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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 Vol. 104 No. 72 • Established 1908

Adults at play

30

WEEKEND EDITION

THE VOICE OF VANCOUVER NEIGHBOURHOODS

NEWS: Year-round school 8/ BACKSTAGE PAST: Caligula protest 25

Prideand reconciliation buoyscanoe ceremony MUSQUEAM CANOE ONE OF 50 CRAFT PARTICIPATING IN SEPT. 17 EVENT CHERYL ROSSI Staff writer photo Dan Toulgoet

Sadira Abdiannia is one of 10 graduates from this year’s Tradeworks Training Society’s carpentry program for women who have a hard time finding employment. For more web content, scan this page with your smartphone or tablet using the free Layar app.

Program helps women build a future WOMEN’S CARPENTRY WORKSHOP MARKS 700 GRADS SINCE 1994 CHERYL ROSSI Staff writer

S

adira Abdiannia was desperate to change her life last year. The 21-year-old server and musician was struggling with a longtime eating disorder and ex-

cessive drinking and had reached a point where she didn’t want to leave her home. Abdiannia fled Vancouver for a month, sobered up and tried to pursue music school, which didn’t pan out. “Then I was just working at the same job afterwards and I felt really defeated,” she said. “I was back

where I was before, except now I’m sober and I couldn’t see anything in the future.” On Sept. 12, Abdiannia will celebrate her graduation from Tradeworks Training Society’s carpentry program for women who have a hard time finding employment. She and nine classmates in Tradeworks Women’s Workshop won’t be the only ones celebrating next Thursday. Tradeworks will be marking 700 women graduating since 1994. See TRAINING on page 4

W

hen Rhiannon Bennett paddles a canoe across False Creek later this month with other Musqueam members in the All Nations Canoe Gathering, she’ll feel a sense of fierceness. “Participating in the canoe gathering is an opportunity to show our pride and our strength as a people,” she said. “The fact there was government policy to kill the Indian in the child… and here we are, still here today and we’ll be getting out on our traditional waters in the traditional way and using our language and singing our songs... We survived those atrocities that were imposed upon us and that are still being imposed upon us.” The Musqueam canoe is one of up to 50 craft participating in the Sept. 17 ceremony welcoming participants to historical Coast Salish lands for Reconciliation Week in Vancouver, Sept. 16 to 22. Dawnda Joseph, canoe gathering coordinator for Reconciliation Canada, a non-profit initiative to further understanding of the legacy of the residential schools system, says former residential school students and aboriginal canoeists from Vancouver Island, the Sunshine Coast, Kamloops and Washington will paddle in cedar dugout and fibreglass replica canoes. They’ll be joined by kayakers and dragon boaters from school districts, the Jewish community and breast cancer survivors. See CANOEING on page 4


THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

IN THIS ISSUE

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NEWS

photo Dan Toulgoet

Artist Julien Thomas will bring his trailer full of plants and a couple of benches to your community as a mobile park.

12TH & CAMBIE: ON THE BUSES BY MIKE HOWELL Vision Vancouver Coun. Geoff Meggs times his trip on the Broadway bus to UBC and says a subway would be a lot faster.

CENTRAL PARK: DATE DELAYED

BY SANDRA THOMAS

Six community centre associations suing the park board will get their day in court — but not until Sept. 18.

OPINION ADS BUSTED BY ALLEN GARR A past legal ruling may have forced TransLink to carry ads about the Palestine-Israeli conflict. But it failed to look at the context of the ads.

ENTERTAINMENT BACKSTAGE PAST: PAST TENSE BY AARON CHAPMAN Hans Sipma’s homemade film of a 1981 protest outside a screening of the film Caligula serves as a fascinating time capsule of Granville Street.

SPORTS GIANT OF A HIKE BY MIKE HANAFIN Many Vancouverites have visited Lighthouse Park on the North Shore. But more should venture past the lighthouse and into the trees.

15 FAMILY/BACK 2 SCHOOL B1 CENTRE STAGE

SEE MORE WITH Additional content in this issue available through the Layar app includes: P01: TRADEWORKS ON WEB AND IN VIDEO The website for Tradeworks Training Society. And a YouTube video the society created to explain its mission.

P23: OUR PICKS Videos of events and artists coming to town including a trailer for the new movie Computer Chess.

P26: BACKSTAGE PAST Hans Sipma’s video of a 1981 protest outside Granville Street’s Towne Cinema, which was screening the X-rated movie Caligula at the time.

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newsfront A4

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

FROM FRONT PAGE

Canoeingreconnectsparticipantswiththeirculture

The paddlers will travel from Kits Point to the south side of Science World where they will acknowledge their invitation to attend the canoe gathering. Representatives of the Squamish, Musqueam and Tsleil-Waututh nations will grant them permission to come ashore to partake in the week’s activities. Area waterways were the highways of Bennett and Joseph’s ancestors but Joseph said traditional practices were interrupted by the colonial system of assimilation. She credits Expo 86 with prompting a resurgence of canoe gatherings. The Qatuwas Festival, which started in 1993, draws 100 vessels annually from Oregon to Alaska to the coast of Washington or B.C. Bennett has had to work at reconnecting with her culture and canoeing has been a bridge to traditional teachings. Her great-grandmother, who went to residential school, did not teach her children or grandchildren her language. “There were quite a few teachings that she chose to walk away from and we are now at a point where we are trying to learn those things,” the 34-year-old said. Bennett, who grew up on Musqueam’s traditional territory in Ladner, has heard traditional stories for the first time while training for the canoe gathering. Indian residential schools in Canada opened in 1870 and the last one closed in 1996. More than 150,000 aboriginal, Métis and Inuit children were placed in residential schools, often against their parents’ wishes, according to Reconciliation Canada. Many were forbidden to speak their language and denied their culture. It’s estimated that more than 80,000 former students are living today. The impact of residential schools has affected generations. Reconciliation Week complements Truth and Reconciliation Commission Canada

photo Dan Toulgoet

Rhiannon Bennett (r) says she’ll feel a sense of fierceness when she and others paddle a canoe across False Creek as part of the All Nations Canoe Gathering Sept. 17. events in Vancouver. The message of Reconciliation Week is that we are all one. “When you witness this procession of canoe vessels coming in and dragon boats and kayaks and all different

shapes, colours, ages, religions, we’re all just one people and just to simply to enjoy the beauty of that,” Joseph said. She hopes the canoe gathering will inspire more people to attend Truth and Reconcilia-

tion events and join the Walk for Reconciliation and New Way Forward, Sept. 22. “The more you go, the more you know,” she said. crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

Training includes carpentry, first aid, forklift operation CONTINUED from page 1 Each year, Tradeworks trains 40 women in carpentry, first aid, forklift operation and materials and safety along with professional skills needed for employment. “This is a second chance at life,” said Maninder Dhaliwal, executive director of Tradeworks. Some of the students have been streetlevel sex-trade workers, some have just completed rehab and others are looking to return to paid employment after decades spent working in the home. Abdiannia read about the demand for women in trades, checked out training programs sponsored by the Industry Training Authority and applied to Tradeworks’s free 10-week program that runs out of a new carpentry shop in the Downtown Eastside. Tradeworks Women’s Workshop runs with a female certified carpenter and a counsellor, who provided Abdiannia with immediate faith in her abilities.

I didn’t even know that I was good at math “ and good at using tools and it’s not so hard to use a drill and it’s not so scary to use a saw. It’s like, oh I could never do that or build anything, but I actually can. —Sadira Abdiannia

“I didn’t even know that I was good at math and good at using tools and it’s not so hard to use a drill and it’s not so scary to use a saw,” Abdiannia said. “It’s like, oh I could never do that or build anything, but I actually can.” Tradeworks also provides women with transportation and childcare costs, lunch, boots and tools. “It’s definitely discouraging when you’re

coming from a place where you don’t have [financial means],” Abdiannia said. “They make it so easy to enter it and explore.” She hasn’t signed up for the six-month joinery program at the B.C. Institute of Technology as grads often do, but she does want to find a job in fabricating. She could sign up for a fabrication job at Tradeworks, which employs alumnae to create corporate gifts which are sold to fund training for in-

dividuals who don’t meet government criteria for program funding. Trainees build compost boxes that are donated. Graduates work on the product line. “Half of the people who graduate, they need a longer runway than just a 10-week or 20-week program,” Dhaliwal said. “Part of our mandate is stabilizing them towards full-time employment.” Tradeworks also trains 36 youths a year in its Fab Shop. Tradeworks’s social enterprise generates $500,000 per year and Dhaliwal has increased the sales target to $2 to $3 million so the society can help more women and youth excel in the trades. With new skills under her belt, Abdiannia feels positive about her future. “I’ve realized that building skills, it takes time and it takes practice and I’m not used to that,” she said. crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi


news

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

35 minutes too long for Meggs

STOP BY SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7TH

12TH & CAMBIE with Mike Howell

V

ision Coun. Geoff Meggs got his September started with a renewed pitch to get a subway built from Commercial Drive to the University of B.C. On Tuesday morning, the advocate for improved transit sent out a series of tweets to let his followers know what passengers endure when catching a bus at the Commercial Drive/Broadway hub. Here’s a taste: • Just boarded 99 B-Line en route to UBC — they’re checking for fares. #translink #backtoschool • Just passed Main St. Bus definitely full. #99BLine #translink • 17 min 20 sec to Granville from Comm Dr — I’d be at UBC now on SkyTrain. Time for regional transit solutions #99BLine #translink • 28 min to Sasamat. Would be at UBC now on LRT. #99BLine #translink • Heroic #translink effort gets me from Commercial Dr to UBC in 35 min 15 sec. SkyTrain would cut in half

#99BLine I gave Meggs a call shortly after his trip and discovered the journey wasn’t as hellish as you might think. He did, however, leave at the tail end of rush hour. But as he pointed out, Wednesday is often the so-called “crush day” when students and workers back from holidays crowd the transit system. So Tuesday wasn’t so bad when considering TransLink says the average trip is 38 minutes. Even so, Meggs’ 35-minute ride was too long for his liking. A $3 billion subway would make him feel a whole lot better. But Premier Christy Clark and Transportation Minister Todd Stone continue to say the best way to improve transit is to first see whether Metro Vancouverites want to pay for improvements. As Clark revealed in her spring election campaign, the government plans to tie a referendum on transit funding to the 2014 civic elections. So far, the question hasn’t been determined. Nor has the cost. But what has been determined is the mayors in Metro Vancouver don’t want a referendum. Neither does Meggs, who, like many of his civic colleagues, doesn’t understand why the government needs a referendum to determine what is des-

perately needed: more and improved transit. As Meggs has pointed out previously, there was no referendum to build a new Port Mann Bridge, widen the TransCanada highway or improve the Sea-to-Sky route to Whistler. “I don’t know if there has ever been more uncertainty about regional transit investments than there is right now,” Meggs said. “The reality is TransLink will be pretty tight for money in the next year or two, whether or not there’s more investment. If the referendum fails, which is always possible, we would not see investments in rapid transit for a long, long time.” In Coquitlam, construction is underway to build the long-awaited Evergreen Line, which will dump an increase of 25 per cent more passengers at the Commercial Drive/Broadway hub. That’s coming in the summer of 2016. Though a $3 billion price tag for a subway is a big price, Meggs said an analysis of that cost should also look at the savings that are made in people’s daily lives. “It’s quality of life for everybody who wants to get around the city,” he said. mhowell@vancourier.com twitter.com/Howellings

A5

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

news

Trust Your Intuition!

