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FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013

Vol. 104 No. 60 • Established 1908

WEEKEND EDITION

THE VOICE OF VANCOUVER NEIGHBOURHOODS

NEWS: Bike Share 4/ OPINION: Social engineering 10

Searching for closure

photo Mike Howell

AS DANIELA SALMEN CONTINUES THE SEARCH FOR HER HUSBAND’S BODY IN HARRISON LAKE, SHE QUESTIONS WHY SHE HAD TO GO OUT OF COUNTRY FOR HELP MIKE HOWELL Staff writer

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lone aluminum skiff slowly plies the placid waters off the shore of a remote campsite on Harrison Lake, near the small town of Agassiz. Aboard are Gene and Sandy Ralston, a retired couple in their 60s from Idaho, who reached this inviting spot after a 50-minute boat ride from a marina at the south end of the lake. The area is known as Westwood Bay. The surrounding terrain is a mix of dense forest and craggy outcrops that slope down to a rocky, windblown shoreline, which makes the campsite all the more unique in this setting. Once a log-sorting area, the site links to a forestry service road that is best managed in a four-wheel drive

for the one-and-a-half hour trip from the main highway. It’s the road 66-year-old outdoorsman Raymond Salmen travelled May 27 to get here in his Ford truck and camper. The retired millwright drove up with his two small dogs from his home in Kitsilano to fish and hike. Thirteen days after Salmen arrived, he went missing and Agassiz RCMP believe he drowned in the very waters the Ralstons have come to search. The couple was hired by Salmen’s wife, Daniela, who was at the marina to wish the Ralstons good luck before they took their custommade sonar equipment and expertise up the lake. “I can’t say enough about them and how they’ve given me some hope that they’ll find Ray,” she said, standing in the marina’s parking lot last Saturday morning with

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Gene Ralston of Idaho comforts Daniela Salmen, whose husband is believed drowned in Harrison Lake. Gene and his wife Sandy are experts at recovering bodies in deep water. Scan page with Layar to see a video. her dogs, Elmer and Bandit, who were rescued from her husband’s camper. The fact the Ralstons are here is comforting to Daniela. But she is baffled why there isn’t a police force, search and rescue team or some other agency in the province that could do the

80

up to

same job. The RCMP says its dive team is restricted by regulations as to how deep it can dive and officers are still training to operate new sonar equipment. Some organizations, such as Kent-Harrison Search and Rescue, have a sonar

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but its capabilities are limited and the team’s volunteer members are not experts on how to use it. Further hampering body recovery efforts for police and others is the absence of a crucial piece of equipment called a remote operated vehicle, or ROV, which the

Ralstons have and is essential to their work. The ROV is an underwater robot, equipped with lights and dual tilting cameras that can be dropped in deep water to search around rocks and debris on the bottom of a lake. Continued on page 14

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013

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FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

IN THIS ISSUE

25 05 12 10 24 29 NEWS

Take

Living to New Heights

Your choice of Moving for Free or a Monthly Rent Reduction.

LET’S TALK ABOUT REX BY JO LEDINGHAM

Offer ends August 31st.

Colleen Wheeler is a powerhouse in Bard on the Beach’s production of Timothy Findley’s play Elizabeth Rex.

CLASS NOTES: MOBILE LEARNING BY CHERYL ROSSI Students from General Gordon elementary will be the third school group to be housed in portables at Queen Elizabeth elementary.

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FRESH MARKET BY SANDRA THOMAS Seniors and poorer residents in South Granville and Marpole are getting a chance to buy economical and fresh produce.

OPINION STRAIGHT AHEAD PATH BY ALLEN GARR Notwithstanding concern from Macdonald Street residents, the Point Grey bike route is a feat of social and traffic engineering.

KUDOS AND KVETCHES HEARD IT THROUGH THE GRAPEVINE BY TEAM K&K Calgary Flames goalie Miikka Kirprusoff is a Finnish minotaur and other things columnist Licia Corbella has learned through eavesdropping.

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EVERYONE’S EARS ARE DIFFERENT.

SPORTS WHEEL WORLD: POINT GREY PLAN BY KAY CAHILL

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Much of the proposed bike lane project for Point Grey Road makes good sense. But the displacement of car traffic is a valid concern.

HOME AND GARDEN

SEE MORE WITH LAYAR Additional content in this issue available through the Layar app includes: P01: FEATURE STORY VIDEOS Mike Howell’s video on the search for a missing Vancouver man’s body in Harrison Lake. Plus David Eby grills Suzanne Anton in the legislature.

THAT’S WHY EVERYONE NEEDS A DIFFERENT HEARING AID WIDHH is different too. Your hearing is assessed by a trusted clinician *. And we offer a wide range of hearing aids, not just one brand.

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P17: STANLEY PARK CELEBRATION A direct link to the city’s interactive website marking events to honour the 125th birthday of Stanley Park.

P23: ENTERTAINMENT: PICKS OF THE WEEK Music videos and movie trailers for shows and concerts coming to town this week.

Download the free Layar app to your iPhone, iPad or Android smartphone or tablet. The Vancouver Courier, a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership, respects your privacy. We collect, use and disclose your personal information in accordance with our Privacy Statement which is available at vancourier. com. For all delivery problems, please call 604-942-3081. To contact the Courier’s main office, call 604-7381411.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013

PointGreyRoadbikelanedebaterollson

SENIORS, PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES SAY THEY ARE BEING IGNORED BY PROPOSAL BOB MACKIN

Contributing writer

T

he public hearing over the Point Grey separated bike lane may be a long and winding road itself. Almost 200 people signed up to air their opinions on the controversial $6 million proposal. The July 23 public hearing at city council’s finance and services committee was scheduled to resume with speaker 18 at 6 p.m. July 25, after Courier press time. A decision is expected before city council recesses for the rest of summer on Aug. 1. Seniors and people with disabilities, who were among the first speakers at council, say they were consulted too late on the proposal and want the Vision Vancouver-dominated council to order staff back to the drawing board. “This is a plan developed for very fit young people, it reduces access for people who cannot travel any distance by foot or wheelchair,” Jill Weiss, chair of the council-appointed Persons With Disabilities Advisory Committee told council. “It reduces access to an important beachfront area for the most fragile and vulnerable people and it reduces

Cyclists navigate traffic along Cornwall Avenue near Maple Street. access to an important seniors centre.” Weiss said city staff consulted her committee and the Seniors Advisory Committee early in the planning for the Comox-Helmcken Greenway. However, on this file, staff didn’t meet with them until July 8, near the end of the four-month, second phase of consultation. Weiss said the plan removes vehicle access and parking on a street that is not fully served by transit. Verbal assurances by staff that alterations would be made are not suf-

file photo Dan Toulgoet

ficient. “None of the proposed solutions to our concerns are included in the report presented to you because of lack of time,” Weiss said. Seniors Advisory Committee chair Chris Morrissey said the costly plan benefits only a small percentage of citizens on the West Side. “If the city’s coffers were overflowing, perhaps we might be more supportive of the project,” Morrissey told councillors. “How-

ever this is not the reality.” “If it is going to go ahead it needs to be sent back for more consideration,” she said. Chestnut Street resident Brian Tucker, who holds a doctorate from Cornell University in organizational behaviour, was the first citizen to speak and set the tone for several opponents to follow, worried that it is a done deal because of the Vision Vancouver majority. Tucker said diversion of more than 10,000 vehicles from Point Grey Road to Fourth Avenue, Broadway and other southern streets to satisfy an estimated 600 cyclists a day would cause congestion and greater danger elsewhere. “I predict blood will flow on the streets of Vancouver,” he said. The staff report said ICBC data, which includes crashes in parking lots and crashes involving parked vehicles, reported 46 bike and car collisions from 2008 to 2012 on Cornwall Avenue and five on Point Grey Road. Tucker said the report doesn’t offer safety projections for the new route. “Don’t you think that if there were some positives and good news about safety in this plan it would have a high-profile, it would be front and centre?” Tucker said. Mayor Gregor Robertson is abstaining from the debate and vote because of the appearance of conflict of interest. A map on the staff presentation shows a new traffic signal at Point Grey Road and Stephens Street and closure to vehicles on the north end of Stephens, near Robertson’s recently purchased home. A bus stop will be relocated to Trafalgar Street. The plan includes additional traffic calming where York Avenue meets Stephens. 2010goldrush@gmail.com twitter.com/bobmackin

Council greenlights $6 million for bike share system TEST LAUNCH WILL INCLUDE 1,500 BIKES AND 125 STATIONS DREW MCLACHLAN Contributing writer

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ancouver will soon be joining the likes of Montreal, New York and Chicago as the city prepares to launch its public bike share system. Designed for locals rather than tourists, the system will allow for both annual and temporary members to use bikes for under 30 minutes for free, while longer rentals require gradually higher fees — an eight hour rental and day pass would cost $118. The city is pursuing Vancouver’s residential demographic in part to appease to private bike shops, which see most of their profits from the tourist market. The city is also enforcing a 50-metre buffer between these shops and bike share stations, and a staff presentation to city council made note of how both Washington, D.C. and New York had worked with local bike shops. The system is set to launch in the spring of 2014, and will include 1,500 bikes and 125 stations. A test launch, planned for early 2014, will include 250 bikes and 25 stations. Stations will be placed within downtown Vancouver, between

Arbutus and Main, and 12th Avenue to the Waterfront. Locations will not be finalized until autumn and will continue to change after implementation based on special events and how much use the station receives. Distance between stations will be approximately two to three blocks. Depending on the success of the bike share system, it may expand into other parts of Vancouver and neighbouring municipalities. The city first expressed interest in a public bike system in April 2011 and began negotiations with Alta in June 2012. Council approved the plan July 23, with seven councillors in favour and two (George Affleck and Elizabeth Ball of the NPA) opposed. The city will be entering a five-year contract with Alta Bike Share, a company from Portland, Ore. that will be acting as owner, operator, and financier of the bike share system once sponsors and donators, financing agreements, and operating plans have been finalized. The city will fund the system with $6 million upon startup and $800,000 annually thereafter to support staffing and signs. The bike system will also result in an expected $500,000 annual loss for the city from lowered parking meter use. Costs will be subsidized by corporate sponsors, with advertisements placed

on bikes, helmets and stations. Alta and the city will share profits equally. The city decided on the business model in order to avoid risk in what they call a “relatively young industry.” Public Bike System Company, also known as Bixi, will be supplying the bicycles, helmets and station hardware and software. Bikes will be seven speed and equipped with GPS systems. The stations will be solar powered and accompanied by helmet vending machines and return receptacles. The bike share system falls in line with Vancouver’s Greenest City Action Plan, Transportation 2040 and Healthy City Initiative, and the city expects a substantial increase in cycling. The proposal to city council made note that in London, England, 70 per cent of users were annual members and in Washington, D.C., the bar was set even higher at 87 per cent. Proposed membership costs are $5 per day, $20 per week and $95 for an annual pass. Alta Bike Share was unavailable for comment to the Courier. Drew_McLachlan@hotmail.com twitter.com/LachedAndLoaded


FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

news

QE elementary portables to stay

Portables will remain at Queen Elizabeth elementary and Queen Elizabeth Annex at least until 2016. The Vancouver School Board decided at its last meeting of the school year to move General GordonelementarystudentstoQueenElizabeth during Gordon’s seismic renewal to make up for an anticipated $2 million budget shortfall, instead of phasing construction and keeping students onsite, as previously planned. General Gordon will be the third school to occupy the portables at Queen Elizabeth elementary. Jules Quesnel students used the portables starting in September 2009 and students who will attend Norma Rose Point school are expected to remain at Queen Elizabeth elementary until July 2014. Queen Elizabeth staff and parents told the board they were concerned about extra wear and tear on the schools and playground as well as traffic problems. They said they were frustrated that previously promised capital improvements remain unaddressed, according to a VSB memorandum. Fourteen classroom portables operate at Queen Elizabeth elementary at West 16th Ave-

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nue and Camosun Street. Five portables will accommodate General Gordon students at Queen Elizabeth Annex at Crown Street and West King Edward Avenue. The school board is improving the playfields at the main school and playgrounds at both and expects to have Wi-Fi at both Queen Elizabeth sites in September. The interior of Queen Elizabeth elementary will be renovated. “Hopefully when [parents] do see improvements, they’ll see the hardship of hosting the school is going to mean they’re going to get some improvements done,” said Jay Hiscox, project manager for the school board. “They would never get this level of improvement done to the school because we’re so hard pressed for dollars.” Queen Elizabeth elementary sits on a large site adjacent to Camosun and Pacific Spirit parks. It includes two gymnasiums, a multipurpose room and two activity spaces. “There’s no other school in the system that has two gymnasiums,” Hiscox said. School board staff will undertake a feasibility studythisfalltocarryoutlong-termplanningfor a West Side swing space. “It is unreasonable to think that we may not have to come back again to Queen Elizabeth,” Hiscox said. He noted the school board installed sprinklers for fire safety at the portables at Queen Elizabeth elementary after Jules Quesnel students departed. crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013

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with Sandra Thomas I had hoped to update readers with the results of the Hastings Park governance issue in this column, but the city deferred the decision until Aug. 1. As I pointed out in a page one story in Wednesday’s Courier, Hastings Park is governed by the non-profit PNE’s board of directors. But it’s undergoing a massive $310.5 million redevelopment so the question of who should manage the park is on the table. While city staff and an independent auditor have recommended the governance remain with the PNE, some residents and community groups want the park board to take control. And the park board has said publicly it wants the job. A third option is to have a city department, such as engineering, manage the property.

