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THE VOICE of VANCOUVER NEIGHBOURHOODS

Muralsof Strathcona

32

WEEKEND EDITION FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 Vol. 104 No. 50 • Established 1908

NEWS: Viaduct removal cost 7 OPINION: Towering over the Drive 10

Direct to our website

photo Dan Toulgoet

Temple of solace

IN THE LATEST INSTALMENT OF OUR VANCOUVER SPECIAL NEIGHBOURHOOD SERIES, WE PROFILE STRATHCONA LIFE AND BUDDHIST TEACHINGS— PAGE 27

Cityinstallsmid-blockcrosswalkonEastHastings MIKE HOWELL Staff writer

T

he City of Vancouver has installed a mid-block crosswalk across a dangerous stretch of East Hastings between Main and Columbia streets in an attempt to reduce the number of accidents involving pedestrians. The crosswalk, which includes a pedestrian-controlled stop light, travels from the north side of East Hastings near the Insite supervised drug injection site and links to the sidewalk outside the Regent Hotel on

the south side of the street. Jerry Dobrovolny, the city’s director of transportation, said the $250,000 crosswalk was installed mid-block because the city’s research showed there were 49 accidents at that spot over a six-year period. “That was a high crash location,” said Dobrovolny, noting the research included data from the Vancouver Area Network of Drug Users, Simon Fraser University and the University of B.C. The installation of the crosswalk comes as Pivot Legal Society lawyer Douglas King and several members of the drug users’ organi-

zation complained to the Vancouver Police Board Tuesday about the disproportionate number of tickets issued to Downtown Eastside residents for jaywalking. Pivot obtained statistics from the police department via the Freedom of Information Act that revealed 76 per cent of the 2,699 jaywalking tickets issued in the city between 2008 and 2012 were to people in the Downtown Eastside. Another 17 per cent were issued in downtown while none was handed out in Shaughnessy, Point Grey, Oakridge, Marpole, Killarney and several other neighbour-

hoods in the city. King pointed out studies show jaywalking and crashes involving pedestrians occur all over the city, as a City of Vancouver pedestrian safety study indicated in 2012. The study revealed there were 3,066 reported collisions involving pedestrians between 2005 and 2010 in Vancouver. The neighbourhoods with the highest number of pedestrian collisions per 100,000 residents and employees included Strathcona, Mount Pleasant, Grandview-Woodland, Shaughnessy and Kensington Cedar Cottage, the study said. See CROSSWALK on page 4


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FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

IN THIS ISSUE

A3

The Kitsilano Chamber of Commerce presents the:

9th annual westside business awards

When I grow up, I’ll own my own business.

05 07 14 10 33 38 NEWS

photo Dan Toulgoet

CLASS NOTES: VALID CHOICE BY CHERYL ROSSI

Theo Cultum, Vancouver’s first transgendered high school valedictorian, talks about support from fellow students and staff like Sue Monti.

CASH AND CARRY BY MIKE HOWELL The demolition bill for the Georgia and Dunsmuir viaducts could be $55 million, not counting the cost of modifying streets and parks.

DEVELOPING STORY: WIDE OPEN BY NAOIBH O’CONNOR The West End’s extra wide lanes could accommodate much needed rental housing for families.

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A surprise proposal to put residential towers at Broadway and Commercial speaks volumes about the city’s top-down planning.

ENTERTAINMENT SWEET SPOT: NIGHT MOVES BY EAGRANIE YUH Sweet Spot columnist Eagranie Yuh gets a deep-fried sugar high while eating her way through the desserts at the Chinatown Night Market.

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SEE MORE WITH LAYAR Additional content in this issue available through the Layar app includes: P24: TRAVEL: MOLOKAI IN PICTURES During a recent visit, the tiny island seemed alive with Hawaiian ancestors, legends and spirits of days long past.

P26, 27: OPEN HOUSE AND THEN AND NOW Picture galleries of a choice piece of real estate in Strathcona and historic locations in the community now and in the past.

P32: ENTERTAINMENT: THE BIG PICTURE A video exploring the dozens of murals that brighten up the buildings and alleyways of Strathcona and how they got there.

Download the free Layar app to your iPhone, iPad or Android smartphone or tablet. The Vancouver Courier, a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership, respects your privacy. We collect, use and disclose your personal information in accordance with our Privacy Statement which is available at vancourier. com. For all delivery problems, please call 604-942-3081. To contact the Courier’s main office, call 604-7381411.

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newsfront A4

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013

PowellStreetoverpassworkstartsMonday CONSTRUCTION TO IMPROVE MOVEMENT OF GOODS AND PEOPLE TO LAST A YEAR NAOIBH O’CONNOR

Staff writer

C

onstruction on the $50million Powell Street Overpass Project gets underway Monday June 24, requiring the closure of Powell Street between Clark Drive and Hawks Avenue for a year. Only local traffic and businesses will have access. The city is responsible for delivering the project, but it’s only paying for a small portion of the cost. Port Metro Vancouver is covering the bulk — $19.5 million. Transport Canada is kicking in $18.5 million, Canadian Pacific is contributing $4.5 million, while TransLink and the City of Vancouver are each paying $3.75 million. “The project does two things,” explained Jerry Dobrovolny, the city’s director of transportation. “One, is it takes the road up and over the railway — it’s called grade separation, by building the bridge. And the second thing it does is shifts Powell Street south so the alignment of the road is also changing to free up additional space on the Port land, which allows them to, in the future, put one full additional lane of rail track on the Port. It’s significant because it goes for kilometres and that’s the pinch point on that whole corridor on the Port land. So, it frees up a major pinch point to create more space and more rail capacity and it also eliminates the at-grade crossing for Powell Street with the

Rendering courtesy of City of Vancouver

Construction on the $50-million Powell Street Overpass Project starts Monday June 24. Businesses in the area are worried about customer access and getting goods in and out. The city says an advisory committee has been struck to deal with concerns that crop up during construction, which will take a year. rail tracks.” The overpass will feature four lanes for traffic and also separate cyclists and pedestrians from traffic. Dobrovolny noted the city has held open houses about the project and has gone door-to-door to businesses to address concerns about the disruption construction will cause.

“We’ve made a number of changes working with businesses to provide access. In one case, a business had access from one of two streets. We were eliminating one of them and there was a light pole in the way for big trucks, so we moved a light pole, so that they could access from a different street,” he said.

An advisory committee has been set up to allow business owners and other interested parties to deal with other concerns that might crop up over the next year. “They’ve had one meeting now pre-implementation. They’ll have another meeting post-implementation after a couple of weeks to talk

about how it’s going,” Dobrovolny said. “So there’s a continual discussion going on now around specific details of access.” Joji Kumagai, executive directive of the Strathcona BIA, said businesses, especially those just west of where the closure will take place and in the Franklin Street area, are worried about the impact of construction noise and dust, along with customer access and getting goods in and out. “We have a few businesses — more retail-based business — that rely on traffic going in and out of downtown. So with that access being restricted, it obviously makes it more challenging to get people into their businesses,” he said, adding, “There’s going to be challenges in reconfiguring the commercial truck accessing area and getting out.” Some business owners, according to Kumagai, feel there should have been more consultation and communication. He said the city has done its best, and has tried to be available for information, but “to some degree it’s out of the city’s ability to really influence the project because it’s something that’s very much dictated by the federal government and the province in terms of trying to increase the capacity of the Port,” he said. “The city, in terms of funding has contributed the least amount, so [the project is] really being dictated by higher levels of government.” noconnor@vancourier.com twitter.com/naoibh

Crosswalk intended to reduce pedestrian/car collisions

photo Dan Toulgoet

The new pedestrian cross walk between Main Street and Columbia Street on East Hastings gets occasional use.

CONTINUED from page 1 “There has to be a fundamental change to the policies that the VPD is using on bylaw enforcement, and it has to be a recognition that these policies that have been in place for the last five or 10 years have been incredibly harmful to the relationship between the department and the residents of the Downtown Eastside,” said King, pointing out commissioner Wally Oppal recommended in his final report on the Missing Women Commission of Inquiry that the city and VPD take measures to reduce the number of tickets issued and charges laid for minor offences. The police board ordered an investigation of Pivot’s complaint but Police Chief Jim Chu defended the ticketing of people in the Downtown Eastside for jaywalking. “It is dangerous for drivers who are going through that neighbourhood,” said Chu, noting a pedestrian was struck and killed by a vehicle

June 4 while attempting to cross East Hastings mid-block near Carrall Street. “When you go down there and you can see some of the wanton disregard for our traffic rules on the road, there are safety concerns that arise.” Two years ago, the city lowered the speed limit along that stretch of East Hastings to 30 kilometres per hour. The city also increased crossing times at crosswalks and installed countdown timers. Though the penalty for a jaywalking ticket is $100, Chu said if a person can’t afford to pay the ticket, “they don’t have to,” although he said community service work could be ordered instead. He said the purpose of issuing a ticket is to educate the public about the danger of jaywalking, which not only occurs mid-block but with pedestrians crossing at a red light. A report on Pivot’s complaint could go before the police board at its next meeting in July. mhowell@vancourier.com twitter.com/Howellings