Inner Peace Movement of Canada

Park board legal duel postponed

Speaker Mandana Rastan

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he B.C. Supreme Court case filed against the park board by six community centre associations, scheduled to begin Sept. 3, has been postponed to Sept. 18, 19 and 20. That doesn’t come as a surprise considering just how complicated this case is. I’ve written almost two dozen stories this year alone about the conflict between these associations and the park board, so my sympathies go out to the Supreme Court judge proceeding over the case who has to wade through the 45-page document filed by the associations along with what I can only assume will be vast amounts of information provided by the park board. The case, filed last month, is broken into two parts. A request for an injunction of the OneCard for use at these six community centres — Hillcrest, Killarney, Hastings, Kerrisdale, Sunset and Kensington — was to be heard Sept. 3. The OneCard is of particular concern to the associations. In June, the systemwide membership card was immediately accepted at seven community centres as well as the city’s rinks, pools and gyms. The six associations are concerned because the OneCard eliminates the need for individual community centre association memberships. According to the provincial Society’s Act, the associations must have a membership list to qualify as a non-profit society. The associations say

photo Jason Lang

Relations between the park board and several community centre associations have been fraught with tension for more than a year. non-profit status is vital to their ability in obtaining government funding or grants. The park board planned to roll out the card at 22 community centres, including these six, Sept. 1, when an interim joint operating agreement was expected to be ratified. But when that didn’t happen the six community centres continued to refuse the OneCard for association-run programs. That’s when the park board initially attempted to strong-arm the six into accepting the card, but then eventually backed off. Instead, in a letter of notice to the associations dated Aug. 29, park board general manager Malcolm Bromley told the six their long-standing partnerships with the board will be terminated at the end of 2013. In the case of Hastings Community Centre Association, that relationship started almost 80 years ago. Bromley wrote in part, “Due to the recent legal actions of the association, it is

no longer in the best interests of the public to continue the park board’s relationship with the association and the park board is compelled to terminate the JOA. Accordingly, the park board hereby gives notice to the Association, effective as of the date of this letter, that pursuant to section 26 of the JOA the Park Board hereby terminates the JOA effective December 31, 2013...” The rest of the case involves accusations of alleged breaches of the current and interim joint-operating agreement brought forward by the associations. The associations also say the interim joint-operating agreement limits their ability to raise money now and in the future. The rest of the court case is scheduled to be heard Nov. 18, 19 and 20. To see a copy of the letter of termination sent to the associations and a statement by Vision Vancouver park board chair Sarah Blyth, visit vancourier.com. sthomas@vancourier.com

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

news

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with Cheryl Rossi

V

ancouver School Board superintendent Steve Cardwell signalled that the VSB may have backed further away from the prospect of year-round schooling, or what he calls a balanced calendar, when he spoke to the Courier the Thursday before school started. Last year, board management recommended that a feasibility study regarding year-round schooling be undertaken centring on the University Hill family of schools. The board subsequently opted for a more cautious approach that didn’t target particular schools.

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Cardwell said Aug. 29 that year-round schooling would have to be a community-based initiative and possibly come from a parent advisory council, or PAC. It would be prudent for a new school, such as the elementary school being built downtown at International Village, to try a new schedule, he said, or schools that have close connections to a post-secondary institution, such as those near the University of B.C. “One of the challenges would be that if any one school was to change to year-round schooling and parents have children in an elementary school and a secondary school, they need to be able to coordinate the time off,” he noted. More continuous schooling could particularly benefit certain groups of kids. “For students who are more at risk in terms of learning, vulnerable students, [English as a] second language students, that long summer period

seems to be maybe just a bit too long,” Cardwell said. “It doesn’t mean that summer will disappear. We had over, I think it was about 16,000, 17,000 students this summer taking summer school in Vancouver, so you have yearround schooling already.”

ENROLMENT The Vancouver School District projected enrolment to drop by up to 1,000 students this year, a trend that’s common across the province, according to Cardwell, who noted enrolment was also flat in Surrey. At the same time, the VSB has attracted a record number of international students, with 1,300 international students from 28 countries enrolled at VSB elementary and secondary schools and adult education centres. crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

THE VANCOUVER COURIER

1574 West Sixth Ave., Vancouver, BC V6J 1R2 604-738-1411 Twitter: @vancouriernews vancourier.com

TransLink ads spark controversy

W

hile much of the world is watching the tragedy unfold in Syria and waiting for the United States to make its “no boots on the ground” move against the Assad regime, we have our own little Middle East related drama going on right here in Vancouver. That is all thanks to a decision by TransLink to run ads on buses and rapid transit stations entitled “Disappearing Palestine.” If you haven’t seen the ads, it is no wonder. The $15,000 dollar purchase gave the Vancouver-based groups calling themselves the Palestine Awareness Coalition a modest presence: The material appears on 15 of TransLink’s 1,600 buses and at two transit stations, one downtown and one at Oakridge (which incidentally is about as close as you can get to the heart of Vancouver’s Jewish community.) It is composed of four maps of what is now the state of Israel and shows a shift it claims has taken place since 1946 in terms of Palestinian presence when the territory was known as Palestine. The only text states that five million Palestinians are classified by the UN as refugees. But as modest as that ad buy may be, the reaction primarily from Jewish organizations and others including the Laurier Institute, a multicultural watchdog, has been explosive. They condemn the ads, the coalition of organizations which placed them and are demanding TransLink remove them. Even before the ads went up, six weeks before in fact, when Jewish organizations learned TransLink was considering a plan to place the ads, they began their lobbying in earnest. But they failed. TransLink says it was compelled to run the ads because of a relatively recent Supreme Court of Canada decision based on its earlier refusal to carry ads by the B.C. Teachers’ Federation and a B.C. student organization that were critical of the provincial government of the day because they were “political.” The court ruled that TransLink, a publicly owned entity, was in violation of the Charter of Rights which guarantees freedom of speech. When TransLink staff was faced with running these provocative ads, they sought legal advice and were told they had no choice based on that court ruling. The appointed TransLink Board spent some 10 days considering what to do and sought its own legal opinion, which also said they had no choice. And indeed, an organization I have a lot of time for, the B.C. Civil Liberties Association, concurred. It was all about free speech. But what is lacking in all of this is context. Here is B’Nai Brith Canada’s take: “The true intent of the ad campaign becomes clear if the groups behind the ad are examined.” Then it defines them as “rabid anti-Israel groups” which it says are fundamentally anti-Semitic and which have in the past hosted terrorists here in B.C. But don’t just take their word for it. Google the spokesperson for the ad campaign, Charlotte Kates. While many Jews, me included, may question the continued expansion of Jewish settlements into the West Bank, Kates would have the whole state of Israel obliterated. She’s quite specific in her view Israel has no “right to exist.” And she supports any tactics including terrorism to accomplish that, as her organization’s literature puts it, “by any means necessary.” This all comes midst a rising wave of anti-Semitism in Europe. And these ads have been placed, and this is no coincidence, during the holiest days in the Jewish calendar: Rosh Hashanah — New Years — and Yom Kippur — the Day of Atonement. It is a time when even Jews, like me, who would rarely set foot in a synagogue feel the need to “return again” and join their community in prayer. In other words, no timing could have been more provocative. One could say that, if protests against the ads stopped when the initial lobbying failed and the ads went up, Kates and her pals would not have received as much public attention as they have. But one could also say that TransLink did not do the due diligence required to understand just who they were dealing with. You can only wonder if the transit companies in Toronto and Montreal which have been in contact with TransLink over this issue will make the same mistake. agarr@vancourier.com

ALLEN GARR

WEB POLL NATION

Do you agree with the park board’s move against the six dissenting community centre associations? Go to www.vancourier.com to vote

Last week’s poll question: Will city hall and the neighbourhood protests over community planning reach a compromise by next year’s civic election? YES – 18 per cent NO – 82 per cent This is not a scientific poll.

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

WE WANT YOUR OPINION Hate it or love it? We want to know... really, we do! Reach us by email: editor@vancourier.com

Spirituality for sale in the New Age of ‘me’

C

afé Gratitude, which I recently discovered online, is an L.A.based vegan eatery frequented by Hollywood celebrities. The dishes have “positive affirmations” rather than names: I Am Transformed, I Am Whole, I Am Magical, I Am Awakening, I Am Terrific, etc. The wait staff reportedly sets down your plate while cheerily repeating the affirmation to you: “You are Grateful” or whatever. You won’t find “I Am Ironic” on the menu, however. Like track shoes and textiles, irony is no longer produced in the USA, as indicated by the “Consciousness Award” bestowed on Café Gratitude by some outfit called Nowism “in acknowledgement of awesomeness.” I’m sure the meals are healthy and delicious, but I would feel like a fourstar nitwit announcing to some actress/model/waitress that “I Am Awesome” (Herb-cornmeal crusted eggplant Parmesan on grilled Panini bread with marinara sauce, cashew ricotta, sliced heirloom tomatoes, arugula and basil). The eatery seems inevitable in retrospect: a pitch-perfect blend of foodie culture, new age spirituality and mass-marketed narcissism. Southern California has long been the vector for most American lifestyle memes, which invariably hop up the west coast and into British Columbian brainpans. It makes sense considering the state’s paradisiacal geography of sun, sand and surf. From the late ’30s to the early ’60s, a clutch of gurus and gadflies blew into the Bay area with the foundational texts of the human potential movement. The most notable included the “British mystical expatriates:” novelist Aldous Huxley, playwright Christopher Isherwood and thinker Gerald Heard. The three wise men would have nodded in agreement with the words of American philosopher Alfred North Whitehead: “The misconception which has haunted philosophical literature throughout the centuries is the notion of ‘independent existence.’ There is no such mode of existence; every entity is to only be understood in terms of the way in which it is interwoven with the rest of the universe.” Whitehead’s pre-hippie homily doesn’t sit well with today’s culture of ego-targeted marketing, however. Over decades, the best minds in consumer psychology have helped engineer a background buzz of dissatisfaction and disconnection, in service of marketers. And the heavily commodified New Age scene, a subsidiary of the self-help industry, offers a solution of its own: even deeper exploration of the “me” meme. This probably isn’t the best approach to get people out of toxic patterns of self-absorption, yet it’s fully in keeping with the American cult of individualism, which began as one part Protestant work ethic and two parts frontier mentality. When a polyglot spirituality emerged on the postwar U.S. west coast, with a vibrant mix of eastern and western beliefs, the ego was never far from the picture. The “self-as-source spirituality” of early 20th century America “dovetailed ever so neatly with the individualism promoted by corporate marketers and their psychology departments,” observes author Douglas Rushkoff in his 2009 book, Life Inc. “Throughout the 20th century, personal freedom would become the rallying cry of one counterculture or another, only serving to reinforce the very same individualism being promoted by central authorities and their propagandists…. While you might expect the marriage of progressive sociopolitical goals and the culture of spirituality to ground activism in ethics, it turns out the opposite is true. That’s because what we think of spirituality today is not at all a departure from the narcissistic culture of consumption, but its truest expression,” the author observes. Rushkoff may lay it on a bit thick — he fails to acknowledge the scientific evidence of health benefits from meditation and other spiritual practices — but I get where he’s coming from. I grit my teeth when I hear someone go on about the so-called “Law of Attraction,” which contends that if you think enough about something, good or bad, you will draw it toward you. This reminds me of former First Lady Barbara Bush’s response when asked on Good Morning America if the impending showdown with Iraq was putting a strain on her son in the Oval Office. “But why should we hear about body bags and deaths and how many, what day it’s gonna happen, and how many this or what do you suppose? Or, I mean, it’s, it’s not relevant. So, why should I waste my beautiful mind on something like that?” she offered in 2003. www.geoffolson.com

GEOFF OLSON

SPEND CAC CASH ON GUELPH PARK

To the editor: Re: “Letters: Spend CAC cash on community needs,” Aug. 28. I was very pleased to see the letter from George Brissette in the Courier that says the money from the CAC should go to improvements to our parks rather than more artist spaces. The Mount Pleasant Community which has grown greatly in the last five years with the numerous condominium and townhouse developments built but no improvements to our parks with the exception of a community garden in Guelph Park. I have owned a condominium across from Guelph Park for the last twenty-five years and seen that park go down hill steadily to now it is occupied mostly by people who use it as a place to drink morning to night and relieve themselves in open view in the park or the surrounding building properties. I realize that Guelph Park is not the only park in the area but with that amount of money improvements could be made to all the parks and green spaces in the Mount Pleasant area making it a even better place to live, spend time walking around and just enjoying the friendly area. I was shocked to learn at the last community meeting the Rize developers wanted to increase

the number of units by reducing the second level of retail/office floor to one level and reducing the ceiling height of all units to enable them to put more floors of units even though the residents of the area had made it well known they felt the height did not fit into the surrounding area. Terri Valerie Nicholson, Vancouver