STANLEY PARK STABBING

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I didn’t have many details prior to the Courier’s press deadline, but a 24-yearold man was in custody Thursday after slashing a 33-year-old man in the neck Wednesday night in an area between Second and Third beaches.

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news Hastings governance decision on hold

You might think it’s common knowledge that it’s not a good idea to feed the many raccoons that wander Stanley Park, but apparently that’s not the case. So the Stanley Park Ecology Society has enlisted the help of a new raccoon recruit to get that

file photo Dan Toulgoet

The city has deferred its decision on the Hastings Park governance issue until Aug. 1. message out. Beginning this week, with the help of a human interpreter, this new recruit, basically a human in a raccoon costume, will engage, entertain and educate visitors to Prospect Point as part of a summer-long park interpretation project delivered by the society. The goal is to answer visitors’ questions about raccoons and other urban wildlife as a way of limiting human and animal conflicts in Stanley Park. According to the society, raccoons are curious and intelligent wild animals that are highly adaptable to living in developed areas near humans. They take advantage of any available food, including easy meals handed out by park visitors, which is not a healthy staple of their diet and also decreases their fear of humans. That combination increases their chance of being injured or posing a danger to humans. The launch of the raccoon interpretation station is the newest addition to the

society’s eco ranger program, now in its 13th year. While the raccoon program might be interesting, what I find even more intriguing is the eco ranger program. The society’s eco rangers are made up of volunteers from Canada and abroad, including Kenya, Switzerland, Taiwan Australia, Italy and Belgium, who combined speak more than 15 different languages in addition to English. In the summer months Eco Rangers work in pairs as roving naturalists in the park and at interpretive stations at Prospect Point, Beaver Lake, Malkin Bowl and Second Beach, answering visitors’ questions about local animals, plants and cultural history. One of their main goals is to educate visitors on appropriate behaviour in the park, such as not feeding wildlife. Watch for eco rangers in Stanley Park, in bright green shirts and hats, every Tuesday to Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10

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FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

news

EW7

Residents call for stricter cell tower laws Staff writer

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patch of parking lot behind an Oakridge mini-mall is being guarded around the clock while its status as a future telecommunications tower location remains up in the air. “I’ve been here for the past 18 days basically just sitting around roasting like a rotisserie chicken,” said security guard Sanji Pakarti on Wednesday. Construction on a 14.9-metre Telus cellphone tower near West 49th Avenue and Oak Street halted earlier this month after nearby residents protested at city hall. A group calling themselves the Concerned Neighbour Committee said they are worried about potential health risks and have collected about 800 signatures protesting the tower’s inclusion in their neighbourhood. Hand-made signs protesting the plan dot the lawns of several surrounding homes. Sita Walia, a spokesperson for the group, said he wants the city’s standards regarding telecommunications infrastructure to be as strict as the Vancouver School Board’s, which doesn’t allow for towers to be built within 305 metres (1,000 feet) of school property because of the chance children

could be more susceptible to exposure to radio frequency (RF) radiation. “The fact that the tower, a large piece of industrial equipment is metres within a residence is not comforting,” Walia wrote in a letter to the city and copied to the Courier. “We believe that until conclusive research demonstrates that there are no adverse effects from cellular towers, cellular towers currently being built should be moved 305m away from residential areas.” Green Party Coun. Adriane Carr introduced a motion at council July 9 to require public consultation for any new cell towers, not just those 15 metres or higher as is the current policy. She also called for RF standards to be 100 times below levels set out in Health Canada’s Safety Code 6 in order to meet similar safety codes in other countries. The motion was referred to staff. A worker at one of the mall’s shops who didn’t want to give her name said the landlord had originally told them they were simply building an electric-car charging station. “The first we heard about it was when neighbours started coming in asking questions about it,” she said. afleming@vancourier.com twitter.com/flematic

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013

In just 12 hours, we raised over $42,600 and counting!

THANK YOU, VANCOUVER

A special THANK YOU to all of our participants, team captains, cancer survivors and caregivers, event day volunteers, sponsors and donors for giving their time and effort to the Canadian Cancer Society Relay For Life event held at Killarney Park on June 22, 2013. A huge THANK YOU goes to our 2013 Relay For Life leadership team and planning subcommittees. Your dedication to the event is one of the key reasons why we were so successful this year.

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news

Penguins parade,protesters plan SUMBUL VALLANI Contributing writer

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s protesters gather outside, Vancouver Aquarium visitors will have a chance to watch African penguins slip, slide and waddle at the Penguin Walk show this week. Guests are invited to see the birds up close while they have their daily walks around the beluga deck at the Arctic Canada Gallery. The Penguin Walk gives the birds an opportunity to learn new behaviours, experience new sights and sounds and get extra exercise, according to marine mammal curator Brian Sheenhan. “It is an important part of the care we provide to animals at the Vancouver Aquarium,” he said. The flightless birds will follow a team member and waddle along a curved pathway numerous times a day. Show organizers say the walks will allow visitors to have a closer look at the birds and experience them without a glass barrier. Sheenhan believes that through the penguin walk, guests have the opportunity to form a genuine connection with the African penguins. “We have never had penguins at the Vancouver Aquarium, they were found at the Vancouver Zoo previously. Vancouverites would have seen them at the zoos,” said Nicole Cann, manager of interpretive delivery. “We brought the African penguins here as they are an endangered species. They are susceptible to fishing threats

and an oil spill happened not too long ago that affected the population as well.” As the penguins take their walk inside the aquarium, animal rights activists will be outside the facility this Saturday waving their signs in support of International Empty The Tanks Protest Day. No Whales In Captivity, an animal rights organization, will be participating in the first ever “empty the tanks protest” taking place at the aquarium. According to event organizers on Facebook, the objective is to have many people come together to stand up against what they say is global industry that fuels the capture and containment of whales and dolphins in tanks. From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., the protesters will hand out flyers and hold up banners and placards condemning what they call imprisoned animals forced to do tricks for human entertainment and profit. Representatives from No Whales In Captivity were unavailable for comment to the Courier at press time. Cann says the Penguin Walk shows are completely safe. “Animal healthcare is the number one priority at the aquarium and we tested it multiple times to make sure [the penguins] felt comfortable,” she said. The penguins at the Vancouver Aquarium were bred at another aquarium as part of the Association of Zoos and Aquarium’s Species Survival Plan. svallani5@hotmail.com twitter.com/sumbulvallani

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Movember moves millions into prostate research DREW MCLACHLAN Contributing writer

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hough Movember lies months away, “mo bros,” “mo sistas” and others affected by prostate cancer have reason to celebrate this summer. Prostate Cancer Canada has awarded $8 million worth of grants to 40 researchers across the country, five of whom are based in Vancouver. The project was funded by Movember Canada, a fundraising organization that calls on young men to put down their razors for the duration of November, in order to raise money and awareness for prostate cancer research. Pete Bombaci, national director of Movember Canada, said that Vancouver is quickly growing into a hub for cancer research, and that “many globally respected researchers are in the Vancouver Prostate Centre, which Movember looks to for leadership in the field.” One of those researchers is Dr. Richard Wassersug, who stands as the first and only researcher to receive a grant from Prostate Cancer Canada for studying survivorship, a field that aims to improve the quality of life for those diagnosed with cancer. Wassersug’s research project aims to alleviate the side effects of patients going through androgen deprivation therapy, which reduces the amount of testosterone and estrogen produced

by the body, causing hot flashes to occur and disrupt the sleep of patients, as well as causing daytime fatigue. “Many patients don’t experience symptoms when they are diagnosed, the drugs and treatments are causing these symptoms,” Wassersug said. “We have a cure, we can prevent prostate cancer using radiation if we can get to it early enough, but we still have to deal with the side effects. I felt very flattered that Prostate Cancer Canada awarded us the grant.” Wassersug said the grant will allow him and his partner to track bloodwork, run controlled experiments, and purchase instruments to track sleeping patterns. Prostate Cancer Canada awards grants annually, and asks researchers to submit proposals for projects, which are decided by a panel of advisors from around the country. Public awareness of prostate cancer has grown exponentially over the past decade and the number of proposals Prostate Cancer Canada received increased by 23 per cent since last year. Stuart Edwards, vice-president of research, health promotion and support services, said the organization is now looking towards the breast cancer community as something to emulate, due to the strong public support and number of breakthroughs it has. Drew_McLachlan@hotmail.com twitter.com/LachedAndLoaded

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013

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Social engineering at work on Pt.Grey Road

J

oanne Emerman gave up her regular bridge game Tuesday to arrive at city council early, one of 193 people who signed up to give their views on Vision Vancouver’s latest and most complex bit of social engineering. This is the proposal (a done deal more likely, although at time of writing this column no final decision had been made) to close Point Grey Road from Macdonald to Alma to through traffic. Many of the private motor vehicles crossing south on the Burrard Bridge will be diverted from travelling down Cornwall and heading in that direction. Those (7,000 to 10,000 per day) that do will end up travelling south on Macdonald, which is what has brought Emerman and her neighbours to council. The UBC professor, who at 70 still teaches and is a regular cyclist, happens to live on Macdonald at Third Avenue. She is opposed to closing Point Grey Road. In case you hadn’t noticed, this exercise that council is engaged in is about more than stop signs, speed bumps and traffic circles. It’s part of a significant cultural shift that is taking place across the globe; one that is intent on dethroning the private car from a position it has held for generations as the apex mode of human transportation. The most zealous in this social engineering movement characterize driving a car, particularly alone, as a sin, whereas riding a bike, walking and using public transit are viewed as a sacrament. The wafer served up Tuesday before the main sermon dealing with Point Grey Road was council’s approval of a bike-share program. We are hardly the lead in this. There are more than 500 cities worldwide that offer bikes mostly for one-way short-term trips. Cities that have most recently taken part in this transformational act report remarkable success. New York, for example, with 6,000 bikes had 529,000 trips in the first month. And it has been a long time coming here since former NPA councilor Peter Ladner moved a motion back in 2008 to introduce this program. What slowed it down was figuring out how to deal with the law requiring bike helmets. In other jurisdictions this has caused a damper on the success of their bike-share programs. By the spring of 2014, Vancouver intends to have 1,500 bikes available at 125 stations, all in or close to downtown. What makes our system unique is that it will be the first to also provide helmets for rent immediately adjacent to the bike stations so people who choose to can obey the law. The helmets will be cleaned before they are returned for rental. The city is contracting with a private operator, will invest an initial $6 million for capital costs and another $1 million for start-up costs. Over the five years of the contract, it is estimated to cost taxpayers about $4,000 per bike. The vast majority of folks addressing council on that issue were in favour. That was not the case with plans for Point Grey Road, Cornwall and the Burrard Bridge, at least not those speakers I was able to hear. Although residents along Point Grey Road wayincluding Ladner are over the moon at the prospects of the closure, the expansion of parks and the daylighting of a stream and why wouldn’t they be? I have some sympathy for Emerman and her neighbours, and I realize shutting down Point Grey Road will do nothing but drive property values up on one of the most expensive strips of real estate in the city; the rich will get richer but then that is what the rich do. City staff, however, has to be given some credit. As a result of open houses and other feedback, many changes have been made to accommodate those being affected. Merchants of Cornwall will be left without separated bike lanes. And folks living on York will have many parking spots returned that were originally eliminated. Residents on First and Third will be spared a serious influx of traffic, if this all works out. Right now, the intersection at Burrard and Cornwall is nuts. It will be fixed. Now if we can just get those damned cyclists to stop riding down the sidewalks that would truly be a blessing. agarr@vancourier.com