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FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

news

Transgendered student makes history as class valedictorian CLASS NOTES

with Cheryl Rossi

V

ancouver’s first openly transgendered valedictorian will speak at his school’s graduation July 25. Theo Cultum garnered twice as many votes as each of the other three students in the running for two valedictorian spots for the alternative school Total Ed. “I was so proud and really very heartfelt that the graduating class was able to vote for a student that they cared about, not about a student’s sexuality,” said Sue Monti, youth and family worker and the safe contact for lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer students at Total Ed. “I’m proud of Theo but I’m almost more proud that the students made that choice... Gay is one thing, but transgendered is a whole other element that I think a lot of people in general just don’t understand.” Cultum felt “very proud of myself and very honoured” to be chosen. “I really didn’t think that they looked up to in me such a way,” he said. Cultum was in a dark place for Grades

7 to 9 and in Grade 10, he dropped out of school. Then known as Tayah, he was struggling with traumatic events that occurred in his early teens, depression, drug and alcohol addiction and questioning his sexual orientation and gender identity. He enrolled in Total Ed in September 2010 and completed treatment for drug and alcohol addiction. “The people at this school have really given me a lot of confidence and courage and hope is the big one there,” Cultum said. “…Just by accepting me for who I was and encouraging me that it’s OK to express myself in any way that I feel is myself.” The just over 100 students at Total Ed don’t often get to hear guest speakers, but a visit by Jeremy Dias of Jer’s Vision, Canada’s Youth Diversity Initiative inspired them to take action. Monti says one-fifth of Total Ed students participate in its gay-straight alliance and photos from this year’s Pink Day against bullying, discrimination, homophobia and transphobia illustrate how enthusiastic students were about its message. Monti thinks Total Ed’s 32 Grade 12 students voted overwhelmingly for Cultum because he’s outgoing and full of energy, a far cry from how worthless and hopeless he felt in the past. Monti believes Total Ed helps students

succeed by providing the feeling of an extended family and abundant support. “Mainstream schools have counsellors. Their lists are 300-plus students. We have three youth and family workers and our lists are 30 students,” she said, adding offering multiple student groups for a small population gives every student a place to belong. Cultum worked with the other valedictorian, Ben Wilks, on their speeches Wednes-

day. “I definitely feel like I need to thank the people at this school for their patience… for really being there for me when I needed it because I have been through a lot and I really don’t think that I would be in this position that I am now without the support of this school,” he said. crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi 2 0 1 2

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013

news Will new AG crack down on unpaid helmet fines? 12TH & CAMBIE with Mike Howell

T

here was a time when I could call Suzanne Anton on her cell, leave a message and expect a call back within minutes, or at least the same day. But that was when Anton was a city councillor. Now that she’s this province’s minister of justice and attorney general, she’s got people — communications people, who take my calls and see what they can do about getting Anton to call me back. I found this out last week when I wanted to hear from Anton on what she was going to do about all those unpaid tickets issued to cyclists for not wearing a helmet. We’re talking more than $300,000 in fines over the past five years. Some background: A few weeks ago, I learned the Vancouver Police Department issued almost 1,800 tickets in 2012 to cyclists for not wearing a helmet. A few of those were given to parents for allowing their child to ride without a helmet. The statistics, of course, begged the question: How many of those people issued the $29 fine actually dutifully plunked down their cash and accepted responsibility for having a good hair day? I called up the Insurance Corporation of B.C. and gave them a few days to crunch the numbers for me. But I just didn’t want to see the data for 2012. Go back at least five years, I asked. And they did — and the statistics were

photo submitted

A cyclist, former city councillor and now B.C.’s new Attorney General, Suzanne Anton did not return Courier calls asking her as AG what she might do about the $300,000 of unpaid helmet fines the police issued over the last five years in Vancouver. She’s seen here in St. John’s, NL. on a cross-Canada cycling trip. alarming/not surprising/interesting in a city where cycling is becoming more popular, as Mayor Gregor Robertson and his ruling Vision Vancouver council will tell you. As I reported June 12, more than 11,000 cyclists who were issued tickets in Vancouver over the past five years for not wearing a helmet refused to pay their $29 fine. The statistics

showed only 1,771 cyclists of 13,154 paid their fines between 2008 and 2012. So when you do the math, you arrive at that $300,000 figure I mentioned at the top of this entry. To provide some context, $300,000 would sure help pay the $700,000 tab for the city’s latest cycling upgrades along Union Street, on the edge of Chinatown.

So that brings me to my phone call to Anton. I was told by the woman who answered the phone at her office that Anton had only been on the job a couple of weeks and needed to be briefed on a number of issues, including unpaid fines. Understandable, I guess. What I did receive is an emailed response from Sam MacLeod, the Superintendent of Motor Vehicles. His answer to my question about whether the government would just simply repeal the helmet law…well…was not exactly an answer. Instead, MacLeod said the government was committed to reducing injuries and fatalities on the roads and “our mandatory helmet law is consistent with that goal.” Which, I assume, means the government won’t be repealing the law. As for what the government plans to do to recoup the $300,000 in unpaid fines? The government sent me a response from Adam Grossman, a spokesman for ICBC. Here, in part, is what he said: “ICBC will look to use a collection agency when we’ve exhausted all previous avenues via refusing to issue both a driver’s licence and/or insurance for any debt owed. A refuse to issue is placed on debt after it is 30 days overdue. If a licence or insurance goes more than a year without being renewed, we will send the debt to a collection agency. If a person’s driver’s licence renewal is more than three years into the future, we will look at sending the debt out. We will typically not use a collection agency for debt that’s less than $50.” Again, the 11,000 tickets were worth $29 each. mhowell@vancourier.com twitter.com/Howellings

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FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A7

STRATHCONA

Viaduct removal could cost $55 million Staff writer

I

t would cost up to $55 million to demolish the Georgia and Dunsmuir viaducts and replace them with a new link from Georgia Street to existing roads in Northeast False Creek. The tab for such a project climbs to more than $130 million when costs are calculated to modify existing streets, parks, utilities, build more parks and conduct soil remediation on what were former industrial lands. City staff outlined the costs in a report released Wednesday that strongly suggests the 1970s-era hulking structures be demolished to open up the area for parkland, housing and better connections between neighbourhoods. Butthereportstoppedshortofrecommending city council give the green light to take down the viaducts until more planning work is done on the feasibility of the demolition and the future of the eastern core of the city. “The issues under study, related to the potential removal of the viaducts, are complex and there is a significant amount of work still to be done before a final report is brought before council,” said the report authored by Brian Jackson, the city’s head planner. Approximately $1 million has been spent to date on the planning and engineering work related to the viaducts’ removal. But city staff wants two more years and $2.4 million to spend on a “work program” to examine the bigger picture of what removing the viaducts will mean for the neighbourhood and surrounding communities. There’s also the problem of what to do about the 43,000 vehicles per day that use the viaducts, which are well-used links in and out of downtown for the movement of goods. The report notes, however, that as time passes, the cost of removing the viaducts will become “more and more challenging,” given the need for temporary roads and deconstruction sites to facilitate the removal of the viaducts. Retaining the viaducts would cost up to

$120 million, if rehabilitation, maintenance and eventual replacement costs are factored in over 40 years, the report said. If the viaducts were demolished, it would free up 10 acres of land worth up to $110 million. Although staff’s desire is to have the land devoted for public open space, affordable housing and other public uses, the report notes some of the land could be sold for development. The report also points out removal of the viaducts has “significant positive impacts” to Concord Pacific’s lands, which are adjacent to the viaducts and would require an agreement with the city to accommodate a new street network. “For Concord, this will produce new development parcels which will need to consider tower placement and density, park configuration and programming and soils contamination,” the report said. The suggestion to demolish the viaducts continues an emerging trend in North American cities. The report mentions Boston, at great expense, eliminated its elevated waterfront freeway and connected that city’s downtown to the waterfront. In San Francisco, politicians elected to tear down the Embarcadero freeway and reconnect several of that city’s neighbourhoods. “In every city’s evolution, there are rare opportunities to take bold city-building steps to advance the city’s goals and livability, or correct a past planning wrong,” the staff report said. “The potential removal of the viaducts provides an opportunity for the City of Vancouver to do both.” With city staff wanting at least two years to plan for the removal of the viaducts, the next opportunity for council to make a final decision on the viaducts’ fate may not come before a new council is elected in the fall of 2014. If the council of the day decides the viaducts should be demolished, it could take up to six years before they come down. mhowell@vancourier.com twitter.com/Howellings

DISCUSS THE ISSUES AND IDEAS THAT MATTER TO YOU.