TALLER BUILDING IS WRONG FOR STONG’S

To the editor: Re: “Dunbar group opposes six-storey building,” Aug. 14. I read with interest your article on the rezoning application by the Harwood Group. I think that it is important to note that the site is presently zoned C2 which allows for a building with a FSR of 2.5 (proposed- 3.12) and a maximum height of 13.1M (proposed - 21.3M). If it applies for rezoning, the provisions of the Dunbar Vision, as the most specific City planning policy governing this site, should be taken into account. One significant provision that is not referred to by the director of planning, is that additional height in this part of Dunbar was specifically rejected by our community in favour of other densities elsewhere in Dunbar. The reasons were multifold

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and many have been referred to already by Jonathan Weisman, Chair of the DRA. This community rejection of additional height was reinforced this year in preliminary community consultation conducted by Harwood. They asked Dunbar residents what they would prefer on the site. Options included a four-storey presentation and ones with additional height. The overwhelming response was a resounding “NO” to additional height and the vast majority supported a four-storey building with a grocery store underneath. The rationalization now brought forward that a four-storey building would not be economically viable, is hard to fathom. Such structures have been built by other developers in Vancouver. In addition, the Harwood group have owned the site for decades so the land acquisition cost must be a trivial compared to the price that new residential units will fetch. An additional factor that is not mentioned is that commercial space is very hard to lease in Dunbar. The City-owned space at Dunbar and 16th is still vacant and even Starbucks closed at 19th a few years ago. A grocery store on the site would be a secure long term tenant for Harwood and would greatly increase the chance that the additional commercial space would let.

Jane Ingman Baker, Chair of Dunbar Vision Implementation Committee

ONLINE COMMENTS COURIER STORY: “Park board terminates agreement with rebel community centres,” Sept. 4. Cheryl Simpson: I have to say, you are the ONLY paper in the area that is reporting news that is so important to the people that live here. The Parks Board and City council are running rampant on several issues and not held accountable for anything. It’s just crazy! Thank you for keeping us informed. The Sun and Province can’t bring themselves to actually report the ramifications of what their darling Mayor, boards and councils are doing. Thank you! Trusha Desai @TrushaDesai: Vision-dominated Park Board has crushed the backbones of volunteers at six Community Centre Associations. CityHallWatchVAN @CityHallWchVAN: Good article. Perhaps ‘rebel’ is not the best adjective in title. #Vancouver is a #democracy or at least should be. #vanpoli. Stuart Mackinnon @betterparks: The key word being CONTROL. COURIER STORY: “Cousens strikes for home,” Sept. 4. UBC Thunderbirds @ubctbirds: Make sure you pick up a copy of the @VanCourierNews for @ MHStewart’s story on #UBC men’s soccer player @ncousens019 #GoBirdsGo COURIER STORY: “Molokai perfect for accidental solo traveller,” Aug. 26. Shirley Alapa: This is a wonderful article about Molokai. I have lived here for 39 years, and there is no other place I can imagine living. The people are warm, loving and friendly. There is wifi at Kamoi’s also. The coffee bar at Coffee’s of Hawaii is one of the most popular places on the island. Follow us on Facebook: The VancouverCourierNewspaper and Twitter: @VanCourierNews

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Letters may be edited by the Courier for reasons of legality, taste, brevity and clarity. To be considered for publication, they must be typed, signed and include the writer’s full name (no initials), home

address, and telephone number (neither of which will be published), so authorship may be verified. Send to: 1574 West Sixth Ave., Vancouver V6J 1R2 or email editor@vancourier.com


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

community

Murals stretch across Marpole COMMUNITY CALENDAR with Sandra Thomas

MARPOLE

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The most recent VIVA Vancouver street mural was completed on Labour Day and is now on display for all to see on West 66th Avenue between Granville Street and the commercial lane. The colourful, fractal-style mural brings together the natural elements of Marpole and southwest Vancouver, including the Fraser River, the Coast mountains and the animals that call it home such as river otters and coyotes. (Fractal-style art is a form of algorithmic art, which incorporates geometry and computer-graphic techniques.) The mural, created in partnership with Emily Carr University, came as the result of a City of Vancouver VIVA Vancouver grant awarded to the Marpole Business Improvement Association to create a permanent mural for the purpose of creating interest from pedestrians and creating new opportunities for community interaction. The mural project began in 2012, with a design competition involving illustration program students from Emily Carr. More than 15 Emily Carr student volunteers and staff worked to apply special non-toxic ecological paint donated by Cloverdale Paint, and were kept fed and watered by the Marpole-based Subway restau-

rant. Weather permitting, a second mural will be created in Marpole Sept. 20 and 21. Both murals are part of the ongoing chART: The Marpole Art Project.

KITSILANO A community eco-art project needs help from volunteers to create a giant bird sculpture in time for World Wide Bird Art Installation Day, Sunday, Sept. 29. The goal of Bird On The Beach, initiated by a group of Kitsilano residents with support from the Vancouver Foundation and City of Vancouver, is to help create awareness on the dramatic increase in the amount of plastic found in West Coast sea birds. A 2012 study showing the dramatic increase of plastic found in sea birds, which washed ashore from Alaska to Oregon, came to the attention of Vancouver artist and activist Mary Bennett who got together with a group of Kitsilano residents to plan the sculpture, which will be made from recycled plastic. Bird On The Beach projects will take place all month through a series of workshops designed to explore the effect of plastic pollution on birds. Each session will include a talk about the issue and art-making activities. Participants will collaborate to build the sculpture from recycled materials before it’s displayed at Heritage Harbour, behind the Vancouver Maritime Museum for the World Wide Bird Art Installation Day. To sign up for a workshop, visit kitsecoarts.eventbrite.ca. sthomas@vancourier.com

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Vancouver cop awaits discipline for alleged interference in murder case MIKE HOWELL Staff writer

A

Vancouver police constable who is alleged to have interfered in a homicide investigation in Oak Bay is expected to learn next week whether he will keep his job. The constable, whose name has not been released, was earlier found in contravention of the B.C. Police Act for allegedly committing several offences related to the homicide investigation of 31-year-old Owen Padmore, who died in December 2001. Offences substantiated under the Police Act were two counts of deceit, one count of neglect of duty, one count of corrupt practice and one count of improper disclosure of information. It’s now up to New Westminster Police Chief David Jones, who conducted an investigation into the officer’s ac-

tions on behalf of the Vancouver Police Department, to determine what type of discipline the constable should receive. Sgt. Diana McDaniel, a spokesperson for the New Westminster department, said Jones was expected to make a decision after Sept. 10. The discipline Jones could impose ranges from a suspension to dismissal. The constable, a 13-year veteran, is not facing criminal charges. The Oak Bay Police Department issued a statement in July, saying the constable allegedly revealed details of the Padmore case to a person under investigation. The constable accessed restricted police databases without authorization and providedthatinformationtothesameperson. Healsofailedtoprovideknowledgehehad of the death to police, the statement said. Vancouver Police Chief Jim Chu suspended the constable with pay in August 2011 after allegations surfaced that the constable lied during the Oak

Bay homicide investigation. The constable was then put on administrative leave in March 2011. In July of this year, the Vancouver Police Board suspended the constable without pay. Oak Bay police arrested two females and a male in connection with Padmore’s death. The females were released without charges while police recommended a charge of manslaughter against the male. Crown counsel reviewed the evidence but decided not to approve the manslaughter charge. Police originally treated Padmore’s death as accidental and subsequently destroyed some of the exhibits seized during the initial investigation — a practice consistent with policy at the time. An autopsy determined Padmore’s death was the result of “a closed head injury consistent with a fall.” Additional information surfaced in 2008, which led investigators to re-open the case. mhowell@vancourier.com

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MINISTRY OF FINANCE BC Responsible and Problem Gambling Program

Contracted Service Provider Required The Province of B.C. is looking for a Prevention Coordinator to provide strategic leadership in the delivery of prevention services to B.C. residents on behalf of the BC Responsible and Problem Gambling Program. Please respond to RFQ # PC-07-13. Closing date: 4pm, September 13, 2013. For full contract requirements and application instructions, visit www.bcbid.gov.bc.ca and respond to the applicable document number.

Open Houses: Pearson Dogwood Lands The City of Vancouver and Vancouver Coastal Health are conducting a planning program to consider the redevelopment of the Pearson Dogwood Lands located between Cambie and Heather Streets and 57th and 59th Avenues. The planning program will produce a new policy to guide the redevelopment of the site. Vancouver Coastal Health, the owner of the site, has proposed a mixed-use redevelopment containing: h Total floor-area: approximately 3.1 million square feet (gross) h Health care housing and related services: approximately 250,000 square feet h Housing: approximately 2,800 units h Building heights: 3 to 28-storeys h Uses: residential, commercial, health care, recreational h Community amenities: approximately 100,000 square feet h Park: 2.5 acres of park plus additional public open space

Improving Vancouver’s Infrastructure: Construction at the South End of the Burrard Bridge – Expect Delays EFFECTIVE AUGUST 26

To learn more about the project and provide your comments on the draft concept plan, come to a drop-in open house: Thursday, September 12, 5 – 8 pm and Saturday, September 14, 10 am – 2 pm Pearson Dogwood Redevelopment, Project Office, 601 West 59th Avenue FOR MORE INFORMATION: Phone 3-1-1, TTY 7-1-1 or vancouver.ca/pearson The Burrard and Cornwall intersection at the south end of the Burrard Bridge will be under construction beginning August 26. This project will improve traffic safety and accessibility around the Burrard Bridge. The improvements to the intersection will: h r\pmq\^b j]_ \oj_lk_aj\no cb making it easier to navigate and safer for motorists, cyclists and pedestrians to use.

h epmlnd_ kg^_jb go` `_al_gk_ travel time for pedestrians at the intersection by reducing the maximum number of pedestrian crossings from five down to two.

h f_al_gk_ j]_ dnqip_ go` speed of vehicle traffic coming off the Burrard Bridge onto Cornwall Avenue. The replacement of expansion joints on the Burrard Bridge will also be coordinated with this work. During construction, motorists can expect traffic changes, lane restrictions and delays and are encouraged to use the Granville Street Bridge.

Before

After

The intersection will remain open and be accessible to motorists, cyclists and pedestrians, and there will be full access to businesses along Cornwall Avenue.

FOR MORE INFORMATION: Phone 3-1-1 TTY 7-1-1 Outside of Vancouver: 604-873-7000

vancouver.ca/roadwork


THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

PRESENTATION CENTRE OPENING SEPT 7TH

Visit us at Arbutus & 12th Avenue

Live Your Own Legacy

Hours: Monday – Saturday 10:30 am – 6:30 pm

Drop by at:

Preview our show suite, and explore our full selection of finely appointed suite options, inclusive service offerings and premium residence amenities.

Presentation Centre 2827 Arbutus Street, Vancouver

Come discover how you can live each day in a more creative and fulfilling way at Legacy.

Sunday Noon – 5:00 pm

For your convenience, we offer complimentary transportation upon request.

PRESENTATION CENTRE

41ST AVE

CAMBIE

OAK

GRANVILLE

12TH AVE

ARBUTUS

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604.240.8550

www.legacyseniorliving.com

The Leo Wertman Residence Legacy Senior Living | 611 West 41st Avenue, Vancouver BC, V5Z 2M8


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family

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE

urban parents’ guide

KIDS WITH CHALLENGES HAVE SUPPORT HOME AND AWAY COMPILED BY HELEN PETERSON

Our House… is a very, very, very fine House Vancouver-based Ronald McDonald House B.C. celebrated its 30th anniversary this past Thursday evening with an Indian-inspired backyard party — complete with cake, a dance-off and DJs — at its residence in Shaughnessy. Party-goers included most of the 13 seriously ill children and their families who are currently staying at the house while they undergo treatment at the nearby B.C. Children’s Hospital (shown: Emma making a speech). They enjoyed the party alongside many of the donors and volunteers who support the house.