ALLEN GARR

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FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

WE WANT YOUR OPINION Hate it or love it? We want to know... really, we do! Reach us by email: editor@vancourier.com

Pressure needed to reduce solitary cell time

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ell. The word was first used in the medieval era to denote a small room for monastic contemplation. It also has a scientific meaning as the basic building block of life, and of course in the context of imprisonment. There is plenty of time for contemplation in the latter kind of cell. But the basic unit of the correctional system has little to do with life when it’s used to isolate a person for months or years at a stretch. It’s a kind of living death for the imprisoned. Certainly there are violent offenders who require cooling off for their own protection or that of others. Yet the issue of extended solitary confinement as a form of torture is getting more press these days, in large part because of public awareness of Iraq war whistleblower U.S. Army soldier Bradley Manning, who has spent most of his time in solitary confinement since his arrest in 2010 for submitting classified material to WikiLeaks. On July 8, 30,000 prisoners in California began a peaceful hunger strike to protest the inhumane conditions of long-term solitary confinement, and the National Religious Campaign Against Torture called for religious leaders across the United States to sign a petition against the state’s use of it. As I wrote last week, Herman Wallace has spent 41 years in solitary confinement at Louisiana State Prison, also known as Angola Prison and the “Alcatraz of the South.” What happens to a human being confined so long, and so inhumanely, in a cage little bigger than the back of a pickup truck? I would think that there are very few options; you either become batty or a Bodhisattva. I suspect Wallace and the other remaining member of the Angola 3 in Angola solitary, Albert Woodfox, took the latter option. Woodfox has clocked 40 years in the hole. In February, Federal Judge James Brady, presiding in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Louisiana, agreed that racial bias tainted the grand-jury selection in his prosecution. The judge granted Habeas Corpus to Woodfox, compelling the state of Louisiana to release him. It was the third time his conviction has been overturned, yet astoundingly, he remains in solitary. “If a cause is just noble enough, you can carry the weight of the world on your shoulders,” Woodfox was quoted in Mother Jones magazine. “And I thought that my cause, then and now, was noble. So therefore, they could never break me. They might bend me a little bit, they might cause me a lot of pain. They might even take my life. But they will never be able to break me.” This issue isn’t irrelevant to Canadians. Even while most countries around the world are retreating from the use of solitary confinement, our nation is going in the other direction, following the American gulag model. Admissions to segregation cells in federal penitentiaries “grew to 8,600 prisoners per year from 8,000 since 2010 — and correctional experts anticipate another substantial jump as tough sentencing policies expand prison populations in the years ahead,” according to a March 2013 report in the Globe and Mail. Out of sight, out of mind. Solitary confinement is the part of the criminal justice system least accessible to media awareness and public accountability, although there are occasional chinks in the walls. Former federal inmate Bobby Lee Worm, who won a settlement with the government for her treatment after spending three and half of her six-year sentence in solitary, described her experience in a May press conference in Vancouver. “Solitary confinement does one thing. It breaks a person’s will to live. Being locked up like that you feel like you’re losing your mind. The only contact with another human is through a food slot. Days turn into nights and into days and you don’t know if you’ll ever get out,” Worm said. Correctional Service of Canada had a protocol of prolonged and indefinite solitary confinement for female prisoners deemed to be “high risk.” After Worm posted her lawsuit, the federal government abandoned the segregation of women for indefinite periods. Hopefully this indicates that the part of the criminal justice system least amenable to public accountability can still be nudged into modern times. Considering the Harper government’s enthusiasm for American models of penal servitude, continuing pressure will be required to keep them from building a bridge to the 16th century. www.geoffolson.com

GEOFF OLSON

BIKE LANES WILL DECREASE TRAFFIC

To the editor: Re: “Bike lanes strangling traffic,” Letters, July 19. The writer of this letter repeats a mistake I have seen made by many opponents of bike lanes. He does not take into account that improvements to cycling infrastructure make driving easier because they remove drivers from the road as people, particularly women, who formerly did not ride due to the perceived dangers of cycling, get out of their cars and onto bikes. I believe the root of this error is that they do not comprehend that the relationship between the number of vehicles is not linear. In many situations, removing just 10 per cent, sometimes even five per cent, of the vehicles removes all congestion. This is particularly true when the road system is near capacity, as it is in that area of the city during busy periods. He claims that diverting traffic from Point Grey Road will “aggravate congestion, increase exhaust pollution, and increase the risk of pedestrian injury.” In my opinion, creating this bike route will encourage many people to stop driving, creating the exact opposite effects to those he predicts. We have all seen the increase in cycling the last five years as bike infrastructure has been improved, and this will only accelerate as more links, particularly separated bike lanes, are added to the network. A happy side effect for those who continue to drive will be decreased congestion and a better driving experience, contrary to the fears of some. Scott Lewis, Vancouver

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PARK COMMISSIONER CAR OWNERSHIP RESPONDS TO DECREASING; SAY ONECARD CRITIC YES TO PT. GREY RD. To the editor: BIKE PLAN Re: “Park board needs to consult more on OneCard roll-out,” Letters, July 12. This letter is in response to Anita Romaniuk, former COPE Park Commissioner’s letter. The details of the roll-out of the OneCard program were jointly negotiated with the Community Centre Associations at the table and the Park Board. Once a community centre ratifies the OneCard agreement, patrons will be able to use the OneCard to access all programming at that centre, not just Core Programming. Also, the OneCard agreement expands our low income program to provide those who qualify with a 50 per cent subsidy for programs offered by the association. We respect the need for associations to have members to support their societies. Under the OneCard agreement, associations are free to solicit members, however, membership fees are not required for access. We believe that residents should not be required to pay a membership fee to access a public community centre. The OneCard replaces the 20 different membership cards and varying fees currently in our system. Unfortunately, Ms. Romaniuk is correct, our Community Centre Associations are vulnerable to take-overs by partisan groups with agendas that are not aligned with the community interest. We have seen this with some associations deciding to spend public money on attack campaigns instead of local programming and equipment. Niki Sharma, Park board commissioner

To the editor: Re: “Kits residents divided over cycling upgrades,” July 5. As a Point Grey resident and a driver and cyclist, I am disheartened to see opponents of the Cornwall Avenue Active Transportation Corridor Project attempting to delay the vote by claiming the city hasn’t taken enough time for evaluation. Consultations have been held for six months with multiple opportunities to be heard. This is one of many misconceptions about the process and the impacts of a bike lane. We know Cornwall is the top priority because of accidents and injuries among road users. Independent evaluations have also shown that the Burrard, Hornby and Dunsmuir bike lanes have been incredible successes for both cyclists, drivers and businesses. And we know that proposed changes to the corridor will minimize impacts for existing users, won’t add more time for motorists and will be accompanied by traffic-calming measures to improve safety for residents. Vehicle ownership and use is down in all cities as dense as Vancouver, and newer generations of residents are using active transportation methods more and more. This move brings Vancouver to the forefront by expanding its network and making it a more desirable, healthy and sustainable place to live. Tyler Bryant, Vancouver

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Letters may be edited by the Courier for reasons of legality, taste, brevity and clarity. To be considered for publication, they must include the writer’s full name (no initials), home address, and telephone number (neither of which will be published), so authorship may be verified. Send to: 1574 West Sixth Ave., Vancouver V6J 1R2 or email editor@vancourier. com

COURIER POLL: “Are individual neighbourhoods winning in the battle with city hall over development policy?” CityHallWatchVAN @CityHallWchVAN: Perhaps a ‘not yet’ option would be helpful Jane Redford @redfordjane1: City hall in Vancouver are very ideological, they don’t respond to the people, they dictate COURIER STORY: “Adrian Dix thinks Liberals cheated before B.C. election,” July 18, John Cameron @JCameron27: Ah, the main plank in Dix & the old boys campaign to keep the NDP leadership Carole James & Harcourt must be barfing #bcpoli It’s good to be King @Jason_E_King: nope, he just blew it. #vanpoli COURIER STORY: “West End: Couple to take Pride in public nuptials,” July 18 Katami Designs @KatamiDesigns: Congratulation to Michael & Randy! We are so happy for you! #vancouverpride #vancouver Follow us on Facebook: The VancouverCourierNewspaper and Twitter: @VanCourierNews


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013

news Mobile market brings groceries to seniors NONPROFIT AIMS TO PROVIDE FRESH PRODUCE FOR SENIORS SANDRA THOMAS Staff writer

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hen Linda Darbey moved to South Granville in the 1970s, she and her mother shopped at a Safeway store once located between West 13th and 14th avenues. “There were two green grocers and some bakeries, but they’re all gone,” said Darbey. “The only place left is Meinhardt [Fine Foods].” The senior, who doesn’t drive, used to take the bus and SkyTrain with her mother to a grocery shop at Metrotown, but then the Save-On-Foods opened on Cambie Street, which made the trip much shorter. Darbey’s mother has since passed away, and arthritis has set in, making carrying groceries home on transit more difficult, so the senior was delighted about a new program at the South Granville Seniors Centre. The Westside Mobile Market offers seniors and low-income residents of the South Granville area fresh fruits and vegetables at prices much lower than what’s offered at most

photo Rebecca Blissett

Westside Mobile Market coordinator Annie Lambla (right) with the help of volunteer Raymonde Jabaji sets up the mobile fruit and vegetable market outside the South Granville Seniors Centre Thursday morning. grocery stores or farmers markets. Darbey shopped at the market last week and was impressed with her purchases. For a total of $6.50, she purchased lettuce, tomatoes, apples, bananas, red onions and a cauliflower. “It was really fresh and good quality and it’s only two blocks from home,” said Darbey. Merrily Tan, program and volunteer coordinator for the centre, said despite preconceived notions that all West Side seniors are wealthy, that’s simply not the case. “This might be a more affluent area, but

there are a lot of low-income seniors,” said Tan, who added besides financial barriers, many seniors aren’t physically able to walk or take transit to affordable grocery stores. “Our centre sees a lot of seniors who have problems in accessing affordable produce in our neighbourhood. There aren’t many affordable grocery stores nearby and then when they do purchase produce they have problems getting it home.” Those issues make a trip to one of the city’s popular farmers markets out of the question

for a senior, which is why the seniors centre and Westside Food Collaborative partnered to create the program. Now through Sept. 6, inexpensive produce will be purchased at the Greater Vancouver Foodbank and sold at two locations, including at the seniors centre, 1420 West 12th Ave., every Thursday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., and at Marpole Place Neighbourhood House, 1305 West 70th Ave., from 2 to 4 p.m. Tan said the one-year pilot project was designed specifically to help seniors and other vulnerable residents living in “food deserts” — areas across the city with no affordable grocery stores within walking distance. She added the prices should be affordable enough for most seniors’ budgets — a head of cauliflower will sell for $1, while two bananas or apples will sell for 25 cents. The project is supported by the Greater Vancouver Foodbank Society and made possible with funding from the Vancouver Foundation and Greenest City Fund. Jen Pleadwell, administrative development manager for Vancouver Farmers Markets, approves of the plan. The non-profit organization is responsible for eight farmers markets that take place across the city, including the winter and holiday markets. “I think it’s a great idea,” said Pleadwell. “We can’t be all things to all people so we support anything that gives people access to fresh food.” sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10

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Grandview-Woodland plan on council’s fall agenda DEVELOPING STORY