Connect with Joyce at an upcoming summer neighbourhood event: June 22 • 11:00 – 1:00 pm West Point Grey Fiesta Days @ Trimble Park June 23 • 10:30 – 12:30 pm Kitsilano Farmers Market @ Kits Community Centre parking lot June 23 • 12:45 – 3:00pm Greek Days @ West Broadway, Bayswater and W Broadway July 1 • 11:00 – 2:00 pm MP Canada Day BBQ @ Locarno Beach, 4445 NW Marine Drive

July 5 • 2:00 – 4:00 pm Java with Joyce @ MP Constituency Office 206-2112 West Broadway July 12 • 2:00 – 4:00 pm Java with Joyce @ MP Constituency Office 206-2112 West Broadway July 13 • 11:00 – 1:00 pm Khatsalano Music Festival @ West 4th and Stephens

Sept 7 • 11:00 – 1:00 pm Kerrisdale Days @ West 41st, West of Yew Sept 14 • 10:30 – 12:00 Kerrisdale Village Farmers Market between 37th and 41st near Kerrisdale Arena Sept 14 • 12:30 – 2:00 pm Barn Raising @ Old Barn, UBC Sept 15 • 12:00 – 2:00 pm Southlands fair @ 7025 Macdonald Street

DEMOCRACY IN ACTION MEET WITH YOUR MP JOYCE MURRAY

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Elite first responders lose funding ANDREW FLEMING Staff writer

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f and when the Big One hits Vancouver — and experts say there is more than a one in 10 chance of a major earthquake hitting the city in the next 50 years — the first responders on the scene are expected to be members of the Heavy Urban Search and Rescue (HUSAR) task force. However, Vancouver Fire Chief John McKearney is worried the team might not be fully prepared to jump in after the federal government axed $400,000 from the unit’s annual operating budget. “The final funding to the HUSAR team ended as of April 2013,” McKearney told the Courier. “If we can achieve a $400,000 a year commitment from the federal government, that gives us the full funding model necessary to keep the team at its current state.” The money was part of the Joint Emergency Preparedness Program (JEPP) cut from last year’s federal omnibus budget bill. Similar teams in cities across the country also had their budgets slashed. Vancouver’s Canada Task Force 1, which in 1995 became the first heavy urban search and rescue team in the country, is made up of volunteer firefighters, police officers, medical personnel and engineers who train on the weekends at a $1.54 million facility off Malkin Avenue in Strathcona designed to simulate earthquake conditions and burning buildings. Along with maintaining equipment capable of keeping them self-sufficient for 10 days, they practise

techniques for rescues from collapsed buildings and high angles, as well as technical search strategies and the use of search dogs. Members of the team recently responded to deadly mudslides on the North Shore and Johnsons Landing, as well as helping with rescue operations in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. McKearney said the team receives $200,000 in annual provincial funding and $150,000 from the City of Vancouver, which isn’t enough to maintain the level of service necessary to respond to a major catastrophe. “What we’ve done is we’ve made an application to the federal government to maintain a national HUSAR program with four teams that are capable of responding to all hazardous events across the country,” said McKearney. “We’ve done the analysis and said for $400,000 a team, or $1.6 million a year, for the next three years, the teams will be able to maintain their current state and that will give us enough time to look for other funding models.” The federal government argues local and provincial governments should be responsible for the funding, and McKearney said they will likely have to scale back the highly-trained response team if the feds don’t change their mind. When the Courier expressed surprise there hasn’t been more coverage of the issue given the level of public outrage that greeted the closure of the Coast Guard station in Kitsilano due to lost federal funding, McKearney gave a sad chuckle. “You and me both.” afleming@vancourier.com twitter.com/flematic

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Judy Kenzie grows a variety of vegetables and edible flowers in the back of her 1993 Mazda pick-up truck.

Truck farmer grows awareness for gardening in small spaces JUDY KENZIE USES MAZDA PICK-UP AS TEACHING TOOL AT EVENTS ACROSS THE CITY SANDRA THOMAS Staff writer

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trathcona resident Judy Kenzie has always loved plants and estimates she had 38 at one time in her bedroom as a young girl. “I’ve loved plants as far back as I can remember,” Kenzie told the Courier during a visit to the family’s tree-lined character home. So it made sense that while mulling over a second career, the advertising and marketing professional turned to plants and flowers for inspiration. Today, Kenzie is the founder of Strathcona 1890 Urban Seed Collections, which sells heirloom seeds packaged specifically to help gardeners with little or even no yard an opportunity to produce a portion of the food they eat. Kenzie put her background in marketing and illustration to good use for the launch of her online business creating historical botanical labels meant to capture the feel of early Vancouver for each seed collection. Kenzie has carefully grouped heirloom seeds into collections for sale with titles such as Salsa Garden, Quick and Dirty, Salad Sampler, Edible Flowers, Junior Farmer and Bee Garden. Even Kenzie’s business cards are made from tiny envelopes packed with seeds. Kenzie has taken an offbeat approach to advertising her online business. Last year, Kenzie stumbled upon the website for Truckfarm.org, a mobile garden education project founded in Brooklyn, NY. The food and film project chronicles the adventures of a group of urban gardeners who travel the streets of Brooklyn with a full-fledged garden planted in the bed of a pick-up truck. On the website, the founders encour-

age other urban farmers to follow their lead and the idea for the Strathcona 1890 Truck Farm was born. Kenzie said it helped that the family already owned an aging 1993 Mazda pick-up truck that hadn’t been driven for six years. With the help of a friend, Kenzie sawed off rusty bits, taped up others and lined the truck bed with plastic and landscaping cloth. “I was surprised to find out the truck already had drainage holes,” said Kenzie. “Who knew?” Kenzie then loaded up the back with soil and planted as many vegetables and edible flowers as she could fit into the four-bysix-foot truck bed. Last December, Kenzie planted a small spruce tree in the truck and decorated it with battery-operated Christmas lights. Kenzie said while the tree was a hit everywhere she drove, it was unfortunately stolen in the New Year. “People really stared at truck then,” said Kenzie, who was garnering attention for the mobile garden. “Bus drivers would give me the thumbs up and one lady blew me a kiss. It was really nice.” Kenzie now uses the Truck Farm to encourage gardeners of all skill levels and raise awareness of the fact they can create their own local, sustainable food resources. In keeping with that theme, the truck’s licence plate reads NON GMO. Kenzie attends community events, such as the recent Car Free Day festival and the Pacific National Exhibition to speak about sustainable gardening, and will visit almost any community group or school that asks. sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10

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You and the Law

ACCIDENTS AND REDUCED EARNING CAPACITY What if you can’t earn as much now because you were hurt in a car crash? You may be forced to find an easier but lower-paying job and be unable to earn as much income as before the accident. Mark Epstein Lawyers call this loss “diminished earning capacity.” This work-related loss is just one of many losses you could be compensated for if the crash was caused by another’s fault. It’s often part of a compensation claim by personal injury plaintiffs. But what if your earnings don’t go down after the accident? Can you still get compensation for “diminished earning capacity”? After all, you might think that because your income didn’t decrease, your ability to earn hasn’t been reduced. Not true. A recent BC case illustrates that this approach is too simple and can be unfair to the injured person. Colleen, 46, was injured in two car accidents, one right after the other. She hurt her neck, shoulder and upper back, resulting in chronic widespread pain (later diagnosed as fibromyalgia). Before the accidents, she was a highly energetic and motivated individual. She had a fast-paced job as an executive secretary to the president of a large organization, which she loved and was ideally suited for. All that changed. Because of her chronic pain – which she only endure with large amounts of pain killers and antiinflammatory medications – she could no longer handle the demands of her job, nor the three-hour (both ways) commute it involved. Colleen sold her house to move to a smaller home with fewer stairs. Because of her injuries, she also found a new easier job where the commute was only 20 minutes. Having to switch jobs “was a huge blow”

and it “was far less rewarding in terms of job satisfaction,” said the trial judge who initially decided her case. Yet, by happenstance, her new job paid her a better salary, and so she didn’t suffer an immediate loss of earnings. Still, her lawyers were able to prove that she suffered a reduction in her capacity to earn (which the appeal court agreed with). The circle of secretarial or administrative positions that she could compete for in future had narrowed because of the limitations imposed by her injuries. In short, she became less marketable as an employee and less capable overall of taking advantage of all employment opportunities that might come her way. As well, the trial judge concluded that there was a real and substantial possibility that Colleen would have moved up in her organization’s hierarchy to a director position had she been able to stay there – at a higher salary and with improved health and pension benefits. (This particular finding was over-turned on appeal as speculative only, reducing her compensation award somewhat.) And there was a real possibility that because of her injuries (which had plateaued or possibly could even worsen), her working career would likely end earlier than it would have if the accident hadn’t occurred. Overall, she proved that she had suffered a loss in her capacity to earn future income, as confirmed by the appeal court. The BC Court of Appeal ultimately awarded Colleen $275,000 for diminished earning capacity. If you’re injured in an accident, consult your lawyer. He can help you receive the fair compensation that you may be entitled to receive. Written by Janice Mucalov, LL.B. with contribution by MARK EPSTEIN. This column provides information only and must not be relied on for legal advice. Please contact MARK EPSTEIN for your FREE, no obligation, initial consultation. Consulting Available • House Calls

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013

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Tower plan Drive-ing East Side residents mad