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Aunt Leah’s is charity of choice for Modern Home Tour

Since its incorporation as a society in 1988, Aunt Leah’s has helped countless children and youth and teen moms lead healthy, safe, productive lives – kids who might have otherwise fallen through the cracks of the ‘system’ into homelessness, entered the criminal justice system or surrendered to suicide. (Go to auntleahs.org for more info.)

It all takes place Saturday, Sept. 14, from 11 am – 5 pm. And when ordering your ticket… use the promo code: ALP2013. You will get $5 off the ticket price and an extra $5 will be donated to Aunt Leah’s Place! Advance tickets are on sale until 8 pm on Friday, Sept. 13. Vancouver. modernhometours.com.

arents watch with pride as their healthy young ones head back to school this week. But as with many things in life, there are some who are not as fortunate. For foster children who are growing up fast and dealing with the challenging teen years, a helping hand is needed. That’s where stellar organizations like this step up to the plate.

In his opening speech, Ronald McDonald House CEO Richard Pass (shown, bottom right) reflected on the house’s legacy helping house more than 12,000 families in need in B.C. and the Yukon over the last 30 years. In 2014 the organization will move into a new 73 room, $31.2 million house, increasing its capacity by five times. Ronald McDonald House still needs about $2 million in donations to help pay for the new residence. Donations are gratefully accepted at rmhbc. ca. Information contributed by Stephanie Orford.

Tour organizers scoured the Vancouver area and received submissions from many creative homeowners, designers, architects and builders of some of the most interesting Vancouver residences. They’ve come up with seven marvelous domains, offering a well-balanced tour of cutting-edge contemporary design and stunning landscapes.

-$*#*%, <#!1"* 8:* -$*#*&'6)$+

./&"24'1 ,-!# *$33+0 JUDE MICHAEL BAGUIO

BUNKBEDS 4502 Main St. (at 29th Ave.)

turns 7 on September 20

by

604.677. 2337

• Since 2003•

Watch for more family-friendly articles and back to school tips in the Sept. 20 edition of the Courier.

vancourier.com

September 20

Jude Michael Baguio 7

September 22

Natasha Lee 11

September 24

Sean Wyatt Thomas 5

September 26

Jordan Rafael Lopez Plechaty 7

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Jude Michael

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Baguio

We’ll publish your birthday for FREE plus you’re entered into the monthly prize draw sponsored by H.R. MACMILLAN SPACE CENTRE Email us your name, phone number, and the name & birth date of the child celebrating the birthday. If you choose to add a photo, email that too! (you will be charged $9.95 + tax for photo publication.) Email: jstafford@vancourier.com (deadline is Friday, Sept. 27th. Next Birthday Club publishes on Friday, Oct. 4th.


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

family

Spend a ‘Day at the Farm’

AND GET IN TOUCH WITH AGRICULTURE BY HELEN PETERSON

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n Saturday, September 7th, 10 am to 4 pm, Delta Farmland & Wildlife Trust, in partnership with Westham Island Herb Farm, are hosting the 8th annual “Day at the Farm,” a free community event set to be one of the most anticipated agricultural fairs in the Lower Mainland.

“Day at the Farm” is unique in the way that real farmers come together to provide a fun educational day with so much for people to experience,” says Christine excitedly. “Families come back year after year because there is always something new.”

Taking place at Westham Island Herb farm in Ladner (a mere 30 kilometers south of Vancouver), the event offers visitors a unique opportunity to visit a real working farm and engage in handson learning about local food production.

The event will feature the ever popular hay-wagon farm tours (led by third-generation farmer, Gordon Ellis); on-farm habitat displays by Delta Farmland & Wildlife Trust; live

entertainment, including Bocephus King; food prepared by White Spot’s Triple O’s food tent and local vendors. There will be plenty of livestock, including chickens, goats, cattle and draft horses; antique tractors and farm equipment on display; roping and 4H demonstrations; and the popular “Local Fruit Pie Contest”. (See website for details: deltafarmland.ca). See you there!

“The farming community opens its arms wide for this event,” says Christine Terpsma, Program Coordinator for Delta Farmland and Wildlife Trust. “It’s important for people to learn where their food comes from.” Attendees can try their hand at activities ranging from harvesting fresh potatoes to learning to milk a demonstration cow. The event will also showcase how farmers provide important habitat for migratory birds on their farms across Delta.

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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tudents of all ages want activities they participate in to be both educational and fun. Think outside the schoolyard this season, by enrolling your child in one or more of the exciting activities as outlined in this section. Don’t delay in signing up – these fun classes and activities are going to fill up fast! Here’s a sampling:

Inverglen Scottish Dance School is a non-competitive dance school that is dedicated to enhancing students’ love of dance. Their repertoire includes ancient Highland dances such as McKenzie of Seaforth, Scottish Country Dances and Step dances. Inverglen Scottish Dance School students range in age from three to adult. New: An introductory class for ages five–10 takes place Saturday mornings from 10 –11 a.m., taught by Melissa McDermid; inverglenscottishdancers.com. }xkcpzcx oewnn}o~ dgxec oe~wwz

Broadway Edge Studio’s “Program for Musical Theatre” is an intensive Musical Theatre training course, created to provide a place for dedicated students to learn. Participants must audition to attend. If selected, students will learn Music, Dance, Acting, Character Development, Vocal Techniques and many elements of Musical Theatre, and perform in a full scale musical at the end of the term. Note, “Musical Theatre 12 and under” begins Sept. 27; broadwayedgestudio.com. dmxfgp ewyymx}ni ecxnpc

Dunbar Community Centre is opening its doors wide for an exciting fall season for pre-schoolers through to teens. For example: “Comedy Zone: Dunbar Young

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Performers (5–9 yrs)”. Here is your big chance to be an actor! Alongside instructor Heather Duff, you’ll learn about improv comedy, clowning, mime, comic timing and what works on stage. Then the group will perform the comedy show for family and friends on the last day. Runs Sept. 19–Dec. 5, 4 - 5:30 pm; dunbarcentre.org. Vancouver Tap Dance Society’s 2013/2014 program has something for everyone from the preschooler and up. Even if he/she is lacing up their very first pair of tap shoes VTDS has an exciting fall program for your child. The upcoming season is driven by the 3 E’s: Educate; excite; excel. The Society’s mandate for children includes TapCo (youth performance ensemble), plus generous Outreach and Scholarship programs. Fall teaser: Tap Pups runs from 4 - 6 pm on Mondays; vantapdance.com. continued next page

Dunbar Community Centre 4747 Dunbar Street, Vancouver, BC V6S 2H2 P: 604-222-6060 (Press 2 for Front Desk) F: 604-222-6066 Web Site: www.dunbarcentre.ca

Register NOW For FALL Programs. Get your Program Recreation Guide at the centre or download it from our website. Register online, by phone or in person.

www.dunbarcentre.ca

Try Before You Buy

from September 9-14th ! Free classes will be showcased between September 9th to 14th. Visit our website or come to the centre for a schedule of participating programs.

Sponsored by the Dunbar Community Centre Association

Dunbar Community Centre is jointly operated by the Dunbar Community Centre Association and the Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

REGISTERING NOW FOR FALL 2013

After School Care Program Serving the Local Elementary Schools

Our dynamic program will offer enrichment programs including drama, yoga, music and Montessori materials to enhance learning; along with field trips and spring break and summer camps.

Inspiring children toward a lifetime of learning

778-838-9705 • 604-222-1114

Let us help your child succeed in school. TEACHERS’ TUTORING SERVICE Qualified Teachers All Subjects • All Grades Professional one-to-one In-home Tutoring Competitive Rates

604-730-3410

A Non-Profit Society

teacher@tutor.bc.ca www.tutor.bc.ca

Extra Credit

MUSIC LESSONS ENHANCE RETURN TO SCHOOL KIDS’ DEVELOPMENT WITH PROPER SHOES

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uitar, piano, trumpet, violin, drums, bass, trombone, cello, vocals, saxophone, clarinet, and vocals – they’ve got it all! At Long & McQuade, they offer private music lessons with inhouse, skilled Shown: Piano lessons at a young age bodes well for children’s hand-eye professional coordination, and the ability to perform in instructors, to front of an audience builds confidence. make learning easier. Kids will learn to play in a supportive creative environment, which makes learning fun. Convenient lesson times accommodate even the busiest schedules. At affordable rates, including no registration fees, Long & McQuade is committed to excellence in music instruction. Fun times: “Rock Skool” – Teens can experience the thrill of rehearsing and performing in a Rock Band! Private instruction is also available; long-mcquade.com.

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ack-to-school shoes, experts say, aren’t just about looking respectable for the new teacher. “Although your son may be happy to return to school in broken down running shoes, or your daughter may be demanding a brand new flimsy, fashionable style, do insist they choose a pair of well fitting, supportive shoes,” says Lisa Irish, a Canadian Certified Pedorthist. “Hand-me-down clothes are fine for school yard play but second-hand or too big-sized shoes are not a wise choice,” say the specialists. The wear patterns already created will not properly support the next child’s unique foot shape and needs.

Shown: Burgundy basketball shoes provide comfort and traction. Made of 100 per cent canvas cotton, with rubber soles; $14.95 at H&M.

Under my umbrella This fall, Arts Umbrella is celebrating its 35th year by expanding offsite programming and adding a number of creative classes to their roster. Known for popular programs in Visual & Media Arts, Theatre & Music and Dance, this fall the school has many unique and diverse classes to choose from including: Boys Only

dance, Eco-Arts, Stage Fight with Academie Duello and Jewellery making. Arts Umbrella is also expanding its outreach programs, making it easier for even more children to access their innovative classes. Registration is open and classes start Sept. 9. Visit artsumbrella.com to find out more.

INVERGLEN SCOTTISH DANCERS

Fall Registration being taken! Highland and Scottish Country Dancing Non-competitive

Sandra Crosby - S.D.T.A, R.S.C.D.S,T.A.C, S.D.C Children & Youth (3-18 years of age)

Scottish Cultural Centre • 8886 Hudson Street

www.inverglenscottishdancers.com

Fall classes Start Sept 16, 2013

TAP Classes for all ages and skill levels Plus Jazz, Hip Hop and Musical Theatre

COME TRY A CLASS FOR FREE Professional Faculty and studio We have a passion for tap dance!

2775 E. Hastings Street - www.vantapdance.com


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

2 k c a B School

A warm and loving environment with an enriched and stimulating program for children 3-5 years old. QUALIFIED ECE TEACHER

TEACH YOUR KIDS ABOUT ONLINE AND CELLULAR SAFETY

Sunshine Corner Daycare

highly interconnected world comes hand in hand with constantly changing threats and one of them is that records are kept permanently. What your children say, post, and share online now can resurface and surprise them in their adult years.

We tell our children to look both ways when crossing the street, and teach them to not talk to strangers, but it’s also important to teach them to stay safe online. As a parent, you might feel that you don’t know the latest online risks or that you aren’t aware of what kids are doing online. Rest assured that there are some trusted places you can go to for information and to start with, here are some tips to make sure your children grow up informed and protected:

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oung Canadians today are growing up in the digital landscape. Their childhood is totally engaged in computers, digital video, cell phones, online games, and the Internet. Digital communication is at the centre of their social world and many children have email addresses and personal online profiles before they get to middle school. Mobile phones are a tool to text, snap photos and share it all with friends. Growing up online can deliver valuable experiences. There are many educational advantages to the Internet – although it can also be menacing. This

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• Talk to your children about what they are doing online and teach them how to deal with inappropriate material that they may come across. • Talk to them about the consequences of posting inappropriate pictures and saying negative things about other people — actions that could damage a reputation or ruin a friendship. • Remind them that the Internet is a public space and it keeps a record. Things children do and say now could have implications down the road. Teach your children to keep strangers away and offer guidance to your child on how to be safe online. Set the example and show your kids how to be cyber safe. More information is available online at GetCyberSafe.ca.