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FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

with Naoibh O’Connor

ity council will debate whether to extend consultation on the Grandview-Woodland Community Plan at a Sept. 24 meeting. Green Party Coun. Adriane Carr presented a motion at Tuesday’s council meeting asking that the Grandview-Woodland timeline be extended by at least six months and that staff “conduct a collaborative public process that would enable local area residents to select preferred land use options for their community plan.” Council voted to refer Carr’s motion to September. At a previous meeting, Vision Vancouver Coun. Andrea Reimer also asked staff to prepare a memo outlining the implications of extending community plans. Carr told the Courier Thursday morning she supports timeline extensions for Grandview-Woodland and Marpole plans, as well as for the West End and the Downtown Eastside, if requested, to allow residents time to more fully discuss and influence the plans. A group of Marpole residents submitted a request to the city earlier this month asking that its community plan timeline be extended. “The reason I think it’s so important is that we are getting to a position in Vancouver where citizens are completely cynical about the planning processes. They believe that they’re being rammed through and that the Vision majority on council is not listening to them nor willing to modify plans to incorporate their concerns,” Carr said. “That’s unbelievably tragic for democracy and it won’t lead to good planning decisions. We need to give the community time to have the input, and not just the input, but the time to have their input incorporated into changed plans.” The city dropped a controversial proposal for high towers at the corner of Broadway and Commercial after residents protested

and also withdrew a proposal for a thin street in Marpole. But both neighbourhoods are still concerned about other elements in the draft plans. The city is hosting open houses in Grandview-Woodland July 29 and Aug. 1 to allow residents to review the outcome of a July 6 workshop dealing with plans for the Broadway-Commercial Drive corridor. (See the city website for times and locations.) A coalition of Marpole residents was meeting Thursday, after the Courier’s print deadline, to finalize the design for a lawn sign protesting “forced rezoning.” Spokesperson Mike Burdick said the coalition hopes to have a minimum of 2,000 signs posted on lawns throughout the community. A formal petition will also be circulated door-to-door. “It looks like we’re going to have a community event someplace in Marpole — we haven’t quite decided yet — on Aug. 17, which is a Saturday,” Burdick said. “We’re going to do a barbecue and we’ll be handing out signs, and getting signatures on petitions. That’s going to be the [campaign] kick-off and then we’ll be going out doorto-door shortly after that with petitions and signs.” Burdick maintains there are still Marpole residents who aren’t aware the community plan is being updated. The coalition has budgeted about $5,000 to produce the signs, the petition and to rent space for weekly meetings. A few people put the money up front and will be repaid through donations to the cause. “If not, then that’s just their gift to the community,” Burdick said. “We’re going to ask for donations at the community event and if people can throw $5 in the bucket — that would be great.” Marpole residents continue to meet and discuss concerns with other neighbourhood groups fighting city hall. Burdick said they’re considering creating an umbrella website. “I think what we’d like to do in the fall is have one big rally with all of the groups,” he added. noconnor@vancourier.com twitter.com/naoibh

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A14

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013

cover story

Idaho couple hired to

B.C. POLICE AND OTHER AGENCIES LACK EXPERTISE, TRAINING

photo courtesy Daniela Salmen

Raymond Salmen, a 66-year-old outdoorsman, left his Kitsilano home May 27 to go fishing and hiking in the mountains around Harrison Lake. Thirteen days in, he went missing and is now presumed drowned in the Westwood Bay area of Harrison Lake. Continued from front page It’s also equipped with a mechanical arm that can grasp a body and bring it to the surface. Daniela sought out the Ralstons and their equipment after learning the former environmental consultants recovered almost 90 bodies in 13 years from waters in North America, including two 17-year-old boys in May from Nicola Lake, near Merritt. The couple only charges for expenses and travels in a custom-made motor home, which they use to tow their boat the “Kathy G.” It is named after a drowning victim in Alaska whose body the Ralstons recovered. Theirgenerosityhasbroughtthemmuchpraiseand media attention. And earlier this month, their reputation was noted in the B.C. Legislature by NDP Vancouver-Point Grey MLA David Eby as he challenged Minister of Justice Suzanne Anton on why Daniela and others in the province have to hire a retired couple from Idaho to recover their loved ones. “Thegovernmentshouldbeembarrassed—incredibly embarrassed,” said Daniela in an interview from her Kitsilano home before making the trip to Harrison Lake. “But nobody wants to take responsibility because then they’re going to own that whole problem, not just for Ray but for all future victims.” THE MOUNTIES believe Salmen drowned sometime after going on a hike high up in the bush above his campsite and injuring himself. Somehow, the mishap left him trapped on a small beach wedged along the shore’s steep terrain. He was roughly 400 metres north of his campsite. Unable to climb out, he took off his boots, socks and pants and likely tried to swim around a rocky bluff to another clearing but slipped under the surface. “Whether he fell off a cliff, or climbed down, we don’t know,” said RCMP Cpl. Len Van Nieuwenhuizen, the media relations officer for the Upper Fraser Valley Regional Detachment. Before Salmen entered the water, police believe he was in such distress that he used his rifle to fire six

shots. His younger brother Bob, a fellow hunter, said it was common for Salmen to carry a gun in the wilderness in case of a run-in with a bear or another wild animal. One of the bullets smashed the headlight of a Nissan Pathfinder, some 500 metres away and directly in sight of the small beach. Another two shots struck the side of a camper in a neighbouring campsite. The number of shots was significant to his brother and friend, Dr. Tony Otto, who hunted with Salmen and is the Salmens’ family doctor. It is common knowledge among hunters, they say, to fire a burst of three shots when in trouble.

I’ve always said,if “ you need to get rid of

somebody,take them on a fishing trip in Canada because it’s the easiest way to get rid of somebody and there’s no follow-up.

—Gene Ralston “He probably put three [bullets] in the air and then another three in the vehicles,” said Bob, who drove down from Cranbrook to observe the Ralstons’ recovery efforts. “But most people up here wouldn’t know what the shots mean.” Police pieced the scenario together after finding Salmen’s backpack in the bush and his shoes, socks, pants, rifle and shell casings on the small beach — a discovery only made by an RCMP helicopter crew which spotted balloons caught up in trees where Salmen sought refuge. His knife and belt, which police speculate was used for a tourniquet, are still missing.

Police got involved after campers from the shot-up vehicles reported the gunfire in the late afternoon of Sunday June 9th. They thought someone was trying to kill them. At the outset, police didn’t know exactly what type of situation they were dealing with. As they collected evidence, including the recovery of the couple’s two dogs inside Salmen’s camper, police realized the focus was a missing person. That led to a massive hunt for Salmen, with search and rescue teams on boats and foot, members of the RCMP’s tactical troop, dog handlers and a dive team. RCMP Cpl. Dwayne Farlin was one of the investigators on the search and travelled by boat to the campsite Saturday to be on standby for the Ralstons. “We have been emotionally involved from the get-go,” said Farlin, standing on the shore. “Personally and professionally, we want to find him to give closure to Daniela and the rest of the family.” Though police ruled out foul play, Salmen’s brother and Otto, who also visited the campsite Saturday, mulled over other scenarios when they received the news.“Ray has run into some strange people here,” said Otto, before Bob picked up the story. “Yeah,” Bob said, “a few years ago people were shooting semi-automatic rifles up here and they threatened to take his boat and everything else. He ended staying up in the bush all night with his gun.” Added Otto: “He figured they were drug dealers or gang members. But Ray wouldn’t get involved, wouldn’t act aggressively, wouldn’t confront them, wouldn’t look them in the eye.” THE RALSTONS began their search Saturday by lowering a torpedo-shaped device off the bow of the boat into the water. The device conceals a sonar that is attached to a cable that sends images to a monitor inside the boat’s wheelhouse. The custom-made sonar, which maps in 66-foot wide sections, is capable of working in depths of 850 feet. The work on the water is methodical and tedious, with the couple running its boat in grid patterns over a search area of approximately 1,200-feet long by 400feet wide. It’s tough going, with the type of rugged terrain above the water much the same as the area below the surface. The Ralstons began searching for bodies in the year 2000. Gene, a trained hydrologist, said he “conned” his wife into buying a sonar for their business, which included scanning under bridges for construction projects. Less than 30 days after buying it, the couple assisted a search and rescue crew and recovered a man’s body from Bear Lake, Utah. On the drive back home, Gene asked Sandy if they could keep the sonar. “She got a tear in her eye and said ‘yes’ because she could see the importance of what it meant to that particular family to have their loved one back,” he said by telephone prior to arriving at Harrison Lake. A question they’ve answered many times is why the couple would drive all over North America searching for bodies. Gene’s answer: “It’s just the right thing to do.” He and his wife have been to B.C. so many times over the years to recover bodies that Gene has lost count. Possibly close to 30 trips, he added. Like Daniela, he doesn’t understand why the province doesn’t have a system, team or protocol in place to recover bodies from B.C. waters. He emphasized obtaining the right equipment is one thing, having the proper training is another — a skill needed desperately in this country. “It’s unfortunate,” he said. “I’ve always said, if you need to get rid of somebody, take them on a fishing trip in Canada because it’s the easiest way to get rid of somebody and there’s no follow-up.”


FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A15

search for Kitsilano man AND PROPER EQUIPMENT TO SEARCH FOR BODIES IN DEEP WATER

photo Mike Howell

Gene Ralston (left) and his wife Sandy started searching for bodies in 2000. They charge no fee, only expenses. The Ralstons have been to B.C. about 30 times, most recently recovering two teens from Nicola Lake, near Merritt.

photo Mike Howell

Bob Salmen looks over Westwood Bay where police believe his older brother Raymond probably drowned after injuring himself and trying to hike down steep terrain. The Courier emailed questions to the RCMP media unit, which speaks for the force’s dive team, and to Minister of Justice Suzanne Anton to ask whose responsibility body recovery is in B.C. RCMP Sgt. Rob Vermeulen said the dive team can’t go beyond 130 feet deep because of provisions set out in the Canada Labour Code and federal diving regulations. Additionally,thediveteam’snewsonarequipment is “sophisticated technology that requires additional training and software integration,” Vermeulen said in response to the Courier’s email. “Sonar does provide additional capacities during searches, but it has been used in a very limited capacity as training is ongoing.” All efforts, he said, were made within the RCMP’s “current capabilities” to search Harrison Lake for Salmen, whose brother described as a strong swimmer in good health with industrial first-aid training. “Unfortunately,” he concluded, “there are numerous challenges involved with trying to locate and recover bodies in water, particularly at significant depths that not many people understand outside of the diving community.” The B.C. Coroners Service doesn’t get involvedinasearchuntilabodyisfound,although Ralston said he was met with resistance by a coroner in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories after discovering a body. “Neither the coroner nor an RCMP member showed up,” he said. “We put the body on an airplane and flew him into town.”