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t shouldn’t surprise you to know another Vancouver neighbourhood is girding for battle with city hall. The neighbourhood in this particular ruckus is Grandview–Woodland, the heart of the East Side of Vancouver. Its main artery is Commercial Drive, a thriving part of this city inhabited by small independent businesses serving families with mostly modest incomes or singles — hipsters and counter culture practitioners — who can still find affordable digs in houses divided into suites. The battle is over the neighbourhood community plan. It has been kicked around for a year and a half now. It reached the point where the city’s planning staff should have presented the community with options. Instead, a couple of weeks ago they published something called “Emerging Directions.” Before I get to that, let me make this point: Mayor Gregor Robertson and his crew regularly strike committees to fend off criticism including a recently created Engagement Committee for which they gave themselves great public pats on the back. But it’s just window dressing. Once again they are failing to engage. Community consultation on development has been turned into a joke. Just ask the folks who tried to reason with the city on the 60 storey Marine Gateway at the south end of Cambie or those who thought reason would win out at the Rize on Kingsway. While the Grandview-Woodland neighbourhood was quite willing to accept some density at Hastings and Commercial and at Commercial and Broadway, no one was prepared for what the city rolled out. The plan contained provisions for a 36-storey tower at Commercial and Broadway surrounded by 10 other towers of 22 to 28 storeys. To put that in perspective, the towers in Yaletown are about 22 storeys. The tower at Knight and Kingsway is 17 storeys. The local community types were stunned. Grandview-Woodland Area Council president Jak King says it represents a “shocking upscale” of density. Towers were not even part of the discussion his group had with the city. The plan will, as it stands, threaten the livability of an area King describes as “an extremely successful single family neighborhood.” He adds that “all we can do now is write a note” in protest but it won’t do much good. Planners at the city are going “full tilt boogie,” as King describes it, to have their report in front of city council before the year’s end. (I am informed that there has been more pressure than usual over this and the city may back off. But we will see.) A week ago and not long after the city released the proposed plan, former Vancouver city planner Frank Ducote posted a brief observation and asked a question on journalist Frances Bula’s blog site that frequently deals with development issues. During his tenure with the city, Ducote worked on its transportation plan and the redesign and preparation of guidelines for a number of neighbourhoods including Broadway and Commercial. He said that 15 years ago when the Millennium Line was going in, council thought the area was ripe for densification but “it would have been suicidal to try and impose those kinds of pro-development ideas then, completely against community values.” Now he wonders rhetorically: “Is this a community-based vision or one being imposed from above? A TransLink wet dream” aimed at building population to make a new subway line from Broadway and Commercial out towards UBC more likely. I think we know the answer to that. And we also should know we are a long way from days more than a decade ago of citizens driving the vision and community plan for their neighbourhoods. It is debatable as to whether those plans ever led to much that was concrete, but they were swept aside when Sam Sullivan became mayor in 2005 and introduced the top down strategy called “eco-density.” When Robertson and Vision arrived on the scene, the push for centralized control over development and increased densification intensified. Whether it was spot zoning for rental housing in the West End or what we are seeing in Grandview-Woodland around transit stations, solutions were prescribed and city staff merely ticked the boxes to say they have engaged. But not really. And an increasingly cynical citizenry is on to them. (Note: The Grandview-Woodland Area Council has called a public meeting for July 8 at 7 p.m. the East Side Family Place to discuss the Community Plan.) agarr@vancourier.com

ALLEN GARR

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letters

FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

WE WANT YOUR OPINION Hate it or love it? We want to know... really, we do! Reach us by email: editor@vancourier.com

God’s grace not in the details of catastrophe

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very once and a while some media item will burrow its way, insect-like, into my brainpan and set up such an unholy buzz it can only be exorcised through writing. This is one of those times. I recently watched CNN’s Wolf Blitzer interview a survivor of Oklahoma’s recent F-5 tornado. “You gotta thank the Lord. Did you thank the Lord for that split-second decision?” he asked the woman of her choice to leave the house with her infant son, saving their lives. “I’m actually an atheist,” she replied with a laugh. I would have played it differently and told the bearded cable news fixture that as a Hellene I worshipped Cerebus, the three-headed hound that guards the Gates of Hades. The tornado was just another “Act of Dog,” I’d insist. Then again, it would probably be difficult to joke with my home flattened behind me and a swath of missing neighbours. There are several disturbing things here, beyond Blitzer’s crowbarring religion into disaster coverage. His routine had a subtext; God either targeted or ignored a number of tornado victims while saving others from death. As soon as you start thanking an interventionist deity for close shaves, you have to rationalize all the miseries, afflictions, deaths and disasters He or She engineered or approved. As Stanford professor of biological sciences Robert Sapolsky observed, “the God concept gets mighty infuriating when you spend your time thinking about, say, untreatably aggressive childhood leukemia.” I’m reminded of a speaking tour by an African-American evangelist who survived the 9/11 attacks on the twin towers. He insisted his survival was proof of God’s love, though it sounded to me more like one man’s posttraumatic spiritual inflation. History is full of challenging theological moments. On the morning of Nov. 1, 1755, Father Manual Portal awoke from a nightmare in which Lisbon was destroyed in an earthquake. He went to mass and prayed. A few hours later his monastery was in ruins, just as he had dreamed. “Tens of thousands of pious citizens were on their knees in their Churches on the All Saints’ Day of 1755, listening to the familiar exhortations to rejoice in praise of their Lord, when they felt the first faint shuddering of the earth beneath them,” writes Otto Friedrich in his history of apocalyptic beliefs, The End of the World. The earthquake was centred just offshore of Portugal, but it caused tremendous damage hundreds of miles inland, with worshippers unwittingly scheduled for burial in collapsing churches. It’s not known if Vatican officials asked any survivors if they “thanked the Lord.” After the 2004 tsunami in Southeast Asia, there were a rash of “Where was God” editorials and commentaries, with pundits inquiring how a supreme being could have allowed thousands to die in such a manner. In a world where hundreds of thousands of children die routinely and unnecessarily every day, it takes a class of comfortable, blinkered people — who’ve never been troubled by lack of food, fresh water or reliable shelter — to imply their SkyGod has an ADHD problem. For his part, Blitzer unwittingly dragged the baggage of “theodicy” onto the plains of Oklahoma. That’s the branch of theology that attempts to reconcile human suffering and evil with a loving Creator, a problem that dates back to The Book of Job. A pious man, Job suffers through a nightmarish raft of afflictions after God and Satan place a wager on his faith. As scripture, it makes for compelling reading — even if it makes the CEO of Smite, Incorporated seem a bit sociopathic. Let the octave-climbing diva give a shout out to God for her Grammy win. Let the college football star drop to his knees in praise for a winning field kick. I won’t argue for or against the existence of a supreme being or beings, or that people aren’t entitled to faiths that sustain them, including atheism (which is just another doctrine beyond formal logical proof or empirical validation). But I will argue there are very good reasons to remind CNN’s Wolf Blitzer and his contemporaries on Fox News and Canada’s Sun Media for keeping church and state separate. As history shows, those two are very bad company together. Hybridize them with mass media and we’d have a genuine three-headed hound on our hands. www.geoffolson.com

GEOFF OLSON

B.C. LIBERALS HARSH MEASURES IN 2002 HURT THE POOR

To the editor: Re: “Liberals have helped the poor,” Letters, May 24. George Vytasek, in his letter published May 24 ,2013 says that the B.C. Liberals have purchased more than 25 hotels for the homeless and will construct 14 housing complexes on city land while funding shelters. What he does not say is that when the B.C. Liberals introduced harsh measures and policies for people on social assistance in 2002, they helped create the tsunami of street homelessness that plagues us still. Instead of doing anything to fix the damage by repairing the huge tears they put in our social safety net, started by the NDP under Mike Harcourt, they are using a stop gap approach that has put only a small dent in street homelessness and has done nothing to repair or strengthen infrastructure. Neither have they done anything to apologize or admit wrongdoing to the poor of this city. So then, whose comments are without merit? Aaron Zacharias, Vancouver

FISHING POND MAKES READER CRINGE To the editor: Re: “Sanctuary pond a birdbrained idea,” June 14. I’m cringing reading about this idea. I have several bird loving friends in New York City where

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Letters may be edited by the Courier for reasons of legality, taste, brevity and clarity. To be considered for publication, they must be typed, signed and include the writer’s full name (no initials), home address, and telephone number (neither of which will be published), so authorship may be verified. Send to: 1574 West Sixth Ave., Vancouver V6J 1R2 or email editor@vancourier.com

they allow fishing in their ponds in places like Central Park and Prospect Park, and it is a nightmare for birds and anyone who cares about them. Birds are constantly being caught in discarded fishing line and even getting hooked with fishing hooks. I can’t believe they would come up with such a dumb idea for Vancouver. Will these fishermen also pay to have birds rescued and treated from their fishing line/hook injuries? There are endless articles about fishing and birds in New York City, including a Times article that reported: “The issue has become so bad that the Prospect Park Alliance has stepped in to post new signs around the lakes to highlight the rules. In addition, they have reached out to fishing clubs, and will start an educational campaign in multiple languages this spring.” The fact is fishermen and their children are not going to care about birds. It’s bad enough with unleashed dogs and kites being left in the pond in the park I go to in Vancouver. And now fishing? I’m stunned someone in Vancouver thinks this is a good idea. Marion Ambler, Vancouver

PORT SHIRKING RESPONSIBILITY ON COAL EXPORTS Re: “Climate Kid Deserves to be Heard,” Letters, June 5. It appears that Port Metro Vancouver has taken a defensive stance over the exporting coal issue and that is an unwise move. Good public opinion is important to the running of any business. PMV seems to be shirking responsibility and

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excusing its lack of consciousness, which is in its mandate, as a “means to a way out” — a rather big pollution in itself. Maybe the coal is not so damaging to our environment here as it will be somewhere else, but PMV’s attitude certainly looks to be diseased. It is unfortunate that being selfishly tunnel-visioned can be a problematical trait in humans. This refusal to accept accountability is a “sickness” and could possibly be very harmful in the long run. People have every right to be involved and included in anything that will affect their health and well-being. Port Metro Vancouver wants to expand its facilities to accommodate American coal. The American ports will not ship this stuff out to their Asian customers. Why is that? Maybe because it’s a filthy product that these ports (or the people living around the ports) don’t want to deal with? Did PMV not expect to run into any opposition here for possibly the very same reason? There is another reason I feel disturbed by Port Metro Vancouver’s expansion development plan. Could these expanded facilities be used as a possible destination point for an oilsands pipeline route proposal in the future? I understand that the Kinder Morgan company is drawing up a new route plan for their crude oil pipeline. Not caring that people have worries and anxieties about health, and not having a conscience regarding the consequences or effects these commodities have on others and the environment, borders on negligent. Frances Dietz, Vancouver