215 East 18th Ave., Vancouver 604-876-9722

BC Girl Guides

Register for New Girls aged 5& upGuiding – join Year GirlOnline! Guides! Sign up for a great year of Guiding fun

Register Online greatin year of Guiding fun fromnow your for ownahome minutes

1-800-565-8111 www.girlguides.ca 1-800-565-8111 www.girlguides.ca

ADULT MEMBERS WELCOME! Make a difference in the lives of girls… and they’ll make a great difference in yours!

It’s time to get inspired!

Programs start this fall in visual, media & performing arts for ages 2–19.

Enroll. Donate. Participate. Arts Umbrella supporters include:

Lucille & Russ Pacey, Ernest Yee, Joyce Chan, Dana & John Montalbano, Julie & James Barron, Salvador Ferreras, Pitblado Foundation, Hemlock Printers Ltd., St. Bernadine Mission Communications Inc

artsumbrella.com View this ad with:

Print advertising sponsor:


EW20

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

New Dentures or a

Natural Smile?

news The park stops here SANDRA THOMAS Staff writer

W Guaranteed for 5 years against breakage

Alex Hupka, RD, RDT

Registered Denturist, Registered Dental Technician (1 block from Richmond Centre) www.bcdenturist.ca

TWO WEEK DRAPERY SALE

Sale ends September 19th

25% OFF SILK DRAPERIES

Choose from over 40 colours in the Arlene’s Silk collection for beautifully made, interlined true silk draperies. Installed orders only.

50% OFF

HUNTER DOUGLAS PARKLAND WOOD BLIND Choose from painted and stained finishes in the popular two inch slat size.

CALL TODAY for your Free In-Home Consultation VANCOUVER( 604 ) 608-1177

www.arlenes.com

hat may look like a simple trailer full of plants and a couple of benches is actually a catalyst for community initiatives and discussion, says Mount Pleasant resident and artist Julien Thomas. Park-a-Park, his latest endeavour, is a disposal bin on wheels transformed into a mobile community space complete with benches, tables, plants, shrubs and an umbrella. A new planterboxfullofpansiesisunderconstruction. The mobile park is located within a residential housing complex on Citadel Parade Street near the Beatty Street Armoury downtown. “I hold a potluck [dinner] every Wednesday at 7 o’clock,” said Thomas. “Tonight I’m bringing my barbecue and it will be a picnic in the park.” Thomas, a construction worker by day, was inspired to create Park-a-Park after the success of a recent project featured in the Courier this past January dubbed Gather Round. Through that project Thomas turned a Mount Pleasant traffic-calming circle into a community hub and meeting place complete with a table and chairs, a cup of coffee for anyone who happened to wander by and an array of flowers and herbs planted in warmer months. “People started approaching me and saying it was really cool and asking if I could come and do

their traffic circle,” said Thomas. “But I wasn’t sure if there was enough interest for that kind of commitment, so I thought I could move towards helping them kick-start their own projects.” Which is partially where Park-a-Park got its start. Instead of being tied down to one traffic circle, Thomas can now move between neighbourhoods. “In cities growing up we see static urban forms like roads, sidewalks, trees and houses,” said Thomas. “Nothing changes much so I decided to tweak that urban form and show they don’t have to be that rigid and that we can have a say in how things go. And you don’t have to be a developer or politician to do it.” Thomas launched the mobile park in July at the corner of East First Avenue and Commercial Drive before moving to the residential towers downtown at the invitation of a resident. This Sunday, Park-a-Park will be available at the Vancouver Food Cart Festival on West First Avenue at the southeast side of the Cambie Street Bridge. Following the festival, the mobile community space will be parked in the courtyard of the Granville Island campus of Emily Carr University of Art and Design for two to three weeks before heading to Marpole for at least three weeks. Park-a-Park is a component of the Emily Carr chART project, a long-term research partnership between the community of Marpole and Emily Carr University.

MELBOURNE TO SIDNEY Next Friday the Vancouver Courier continues our series Vancouver Special – an ambitious year-long journey through twenty-seven neighbourhoods that make up the city of Vancouver. We will report on the character and the changing face of each neighbourhood, what makes it unique and how it is responding to the challenges of being part of our rapidly changing city. Next Friday we visit Renfrew-Collingwood, to advertise in this special section call 604-738-1411.


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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GREAT STORIES

LIVE ON STAGE Margaret Atwood

Joseph Boyden

Michael Crummey

Sarah Dunant

Xiaolu Guo

Tomson Highway

Rachel Kushner

Amanda Lindhout

Colin Mochrie

Lisa Moore

Marisha Pessl

Michel Tremblay

One hundred writers, 81 events, thousands of readers like you.

OCT 22 –27, 2013

on Granville Island

Tickets on sale September 9 vancouvertix.com 604 629 8849 writersfest.bc.ca


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WELCOME TO THE VSO’S 95TH ANNIVERSARY SEASON!

The 2013/2014 Season contains an outstanding mix of Classical, Pops, Matinees, and concerts for children and families. It also features three exciting, brand new celebrations of music-making: The VSO Spring Festival, a Pacific Rim Celebration and the VSO New Music Festival.

TICKETS ON-SALE NOW!

BRAMWELL TOVEY

NICOLA BENEDETTI

YEFIM BRONFMAN

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SARAH CHANG

BRAMWELL TOVEY & THE VANCOUVER SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA AT THE ORPHEUM

JAMES EHNES

ANDREW VON OEYEN

JOYCE YANG

CHRIS BOTTI

30% over single concert pricing!

BROWSE THE NEW SEASON ONLINE AT

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VSO CUSTOMER SERVICE

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MEDIA PARTNER


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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2013-14 Season

Plus don’t miss our dance shows! Buy a Season Pass and save.

FIREHALLARTSCENTRE.CA 604.689.0926

2013/2014 SEASON THE HIGHEST STEP IN THE WORLD CRASH THE KING AND I ‘ART’ DREARY AND IZZY THE GRANDKID

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The Firehall Art Centre You Should Have Stayed Home Assassinating Thomson People Like Us Hotel Bethlehem Medicine Young Drunk Punk Re:Union Hirsch Chelsea Hotel Prisoner of Tehran The Concessions

B3

Bruce McCulloch in Young Drunk Punk

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B4

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

FROM

LAST CHANCE— MUST CLOSE SEPT 14!

Centre Stage

$29!

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LIFE. YOUR IER. LIKE . FUNN PETS ONLY ITH PUP W AND

photos by emily cooper

MUSIC AND LYRICS BY ROBERT LOPEZ AND JEFF MARX. BOOK BY JEFF WHITTY playing at

ARTSCLUB.COM 604.687.1644 season sponsors

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FESTIVALS

201392014 season

Global Dance Connections series Photo: 605 Collective by David Cooper

Contemporary dance from Vancouver, the USA and Europe

Discover Dance! series

Noon hour series. Hip hop, flamenco, Ukrainian and more

Subscribe now! thedancecentre.ca MEDIA SPONSORS Discover Dance!

Dance In Vancouver

Global Dance Connections

PRESENTATION PARTNERS

theatre for living (headlines theatre) presents

Artwork & Graphic Design: Dafne Blanco

BC/Alberta Tour

22 Communities between Oct 16 & Nov 30, 2013

Is a corporation a person? Theatre for Living continues a 32-year legacy of innovation with a project about the corporate messages that live within our collective psyche.

Theatre without a net. No actors. No play. No script. Joked by: David Diamond The event takes 2.5 to 3 hours.

VETTA CHAMBER MUSIC 28TH SEASON VIOLE SONORE

Friday, Sep 20th, 2013 at 8pm Thursday, Sep 19th at 2pm*

SERIOUS STRING QUARTETS

Friday, Nov 22nd, 2013 at 8pm Thursday, Nov 21st at 2pm*

Oct 10 & Oct 11 Mount Pleasant Neighbourhood House

Dec 4 to 8 at various venues across Metro Vancouver For full schedule please visit:

SCAN WITH

For more information call: 604.871.0508 Follow us: facebook.com/TheatreForLiving @theatre4living

FAMILIAR FAVOURITES

Friday, Feb 7th, 2014 at 8pm Thursday, Feb 6th at 2pm*

MEMORABLE MASTERPIECES Friday,Apr 11th, 2014 at 8pm Thursday, Apr 10th at 2pm*

TANGISSIMO PLUS RETURNS

Friday, May 16th, 2014 at 8pm Thursday, May 15th at 2pm* West Point Grey United Church 4595West 8th Ave (atTolmie)

Tickets: 1.866.863.6250 or at the door

(cash or cheque only)

www.vettamusic.com *selections from the Friday Evening Concert

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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Live music at its best

2013

Romancero Gitano Choir & Guitar 8 pm Friday, September 27 Ryerson United Church Handel & Haydn The Choral Classics 8 pm Friday, October 18 Ryerson United Church A Quiet Place Healing Series CD Release Concert 8 pm Friday, November 15 Ryerson United Church

JOIN US THIS SEASON Music by STEPHEN FLAHERTY Lyrics by LYNN AHRENS Book by LYNN AHRENS and STEPHEN FLAHERTY Co-Conceived by LYNN AHRENS, STEPHEN FLAHERTY and ERIC IDLE Based on the Works of DR. SEUSS

A Baroque Christmas Music of Celebration 8 pm Friday, December 6 Orpheum Theatre

The Ugly Duckling The Tortoise and The Hare (Ages 5+) Nov 24-Dec 1 2013

A Charlie Brown Christmas A Little Jazz & Joy 8 pm Friday, December 13 3 pm Sunday, December 15 Ryerson United Church

Busytown (Ages 3+) March 1-30, 2014

2014

Wondrous Tales of Old Japan (Ages 7+) April 4-20, 2014

The World In Music Songs of Many Lands 8 pm Saturday, January 25 Ryerson United Church

Canadian Voices Music Shore to Shore

8 pm Friday, February 21 Ryerson United Church

Schubert & Schumann The Art of the Romantic Era 8 pm Friday, March 21 Ryerson United Church

DECEMBER 6 - JANUARY

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Eternal Light Mozart & Lauridsen FOR AGES

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8 pm Friday, April 18 Orpheum Theatre

Space Music Five Centuries of Spatial Song 8 pm Friday, May 9 Ryerson United Church

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

."'' Preview

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B8

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

FRED

EMAIL: yvrflee@hotmail.com TWITTER: @FredAboutTown

UNLEESHED

SAIL WORTHY: Motionball is a charity that builds awareness and raises funds for the Special Olympics targeting the next generation of volunteers and donors to the Olympic movement through integrated social and sporting events. Vancouver recently hosted a swish Port and Starboard weekend benefit, an upscale Hamptons style Sunday brunch, in support of the national non-profit. A young and stylish, nautically chic crew converged at the Keg Yaletown for an afternoon of fun and philanthropy. BIG FISH: Brian Legge and Brian Grange’s Westcoast Fishing Club hosted their annual fishing derby for Canucks Autism Network. Forty-four anglers — hockey players and captains of industry, each shelling out an entry fee of $12,500 — dropped their lines off Haida Gwaii looking for the big catch and $200,000 in prize money. Singer Jann Arden performed at a kick-off party held at Rosewood Hotel Georgia’s Reflection Lounge. Dwight Jefferson and Colin McIvor reeled in the weightiest catch, 33.8-pound Chinooks during the three-day affair.

UNION BASH: A day after the formation of mega labour group Unifor, brothers and sisters gathered at John Henry Park in Trout Lake for the annual Labour Day picnic presented by the B.C. Federation of Labour, Canadian Labour Congress and Vancouver and New Westminster and District Labour Councils. Yours truly emceed the family-friendly day of activities that included musical performances by No Sinner, Bend Sinister and Jim Byrnes.