To the question of whose responsibility it is to recoverbodies,Antonsaidinanemailthatpolice and search and rescue teams make “operational decisions around recovery efforts, searches and investigations.” “Recovery efforts,” she added, “whether they be RCMP or search and rescue volunteers, need to be weighed carefully against safety of the responders and the likelihood of successful recovery.” Earlier this month, David Eby, the NDP MLA for Vancouver-Point Grey, pressed Anton during question period in the Legislature, saying she needed to take leadership on the issue. Anton took Eby’s challenge as him criticizing the RCMP, which he told the Courier he wasn’t. He simply wanted Anton to take action on the matter. He believes it’s the government’s responsibility to coordinate all agencies, including reaching out to B.C. Hydro that has a remote operated vehicle, to develop a comprehensive approach to body recovery. “I would expect government to roll up its sleeves and say, ‘How can we solve this problem?’” Eby said by telephone this week. Anton’s response in the Legislature: “I am not going to tell individual RCMP detachments or search and rescue people how to manage their affairs. They are the experts. They make the operational decisions. They take things to heart.” AT JUST before 11 a.m. Saturday, the Ralstons guide their boat into the shore where Salmen’s brother and Otto anxiously await

news of the morning’s work. They climb aboard to view the scans and Otto reports an “interesting figure” was spotted near the beach where police found Salmen’s belongings. The discovery prompts the Ralstons to request the RCMP’s Farlin to go out for a second look with the underwater robot. After more than an hour working the shore near the beach, the “interesting figure” turns out to be a triangular rock with smaller ones around it. When the couple returns to the shore, they look frustrated and Gene tells Farlin and the others that he’s open to suggestions. They return to the water. This time, Otto joins the Ralstons. Again, they drop the sonar in the bay and scan the bottom for Salmen’s body. The work becomes more frustrating with young beer-drinking campers hooting and hollering from the shore and drifting by the search site in inflatable boats . At one point, Farlin tells the campers, who were informed of the reason for the search, to quiet down. He requests one camper to yell out to his friends to make way for the Ralstons’ boat. Salmen’s brother wanders down the shore to escape the noise. He steps out to a few large rocks protruding at the water’s edge. He stands with his hands in his back pockets and looks out to the Ralstons’ boat. He stays in that position for a while. Then he turnsback, hisheaddownandstepsontheshore. “I sure hope they find him. Then it can bring us some closure and we can bury him. He never wanted to be cremated. He wanted a marker so he said people could come and visit him.” In the late afternoon, the Ralstons return to the shore and conclude they have done all they can, despite the challenging topography of the lake’s bottom. They call it a day and begin the long trip back in rough water that requires Sandy to hold down a computer monitor while Gene manages the three-foot swells. “We’re going to review our images tonight to see if there’s anything that jumps out at us,” said Gene over the noise of the boat’s motor and crashing waves. “If we don’t see anything, I think

we’ve done about everything we can, unfortunately. It’s going to be difficult telling [Daniela] that we haven’t been able to find him.” DANIELA MARRIED Raymond Salmen 30 years ago at Nitobe Gardens on the grounds of the University of B.C. Next month was to be the couple’s 31st wedding anniversary. They met on a blind date in February 1981, which began with dinner at the Keg and dancing afterwards. Raymond proposed to her a few months later at the Commodore, mumbling and stumbling over his words. He was a millwright at Rogers Sugar, she was a tax auditor at the Canada Revenue Agency. She liked camping, too, but stayed home this time to prepare for a trip to Slovenia. “Ray was never alone for too long up there, always meeting people and running into someone he knew,” she said in an interview earlier this month. When the Ralstons pulled up to the dock late Saturday afternoon, Daniela already heard from a search and rescue crew that her husband’s body wasn’t found. The Ralstons met her at the top of the dock and welcomed her into their motorhome. A few minutes later, Daniela emerged and sat on a rock in the marina’s parking lot. Gene walked over from his motorhome, sat next to her and held her in his arms. It was all he could do for her that day. THE DAY after Daniela returned from Harrison Lake, she sent the Courier an email. She said she is considering hiring a dive team from Las Vegas. The divers come with Gene’s recommendation. But right now, she wrote, she needs a break. “I really don’t know what I’m going to do.” The Ralstons, meanwhile, left Harrison Lake for northern B.C. They’re on Francois Lake this week, searching for the body of 35-year-old Sid Neville, who drowned in the lake last month. mhowell@vancourier.com twitter.com/Howellings


A16

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013

news

Density increase a concern for Lord Nelson elementary CHERYL ROSSI Staff writer

G

randview-Woodland parents worry a seismically renewed Lord Nelson elementary won’t have enough room for future students if the city adds housing density to the area. “The [Grandview-Woodland Community] plan document proposes row housing along Nanaimo Street and six-storey apartment buildings surrounding the Lord Nelson field,” said Eileen Mosca, a longtime resident of the area. But Jim Meschino, director of planning and facilities for the Vancouver School Board, says board staff meet with the city routinely each year to discuss shared concerns. He said school board and city staff met nearly three weeks ago to discuss what increased housing density along the Cambie Corridor could mean. “It wouldn’t be in the city’s interest not to include us because we’re like fire stations,” he said. “Oftentimes, we work together and nothing comes of it. Olympic Village, there wasn’t as many housing units as we anticipated.” A school site for the former Olympic Village has been set aside and remains in the board’s capital plan. For the Cambie Corridor, Meschino said the school board will likely look at an addition

to Sir Wilfred Laurier near Cambie Street on West 65th Avenue to accommodate children from a redevelopment of the Pearson Dogwood Lands. As for Grandview-Woodland, Meschino doesn’t expect the city has provided school board planners with projected housing numbers related to that area’s community plan because it’s early in the process. The capacity at Lord Nelson is 535 students and a seismically safer school is being planned to hold 510. “In the larger context, we do have space in that quadrant of the city,” Meschino said. “Macdonald [elementary], for instance, only has 70 kids and it’s probably a 300 to 400 capacity school. “Garibaldi has 60 kids. It’s got at least a capacity of a couple hundred.” He said Nelson will be built with larger “core areas” such as offices to allow for additions. The city is also considering changing zoning to increase housing density in Marpole. Meschino said representatives of the Vancouver Hebrew Academy that occupies Shannon Park Annex at 1545 West 62nd Ave. know their school might have to move to open 120 spaces to public school students. Meschino said neither the school board nor the city want to see a repeat of what happened with Elsie Roy elementary in Yaletown, which was too small to meet demand from day one. crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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community

FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A17

EVENT OR COMMUNITY NEWS WE SHOULD KNOW ABOUT? 604-738-1411 | sthomas@vancourier.com

StanleyParkgetsreadytoparty COMMUNITY CALENDAR with Sandra Thomas

STANLEY PARK The park board has created a great interactive website dedicated to the Celebrate! Stanley Park festival taking place Aug. 24 and 25, in celebration of the 125th birthday of the iconic green space. The site allows readers to click on icons, which lead them to information on Family Fun at the Arch, Memory Lane at the Garden, Brockton Sportsapalooza and Lost Lagoon’s Ecoharmony featuring musical performances on the Lost Lagoon Stage and roving performers. It’s the Live at Second Beach festival zone where participants will be able to enjoy an allCanadian line up of musical performances, concessions, outdoor sports and a licensed area. Headliners include Arkells and the indie rock band Born Ruffians. Family Fun at the Arch is where families can listen and dance to children’s entertainers such as Bobs & Lolo, Will Stroet & the Backyard Band, and Music With Marnie, to name a few. A free all-ages performance of Fall Away Home will take place in the Memory Lane at the Gardens festival zone. The play follows the story of a young girl who falls down a hole and then embarks on a journey to get home. And while the Aug. 24, 25, 29, 31 and Sept. 1 shows are all free, tickets are still required by visiting bocadellupo.com. Meanwhile, Theatre Under the Stars is presenting the first annual Sing-a-long Under the Stars with the hit movie Grease Aug. 24 at Malkin Bowl. For ticket information, visit tuts.ca. A detailed program and schedule will be available by Aug. 1. For more information on Celebrate! Stanley Park, visit vancouver.ca.

KITSILANO

Kitsilano Neighbourhood House has a lot going on this summer, including family fun at Tatlow Park every Monday and Friday now through Aug. 23 from 10 to 11:30 a.m. weather permitting. The neighbourhood house is also hosting a Balcony Garden Club where you can join a group of interested volunteers in building, maintaining and organizing workshops

Erin Cebula, Global BC

Say YES to BC

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Dortetearm y L

file photo Dan Toulgoet

A number of events are planned to celebrate Stanley Park’s 125th birthday Aug. 24 and 25. Scan page with Layar for website info. about gardening, food and natural medicines. Those sessions will take place on the Kits House balcony at West Fourth Avenue at Alma. For more information, contact roya@kitshouse.org or call 604-735-3588.

DOWNTOWN

Tickets are on sale for the Vancouver Pride Society and LOUD Business Legacy Lunch taking place next Thursday, Aug. 1 from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Metropolitan Hotel on Howe Street. The lunch is an intimate tribute to the eight recipients of the inaugural TELUS Pride Legacy Award and an opportunity to mix and mingle with these leaders in community and

often unsung heroes, including Joe Average, Dean Malone, Barb Snelgrove, Shawn Ewing, Jag Bilkhu, Maria Foster, Bradford McIntyre and Jen Sung. Enjoy delights from the culinary team of Diva at the Met accompanied by bubbly from Barefoot Wines. The grand marshals from this year’s Pride Parade will be in attendance. For more information, visit vancouverpride.ca.

DOWNTOWN

It’s time to polish up that latex for a weekend that promises “three nights of kink.” The first annual Vancouver Fetish Weekend, which takes place July 26, 27 and 28

at the Commodore Ballroom on Granville Street, has been described as the largest gathering and celebration in the Pacific Northwest of fetish culture, artists, performers, models, photographers and designers. For that matter, it’s also been described as “Three nights of Pervy Perfection.” Special guests include Perish, Mosh, Mantra and Sweet Soul Burlesque among others. The weekend was organized to coincide with the 10th anniversary of the popular Sin City party circuit. For more information visit, vancouverfetishweekend.com. sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10

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A18

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013

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A: Yes, they can be removed, but you may not wish to remove all of them. The side branches that emerge from the main stem of tomato plants always start life as “suckers.” These originate between the main stem and a leaf. The leaf ceases to properly develop and the sucker grows into a thick side branch. At first these side branches are non-productive because they’re focusing on stem and leaf growth. But later they flower, fruit and develop their own suckers. By the time they fruit it’s later in the season and only the first few side branches have a chance of producing ripe tomatoes in this climate. Unless almost all the suckers are removed the plant will grow into a massive uncontrolled bush. Tomato fruit will ripen slowly because it’s shaded by stems and foliage so some fruit may rot and slugs will have a feast. Most healthy plants can handle one, two or

even three side-branches, but the crop is better quality if you remove all the other suckers while they’re very young. It’s only the main stem and the first three side branches that have a chance of ripening fruit. It’s a balancing game between quantity and quality. The more suckers that become side branches, the more tomatoes you get. Some will be large and ripe but most will be smaller and green. Many of these can ripen on a sunny windowsill. Your tomatoes are producing suckers because they belong to an indeterminate variety. All indeterminates aim at becoming huge bushes which keep growing, flowering and fruiting until they get killed by frost or blight. But you could also get seed or plants of determinate tomatoes. These never produce suckers and they stop growing when fruit sets. Then they ripen all their crop quickly and die. Container gardeners like them. Determinates are very easy to manage but produce fewer tomatoes than indeterminate plants. Q: We are the proud owners of a Monrovia Dancy tangerine tree. At the moment it has produced eight great looking oranges. When would we be able to pick them? Deni, via email

A: You can pick your oranges when they look very orange, are not as hard as they were and when they separate from the stalk if you gently lift them.

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home garden

FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A19

JULY 2013

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t’s the middle of summer and back-to-school season seems a world away. However, September tends to creep up quickly, and before you know it you’re immersed in the school year’s hustle and bustle. To reduce some of the pressure in those weeks, now is the time to get started on a creating a perfect study space for your kids. Who has time in September? CHOOSE A SPACE First you have to decide where to put the study area. Consider things such as whether your kids work well in a quiet atmosphere or better when working among other people.

If your child is older, consider placement of the desk relative to electrical outlets for laptops/computers. Putting up a billboard over the desk is a good idea, and can be used to post assignments that they’ve done well on or artwork for further inspiration. A comfy reading chair is a good idea as well if your child will be reading a lot of literature throughout the year. A good book seems much more enjoyable if it’s being read in a good chair! However, try to encourage they stick to the desk when reading textbooks to avoid getting sleepy.

The quiet student may prefer a work space in their own bedroom, whereas those that can concentrate well working around others might want a study space in a central area of the home. Try to avoid putting the space near game machines or TV’s, which can be a huge distraction.

A calender is a great option to keep track of assignment and project deadlines, as well as any extracurricular activities your child is involved with. Putting the task of planning and scheduling in their hands will give them a sense of responsibility, and make their transition to high school or university that much easier.

SET TO IT For the study space, a desk, desk chair, lamp, pencil/pen holders, a file cabinet and a garbage bin are all essentials. Remember, if they like the space, they’ll use it. Let them personalize it or even help select the furnishings. Allow them to decorate!

ENCOURAGE USE OF THE AREA It’s still a few weeks before school starts but now is the time to get the kids excited about their study area. Let them use the space to get draw, read and get creative throughout the summer and they’ll feel more positive about the area into the school year.

Photos above and below courtesy of Pottery Barn

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A20

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013

home garden

From pallet to cute planter RECYCLING SHIPPING PALLETS INTO A CASCADE OF PLANTS

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ere in Vancouver many of us are not blessed with a lot of personal outdoor room. If you’re looking to green up your outdoor space as much as possible, we have a creative and inexpensive way to recycle a shipping pallet and turn it into a cute vertical planter.