SOCIAL MEDIA COURIER STORY: “Developing Story: ‘Skybridge’ part of unique Main Street project,” June 11 Lasso CRM @LassoCRM: Can’t wait for the reveal! COURIER POLL: “Should #vpd spend time ticketing cyclists who don’t wear helmets?” Barb Adamski @BarbAdamski: Of course! It’s not like there’s any real crime happening in Vancouver… #sarcasm #bikehelmets Debbie Walker @DeeWuu: It’s usually the crackheads, so if they can ‘catch’ them, good on them...but nobody is going to pay...Insert Sad Face xx/oo Mtnbvan @mtnbvan: more important, should cyclists be held accountable like everyone else or get special treatment to bypass existing laws? Follow us on Facebook: The VancouverCourierNewspaper and Twitter: @VanCourierNews


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owlers have until June 27 to slide their feet into twotoned shoes and hit the lanes for five-pin bowling at Varsity Ridge Bowl. The 63-year-old alley at West 15th Avenue and Arbutus Street is closing its doors to make way for a new condo complex. Co-owner of Varsity Ridge, Ken Hayden, says 10 people want the alley’s carpet that features green bowling balls as planets that glow under black lights. “If you can get it, you can have it,” he told its admirers. But it’s glued down. Other equipment and furnishings have been sold. “For an ugly situation we got away pretty good,” Hayden said. Thealley’sautomaticscoring machines will go to the Commodore Lanes on Granville Street downtown. That alley will hire two of Hayden’s staff. It is also taking on the Golden Age leagues and Hayden and his wife and business partner Judy will take care of those

photo Dan Toulgoet

Bowlers Nancy Bednard, 86 (L), and Catherine Penny, 91, with Varsity Ridge owner Ken Hayden, who closes shop June 27. bowlers there as volunteers. “I’ve been in the business since 1976. I have four generations of families. I have many, many, many friends and it’s just sad to see everybody go their separate ways after so many years,” 69-year-old Hayden said about why they’ll volunteer. VarsityRidgehummedTuesday afternoon. Children from a Montessori school in Marpole rolled balls beneath disco lights toward glowing pins on the eight lanes in the back and seniors dominated the eight lanes in the main room. “We’re

all very sad,” said 91-year-old Catherine Penny who’s bowled at Varsity Ridge for at least 20 years.“[VarsityRidge]meansa lot to a lot of people,” she said. “My son came here as a kid and he’s in his 50s now. He used to bowl up a storm here.” Both Penny and her friend Nancy Bednard, 86, plan to bowl on Granville Street, with the knowledge that the Haydens will be there. Special Olympics bowlers will transfer to Grandview Lanes on Commercial Drive, as will the youth leagues.

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“A lot of parents don’t want their kids to go downtown,” Hayden said. He’s clear about how he feels about closing. “Oh! It’s a terrible feeling, actually,” he said. “It’s just so sad. Not only for myself but for the community, the neighbourhood. You see these kids come in, they bowl and they have fun and they can do the glow-in-the dark. Twelve thousand school kids come here every year and that will never happen again, another 15,000 for birthday parties come here every year, so that’ll never happening again.” A McDonald’s and the Ridge Garden Restaurant are the only other two remaining businesses. The Ridge Theatre closed in February. The Chinese restaurant will close Aug. 31 and relocate to Macdonald Street at West 24th Avenue. Varsity Ridge will host an open house for past and present bowlers June 26 from 7 to 9 p.m. and a Golden Age wrapup will happen the following afternoon. crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

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FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

STRATHCONA

DIY shop mimics homesteader traditions

A13

FUTURE SHOP - CORRECTION NOTICE NEWSPAPER RETRACTION FOR THE FUTURE SHOP JUNE 21 CORPORATE FLYER We regret to inform customers that certain pages in the June 21 flyer show incorrect effective dates. Please be advised that the promotional flyer period is in fact from June 21 - June 27, 2013. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused our valued customers.

EMPORIUM OFFERS INFO ON HERITAGE SKILLS, PICKLING

vancouver.ca

CHERYL ROSSI Staff writer

R

ick Havlik’s business grew out of “a really out-of-control home-brewing hobby.” There’s a lot of waiting around when brewing beer, so he and his brewing buddy explored other doit-yourself projects. “There’s this satisfaction that you get when you hold up a beer in your hand that you brewed and realize it’s actually pretty good and it actually wasn’t all that hard,” Havlik said. “It’s almost an addicting rush where you start asking other questions like what else can I make?” Owner of Homesteader’s Emporium, Havlik wanted to make cheese, jam and roast coffee but he wasn’t sure where to begin. He searched around town, ordered supplies online and on his first try made “sour milk, fruit syrup and burned beans,” according to his website. Now the 28-year-old apartmentdweller provides the know-how and the supplies that make activities, including composting, doable in a small, urban space. Havlik says customers of his shop on East Hastings near Heatley Avenue include people in their 20s who are discovering “heritage skills,” homesteaders who aim to be self-sufficient, “preppers” who are preparing for a breakdown of the global supply chain, and regular people who wish to learn the pickling and sausage-making skills

Powell Street closed to make way for new overpass Effective June 24 – summer 2014

photo Dan Toulgoet

Rick Havlik from Homesteaders Emporium takes care of half of the garden at the Strathcona Green Zone Resource Park on East Hastings Street. their families failed to pass on. Homesteader’s Emporium started monthly workshops on gardening last fall. Havlik, a member of the Strathcona Business Improvement Association and its sustainability committee, saw an opportunity to take the sessions outside and into the BIA’s Resource Park, which includes commercial recycling and composting and 27 garden beds on a former parking lot. “The first time I went over there they were full of weeds and it seemed like no one had really been paying attention to them for a full season,” Havlik said. Charlotte Fesnoux, Resource Park site coordinator for the BIA, says a restaurant was keen to manage the urban garden, but the arrangement faltered. Now the BIA is renting 14 of the plots to Homesteader’s. It will use 10 of the plots for workshops and participants who pay $5 to $10 per session (prices slated to increase in July) will take

produce home. At least a quarter of the harvest will go to the meal program at the Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood House, and Havlik has invited the neighbourhood house’s gardening group and representatives of The Salvation Army Grace Mansion to use two plots. Flax is sprouting on two other beds for the Urban Weaver Project. Havlik believes interest in beekeeping, pickling and preserving is here to stay. “It is sort of trendy to trend almost toward Portland-style hyper awareness of what’s happening with your food,” Havlik said. “Learning to take on do-it-yourself food projects or prepare or process food in different ways, that kind of goes hand-in-hand with just a generalized increase in the amount of attention that you pay to what food you eat.” For workshop information, see homesteadersemporium.ca. crossi@vancourier.com twitter.com/Cheryl_Rossi

A new overpass will be built on Powell Street in Vancouver to improve the flow of buses, cars and trucks and create safer and more convenient cycling and walking routes. The new overpass will replace the streetlevel rail crossing near Raymur Street. Powell Street will be closed for construction between Hawks Avenue and Clark Drive from Monday, June 24 until summer 2014. Please use alternate routes during this time. Businesses on Powell and Cordova streets will remain open and accessible to local traffic throughout construction. FOR MORE INFORMATION: Phone: 3-1-1 TTY: 7-1-1 Outside of Vancouver: 604-873-7000 Visit: vancouver.ca/powellstreetoverpass Transit information: translink.ca/servicechanges

Downtown Vancouver Local Bus Service Review Open Houses

The City and TransLink are launching the Downtown Vancouver Local Bus Service Review to create a five-year vision for the downtown bus network that will match rider needs and the City’s transportation goals.

Join us at one of the following open houses to learn more about the review and share your thoughts with the study team. Saturday, June 22, 1 – 4 pm Strawberry Festival at Barclay Manor 1447 Barclay Street and Barclay Heritage Square

Life Improvement by Dulux.

Wednesday, June 26, 3 – 8 pm Central Library, 350 West Georgia Street FOR MORE INFORMATION: vancouver.ca/downtownbusreview

Hillcrest and Riley Parks Master Plan Open House

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The Vancouver Park Board has integrated input from a previous open house into a draft master plan to improve Hillcrest and Riley Parks, site of the former Vancouver Curling Club, Riley Community Centre and Percy Norman Pool. Drop by an open house to review the plan and provide feedback. Tuesday, June 25, 5 – 8 pm Hillcrest Centre, 4575 Clancy Loranger Way (outside the main doors or room 322 if it rains) An online comment form on the draft master plan will be available at vancouver.ca after the open house. FOR MORE INFORMATION: 604-257-8402 or steve.wong@vancouver.ca


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013

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Because laneways in the West End are 33-feet wide compared to a city average of 20 feet, WERA president Christine Ackermann thinks they’d be good for rental housing.

