever happened to us.” mstewart@vancourier.com twitter.com/MHStewart

Olympian Verbeek hosts wrestling clinic

photo Rebecca Blissdett

Thora Rae (No. 15), a Grade 9 stand-out for the Churchill Bulldogs, dekes through the David Thompson defence to score. The Bulldogs beat the Trojans 6-0 Tuesday to advance to the senior girls field hockey city championship Thursday against Eric Hamber.

Three-time Olympic wrestler Tonya Verbeek will attend the third annual Joker Slam, a three-day bout and clinic to mark the start of the 10th season at John Oliver secondary and recognize returning alumni. The Slam begins Oct. 31 at J.O. and culminates at Simon Fraser University Nov. 2. Verbeek, 36, won a silver medal at the 2004 Athens Games and bronze medals at both the 2008 Beijing Games and most recently at the 2012 London Games. She will host a clinic alongside fellow Olympian Chris Wilson, a six-time na-

tional champion and junior world champion who also handed Arsen Fadzaev, the only losses of his legendary career at 149.5 pounds. Two of the greatest wrestlers in Canadian history will run drills and teach technique to high school and university students Nov. 1 at J.O. beginning at 10:30 a.m. The clinic is free and open to the public. Joker alumni from SFU and the University of Winnipeg will also attend the Slam, including wrestlers who reached national and junior champion status while at J.O. — Megan Stewart


A25

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

sports&recreation

’Tis the season of the Griffin Both the boys and girls senior volleyball teams from Eric Hamber will compete in their respective city championship finals Friday night. The Hamber boys are in the hunt for their third consecutive title. On the girls side, the Griffins meet the Point Grey Greyhounds 6 p.m. Nov. 1 at Prince of Wales secondary. Point Grey swept the host Walesmen 3-0 in Tuesday’s semi-fi-

nal and the Griffns faced a tougher battle against the Killarney Cougars, who eventually went down 3-2. The boys clash at Magee secondary, also 6 p.m., Nov. 1. The Griffins play the David Thompson Trojans. Hamber downed Van Tech 3-0 and the Trojans also eliminated the host Lions in three sets. — Megan Stewart 2 0 1 2

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today’shomes A26

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2013

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604-738-1411 | lgarner@vancourier.com

City staff reject proposal for Stong’s site DEVELOPING STORY with Naoibh O’Connor

A

s reported by the Courier in an Oct. 24 online story, Vancouver city staff rejected a rezoning proposal for a six-storey mixed-use building in Dunbar at the site of Stong’s Market. Staff recommended the applicant pull the application because there is no definitive policy to support a six-storey market development at that location, particularly when there is little community support. The community vision calls for a building limit of four storeys. (The application could still go before council albeit, with an unfavourable staff recommendation.) Henriquez Partners Architects filed the rezoning application with the city on behalf of the landowner Harwood Group.

The site includes properties from 4508 to 4560 on Dunbar Street and 3581 West 30th Avenue — the current locations for Stong’s, McDermott’s Body Shop and two parking lots. The applicant wanted the sites rezoned from C-2 (commercial) district and RS-5 (one-family dwelling) district to CD-1 (comprehensive) district. The rezoning proposal envisioned a six-storey building with a space for a grocery store, so Stong’s could move back to the site after the project was completed, as well as 11 townhouses on the 30th Avenue site. In its decision, staff said the city would work with the applicant under the existing C-2 zoning, according to a letter Brian Jackson, the city’s manager of planning and development sent to Jane Ingman-Baker, chair of the Dunbar Vision Implementation Committee, notifying her of the decision. “Under the discretionary provisions of C2 zoning heights of up to 45 feet are anticipated, however, a height of 55 feet can be considered for large sites under certain conditions. A development for this site would need to be considered for the Development

Permit Board.” Cori Bonina, the president of Stong’s Market, told the Courier she was shocked staff rejected the development proposal. Bonina is the granddaughter of Ralph Stong who founded the original location of the store in 1955. Stong’s lease runs out in 2015. “We’re obviously disappointed that we [aren’t] able to have a new store that they proposed for the existing site, but really all we can do now is wait and see what the owners are going to do with the property,” she told the Courier earlier this week. “We’ve talked to one of the partners and they’re meeting to regroup and I’m sure we’ll meet with them in the next couple of weeks.” Bonina said she planned to speak in favour of the application if it went to public hearing.“The new store would have been nice for us — bigger, a lot more efficient,” she said. Harwood Group and Henriquez Partners Architects did not return calls from the Courier. Jonathan Weisman, president of the Dunbar Residents’ Association, which opposed a six-storey structure, said he’s

pleased with the decision. “We were happy to see Mr. Jackson’s commitment to community support in that decision. That was a real pleasant part of the overall decision,” he said. “The mere fact that the planning department recognized the value of community input is fabulous.” Weisman suspects Bonina is disappointed because Stong’s is looking for certainty about its future plans. Weisman is curious about the owners’ next move. “The landlords seem to want to redevelop. We’d also like to see something there. We put in our original position that it would be nice to have a supermarket of some kind there. There are a lot of supermarket structures with four floors in Vancouver right now and they’ve all been built in the last five to 10 years,” he said. “Clearly it would be nice to have something there at four storeys that brings some density into the neighbourhood that fits in with the existing vision.” noconnor@vancourier.com twitter.com/naoibh


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A27


A28

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2013


A32

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2013

WEEKLY SPECIALS 100% BC Owned and Operated Prices Effective October 31 to November 6, 2013.

We reserve the right to limit quantities. We reserve the right to correct printing errors.

Grocery Department

Meat Department Zevia All Natural Sodas

Nourish Premium Loose Tea assorted varieties

from

SAVE

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44%

100-125g product of Canada

Olympic Organic Yogurt

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946ml

32%

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2/7.00

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17%

1.89L product of Canada

23%

28%

1dozen • product of Canada

25%

30-37g product of Canada

180g • reg 11.99

5.49

165g • reg 8.99

or Double Cream

7.49

2/3.00

+deposit +eco fee product of Canada

from

L’Ancetre Organic Cheese

assorted varieties

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2/4.00

4.99

product of Canada

20% off regular retail price

Health Care Department Manitoba Harvest Hemp Pro 50

25.99

Dr. Dunnar Sambu Guard

21.99

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Mama Mary’s Pizza Crusts

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Produce Department

Chum Salmon Fillets

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Vancouver Courier November 1 2013  

Vancouver Courier November 1 2013

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