Plant anything from herbs, which are great for this time of year as they’ll last into the fall and winter, to fresh flowers in the spring. It’s better to plant seedlings as it gives you the chance to arrange the plants as you like and allows you to turn the pallet vertical sooner. Make sure you pack the soil well around the seedlings.

You may have seen these planters start to pop up around the city. They’re a great way to reuse shipping pallets, many of which go to waste. If you don’t have your own, they are always popping up for free on websites like Craigslist and Kijiji.

Leave the pallet horizontal for a few weeks to allow the roots to set in, turn it upright and voila! You have a wall of gorgeous plants that will easily fit in any space and makes use of an unwanted pallet.

Creating one is easy and there are plenty of websites which give you a step-by-step walkthrough. Essentially, it’s made by stapling landscaping fabric to the back of a sanded shipping pallet, laying the pallet flat on the ground and filling it with soil, and packing in seedlings of your choice.

To really jazz things up, consider painting the pallet beforehand with nontoxic paint in bright colours. If you’re really recyclingsavvy, try disassembling the pallet and reusing the wood to create square crates to plant in as well! For more information, check out urbanfoodproducer.blogspot.ca or lifeonthebalcony.com

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FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

DR. D-I-Y

home garden Your home improvement project specialist with Ron Russell

THIS MONTH’S TOPIC:

BUILD A GARDEN SWING

A21

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here’s a renaissance in the air when it comes to home and garden projects – whimsical yet practical add-ons that create a warm, family feeling to your property are always fun. Here’s one that is inspiring interest this year. HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE TO BUILD A GARDEN SWING? The average woodworker can build a swing in a weekend. Staining and sealing will add several more days to the project due to drying time in between coats. WHAT MATERIALS DO I NEED TO BUILD A GARDEN SWING? You will need two 8-foot 2-by-4’s, 220 1 1/4-inch deck screws, 32 2 1/2-inch deck screws, nine 10-foot 1-by-4’s, a

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HOW DO I MAKE THE SWING? Cut the wood with a circular saw, handsaw, or sabre saw, but keep in mind that the angled back support would be more easily cut with a table saw. After you build the swing, protect the wood with several coats of exterior, satin-finish polyurethane.

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A22

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013

health

How healthy is your doctor? PHYSICIANS EXPERIENCE INCREASED RISK OF STRESS, BURNOUT, DAVIDICUS DEPRESSION WONG

H

ow healthy is your doctor? When you see a physician, the focus is appropriately on your health. Seldom do we consider the health of physicians. We encourage our patients to eat healthy meals, get sufficient rest and daily exercise, and to do regular screening tests. But you would be surprised at how many doctors do not follow

their own advice. In fact, physicians tend to neglect their own health, especially when it relates to the stress of their work. Physicians are subject to the same illnesses as their patients. But because of personality traits common in the profession and the traditional culture of medicine, we are at increased risk for stress, work addiction, burnout, depression,

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The people who make it into medical school tend to share compulsive traits and perfectionism. This is great for patients but bad for doctors. suicide, alcohol abuse and drug abuse. Physicians tend to selftreat and are reluctant to become patients themselves and seek help. They tend not to see their family doctors as regularly as they should. Many do not even have a family doctor. The people who make it into medical school tend to share compulsive traits and perfectionism. This is great for patients but bad for doctors. You would want an extremely careful surgeon operating on you. You won’t have to worry about anything left undone or sponges left behind. Our compulsivity will ensure that we chart accurately and completely and that we follow-up on important test results. Perfectionism can make us judgmental and overly critical of ourselves and others. This can have negative effects on our work and personal relationships. The downside of compulsivity include rigidity, stubbornness, reluctance to delegate our work to others, self-doubt and excessive feelings of guilt. Compulsive doctors tend to have an exaggerated sense of responsibility and can be excessively devoted to work at the expense of their personal lives. The culture of medicine acts synergistically with our personal vulnerabilities. Early in medical school we learn to dissociate our natural emotional reactions from our rational minds. We learn anatomy by dissecting cadavers. We learn to think and act professionally even when confronted with horrific trauma. This emotional dissociation, if carried to the extreme, can put us out of touch with our own feelings. We may bottle up grief and anger. We may ignore the symptoms of depression, stress and anxiety. Doctors

who are overly dissociated may come across as cold or clinical to patients. A workaholic attitude has been a tradition of our profession. When we applied to medical school, we knew that we would be working hard and losing sleep during our studies, in residency and throughout our work lives. We will give all that we have to our work and our work will consume all that we can give. There is never a shortage of patients to be seen, shifts to take or paperwork to catch up on. We are invited to be involved in numerous committees and worthwhile organizations. We are taught to put the well-being of each patient before our own. As a consequence, when a physician is overstressed and his life is out of balance, his personal health and relationships will be neglected long before his work. When a physician’s quality of work suffers, everything else in her life has likely fallen apart already. Fortunately, our professional organizations are supportive of physician health. The Physician Health Program of B.C. provides counseling services for physicians and their families in addition to a variety of workshops to foster resilience. Our Burnaby Division of Family Practice is a nonprofit organization committed to improving the wellbeing of all members in our community, including physicians. Next: Managing stress and burnout and achieving balance in your life. Dr. Davidicus Wong is a family physician and chair of the Burnaby Division of Family Practice. His Healthwise column appears regularly in this paper. You can read more about achieving your positive potential for health at davidicuswong.wordpress.com.


FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A23

GOT ARTS? 604-738-1411 | arts@vancourier.com

1

2

3

OURPICKS JULY 26 TO 30

For video and web content, scan page with

1 2 3 4

Vancity Theatre hosts THE INTERNATIONAL BUDDHIST FILM FESTIVAL July 26 to Aug. 1. Realign your chakras with 15 films from China, Japan, Nepal, Thailand, Argentina, U.S., U.K. and Canada, including SAMSARA, which comes from the filmmakers of Baraka and is described as “audiovisual poetry, filmed over a period of five years in 25 countries on five continents, and brilliantly shot on 70mm film.” For more information, call 604-683-FILM (3456) or go to viff.org.

4

Those crazy cats in ORKESTAR SLIVOVICA have got the fever again — BALKAN FEVER. And they’re bringing it to the Backstage Lounge with guests Briga, from Montreal, for an evening of fiery Bulgarian, Macedonian and Serbian music July 26, 9 p.m. Tickets at brownpapertickets.com or by calling 1-800-838-3006. More details at caravanbc.com.

In Sebastian Silva’s CRYSTAL FAIRY, boy wonder MICHAEL CERA sports a loafy hairdo and fuzzy upper lip as he travels through Chile in search of a magic cactus and the drug trip of a lifetime. Gabby Hoffman plays his hippie nemesis in what looks like a fantastically weird and wonderful movie. The film, which won the directing award (Dramatic World Cinema) at Sundance 2013, opens July 26 at Fifth Avenue Cinemas. We don’t claim to know a lot about hip hop, except when we’re at parties and want to look cool. But we’re fairly certain the EL-P and KILLER MIKE show at the Biltmore July 26 will be one for the books. The American rappers are currently on tour is support of their new collaborative record Run the Jewels. Despot and Kool A.D. open. Tickets at Red Cat, Zulu, Highlife and Beatstreet Records. More info biltmorecabaret.com.


A24

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013

arts&entertainment KUDOS& KVETCHES HEARING IMPAIRED

There’s been a lot of fuss made over the recent opinion column by Calgary Herald “scribe” and Spaghetti Factory entrée Licia Corbella. In her column, she asserts that Glee star Cory Monteith would be alive today if he had been in any Canadian city other than Vancouver. She blames his overdose death on the apparent ease in which one can procure heroin in Vancouver as if it were chewing gum and by extension the Insite supervised injection site, which she believes shares much of the blame. The piece was inflammatory, to say the least, made more so by a litany of assumptions, generalizations, flawed logic and piss poor writing — Corbella ham-fistedly mentions her own “addiction” issues with sushi and how she “injected” herself into someone’s life. Subtle. To make matters worse, Corbella didn’t interview a single person for her column and the only “research” she conducted was remembering a conversation she apparently overheard several years ago in said sushi shooting gallery among a group of young people planning to head to Vancouver and try heroin for the first time. So we started to wonder. If Corbella can get so much attention for a column with so little research, what else is she planning to write about based on conversations she’s overheard in pubic spaces? Here’s what we anticipate. • While shopping in IKEA, Corbella notices two middle age women with short hair bickering in the children’s section over what colour Skojig Table Lamp to buy. Conclusion: same sex

SUNSET TO KNIGHT

marriage is bad for kids… and the economy. • During a movie screening of The Wolverine, Corbella overhears a group of kids talking about a classmate. Though she can’t make out exactly what was said, Corbella is pretty sure that the kids are part of an Al-Qaeda terrorist plot and that Amber Radisson in Ms. Linley’s Social Studies class is a total slut for making out with a boy in a hammock. Either that or she got a B+ on her presentation on how to make bannock. • Calgary Flames goaltender Miikka Kiprusoff is a Finnish minotaur. Corbella was told as much in a past life by a blind soothsayer when she was a leper and drank too much mead. • While walking past a men’s urinal that our dad was using, Corbella learned that “this is where all the pricks hang out.” • Swiss Chalet’s Rotisserie Chicken Pesto Penne is a tad underwhelming, according to John, a surprisingly forthcoming waiter at Swiss Chalet, who also confided in Corbella that most tapas restaurants are fronts for meth labs. • During a trip to the Calgary Stampede, Corbella stands behind an elderly couple as they wait in line for flapjacks and concludes that if these people lived in the U.S. instead of Calgary they would have likely been euthanized by now under Obama-care and its strict Muslim guidelines. • Several weeks ago Corbella awoke from a feverish dream to hear God whispering in her ear. Here’s what she learned: Cory Monteith is in heaven, the blue Skojig Table Lamp looks best in a boy’s room, abortion is an abomination, the government needs to get its filthy hands off our guns and yes — despite the uproar, on-air persecutions by radio talk show hosts and laws of science — Calgary Flames goaltender Miikka Kiprusoff is in fact a Finnish minotaur.

'+ (%+3%<;867 67! &%+#)31!< *)3<4!< /4.. !,$%<0 3A)+ Next Friday the Vancouver Courier continues our series *)#(!-,'"Special–an +$'(&)%5%+ambitious %,$464)39year-long -!%<@.)+:journey 2)3<+!-through 67<)3:7 Vancouver =)<6-@!4:76 +!4:7$)3<7))"9 67%6 ,%0! 3Aup 67!the #46)= of &%+#)31!<> twenty-seven neighbourhoods that make city Vancouver. '1!< 6/!.1! ,)+679 <!A)<6 )+the 67!changing #7%<%#6!<face %+"of 67!each #7%+:4+: We will report on the /!C.. character and =%#! )= !%#7B /7%6 ,%0!9 67!, 3+4?3!and %+"how 7)/it67!%<! <!9A)+"4+: neighbourhood, what makes it unique is responding to the 6) 67! #7%..!+:!9 )= $!4+: A%<6 )= % <%A4".#7%+:4+: #46-> challenges of being part of our rapidly changing city. Next Friday we visit East Hastings, to advertise in this special section call 604-738-1411.


FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

arts&entertainment

A25

thousands

Wheeler riveting in Elizabeth Rex

@VanCourierNews follow us for the most up-to-date election coverage

ELIZABETH REX

At Bard on the Beach until Sept. 11 Tickets: 604-739-0559 bardonthebeach.org

I

love this play by the late Canadian writer Timothy Findley. It’s not as great a play as, say, Hedda Gabler or Macbeth, but it offers an equally monumental opportunity for a mature actress at the top of her game. Colleen Wheeler is just such an actress. And it asks such an interesting question: What does it really mean to be a woman or a man? Findley sets up a theatrically potent situation: Elizabeth I has condemned her lover, the Earl of Essex, to be beheaded for treason. It’s unclear whether he really is a traitor, but much of the populace believes he is; failing to execute him will be seen as weak, and England, beset on all sides, does not need a weak monarch. To pass the time before the Earl meets his fate at dawn, Elizabeth commands the Lord Chamberlain’s Men, under the direction of William Shakespeare, to perform Much Ado About Nothing. After the performance, she wanders into the barn where the players are housed for the night. “Oh, I love a barn,” she says wistfully and immediately we see the burden that royalty has placed on her. Simple pleasures are not for her. She’s

a woman whose sovereignty demands that she be strong, decisive, even brutal; she has turned her back on qualities some consider “feminine.” Amongst the players is young Ned Lowenscroft who stars in Shakespeare’s plays in the female roles; he has just finished performing Beatrice for the queen. A week in bed with a dashing young captain has “poxed” him; he’s dying of syphilis and his lover has been killed in a skirmish. Ned needs courage, a so-called “manly” attribute, to carry on. “If you will teach me how to be a woman, I will teach you how to be a man,” is the deal Elizabeth offers Ned. He has spent his whole career pretending to be a woman; she has spent her life behaving like a man. Through all of this we glimpse playright Findley, a gay man, who battled his own demons. Wheeler was made for this role. Her deep voice, long stride and commanding presencemakeherapowerhouseonstage. Findley’sElizabethissharp-tongued,quick and clever and all this Wheeler executes with regal haughtiness. When Ned presses her to say the name of her lover — not “the Earl of Essex” but “Robert,” it’s a moment of heart-wrenching poignancy. Haig Sutherland stole my heart years ago on the Playhouse stage in David Hare’s Skylight. He steals everyone’s heart in Elizabeth Rex. Because Ned is dying,

he has nothing to lose by provoking the queen. “King Henry in skirts,” he hurls at her — a reference to her father Henry VIII who systematically killed off his lovers. Sutherland is an actor without artifice and consequently his performance feels stripped clean and utterly honest. The air between Wheeler and Sutherland crackles with thrust and parry. Findley moves us to profound pity for both of them caught, as they are, having little chance to be themselves. “I shall die never having been myself,” the queen declares but perhaps on this very night — this only night — she will be herself. David Marr, who played Ned in a Playhouse production years ago, is Shakespeare in this show, capably directed by Rachel Ditor. Young Dustin Freeland and Anton Lipovetsky are sweet as the two other female role players in the company; Bernard Cuffling portrays an older actor who wistfully remembers playing the women’s parts in his youth. Andrew Wheeler is the very sexy, very haughty actor Jack Edmund, sympathetic to Ireland and hence no admirer of the queen. And there’s a bear, a very good, very well behaved bear. It’s a fascinating play, an excellent production and a departure from Bard’s usual fare of Shakespeare plays. —reviewed by Jo Ledingham More reviews at to joledingham.ca.

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MOVIE MOVIE LISTINGS

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A26

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013

FROM

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arts&entertainment The scoop on local gelato and ice cream

—Jo Ledingham, The Vancouver Courier PHOTOS BY EMILY COOPER

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www.festivalcinemas.ca CINEPLEX PARK THEATRE 3440 Cambie St., 604-709-3456 THE WOLVERINE: Fri-Sun 4:00 MonThurs 4:05 THE WOLVERINE 3D: 3D: Fri 6:50, 9:35 Sat-Sun 1:15, 6:50, 9:35 Mon-Thurs 6:50, 9:30 www.festivalcinemas.ca DUNBAR THEATRE 4555 Dunbar St., 604-222-2991 THE WOLVERINE 3D: Fri-Thurs 1:00, 3:45, 7:00, 9:45

www.riotheatre.ca VIFF: VANCITY THEATRE 1181 Seymour St., 604-683-FILM IBFF O CANADA: SHUGENDO NOW: Fri 7:00, MINDFULNESS AND MURDER: Fri 9:00, THE BUDDHA: Sat 3:30, KARMA: Sat 7:00 DEAD MAN: Sat 9:00, OLO, THE BOY FROM TIBET: Sun 5:00, KANZEON: Sun 7:15, SAMSARA: Sun 9:00, UN BUDA: Mon 6:30 MARIA BETHÂNIA: PEDRINHA DE ARUANDA: Mon 8:45, CRAZY WISDOM: Tues 6:30, O CANADA: WORDS OF MY PERFECT TEACHER: Tues 8:30, FOCUS ON CHINA: AMONGST WHITE CLOUDS: Wed 6:30, FOCUS ON CHINA: WINTER CICADAS: Wed 8:30, DIGITAL DHARMA: Thurs 6:30, WHEN THE IRON BIRD FLIES: Thurs 8:30

www.viff.org

JULY 26 - AUGUST 1

W

with Eagranie Yuh

hen it comes to gelato, La Casa Gelato packs a one-two punch of sheer quantity (218 flavours at any given time) and total wackiness. Sure, there’s good old chocolate and vanilla, classic amaretto and spumone, and for the kids, several tubs of day-glow bubblegum. But let’s be honest: people are drawn to the Vancouver institution for its unusual flavours: basil, garlic and even durian. “When we make durian ice cream, people come in and say, hey, you have a gas leak,” says Pina Misceo, who owns the shop with her husband Vince. The Misceos have been at their current location, at the corner of Venables Street and Glen Drive, since 1992; for a decade before that, they had a small wholesale operation on Commercial Drive. Given Vancouver’s ethnic diversity and near-obsession with eating seasonally, it shouldn’t be surprising that we expect the same from our ice cream. For example, La Casa Gelato has riffed on akbar mashti, a Persian dessert made with saffron, rosewater and pistachios, and once a year makes lucuma gelato from fresh Peruvian fruit. “When we run out, we run out,” says Misceo. In other cities, that impermanence might drive customers to revolt, but not in Vancouver. In Coal Harbour, Bella Gelateria routinely has a line snaking out the door and around the corner as eager disciples try their luck with James Coleridge’s latest concoctions. Trained at Italy’s Carpigiani Gelato University, the award-winning gelato maker prides himself on making small-batch gelato from top-notch ingredients. This weekend, Coleridge will launch a salted Moroccan lemon gelato, made from lemons he started curing 14 months ago. “We’ll do a lemon salted

photo Rebecca Blissett

Earnest Ice Cream co-owner Ben Ernst holds an armful of frozen goodness. For added content, including web links, scan this page with your smartphone or tablet using the free Layar app. caramel and a lemon salt sorbetto. It’s crazy,” Coleridge says. He’s also looking forward to a raspberry-lime gelato, made with local raspberries from Krause farms and Peruvian lime; and a fruita de bosco (fruit of the forest) with local raspberries, strawberries, blackberries and blueberries. Though “gelato” sounds like a fancy word for ice cream, the two really are different. Gelato is made from a base of milk, eggs, and sugar; ice cream contains the same, plus cream. Both are churned to incorporate air, though gelato slightly less so, which results in a slightly denser texture. (Sorbet, or sorbetto, is made without dairy, typically with water or fruit puree instead.) Over in the ice cream corner, Earnest Ice Cream has won Vancouverites over with its grown-up comfort flavours and exceptional quality. “Ice cream is a blank slate for flavour,” says Erica Bernardi, one half of the two-person operation. “We can take inspiration from entire dishes and other cultures and spin it how we

want.” Recent flavours include preposterously rich milk chocolate, spicycool cardamom and the very popular rhubarb oat crumble. “[Co-owner Ben Ernst] and I grew up eating rhubarb crumbles, made by our grandmothers — a la mode, of course. We rolled it all into one ice cream.” Earnest Ice Cream started off selling ice cream at farmers markets, and fans are buzzing about their forthcoming bricks-and-mortar shop at Fraser and East 24th Avenue. It’s set to open any day now. “We’ll be able to do one-off batches,” says Bernardi, “especially with the locally grown, foraged ingredients we can only get so much of.” Similarly, Bella Gelateria’s Coleridge is working on a second location on Marinaside Crescent, on a prime strip of Yaletown waterfront. He’s planning to open by the end of the year with a full gelato and espresso bar, and to offer Neapolitan-style pizza. Gelato or ice cream? Whichever you cheer for, your taste buds will win. twitter.com/eagranieyuh


FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

FRED

A27

EMAIL: yvrflee@hotmail.com TWITTER: @FredAboutTown

UNLEESHED

FOOD BANK SCORES: Inspired by the hordes of fans who flocked to impromptu ball hockey games on downtown streets during the Vancouver Olympics, Richard Loat took that uniting force and hatched Five Hole for Food, a hockey campaign tackling hunger. The annual summer road trip to help hungry Canadians started July 3 in Newfoundland and concluded this past Saturday in Vancouver. During this period, Loat and his teammates visited 13 cities in 17 days, setting up ball hockey games in each community to collect donations for local food banks. This year’s tour raised a total of 340,000 pounds of food. LA DOLCE VITA: Fairmont Pacific Rim unveiled The Market — the luxury hotel’s latest addition to its sleek Giovane Café + Winebar. The internationally inspired gourmet market takes foodies on a culinary journey, sourcing handcrafted products from B.C and around the world, including mining mogul and philanthropist Frank Guistra’s winning olive oil Domenica Fiore Olio Reserva. TRUE COLOURS: Yours truly emceed the first-ever Pride Legacy Awards honouring individuals who have contributed significant efforts towards Vancouver’s queer communities. Several hundred attendees converged at the Imperial for the rainbow romp. Eight awards, representing colours of the gay rainbow, were handed out, celebrating individuals that built and continue to shape the city’s LGBTQ community with unabashed Pride.

For the dog days of summer, Kate Colley and Jody Levesque poured See Ya Later Ranch’s winning wines at UBC’s best of B.C. summer wine tasting.

Five Hole for Food founder Richard Loat welcomed Mayor Gregor Robertson to a game of street hockey benefiting the Great Vancouver Food Bank.

Anita Auer and Dani Pretto’s Burrard Hotel, the former ’50s motor inn, welcomed guests to their weekly retro luaus on their newly licensed patio.

Pride Society president Tim Richards and vice president Chrissy Taylor hosted the inaugural Pride Legacy Awards, citing the best and brightest in the LGBTQ community.

Wine experts Michaela Morris, James Nevison, and Lindsay Kelm fronted Wines of B.C. and alumni UBC’s summer sippers soiree for recent grads.

Jenn Sung (youth), Joe Average (arts) and Maria Foster (safe spaces) were among the inaugural winners of the Pride Legacy Awards.

Cesare Bianchini, producer of Domenica Fiore olive oil, fronted Giovane Cafe + Winebar’s olive oil dinner at the Fairmont Pacific Rim.

Executive chef Darren Brown unveiled Fairmont Pacific Rim’s newest jewel, The Market, offering gourmet selections of fine crafted B.C. and Italian products.


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013

GOT SPORTS? 604-738-1411 | sportsandrec@vancourier.com

SPORT SHORTS WEST END ARENA HOSTS MEN’S NATIONAL FLOORBALL TRYOUTS

The ice is packed away at the West End Arena and in its place is a smooth concrete slab ideal for hockey’s close cousin, floorball. Canadian national men’s team coach David Jansson will add his expertise to a floorball skills session and scrimmage at the small rink on Denman Street this week and will host a national team tryout Saturday. Canada’s best hockey players were invited to try out for the Olympic team and non-skating players can try out for the national men’s floorball team. The open invitation is for Canadian boys and men 16 years or older (players born before January 1998) who are members of Floorball Canada. Players can register at flooballcanada.org. There is a one-time fee of $50 and players must be Canadian citizens. The tryout runs July 27 from noon to 2:30 p.m. at the West End Arena, 870 Denman St. Jansson is an internationally recognized coach who helms one of the world’s top clubs, Pixbo Wallenstam of Sweden, where floorball is a popular sport. Like hockey, floorball is a five-a-side arena game played with sticks and a rolling ball instead of a puck. Unlike hockey, players don’t wear pads or helmets, sticks are short and made of light plastic, and because there is no hitting, floorball is a skilled speed game. Before Saturday’s tryout, players of all ages, genders and skill levels are invited to train and scrimmage. The training costs $10 and is hosted by Hockey Jam Sessions with proceeds benefiting King George secondary, which is adjacent to the arena and aspires to start a floorball program. For questions, email faez@hockeyjams.com. Children aged 6 to 12 are invited from 6 to 7:30 p.m. July 24 and from 9:30 to 11 a.m. July 27. Teen and adult players aged 13 and older are invited from 9:45 to 11:15 p.m. July 24, 7:30 to 9 p.m. July 25 and 7 to 8:30 p.m. July 26. — Megan Stewart

photos Rebecca Blissett

Clockwise from top left: Hasting’s Carter Kada-Wong tracks down an infield hit July 24 in a 12-9 loss to White Rock. Josh Ezekiel slides across home plate behind Kerrisdale catcher Marcus Dee to score for Dunbar July 24 in a 3-10 victory. Kerrisdale coach Stephen Chia consults with pitcher Jooney Yoen. Scan this page with Layar to see more photos.