CUPE B.C. president Mark Hancock, Cindy McQueen and Sharon Prescott served up hundreds of fresh Chilliwack corn at the annual Labour Day picnic.

On the Hotel Georgia’s Reflections Lounge, host Bruce Langereis welcomed singer Jann Arden to the Westcoast Fishing Club’s annual fundraising kick-off party.

Canadian Labour Congress’s Ken Georgetti and NDP MLA Kathy Corrigan celebrated workers and working families at the Labour luau.

Terry David Mulligan foresees colder days ahead for Jason Priestley. The 90210 heartthrob directs Cas & Dylan, which will open the Whistler Film Festival.

Former Canucks Brendan Morrison and Willie Mitchell joined 42 anglers for the annual fishing derby off Haida Gwaii in support of the Canucks Autism Network.

Andre Thibault, second from left, and the Samar Oriental Dance Ensemble turned up the beats at the Amnesty International benefit concert held at Fan Club.

Committee member Kris McKenna, right, welcomed Big Brother Canada castaways Peter Brown and Suzette Amaya to the Special Olympics brunch held at the Keg.

TSN’s Cabbie Richards and Motionball gala co-chair Michael Blonde welcomed mateys to the first Port and Starboard Sunday Brunch.


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A21

health The 68th BC Derby & 50th BC Oaks ADVERTORIAL

Life’s got rhythm DAVIDICUS WONG Contributing writer

W

hen doctors talk about rhythm, we’re usually referring to the heart. As we check your pulse and listen to your heart, we make note of the rate (Is it fast or slow?) and the rhythm. Is it regular or irregular? Are there pauses or extra beats? I frequently pick up arrhythmias (or irregular heart rhythms) when patients come in for a blood pressure measurement. They may be feeling perfectly well if the rate is not fast or slow enough to cause light-headedness or fainting. We also make note of other rates and rhythms as each patient breathes, speaks and moves. A very depressed patient may speak and move more slowly. There may be long pauses between words. Patients who are manic often demonstrate pressure of speech. Their thoughts may fly such that they can hardly get the words out fast enough. A stressed or anxious patient may speak and move so quickly that they make people around them feel anxious themselves. Of course, an over or underactive thyroid gland can mimic the symptoms of anxiety and depression, respectively. Just as most of us are not aware of the rates and rhythms of our hearts as we move through our days, we can take for granted the pace with which we live our lives. Ideally, we simply adjust our rhythms to the demands of the moment. This week as families adjust to a new school year, parents and children attempt to synchronize their clocks and somehow manage to get to school and work on time — give or take a few minutes — without everyone getting stressed out. For some young parents, coming to the doctor’s office alone is one of the few breaks they may have during the week. Most of them recognize that this is the rhythm and pace of this stage in their family���s life. Most of my family practice colleagues have frenetic work lives. There is always the pressure of time, punctuated by interruptions, unexpected problems and counselling visits, and the need to be fully present for each individual. Some doctors have told me that they don’t even have time to go to the washroom. But don’t ask your doctors if they’ve had a break. It might remind them that they really have to go. We all need to adjust the rhythm and rates with which we live ourlives.Weneedbreaksthroughoutthedaywhenwecanpause, take a health break and change gears. We can fall into unhealthy rhythms out of habit or succumbing to the demands of others. We can be entrained by the rhythms of the people around us — coworkers, friends and family. An overworked mom or dad can stress the entire family. If we don’t attend to and adjust the pace of our lives, it can affect our health, our performance and our relationships. Today, take a pulse check. How is the rhythm of your life? Are there times you need to slow down or speed up? Is the rhythm of your family life a lullaby, a dance or hard rock?

BC’s most prestigious day of horse racing is Sunday, September 8th, 2013 at Hastings Racecourse, with the first race starting at 12:50pm. The BC Derby is BC’s equivalent to the Kentucky Derby and on Sept 8th there will be 6 stakes races worth over $550,000 in total prize money. The date always brings excitement to horse racing enthusiasts and newcomers alike. Whether familiar with horse racing or it’s your first time to the track, there’s lots of action to take in, both on and off the track. There is a giant screen to catch all the action during the races. And there will be Learn to Wager Ambassadors walking around, helping visitors learn the lingo and how to wager, understand the program and how to read the tote board, as well as tellers there to help you place a bet.

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A22

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

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We Match Prices! *Look for the symbol in store. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITES (note that our major supermarket competitors may not). Due to the fact that product is ordered prior to the time of our Ad Match checks, quantities may be limited. We match select items in our major supermarket competitors’ flyers throughout the week. Major supermarket competitors are determined solely by us based on a number of factors which can vary by store location. We match identical items (defined as same brand, size, and attributes) and for fresh produce, meat and bakers, we match a comparable item (as determined solely by us).


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A23

GOT ARTS? 604-738-1411 | arts@vancourier.com

1

2

4

3

OUR

PICKS SEPT. 06 - SEPT. 10

For video and web content, scan page with

1 2 3 4

Writer-director Andrew Bujalski (Mutual Appreciation, Funny Ha Ha) leaves behind his mumblecore roots and recreates the nerdy world of chess software programmers 30 years ago in his latest film COMPUTER CHESS. Variety calls it “an endearingly nutty, proudly analog tribute to the ultra-nerdy innovators of yesteryear — about as weird and singular as independent cinema gets.” A hit at this year’s Sundance festival, COMPUTER CHESS screens Sept. 6 to 11 at Vancity Theatre. For show times and info, go to viff.org. With a backing band, singer-songwriter and poet RODNEY DECROO transforms his tales of growing up in a small coal town on the banks of the polluted Allegheny River just outside Pittsburgh into a raw and powerful performance piece. ALLEGHENY, BC runs until Sept. 15 at the Cultch as part of the FRINGE FESTIVAL. For more details and show times, go to vancouverfringe.com. It’s been a weird and rough road for THE DODOS. After years as a two-piece, the San Francisco duo added touring member Chris Reimer, who died suddenly from a heart condition in 2012. After much reassessment, MERIC LONG and LOGAN KROEBER are back with their fifth album, Carrier, which not surprisingly adds a sense of brooding and intimacy to the band’s indie folk stylings. THE DODOS play the Biltmore Sept. 9 with guests Cousins. Tickets at Red Cat, Zulu and ticketweb.ca. Who likes violence? Who likes fortune telling? Who likes comedy? You can have it all when ARNIE THE CARNIE’S HOUSE OF MYSTERY creeps its way into Performance Works as part of the VANCOUVER FRINGE FESTIVAL. For more details and show times, go to vancouverfringe.com.


A24

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

arts&entertainment KUDOS& KVETCHES FORGIVE US In honour of Yom Kippur, the Jewish Day of Atonement, which begins the evening of Friday, Sept. 13 and ends the evening of Saturday, Sept. 14, and indeed in honour of atonement rituals in religions everywhere, K&K resumes its yearly atonement series, begging forgiveness for past mistakes, misdeeds, egregious errors in judgment and

moments of all around douchey-ness. Once again, we’re sorry. • Our mother-in-law can be a tad passive at times and although it doesn’t irk us tremendously, it does fill us with a misguided sense of superiority where we feel it’s our duty to engage in a series of “behaviour modification” exercises, which don’t always reflect well on us. Case in point. A few years ago we were left in the car with our mother-in-law — a lovely woman, by the way — while our significant other ran into the store to pick something up. After a few minutes, our mother-in-law, who was sitting in the back seat of the car,

says to no one in particular, “It sure gets stuffy in here.” “Yes it does,” we replied, knowing full well she wanted us to open the window but would never come out and say it. We then sat in silence. Two minutes later, our partner returned, realized the stalemate that was taking place, ordered us to roll the window down and later admonished us for purposely ignoring our passive passenger’s cues. “If she just asked directly, we would have gladly rolled down the window,” we said. But apparently it just made us look more like a jerk.

Sorry, mother-in-law, for not accepting the fact that you don’t like to directly ask for things and would rather passively hint at them until we have to offer you what you wanted all along. Sorry, significant other, for treating your mother like a misbehaving pet in need of training. Sorry, self, for forcing you to sit in a stuffy car with the windows rolled up when you really wanted to breathe in cool fresh air — just so you could make a stupid point that the intended recipient probably didn’t even pick up on in the first place. k&k@vancourier.com twitter.com/KudosKvetches

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A25

arts&entertainment

Porn protest on Granville strip SUPER 8 FILM SERVES AS TIME CAPSULE FOR GRANVILLE STREET CIRCA 1981 BACKSTAGE PAST with Aaron Chapman

It was July 1981, and I was a photographer working for Eaton’s in their advertising department,” recalls 66year-old Hans Sipma. “I’d gone for lunch, and walking down Granville Street I saw the protesters outside the theatre. I went back to the office where I had my Super 8 camera, grabbed a few rolls of film and started shooting.” The controversial film Caligula, a big budget historical drama intercut with scenes of hardcore sex and violence and given an Xrating by film censors, had begun its theatrical run in Vancouver. But not in the sleazy confines of an X-rated movie house, where in those pre-Internet days and before home video cassette rental made adult films widely accessible, but in a mainstream cinema on theatre row — right in the downtown

photo screen shots

In July 981, Bernice Gerard, spokeswoman for United Citizens for Integrity, led a rally outside the Towne Cinema protesting the screening of the big budget, X-rated film Caligula. Photographer Hans Sipma caught the colourful event on his Super 8 camera. heart of Vancouver. And the Towne Cinema at 919 Granville St. was ground zero where that summer a Vancouver evangelical group gathered to protest outside the theatre, calling on the premier and attorney general of British

Columbia to ban the film for violating the community standards of decency and good taste. What Sipma captured as his camera rolled makes not only for an early example of citizen journalism years before mobile phone

www.bcschools.cupe.ca @CUPEbcschools cupebcschools

cameras were ubiquitous but a remarkable record of street life during an extraordinary event on what appears to be an otherwise ordinary day on Granville Street. He would simply title his documentary film Protest. Continued on page 27


A26

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A27

arts&entertainment

Caligula protest doc dusted off and now onYouTube Continued from page 25 In the film, while onlookers and passersby interact with the protesters gathered in front of the cinema they deemed showing a pornographic film, Protest reaches its own climax of a sort when a near-fight breaks out between one flop-sweat protester and an onlooker who calls him a dogmatist. “I basically started filming these little conversations and arguments,” says Sipma, recalling the scene from his Gastown photography studio. “In a way, nobody took notice of me or acted like they were on camera, I don’t think they realized I was recording sound.” Featured at the beginning of the film, Bernice Gerard, spokeswoman for United Citizens for Integrity appears. “I asked her if she’d say something for the camera. It was a Super 8 movie camera with a big microphone boom on it, and she thought I was with the media and immediately went on with her bit you see at the beginning of the film.” Hollywood central casting could not have provided a better character for Sipma’s film than that of the real life “Church Lady” Bernice Gerard. Once named the most influential religious figure in B.C. by the Vancouver Sun, Gerard dressed like a prim school marm from the 1950s and possessed a hectoring voice not unlike Vancouver Canucks ex-coach Marc Crawford during an angry post-game press conference. Well remembered for her appearances on community television for her Sunday faith-based TV show, she’d been a one-time city councillor who gained notoriety in July 1977 leading an army of concerned churchgoers and pill box-hatted ladies, dressed in their Sunday best and clutching their bibles, down the UBC bluffs to the shores of Wreck Beach, where they protested the “immodesty” of nude sunbathers there. In Protest, it’s remarkable to watch as Gerard’s picketers debate with pedestrians about morals and free speech, and even the validity of God right on the streets of Granville. But it’s the other details captured, from the fashions

of those dressed to the period vehicles and old Granville Street businesses in the background that make Protest such an interesting time capsule of Vancouver in 1981. “As I shot it, I didn’t recognize anybody else aside from Gerard. I still don’t know who they were. They were just people on the street. I’ve never seen them since,” Sipma says. His film sat on his shelf for years, showing it occasionally at home on a projector to amuse friends or those at family gatherings. But in recent years, Sipma had the film transferred and uploaded the video online where it caught the attention of the Vancouver Archives, who now feature the film on its YouTube Channel after Sipma donated the negative. When asked how Gerard (who died in 2008) would have regarded the current state of Granville Street where young club-goers drunkenly revel in the city’s “entertainment district” and most of the cinemas of “Theatre Row” gone and renovated into nightclubs, Sipma laughs. “She was a pretty straight lady. Gosh, I don’t know what she’d think.” Today, Caligula is more remembered as a bad film than anything particularly titillating. The Granville Street preachers can still be found at the corner of Georgia Street, loudly admonishing on the wages of sin as pedestrians dart past with their shopping bags. Vancouverites are now more likely to protest restaurants than cinemas, and it’s difficult to imagine a film causing such controversy that it would move those out to the streets to protest. On a recent Saturday night, I walk by the old TowneCinemaonGranville— nowJoe’sApartmentnightclub—andaskthedoormanoutside checking IDs, “Is Caligula is playing tonight?” He shakes his head and names the local cover band performing that evening, oblivious to the history of the sidewalk and the moral battle that once played out at his very feet. ••• Do you remember the protest? Do you recognize anyone in the film? If so, email aaron@ aaronchapman.net.