WideWest End laneways eyed for rental housing DEVELOPING STORY with Naoibh O’Connor

W

est End laneways are the widest in Vancouver, measuring 33 feet compared to most others in the city, which are typically 20 feet. How to take advantage of them is among a host of topics that have emerged during discussions about updating the West End Community Plan. Community plans address subjects including transportation, land use and development, parks and open space, heritage and culture, sustainability and public amenities and facilities, and guide neighbourhood change over the next 30 years. The city is updating four community plans, including the West End’s. The median income for West End residents is $38,000, below the citywide median income of $48,000. Half of the residents are between 20 and 39 years of age and 80 per cent of the housing is rental housing — it provides 30 per cent of the city’s total. “It’s doing well providing a great service to the citizens of Vancouver by providing affordable rental housing near a lot of jobs in the central business district,” Kevin McNaney, the city’s assistant director of planning, told the Courier. But West End neighbourhood challenges include the need for more affordable housing, particularly for families. McNaney said it has one of the highest densities of children in Vancouver, but it doesn’t have many two or three bedroom units. That’s where laneways come in. “We are looking at some strategic and surgical infill approaches through lanes. A lot of people complain in the West End that they’re quite ugly and that they could be used better in such a dense area. So what we’re

thinking is these lanes provide an opportunity to generate some of that rental family housing — some of the two or three bedroom units in small infills,” he said, adding, “That rental housing could also provide additional revenue to help the property owners reinvest in the rental buildings.” The subject interests Christine Ackermann, president of the West End Residents Association, who noted the city developed a selfguided laneway tour — a link can be found on the city’s and WERA’s websites. “There’s a lot of opportunity to change the laneways. Of course we’re looking at Mole Hill laneway as sort of the Holy Grail. They’ve done such a good job, so we’re trying to learn from what worked well there and what didn’t work well,” Ackermann said. “But I’m kind of excited about the opportunity to have some affordable housing specifically for families in the laneways. I think that’s exciting because that’s the one area of affordable housing in the West End that we don’t really have — a lot of places for families, three bedrooms. We have a lot of bachelors, a lot of one bedrooms, but not much apart from that. And it would be great to see some families come back into the West End. It’s only one of the issues under discussion. In-depth information about the West End Community Plan can be found on the city’s site at vancouver.ca/westend. Information about the plan will be available at open houses at the Strawberry Festival at Barclay Heritage Square from 1 to 4, June 22 and at Blue Horizon Hotel, 1225 Robson St. from 4 to 7 p.m., June 25. McNaney said once further feedback is gathered from these events and through online efforts, staff will create the draft plan, which will be revealed to the public in the fall for a final look, and then to council on November for adoption. noconnor@vancourier.com twitter.com/naoibh


FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

CITY OF VANCOUVER FOOD SCRAPS RECYCLING PROGRAM

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community

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013

EVENT OR COMMUNITY NEWS WE SHOULD KNOW ABOUT? 604-738-1411 | sthomas@vancourier.com

LeaduptoPowellFeststartswithOrientique clude improving the entrance experience for visitors, refreshing and enhancing the exhibition space, and safeguarding its archives and collections. On Tuesday, June 22, the museum will host the second in a series of community consultation events to be held across the province, at the Vancouver Public Library, 350 West Georgia St., from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

with Sandra Thomas

CHINATOWN The 36th Powell Street Festival takes place Aug. 3 and 4, but there are already smaller celebrations planned leading up to the main event, which highlights Japanese-Canadian and Asian-Canadian arts and culture and encourages members of those communities to take a leadership role in the development of the arts. These events are considered part of the “Season” leading up to the main festival. To that end, fashion and art come together in The Orientique June 22 at Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese Garden, 578 Carrall St. The evening of performance features designs by Yasuhiro Tomita of Rukus, Terry Sasaki and Akihiko Izukura. A fusion of Western and Eastern influences and old and new Japan, The Orientique includes the sounds and beats from DJ LKS and performances by musician Caroline Jang and dancers Ralph Escamillan and Katerina Leppard.

KILLARNEY

The city’s annual Canadian Cancer Society Relay For Life takes place at Killarney Park this Saturday, June 22, from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. Everyone’s invited to take part in the relay, which this year has a new Carnival theme. Besides actually walking or running, this 12hour relay includes live performances and ac-

WEST END As part of the West End Community Plan, West End Arts has organized an open house to ask residents what it is they’d like to see in the community when it comes to the arts. The Arts Open House event will allow residents to give an opinion on everything from how to build community through the arts to their own arts recommendations for the West End. The open house takes place June 24 from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Coast Plaza Hotel and Suites, 1763 Comox St.

SOUTHLANDS

Fashion and art come together in The Orientique show at Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Garden June 22, which is part of the lead up to the 36th Powell Street Festival in August. tivities for all ages organized to celebrate cancer survivors and remember loved ones lost. Find out more at relaybc.ca. Killarney Park is located off Kerr Street and East 49th Avenue.

DOWNTOWN

The Victoria-based Royal B.C. Museum is

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The Friends of Southlands Society is holding a farmers market on Saturdays this summer (except long weekends) at 6767 Balaclava St. from 4 to 7 p.m. to support local agriculture in the city. The market launches this Saturday with tours of the Southlands Heritage Farm, Diana’s Famous Pies, Ruth’s Coffee, City Farms Co-op, Lifebites and more.

TROUT LAKE Annual Aboriginal Day celebrations take place at Trout Lake today, June 21, from noon to 5 p.m. with songs, traditional games, dances, food and more. sthomas@vancourier.com

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FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A17

STRATHCONA

Life in Canada comes with bitter taste MEXICAN COUPLE STRUGGLES TO MAKE A LIVING AT CAFE MIKE HOWELL Staff writer

T

he story Daniel Gomez and his wife, Patricia, are telling isn’t one theyimaginedwouldincludesomuch frustration and disappointment. Life was supposed to be much better when they left Mexico City with their two young daughters for the promise of good fortune and happiness in Vancouver. “For me, since I was a little kid, I always thought about Canada,” says Daniel before his wife added: “Canada is famous in Mexico. We always saw the advertising for this country and how it was beautiful.” The couple is sitting at a table in the Hogan’s Alley Café at the corner of Union and Gore streets. It’s late Tuesday afternoon and they are the only people in the place. There’s a reason for that: They own the café. There’s also a reason the café, which they took over in February 2012, is closed early: Business hasn’t been as good as they were told it would be and they can’t afford to hire extra staff. “I thought I would be a successful businessman but now I’m a barista,” says Daniel, a

photo Dan Toulgoet

Mexican immigrants Patricia and Daniel Gomez feel they were misled by an immigration consultant in Mexico and local business people in Vancouver about the Hogan Alley’s Cafe they purchased before coming to Canada. trained accountant who looks drained after another day at the café. “But I’m really happy, despite all the troubles, and ready to start our new life in Canada.” Their story of immigration is a complicated one they told in painstaking detail. It involves being misled by several people, including an immigration consultant in Mexico and business people in Vancouver.

Money was at the root of it — a lot of money the Gomezes spent that they believe they will never get back on what was supposed to be an investment in their future. The experience left the couple bitter, stressed and reaching out to politicians, lawyers and the local Mexican consul, whom the Gomezes say, were not able to provide any solace to the family. “Somepeopletoldusthatwasthewayitisinthis

country for immigrants — that it is a struggle and welcome to Vancouver,” said Patricia, who is a trained massage therapist whose credentials are not recognized in Canada. Daniel acknowledges he should have spent more time investigating his options for a business before immigrating but he is at a loss for words when attempting to reconcile the trust he put in people to get him here. “That, I don’t understand, why people do that,” he says. “But maybe I lost my mind in this big dream of coming to Canada. I don’t know.” So here they are, the couple says, not exactly living the dream but making the best of a situation in a community that was built largely on the struggle of immigrants from China, Italy and Japan. They’ve made some friends, their daughters enjoy their schools and they are learning more about the vibrant community in Strathcona, where they live in a basement suite. And like immigrants before them, the Gomezes have relied on their heritage to carry them through. They’ve added Mexican food, served at breakfast and lunch, at a café sought out by locals more for coffee. “Is it a coffee shop or a restaurant?” Daniel says of the question he gets from customers. “I say it’s both. It doesn’t matter to us why the people come here but as long as they leave happy.” Adds Patricia: “When the people smile, you forget everything.” mhowell@vancourier.com twitter.com/Howellings

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A18

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013

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Summer employment

KIDS WORKING TO GROW THEMSELVES BY EMMA LEE BERG

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

I

f your kids are prone to asking The Bank of Mom and Dad for money to buy what they want, ask them to consider working for it. And if they need money-making ideas, here are a few to get them—no matter what age—started.

YARD MAINTENANCE In the summer when the weather is sunny and warm, yard maintenance is easy. Think mowing the lawn, weeding, or watering the garden. Your child could offer all of these services under the umbrella of yard maintenance.

BOTTLE RECYCLING Your child can collect bottles for a deposit refund. He can make flyers asking neighbours for their returnable beverage containers. Then all he needs to do is return the containers to bottle depots for the deposit refunds. He could also hang out at local parks (where teams often play ball games and leave behind beverage containers) to pick up empties that are left behind.

younger children for a couple of hours a day. Parents are already scrambling to keep their kids occupied, booking them at summer camps and other activities and them rushing to get home from work in time to pick them up. Your child can bridge the gap by offering to pick the kids up and looking after them for an hour or so after a day camp has ended.

PET CARE Summer is a busy time for vacations— vacations that may leave a pet behind. Your child can offer pet-care and petsitting services, ensuring that fish are fed, dogs are walked, and litterboxes are cleaned. If your child is an animal lover, this is a good way to match his interests with a job that pays.

CLEANING HOUSE If you have a child who is meticulous, cleaning house for neighbours is a great idea. Just make sure your child knows the basics of cleaning before you send him out on a job. He could specialize in a certain type of cleaning, like floors and vacuuming, or bathrooms and kitchens.