Hastings,DunbareyeB.C.title MEGAN STEWART Staff writer

H

astings Little League decimated the hosts from Kerrisdale 33-3 last Saturday at Elm Park and then conceded a walk-off home run Wednesday to lose 12-9 to White Rock. Despite the loss, Hastings (3-1) will likely finish in the top four and advance to Saturday’s semifinals along with Dunbar Little League (3-2) as of Thursday morning. Withtwodaysremaininginthesix-game

round robin, White Rock Little League, the 2007 and ’08 Canadian champions, sat 40 and remained the only undefeated team at the provincial tournament. On Thursday, White Rock played Kerrisdale (1-3) and on Friday at 3 p.m. will meet North Vancouver’s Forrest Hills (3-1). Results weren’t known before the Courier’s print deadline. Hastings met Victoria’s Beacon Hill (1-3) Thursday and will clash Friday at noon with Dunbar, who did not play Thursday. Kerrisdale plays its final game 6 p.m. Friday against Beacon Hill.

The 2012 provincial hosts from Trail (05) are at the bottom of the charts. In the event of a tie between any of the top four teams, the Little League with the most aggregate runs will have the edge. The first-place team meets the fourthplace finisher at noon on Saturday in the first semifinal while the second- and third-place teams play at 2:30 p.m. The championship is set for 2 p.m. Sunday. All games are at Elm Park on 41st Avenue near Larch Street. mstewart@vancourier.com twitter.com/MHStewart


FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

sports&recreation

A29

York Street best for bikes WHEEL WORLD

T

with Kay Cahill

here’s nothing like a new bike route to draw the crowds at City Hall. More than 150 people signed up to offer their opinion of the city’s proposals for the Point Grey-Cornwall corridor at the ongoing public debate, creating the longest speaker’s list in years and highlighting the passion of the proponents and opponents of this plan. I’ve been watching as houses along the proposed route have acquired “Please slow down” signs and listening as residents ask the city to delay the vote on the proposals and take more time to consult and consider alternatives. HUB, Vancouver’s cycling advocacy organization, countered with a petition to raise awareness of the unsafe conditions for cyclists on this stretch of road, and promote city hall’s recommendations as a safer, greener alternative. The proposal includes a traffic diversion on Point Grey Road as well as separated bike lanes from Jericho Beach to Alma Street and between Macdonald and Trafalgar streets, a stretch of land between two popular beaches Vision Coun. Geoff Meggs called “a big gap” for cyclist safety. The route veers onto York Street, which can be severely congested, especially in summer. Clearly, not all residents feel their voice has been heard, but a considerable amount of public consultation did go into the proposals and the final version saw a number of significant amendments to address specific concerns. Much though the cyclist in me would have enjoyed a separated bike lane on Cornwall, I can’t begin to imagine how the volume of displaced traffic could possibly be absorbed by the already clogged arterials of West Fourth and Broadway. I was glad to see this replaced by the considerably more balanced solution of a dedicated bike route on York.

Many of the proposals make good sense. Improvements to the notoriously accident-prone spot at the south end of the Burrard Bridge are long overdue and will improve the movement of traffic considerably. York will make a much better designated bike route than the narrower and hillier West Third Avenue route that never completely caught on with cyclists. But at the heart of the controversy lies the proposal to make Point Grey Road a local street with one-way traffic from Alma to Waterloo, and road closures at Trutch and Macdonald. Point Grey is currently used as an arterial route with approximately 10,000 cars traveling along it each day. With dozens of driveways lining its sides and an abrupt narrowing before Alma, it’s poorly suited for this purpose. Making it a local street with enhanced pedestrian and cycling access to the parks and beaches makes better sense given the configuration of the road. However, I think Kitsilano residents have a very valid concern about traffic displacement, especially for the crunch point of Macdonald where motorists will have to make their way along the designated through routes. An estimated 7,000 additional cars could make their way up Macdonald each day, according to the city. That’s a huge increase in traffic on a short stretch of residential street that includes major intersections with the busy arterials. If I lived on Macdonald, there’s no question I’d be deeply concerned, and I’d want to hear more a lot more detail about what this means for the street. The bike lane proposal was always going to be a tough sell because the changes affect busy roads and will mean significant adjustments for the folk who live in and travel through the area. As a cyclist, I support new infrastructure — especially where it improves safety — but believe firmly in achieving balance between the different groups who use and are affected by conditions on our roads. Kay Cahill is a cyclist and librarian who lives in Kitsilano, regularly drives along the affected roads and cycles daily along Point Grey Road and Cornwall Avenue. Send your comments to kay@sidecut.ca

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FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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Resale housing market improves VANCOUVER NUMBERS WERE UP 6.4% FOR JUNE JEN ST. DENIS biv.com

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he resale housing market continued to improve in June across Canada, the Conference Board of Canada reported on Tuesday. In British Columbia, Victoria saw a jump of 14.1 per cent compared to May, while Vancouver resales rose 6.4 per cent and Fraser Valley resales rose 6.9 per cent. Listings were down from May in 16 of the markets the conference board surveyed. Listings in June rose 2.7 per cent in Victoria and 5.2 per cent Vancouver compared with May, but dropped 2.9 per cent in the Fraser Valley.

However, compared with June 2012, listings in all three markets were down: 15.8 per cent in Victoria, 10.6 per cent in Vancouver and 11 per cent in the Fraser Valley. Across Canada, the conference board said that “balanced conditions” were found in 26 markets in June, up from 22 in May. The board noted that only Thunder Bay could be considered a seller’s market. Home prices across the country are also starting to look more “solid,” according to the conference board. Prices are either rising or declining at a less rapid pace in most markets surveyed. Vancouver and Victoria saw house price gains in June, both year over year and compared with the previous month. Vancouver home prices rose 0.9 per cent compared with May and 8.8 per cent compared with June 2012. Victoria prices rose 8.6 per cent month-over-month and 5.9 per cent yearover-year. Fraser Valley prices declined 0.2 per cent compared with May and 0.4 per cent com-

pared with June 2012. “The large jump in Vancouver’s average price was the result of a large number of pricey detached homes changing hands,” said the conference board’s report.

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FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A37

dashboard

VivaVancouver ElectricVehicle Association

BRAKING NEWS

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THE VOICE OF VANCOUVER NEIGHBOURHOODS STRAIGHT TO YOUR PHONE

ship is prejudice. As with any other subject, the best weapon against prejudice is education, and VEVA is certainly all about that. Buttonhole any member and they’ll happily explain the cost-benefit analysis of electric vehicle ownership, the clear advantages, and the minor annoyances. They’ll outline the increasing ease of finding charging stations (a database is maintained on their website), and the reducing cost of actually buying a commercially avail-

able, dealer-supported electric car. And, what’s more, you’ll be inducted into a club with an active, supportive membership that’s as close-knit-yet and welcoming as the classic car association of your choosing. It’s not all nerdy do-gooding either, most of these guys and gals are basically hotrodders — they’re just using lightning rods instead. But that’s not to discount the environmental advantages of vehicle electrification. Most of British Co-

lumbia’s power is cleaner than our eastern cousins, and with Vancouver rated the second most congested city in the world, a line of internal-combustion cars parked idling for blocks and blocks on Georgia Street on a hot Friday afternoon is just plain wasteful. I love the sound of a V-8 roaring as much as the next guy but the cruel realities of city traffic mean you’re just burning dollars better saved up for a track day or a road trip up to Lillooet.

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he pride and joy of the Vancouver Electric Vehicle Association (VEVA) is its 1912 Detroit Electric. Yep, you read that right, a 100-year-old electric car. Take that, Nissan Leaf. The machine in question had a range of about 160 kilometres originally and was once stored in the basement of the Empress Hotel in Victoria, ready to leap into action at any moment to ferry its wealthy original owner about town without any of that tricky Model T pedal work. Today the car lives in the Stave Lake hydroelectic dam, and the original nickel-iron batteries have been replaced

with lead-acid ones, reducing the range to a still-respectable 60-80 km. The car was on display last Saturday at ElectraFest at B.C. Place. Vancouver was actually once something of an electric vehicle hub as our unique hemmed-in geography makes the electric vehicle a much more practical proposition than someplace like Calgary. The VEVA first officially formed in 1988 and has been spreading the gospel of EV machinery ever since. Their membership is highly active at any car show you’d care to name, and they’re often out and about with that 1912 Detroit, as well as any of the numerous conversions and/ or factory-built electric vehicles that members own. Why? It’s simple really. While the internal combustion engine still rules the road, the practical drawbacks of electric vehicles (availability, range, ownership know-how) are rapidly falling by the wayside. In fact, the only impedance to more widespread owner-

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A38

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013

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BI-WEEKLY

Bi-weekly for 84 months with $0 DOWN PAYMENT. Offer includes delivery, destination, fees and $500 CASH BONUS ¥ . Offer based on 2014 Forte LX MT with a purchase price of $17,502.

Offer(s) available on select new 2014 models through participating dealers to qualified customers who take delivery by July 31, 2013. Dealers may sell or lease for less. Some conditions apply. See dealer for complete details. All offers are subject to change without notice. Vehicles shown may include optional accessories and upgrades available at extra cost. All pricing includes delivery and destination fees up to $1,665, other fees and certain levies (including tire levies) and $100 A/C charge (where applicable) and excludes licensing, registration, insurance, other taxes and variable dealer administration fees (up to $699). Other dealer charges may be required at the time of purchase. Other lease and financing options also available. **0% purchase financing is available on select new 2014 Kia models O.A.C. Terms vary by model and trim, see dealer for complete details. !Bi-weekly finance payment O.A.C. for new 2014 Forte LX MT (FO541E)/2014 Rondo LX MT (RN551E) based on a selling price of $17,502/$23,482 is $93/$125 with an APR of 0% for 84/84 months, with a remaining balance of $0/$0. Bi-weekly finance payment O.A.C. for new 2014 Sorento 2.4L LX AT FWD (SR75BE) based on a selling price of $28,482 is $152 with an APR of 0% for 60 months, amortized over an 84-month period. Estimated remaining principal balance of $8,138 plus applicable taxes due at end of 60-month period. Retailer may sell for less. See dealer for full details. ‡$2,500/$1,250/$1,750 cash savings on the cash purchase of an eligible new 2014 Sorento 2.4L LX AT FWD (SR75BE)/2014 Forte LX MT (FO541E)/2014 Rondo LX MT (RN551E) from a participating dealer between July 3-31, 2013, is deducted from the selling price before taxes and cannot be combined with special lease and finance offers. Some conditions apply. ¥Cash bonus of $500/$750 is available on all cash, finance and lease offers of new 2013/2014 cars/SUVs from a participating dealer between July 23-31, 2013, and is deducted from the selling price before taxes. Customers will receive a cheque in the amount of $500/$750 (excluding taxes) or can apply it to the selling/lease price before taxes. Offers available on in stock models only. See your dealer for complete details. "Model shown Manufacturer Suggested Retail Price for 2014 Sorento 3.3L EX AT AWD (SR75HE)/2014 Forte SX AT (FO748E)/2014 Rondo EX Luxury (RN756E) is $34,195/$26,195/$32,195. Highway/city fuel consumption is based on the 2014 Sorento LX 2.4L GDI 4-cyl (A/T)/2014 Forte 1.8L MPI 4-cyl (M/T)/2014 Rondo 2.0L GDI 4-cyl (M/T). These updated estimates are based on the Government of Canada’s approved criteria and testing methods. Refer to the EnerGuide Fuel Consumption Guide. Your actual fuel consumption will vary based on driving habits and other factors. °The Bluetooth® wordmark and logo are registered trademarks and are owned by Bluetooth SIG, Inc. Information in this advertisement is believed to be accurate at the time of printing. For more information on our 5-year warranty coverage, visit kia.ca or call us at 1-877-542-2886. Kia is a trademark of Kia Motors Corporation.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2013


Vancouver Courier July 26 2013  

Vancouver Courier July 26 2013

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