photo Rebecca Blissett

Hans Sipma stands in front of the former Towne Cinema with the same Super 8 Camera he filmed his documentary Protest. To see Sipma’s film, go to vancourier.com/entertainment or scan this page with your smartphone or tablet using the free Layar app. Sponsored proudly by

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

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Freedom can be imprisoning; its sisters are exile and alienation. What is most painful, to be imprisoned by your society/humanity, or exiled from it? Poor Caliban, in Shakespeare’s play, was both. As the ultimate exile is death, perhaps imprisonment is better. The freest nation on earth, in all history, is certainly the United States. But no other country seems so lost, as it bravely swims in a river whose distant delta is unknown. This sense, of being new, of uncharted directions over uncharted waters, of carrying a very valuable item – the concept, the idea and belief of freedom – both inspires and haunts these citizens. They are staring at something totally unknown, though, amazingly (it is a gauge of their zeal) they continue to believe they do see the future. Americans face a far more complex and option-filled future than anyone. Social and economic agility and freedom replace the more comfortable, static hierarchies built in Europe or Asia. Formal dates aside, most Europeans can predict that they will eat at home Thursday night; most Americans don’t know what restaurant they will eat at Thursday, or even if they will eat out or not. Loads of work awaits you – plunge in. Protect your health, eat and dress sensibly. A strong romantic streak continues, but a relationship (perhaps a budding one) turns from affection and mutual attraction to a more talkative, restless base. From here forward, intimacy either blossoms, or becomes a point of contention. In business, the rest of September favours commitment and funding, but if these don’t happen, a split occurs.

Continue to rest, contemplate and plan. Be charitable, reconnect with your spirit, and deal with shut-ins, government agencies, and institutions. Protect your health and your reputation. You remain hopeful about a social link and/or a possible romance, even a possible mate. If you’re married, life’s fun and your partner’s witty. Your energy remains mildly high Sunday.

A romantic, creative, speculative and pleasure-prone streak continues, but so does potential domestic strife based on sexual urges or male testosterone. Whatever your status or involvements, avoid renting, buying, or moving into a new domicile through mid-October. Tackle chores Sunday. This night through Tuesday, relationships come front and center – they can cause some friction Monday morning.

Wishes can come true. But bosses remain impatient, temperamental, so you probably need to separate social life from career and give each your attention. (Be careful with those higher-ups, from parents to police, bosses to VIPs, Sunday night and Monday am.) Your energy and charisma rise Sunday eve through Tuesday. Tuesday’s a bit of a dud, so concentrate your efforts on Monday.

Your sluggish, relaxed mood continues – so does the emphasis on your domicile, family, security, retirement, nutrition, stomach and soul. Romance, beauty and pleasure paint your world Sunday. A love matter might be settled around midday. But this evening through Tuesday brings chores and health concerns. Talking and swift action won’t help, up to 9 a.m. PDT Monday.

Be ambitious. Further plans already in the works. Show bosses your skills. Present proposals. A romance might be approaching a marriage (or proposal) state. If so, you’ll be marrying “upstairs.” Sunday’s for enjoyment, entertainment, light romance, flirting, and wishful thinking or optimism. Something nice might come true around early afternoon. But retreat this night through Tuesday.

Errands, short trips, visits, communications, paperwork, details and daily business continue to fill your days. Be curious, ask questions, seek variety. These add to your knowledge. Siblings might arrive or phone. Casual acquaintances surround you – one of these might become a romantic contact Wednesday onward (into October) if you’re single. Money flows swiftly to you – bank it, resist spending urges.

The emphasis remains on long journeys, higher learning, law, cultural events, social rituals, and gentle love. You feel wise, mellow. Good. Be wise enough to know that lust is probably not the right road – it lures you all month. So might an unwise or “hasty” investment. (Both, lust and finances, might hit a brick wall Sunday night, Monday morning.)

A new contact, or the shutting down of an old one, marks Sunday. Errands, calls, trips round out the day. This night through Tuesday steers you toward home, rest, recuperation, security, retirement issues. Garden, seek mother nature, hug your kids. You could be a little too aggressive or hasty Monday morning. Your romantic, creative, pleasure-beauty prone, speculative and self-expressive side blossoms Wednesday.

You continue to wade through life’s depths. You’re stirring up your subconscious, so hunches and buried yearnings float to the surface. What you do this month tends to affect your future lifestyle. For example, finances and sexual intimacy are prominent concerns. If you sign a mortgage, or create a baby, your lifestyle will certainly change. Dig deep – don’t be satisfied with surface appearances.

Your energy, charisma and effectiveness continue high. Start important projects, see and be seen, ask favours, approach people on your “A” list. Your only Achilles Heels right now are lust (which can tie you to a burdensome personality, or impact your reputation) and/or a possible “detritus from the past” involving a government agency, an institution or large corporation.

The accent lies squarely on relationships. Be diplomatic yet eager to join or merge, in business, practical affairs, and love or friendship. You can form a temporary co-worker alliance that yields money rewards. Sunday daytime pulls a string that lures you into financial commitments or intimate yearnings. Be careful on the financial side, as a problem (perhaps a legal or ethical one) lurks until mid-morning.

Monday: Adam Sandler (47). Tuesday: Colin Firth (53). Wednesday: Moby (48). Thursday: Jennifer Hudson (32). Friday: Stella McCartney (41). Saturday: Sam Neil (66). Sunday: Prince Harry (29), Dan Marino (52).

MORE AT ASTRALREFLECTIONS.COM


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A29

GOT SPORTS? 604-738-1411 | sportsandrec@vancourier.com

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hile hiking recently in Lighthouse Park, a gentleman approached me from the opposite direction on the trail to the Valley of the Giants. After a friendly hello, he looked up to the forest and said one word: “Magical.” Most Vancouverites have been to West Vancouver’s Lighthouse Park at some point in their lives — usually just to see the historic lighthouse, which dates back to 1874. Hiking here involves only moderate effort, and the hardest part could be avoiding tripping over rocks and roots on the trails while looking up to admire huge old growth trees. You can thank that lighthouse for all the massive trees. Sixty-five hectares of forest was protected by the Dominion of Canada in 1881 to provide a dark backdrop for the lighthouse. The current building was constructed in 1912, and the trees remained off-limits to loggers. When you visit, arrive early — especially on weekends — and allow plenty of time (three hours minimum, but ideally four hours) to explore everything there is to see in the park. Most tourists and sightseers walk directly south of the parking lot to the lighthouse area. But our suggested route winds through the forest and across the path of nearly one hundred giant trees, makes stops at rocky ocean viewpoints and stops for an obligatory look at the lighthouse. Start on the upper branch of the Juniper Loop heading towards Juniper Point and its perfect view of Bowen Island. Returning along the lower trail provides some hints of the massive trees to come. Turn right at a large cedar with a “hanging root,” which marks a junction with the Shore Pine Trail. The centuries-old cedar originally grew out of a decaying nurse log, a fallen tree that provided nutrients for the current tree.

J u n i p e r Loop

M aple Trail

with Mike Hanafin

PA R K B O U N D A R Y

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TAKE A HIKE

The trail continues south and east, passing more big trees and rocky viewpoints before reaching the park’s namesake. The lighthouse is officially recognized as a national historic site, but sadly has suffered from recent neglect after the federal government deemed it surplus and put it up for sale. Two nearby buildings housed soldiers during the Second World War. The old dining hall now serves as the Phyl Munday Nature House and is operated by the Girl Guides. It is named after Phyllis Munday, one of B.C.’s greatest early mountaineers. Head north and west to reach the Seven Sisters Trail, named after a cluster of large firs and cedars that guard the trail near the junction with the Lady Fern Path. Turn right here, and after a quick uphill trek, you reach a massive Douglas fir, close to 2.5 metres in diameter and 65 metres tall. Our suggested route now heads to the eastern half of the park, home to dozens huge trees. In fact, there are too many to describe here. The magic continues along the serene Valley Trail, which features some of the park’s biggest western red cedars along with massive yellow cedars and Douglas firs. Some are estimated to be over 600 years old. With map in hand, it’s great to explore areas we haven’t described in detail here. Some of the rocky points and coves are ideal for finding a secluded picnic spot and swimming hole with views looking south to Pacific Spirit Park and the UBC campus and east to Stanley Park and downtown Vancouver. Whatever your route, don’t miss a venture into the Valley of the Giants. A close look at some of the old-growth firs shows grooves as deep as 20 centimetres in the gnarly bark. Continuing north onto the Maple Trail rewards you with yet another cluster of huge trees, named the Grove of Four. A Douglas fir among this group is the tallest tree in the park and one of the tallest of its species in all of B.C. It tops out at nearly 80 metres. From here, follow any of the well-marked trails back to the parking lot. If you’d like one last climb for additional exercise, follow signs to the summit, which is actually just a rocky outcrop barely rising above the forest at the park’s highest point of 117 metres. mhanafin@shaw.ca

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A30

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

feature story

All the kids are doing it; ZOMBIES, SLIP ‘N SLIDES, COLOUR BOMBS, FLASH MOBS AND

photos Dan Toulgoet

Germaine Koh, in white, is the creator of League. She challenges the conventional notion of sport and invents games with people like Nic Miskin (in green) and Elisa Yon (in blue), using unexpected equipment and made up or modified rules. MEGAN STEWART Staff writer

P

laytime isn’t just for kids anymore. Just ask Christopher Williams, 34. Or 46-year-old Germaine Koh. They don’t just make time for fun and games. They invent, host and prioritize play. And they invite friends. On the first Sunday in August, Williams stretched 60 metres of heavy-duty plastic down a steep, grassy hill at North China Creek Park. He then doused the chute with water and hosted close to 100 people for the third annual East Van Slip and Slide. On the last Sunday of each month at Elm Park, Koh hosts League, a club that invents and improvises games as they’re played. Some are complex strategic mindbenders and others are bocce with odd-sized balls. On Sept. 8, Koh will host the n Games, a round-robin tournament with six teams drawn from the artistic, athletic and corporate corners of the city. Spectators are welcome and attendance is free. “A lot of people are starved for play,” said Koh. “So many adults get to a point where they think that play is not a part of adult life anymore and I feel so sad for them because they are stuck in these conventional patterns of behaviour.” In particular, she sees parents hold back when families first lay eyes on the games played for League. “The adults would encourage the children to go and participate in the

sports events but some of the adults didn’t assume they could do it too. Adults can get very inhibited, but it’s really so liberating […] once you allow and even request that things be done differently than the conventional ways.”