BABYSITTING If your child has taken the babysitting course, she could offer to babysit

TEENS MUST ‘UNLEARN’ ENTITLEMENT HABITS Teresa, a 40-year-old Vancouver mom, says that her 15-year-old son Lucas was motivated to work when she said wouldn’t pay for a video game he wanted. So, he canvassed the neighbourhood offering his cleaning services to neighbours and landed a couple of gigs. “I didn’t expect him to actually go out and get work,” Teresa admitted. “Honestly, I thought by suggesting he work for it, he would just give up on getting the video game. After a few weeks, he ended up earning enough to buy a few games.” Lucas has been working steadily since then. He’s 17 years old now, and earning an honest day’s wage on the grill at McDonald’s. His goal now? To buy his first car!

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FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A19

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ake sure to protect your kids’ eyes this summer because children’s vision is at greater risk of damage from UV rays, warn Canadian doctors of optometry.

(Main Street and 29th Ave.) • Since 2003•

Want to keep up with the Courier online? It’s easy. Follow us on Twitter at @VanCourierNews

“The crystalline lens in children’s eyes is less capable of filtering UV than in adult eyes, resulting in greater risk for internal eye damage later in life,” says Dr. Ahmed.

Because exposure is cumulative, direct contact with sunlight for even short periods of time can cause several longterm eye health problems, many of which begin symptom-free. For children, the first years are formative to their future vision and eye health, says Dr. Ahmed.

A HAT, SUNGLASSES AND APPLICATION OF SUNSCREEN KEEP BABY PROTECTED

While tests have shown that inexpensive sunglasses can provide full UV protection, the quality of materials and consistency of the tints may be inferior. Such imperfections can distort children’s vision, causing a mild headache or eyestrain when sunglasses are worn. “Before choosing sunglasses, children should have a thorough eye examination to ensure their eyes are healthy and to take any current eye conditions into consideration,” says Dr. Ahmed. “At the very least, have their sunglasses assessed by a doctor optometry to ensure that your child is wearing a good quality product.” More information can be found in the Eye Heath Library at doctorsofoptometry.ca. Article courtesy newscanada.com.

The World Health Organization estimates that up to 80 per cent of a person’s lifetime exposure to damaging UV radiation occurs before the age of 18. Conditions directly related to it include: cataracts, macular degeneration, cornea sunburn, tissue growths on the surface of the eye that can eventually block vision, as well as eyelid skin cancer and malignant melanomas in the eye. Protecting your child now will decrease the potential for serious eye problems later in life. A close-fitting, wrap around style frame that protects both the skin around the eye, as well as the eye itself, is recommended. So, too, are 100% UVA and UVB blocking lenses. A widebrimmed hat tops things off.

“Bigger thinking, Better design, Bolder ambitions” Professor Jack Lohman, CBE; CEO Royal BC Museum

The Royal BC Museum is looking forward – what do we need to accomplish for future generations? We believe a refreshed, modern museum and archives is at the heart of celebrating British Columbia and its place in the wider world. Bigger thinking, better design, bolder ambitions – these will mark what we do for the benefit of the society and economy of our province. Please join us to find out more about our plans and share your ideas with us.

Community Event Details: Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - 11:00 am to 3:00 pm Promenade, Central Library, 350 W. Georgia, Vancouver For further information and to participate online starting June 22, 2013 please visit: www.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca

USE A PROTECTIVE COVER OVER BABY’S STROLLER

Various styles of hand mauls – stone hammers with carved grips – all from British Columbia.

062013

Before choosing sunglasses, children should have a thorough eye examination to ensure their eyes are healthy

604.677. 2337 4502 Main St, Vancouver BC

Kids wearing sun glasses to shield their eyes from harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation is just as important as slapping on sunscreen to protect their skin. Just as the sun causes sunburn, UV light is also absorbed by the tissue of the eye and can cause serious eye damage. Children are more vulnerable than adults, says Dr. Riaz Ahmed, spokesperson for Doctors of Optometry Canada.

“This is particularly concerning as children spend more time outdoors than the average adult. It’s estimated that children receive approximately three times the annual adult dose of UV.”

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EW20

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013

STRATHCONA

PhilippineWomen Centre looks to re-open FACILITY HELPS FILIPINO WOMEN WITH IMMIGRATION AND JOB ISSUES SANDRA THOMAS Staff writer

T

he volunteer executive director of the Philippine Women Centre of B.C. wants to resurrect the group’s Strathcona building, which has been closed since 2008 due to a lack of funding and a dire need for repairs and renovations. “The centre was such an important place because we were the first ones to offer services to Filipino women,” said Cecilia Diocson. “It was also a space where women pushed out of their employer’s home could come. We considered that a rescue operation.” Diocson said the centre took the lead working with academics and the federal government on important research studies affecting Filipino women. Some of those studies focused on gender equality, discrimination and the challenges and needs of Filipino nurses doing domestic work in Canada. Other studies conducted with the help of government funding included one regarding Filipino mail-order

photo Dan Toulgoet

Cecilia Diocson goes through some of the stored boxes at the Phillipine Women Centre of B.C. at 451 Powell St. brides and another that dealt with issues that concern domestic workers in Canada, such as employer tactics to dampen wage claims and extend working hours, structuring conditions, dignity on the job and suggestions for policy change. According to research completed by the centre, in 2005 Filipino women accounted for 95.6 per cent of the live-in caregivers in Canada. In 2008, the centre received $262,212 from the Women’s Community Fund of the Status of Women Canada for its project, Breaking the

Silence: Eliminating Violence through Filipino Women’s Empowerment. Due to federal government cuts to funding, the majority of Status of Women Canada offices across the country have since closed. Marc-David Seidel, the chair of organizational behaviour with the University of B.C.’s Sauder School of Business, said these types of centres are vital to struggling immigrants. “In a crisis that social support is critical,” said Seidel. She advised that once an immigrant’s life has stabilized, it’s a good idea for them to

expand their social circles beyond dedicated services. “These centres are very positive, but after a person get through a crisis it’s important they learn how to expand their social circles,” said Seidel. Diocson noted government funding enabled the centre’s staff to purchase offices at 451 Powell St. in 1996. A lack of government funding closed the building in 2008, when the building fell into disrepair and mould started to grow due to a leak in the roof. At the time of the centre’s closure, Diocson had been living in Montreal helping her ailing mother, but now that’s she’s back the volunteer is determined to re-open those offices. “We’ve been meeting at my apartment every Saturday to discuss how we can build it back up,” said Diocson. “And we’ve been going to the building to clean it up, even though there’s mould and no water or lights.” Diocson said selling the building in this economy doesn’t make sense financially, so she hopes that by making the centre’s plight public, volunteers and businesses will step forward to help with renovations. “Real estate prices are down right now,” said Diocson. “But if we can renovate with donated materials, we’ll be back in business.” For more information about the Philippine Women Centre of B.C. visit pwc.0.tripod.com. sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10

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FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013

news Buskers to take over Granville Mall SECOND ANNUAL FESTIVAL UNFOLDS CANADA DAY WEEKEND DREW MCLACHLAN Contributing writer

O

n Canada Day weekend, Granville Street will become a cacophony of street music, as musicians and performers from around the world descend on our city’s downtown for the second Vancouver International Busker Festival. Five blocks of Granville Street, from Smithe to Pender, will be closed to traffic from June 29 to July 1, allowing pedestrians to crowd around local and international talent, including contortionist Bendy Em, sidewalk artist Chalkmaster Dave, and a multitude of musicians. Despite the first festival officially taking place in July 2012, the seeds were planted during the 2010 Winter Olympics. Barbara Fairbrother of the Downtown Vancouver Business Improvement Association reached out to local buskers to fill the streets and entertain tourists. “[This year’s festival] is the same format and same place,” said Mike Bonnici, founder and artistic director of the festival. “Prior

photo submitted

Musicians and buskers like Dawn Dreams will occupy Granville Street for the second annual Vancouver International Buskers Festival, June 29 to July 1. to the Olympics, Barbara sent out emails to the busker communities in order to activate the streets during the Olympics. It was a massive success, there was a diversity of art and some epic, epic, epic shows.” Bonnici has travelled around the country and abroad, taking his craft — knife juggling and unicycle riding — to the streets of Ottawa, Amsterdam and London, among other cities. Bonnici said the festival isn’t only about entertainment, but an opportunity to rethink how the public uses public space.

“From a Canadian history point of view, the outdoors are for public use,” Bonnici said. “The more it is regulated and the more uses are prohibited, the less people interact at the same level. When it’s successful and well coordinated, everybody wins. Artists can communicate to each other without a boardroom.” On Granville Island, Bonnici is active in the ongoing battle against licensing changes imposed by the Granville Island Cultural Society. The new rules include a fire ban, a doubling of licensing fees (from $55 per sea-

son to $110,) a reduction in “circle shows” (where an audience gathers around the performer) and mandatory auditioning for buskers. Bonnici also said that he disagrees with how the city handles noise regulation. The current limit is only 75 decibels in six metres, which he claims is almost inaudible, and wants to see the distance moved to 20 metres. However, he said that he is very grateful of how supportive the city has been with the Busker Festival, and pleased with how Vancouverites compare to audiences in other cities. “The most exciting thing about Vancouver crowds is the politeness, intelligence and diversity,” Bonnici said. “People here are very articulate, but also respectful — they like to get engaged. In other places, you’ll sometimes get drunk people yelling at you while you perform, but its pretty rare in Vancouver.” Bonnici said he hopes the festival will inspire attendees, and bring more variety to Vancouver’s busking community. “The arts matter, the arts inspire people,” Bonnici said. “When people are inspired they’re better friends and they’re better neighbours.” The Vancouver International Busker Festival takes place from June 29 to July 1, on Granville Street from Smithe to Pender. Over 150 performers will be in attendance. Drew_McLachlan@hotmail.com twitter.com/LachedAndLoaded

this could be your big moment The Vancouver Courier is calling on all filmmakers—young, old, students, hobbyists, talented or otherwise. Following on the success of our neighbourhood series, Vancouver Special, we’re launching Vancouver Minute—a contest giving city residents the opportunity to share thoughts and stories about your neighbourhoods in the form of a sixty second video. Your “minute” can be shot in any style or genre—documentary, mockumentary, drama, comedy, an animated story, even a music video. There are three categories of prizes—first, a Juried Prize of $1500, second, a People’s Choice Prize of $1000 and finally, two Voters’ Prizes of $250 each drawn randomly from those of you who’ve voted. All prizes are in the form of gift coupons courtesy of London Drugs. To submit a video and to browse the small print, go to contest.vancourier.com. Final date for entries is July 17, 2013. Everyone has a story, let’s see yours.