LAUGHS AND LAPS Exercise is fun again. Urban obstacle courses styled after the Amazing Race reality television show like the City Chase and Awesome Race challenge competitors to solve puzzles, beat the clock and challenge their physical limits. Similarly, extreme events like the Tough Mudder take the concept of outdoor play much further. But conventional athletic pursuits are also being disguised as exercise thanks to a heaping dollop of fun. Color Me Rad is a five-kilometre running event that encourages participants to wear white clothing and then bombs them with corn starch dyed every colour of the rainbow. Their marketing is also showered with a pungent dose of irony. The website promotes the event that will raise spirits when “Zoloft and animal balloons” fall flat and alleges, “Historically, running has only been acceptable when trying to escape the law, personal responsibility, the truth, and grizzly bears.” Run for Your Lives moves racers forward over five kilometres with the threat of zombies, and the five-km nighttime Electric Run rewards glow sticks and neon. Koh’s impulse to find rules only to bend and maybe break them is shared by Williams, who said he tries to stretch limits and challenge people to try things they normally

wouldn’t. Adults may have less time for fun, he said, but “we have the means and abilities to have better fun.” “There is nothing more satisfying than play,” he said, “and somewhere along the way as we grow up the idea of play, fun and imagination outside of the normal social constraints becomes oppressed through social norms and stigmas about how adults should act.”

NEVER TOO OLD TO PLAY If an adult is too shy, too self-conscious or just too uptight to risk embarrassment by cannonballing down a slippery slide, it may be because their sense of play was discouraged as a child. At a B.C. School Sports annual general meeting in May, ViaSport ambassador Drew Mitchell told the crowd of coaches and educators that “sport is not the only space we need to play in.” ViaSport is dedicated to increasing sports participation, but Mitchell recognized organized sports are not welcoming to all participants, particularly in an era of early specialization and limited diversification. “The thing we’re talking about are adult desires when you here feedback like, ‘suck it up, buttercup,’ or ‘sink or swim,’ and then applying it to nine year olds. We in the sport system have to take on a better value system.” Also missing from the lives of many city-raised children is what Mitchell called “organic play,” which happens on neighbourhood streets and in parks. But for adults today, there is a renewed discovery of play.


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A31

adults at play URBAN OBSTACLE COURSES ARE MAKING EXERCISE FUN AGAIN

Germaine Koh, Nic Miskin and Elisa Yon play a game of “Big in the Middle.”

Nic Miskin is blindfolded for a game of “extra sensory proprioception.” “The concept of play for adults is very real,” he said on the phone from Ontario where he now works as a consultant. “In my age group of 50-plus, there are many women who didn’t have a lot of sporting opportunities when they were younger. They weren’t offered.” Life expectancy for some groups of North American adults is falling, according to research published last summer out of the University of Illinois at Chicago. An equally disturbing trend is the rising obesity rates among children and the weight gain that persists into adulthood. Only 15 per cent of children were overweight or obese 35 years ago. Five years ago, Statistics Canada revealed that nearly one in three adolescents had an unhealthy weight. Instead of outgrowing weight gain, most children and teens gain more and if the current trend continues, up to 70 per cent of adults 40 years and older may be overweight by 2040.

THE PRACTICE OF PLAY Play is fun, by definition, and play can be part of a healthy, active lifestyle. But play may also enhance brain development. Stuart Brown, a psychiatrist and clinical researcher, founded the California-based National Institute for Play in 1990 and began to see play as a long-evolved and essential behaviour for the well-being and survival of animals, including humans. In fact, he argues that humans of all ages are uniquely designed to enjoy play throughout their entire lives. In a popular TED talk, Brown asks if childhood play is a rehearsal for adult activity. He says it’s not. “Play has a biological purpose, just like sleep and dreams.” Play will factor in the next step of evolution, he believes, and is essential to crafting and challenging the brain. It’s not just something we do in our spare time. Vancouver psychologist and artist Lisa Voth is a fan of Brown’s work. A believer

in “necessary shenanigans,” she readily practises what she preaches as a consultant and teacher who hosts clowning workshops and weekend seminars called the Practice of Play, which are designed to break down inhibitions and stale patterns in order to find the creative and playful possibilities in everything we do. Voth is constantly trying to “unstick the stuck,” as she puts it. Koh has another way of looking at play and, like Voth, it also has a lot to do with creative expression. A roller derby skater as well as a visual artist and the resident artist at the Elm Park Field House until 2015, she says play is about more than games. It’s about practice. “Even though I’ve been a longtime jock, I’ve not always been a great competitor. I’m way more interested in the kinds of things that happen during practice when you’re trying to master a skill, come up with strategy, perfect a strategy.” Trying something new, like changing one rule in a soccer game or sourcing a whistle blast while blindfolded, is a way to upend conventional norms and possibly discover better ways of doing things with the body and the mind in everyday human interactions. “In other words, it’s less about problemsolving than problem-finding,” said Koh. “Asking, what could be better, what can you make interesting by problematizing it or making it unconventional?” The math principle to solve the unknown, or n, is the inspiration of this weekend’s League tournament the n Games. Koh saw a new solution, not even knowing there was a so-called problem, when she came across a spontaneous nighttime handball game in the back alley behind a friend’s workplace.

“The people were making full use of the infrastructure that existed there. I had never really seen the potential of that wall but now when I go into the studio, now I see it as the handball wall. “Part of what play does is it helps us see and think about things differently. When you’re in a playful state of mind, all of the sudden the stuff around you has a greater sense of possibility. I felt privileged to have stumbled upon this wonderful thing.” At his slip and slide four weeks ago, Williams encountered the same thing but from the other perspective. A grey-haired man he estimated to be in his 70s saw the delight of people splashing down the slide. He soon stripped down to his equally white briefs. “He’d been sitting on the bench all afternoon and as I passed by at one point, [he] quietly asked if he could ride,” remembered Williams. “He was a champion and stripped down to his tighty-whities and ended up riding the inflatable tube down the hill. He wasn’t really on my radar up until that point, but given the ageism that is endemic to our society, to see what appeared to be a frail old man ride an inflated tube down 300 feet of wet plastic and then carry the tube up the hill like one of the 20-year-old men was to see an astonishing change in both my perspective and his.” Williams calls sliders like the older man a spontaneous rider and every year there are a handful who take leave of their plans to take part. They tell Williams the event was, “the best time they’ve had all year.” And, “Smile from cheek to cheek, beaming like a kid again.” msteweart@vancourier.com twitter.com/MHStewart


today’shomes A32

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

INTERESTED IN ADVERTISING IN TODAY’S HOMES? Contact Linda Garner:

604-738-1411 | lgarner@vancourier.com

What happens when boomers sell their houses? NEARLY HALF PLAN TO RETIRE IN LARGE HOMES ANGIE OSHIKA rew.ca

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magine a flood of houses suddenly listed for sale across Canada, overwhelming supply and causing prices to drop dramatically. That’s the nightmare scenario that some real estate analysts predict. And the source of this sudden flood? The generation of Canadians known as the baby boomers reaching retirement and downsizing. Boomers make up almost one-third of our population (29 per cent), and as they’ve moved from one life stage to the next, their needs have always shifted our society. So should we fear that this time they’ll topple the entire real estate market and ruin the financial future of the genera-

tions that follow? Probably not. Recent studies by the Conference Board of Canada and Royal LePage suggest that the situation isn’t as clear cut as the demographic charts might make us think. Boomers don’t always follow the path of previous generations. They’re approaching retirement with more ambition, better health, and more affluence. In fact, the Royal LePage study reports that nearly half (43.5 per cent) of boomers who plan to move intend to find a new home that is the same size or bigger than their current one. “Baby boomers are the wealthiest generation in Canadian history,” said Phil Soper, chief executive officer of Royal LePage Real Estate. “They live in large homes with ample space for their many possessions. They love their garages and their yards.” Adult children are staying at home longer, too — as many as 33.4 per cent in some provinces. “The adult children of baby boomers aren’t going anywhere

fast,” added Soper. “Good jobs have proven more difficult for them to find, they’re extending their studies and they’re living at home. It is no wonder the concept of swapping a family-sized home for a small retreat has lost its lustre.” When boomers do start to move to smaller dwellings, will there then be an absence of interested buyers for multistory houses? It doesn’t look that way. The children of the boomers, known as Generation Y, are a substantial subset (27.3 per cent) of the population themselves. As they settle and start families, the perceived safety and comfort of the multi-storey homes in the suburbs is appealing and familiar. “The study results do not point to a … decrease in demand for traditional singlefamily homes,” he added. “For the baby boomers that do head downtown, there is a generation waiting to move in.” Another factor is international immigration; new Canadians will also be looking for safe neighbourhoods with parks and schools nearby. In addition to

this increase in demand, construction of new single-family homes is expected to decrease, and some of the existing houses will be converted into multiple-unit dwellings. Single-family houses will become somewhat rarer. As we can see, the formula isn’t as simple as predicting what the aging boomer generation will do. The market for smaller homes is just as complex. The Conference Board of Canada study points out that a percentage of boomers will downsize, thereby increasing the market for condominiums and townhomes. One-person households are growing as well, because of more divorces and fewer couples and families being formed. That adds to the demand for multifamily units, particularly in urban centres. But both studies agree that a wide range of market and demographic factors will contribute to keeping our real estate market cushioned and homes of all sizes selling as the boomers settle into retirement.

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EW40

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY 100% BC Owned and Operated Prices Effective September 5 to September 11, 2013.

We reserve the right to limit quantities. We reserve the right to correct printing errors.

Grocery Department

Meat Department Green & Black's Organic Fair Trade Chocolate Bars

Ethical Bean Whole Bean Organic Fair Trade Coffee assorted varieties

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Stahlbush Island Farms Frozen Fruit

3.99

4.98

3lb product of Canada

WOW!

PRICING

product of USA

assorted varieties

SAVE

7.99lb/ 17.61kg

Popcorn Indiana Popcorn, Chipins or Indulgent Snacks

PureBlue, PureRed or PureBlack Juice Blend

SAVE

value pack

2/8.00

30%

1.89L

product of Canada

3.99

Organic Beef Stewing Meat

assorted varieties

assorted varieties

Organic Gala Apples from Harker’s Fruit Ranch Cawston, BC

100g • product of E.U.

Liberté Méditerranée 750g or Greek Yogurt 500g

Earth’s Own Almond Fresh or Coconut Beverages

SAVE

2/5.00

37%

340g product of Canada

3.99lb/ 8.80kg

assorted varieties

SAVE

8.99

Produce Department

Whole Specialty Frying Chickens

90 vegcaps

A.Vogel VegOmega-3

1.50 off regular

27.99

60 capsules

• 100% vegetarian-friendly. • Not derived from fish or other animal sources.

retail price 425-454g

170g • product of USA

WOW!

Happy 8th Anniversary South Surrey !

PRICING

Stop by Saturday, September 7th from 11:00am to 3:00pm at 3248 King George Blvd. South Surrey to celebrate our 8th Anniversary. We will be hosting a donation barbeque and serving coffee and cake. Take advantage of our many in-store specials. See you there!

Look for our

2010 - 2013 Awards. Your loyalty has helped Choices achieve these awards. Thank you!

WOW! PRICING Find us on Facebook: facebook.com/ChoicesMarkets

Best Organic Produce

Best Grocery Store

Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/ChoicesMarkets

2010-2012

www.choicesmarkets.com Kitsilano

Cambie

Kerrisdale

Yaletown

Rice Bakery

South Surrey

2627 W. 16th Ave. Vancouver 604.736.0009

3493 Cambie St. Vancouver 604.875.0099

1888 W. 57th Ave. Vancouver 604.263.4600

1202 Richards St. Vancouver 604.633.2392

2595 W. 16th Ave. Vancouver 604.736.0301

3248 King George Blvd. South Surrey 604.541.3902

Burnaby Crest

8683 10th Ave. Burnaby 604.522.0936

Kelowna

Floral Shop

1937 Harvey Ave. Kelowna 250.862.4864

2615 W. 16th Vancouver 603-736-7522


Vancouver Courier September 6 2013