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news

FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Cannabis devotees to descend on city for Kush Cup EVENT CELEBRATES MEDICAL AND RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA DREW MCLACHLAN Contributing writer

T

he nation’s dankest weed will soon descend upon Vancouver for the second annual Kush Cup, a celebration of medical and recreational cannabis that includes a Canada-wide growers’ competition. The event, which runs June 28 to 30, was started as part of the Vancouver Health Expo last year by Mark Klokeid, who wants to see a reversal of the negative stigma surrounding the substance.(Kush is a strain of marijuana.) “It’s important to normalize [cannabis,] so the Vancouver Health Expo is very useful,” Klokeid said. “It helps us attract a lot of people interested in health and wellness and shows people that it is a health issue.” Klokeid was diagnosed with stage two lymphoblastic lymphoma in 2003, and underwent four rounds of chemotherapy, several spinal taps, and stem cell and blood transplants. He found comfort in medical cannabis as it provided him a means to improve his appetite and relieve himself of physical pain without having to worry about addiction or liver damage. Along with years of illness and rigorous treatments, it also helped him change his outlook on life. “When I was sick I promised myself that I would live like there was no tomorrow,” Klokeid said. “I decided to travel the world — to make travelling my passion.” Klokeid regularly produces travel videos for his self-titled YouTube channel, all of which focus on or incorporate cannabis. His most recent trip was to Turpan, China where he visited a 2,700year-old mummy that was found with the oldest known marijuana stash. The grower’s competition will feature different strains from medical marijuana growers from across Canada. Judge positions will be open to any attendee with a valid medical license. They will grade each strain based on flavour, potency, psychological effect and cleanliness. Six awards will be given out. Klokeid, who was born in Calgary, said that Vancouver is an ideal city to hold the Kush Cup and that he has seen virtually no opposition to the event. “Most people in Vancouver are friendly towards [marijuana] usebecauseoftheprevalenceofdruguseinthecity,”Klokeidsaid. “But there’s still a part of the population that doesn’t know the facts. The VPD is very educated on drugs and is one of the most liberal police forces in Canada. There are a lot of vapour lounges and dispensaries downtown, and it’s legal for recreational use just across the border in Washington. The city is getting more and more liberal, and going in the opposite direction as federal law.” Klokeid said that although education is a primary goal, he also wants to focus on the spectacle of the event, noting that there are several annual beer and liquor events in the city. “I want the expo to not just be a health show, but a place where people can have a memorable experience,” Klokeid said. “A lot of people said that they had the time of their lives last year and were grateful to have a pot-friendly event. A lot of events in Vancouver are alcohol-based, but cannabis is becoming more accepted in the mainstream — not just as medicine, but as recreation.” The Kush Cup will feature 20 keynote speakers, including authors, doctors and lawyers, live glass blowing sessions, deprivation tanks, a boat cruise and three musical concerts. It takes place at various venues including the PNE Forum, Green Room restaurant, Yaletown Dispensary and the Centre for Performing Arts. For more information, go to kush.ca/kushcup.html. Drew_McLachlan@hotmail.com twitter.com/LachedAndLoaded

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013

travel Molokai valley offers glimpse into‘old Hawaii’ SANDRA THOMAS Staff writer

M

olokai, Hawaii—The moment I stepped off my small aircraft onto the tarmac of the Molokai Airport in Hoolehua, I immediately sensed this would be a visit to Hawaii unlike any I’d experi-

enced before. The tropical island had been previously described to me as an example of “old Hawaii,” but those words hardly do Molokai justice. During my visit, the tiny island seemed alive with Hawaiian ancestors, legends and spirits of days long past. That feeling remained for the duration of my five days on the island, but never so much as when I had the opportunity to

watch Kupuna (respected elder) and storyteller Anakala Pilipo Solatorio make poi (paste made from taro plants) from scratch using a well-worn, shallow wooden bowl treasured by his family for decades. As Solatorio worked, he told the small crowd gathered for the demonstration stories about the great tsunami and flood that swept through Halawa Valley on Molokai in 1946. I wasn’t the only one transfixed as the elder brought us back to that fateful night when the waters tore through the fishing village also known for its taro farms. Today, Halawa Valley is considered a sacred site. It’s thought the valley was first inhabited as early as 650 AD and still today there’s evidence of former heiau (places of worship). History aside, the valley is stunning with towering waterfalls and a

beach that on this day was inhabited by about six other tourists swimming and sunning themselves on the sand. That’s right, not 60, 600 or 6,000, but six, and I instantly had a feeling of privilege in that I had access to this sacred valley and beach. After spending some time near the crystal, blue ocean, my tour guide for the day, Molokai native Julie Bicoy, took me on a short hike through the jungle past the home and taro fields of Kupuna Solatorio. It was at the far end of the property when Bicoy stopped at the modest dwelling of Solatorio’s nephew Kumu Pa’a Lawrence Kalainia Kamani Aki. Standing at the edge of the outdoor living area, Bicoy sang a beautiful chant asking for permission to enter the space. In response, “Lawrence,” as he’s known to friends and family, came out of his home to welcome us with offers of juice and chocolate. Kumu Pa’a Lawrence Kalainia Kamani Aki is a 50th-generation descendent of storytellers and teachers of Hawaiian knowledge. Today, Lawrence’s knowledge, passed down from Kupuna Solatorio, is sought after by groups from around the world and he regularly travels to share Hawaiian culture and stories. Despite his title as a revered elder, on this day Lawrence looked more like he was ready to go surfing rather than impart the wisdom of his ancestors. Dressed casually in a sarong and muscle shirt, his long black hair flowing loosely down his back, the handsome Hawaiian jokes with his unexpected guests as he tells stories of his recent travels while showing photos on an iPad. Also on the property this day, was Lawrence’s apprentice Mano O Kahiko LLC. Kawika, who was also quick to welcome us as guests by touching foreheads and sharing an exchange of “ha,” the Hawaiian word for the breath of life. As I stood on the lush green property surrounded by mountains, waterfalls, swaying coconut trees and taro plants, in the company of two of the most revered teachers of Hawaiian culture in the world, I could almost feel the spirits enveloping us. And while the bright lights of Waikiki were just minutes away by plane, I felt like I had been granted a rare glimpse of old Hawaii. Guided hiking tours are available through Halawa Valley Hiking at 808-551-1055. (There is no email or web address.) For more information on Molokai, visit visitmolokai.com/visitorcenter.php. sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10 (Go to vancourier.com or scan page with the Layar app to see more photos.)

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Apprentince Mana O Kahiko LLC. Kawika (l) with spiritual teacher and elder Kumu Pa’a Lawrence Kalainia Kamani Aki at their Halawa Valley retreat.


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013

health

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t is a well-worn ritual. Near the end of your medical visit, the doctor gives you a prescription. Traditionally, it is handwritten and because calligraphy isn’t a prerequisite for medical school, you may not be able to read it. Most patients are like polite travellers in a foreign country. They may not understand everything that was said, but they’re willing to take a leap of faith and assume they got the gist of it. That may be a big risk if you’re travelling close to the border of a hostile country or about to take a potentially dangerous drug. An important principle in medical ethics is informed consent. In order to make a decision about what treatment — including medication — to take, you need sufficient information. So what should you know before you fill that prescription? There are five crucial areas of information summarized with my acronym, BRAIN: Benefits, Risks, Alternatives, Interactions and the Need for follow-up. The first question you need to answer is, “What is this drug for?” (i.e. What are the intended BENEFITS?) That’s what your family will ask when you get home. So if you’re not sure, ask before you leave the doctor’s office. The second area of information you need to know are the RISKS of taking this medication. These are the potential side effects. You won’t get every side effect listed in the pharmacy

handout. Only a few lucky winners will hit the jackpot. Like most lottery players you may not get any at all. However, as doctors, we should tell you the common side effects and the serious side effects (even if they are rare). The third question that should be answered is “What are the ALTERNATIVES?” What are the risks of not treating this condition? Are there other medications — cheaper or more expensive, synthetic or natural? Would lifestyle changes be sufficient? The fourth important area of information is the potential for INTERACTIONS with food or other drugs. Grapefruit juice interacts with many medications. It can raise the blood levels of many cholesterol-lowering drugs and increase the risk for side effects. The blood thinner, warfarin has to be carefully dosed in order to be effective in preventing blood clots without increasing the risk of bleeding. Many medications interact with warfarin, including non-prescription acetaminophen (Tylenol) and vitamin K (present in many foods, including leafy vegetables). Finally, the fifth area is the NEED to follow up?” If this is a short-term prescription — such as a course of antibiotics for an ear infection, should you return to the doctor if you’re not better? How long should you wait? If the prescription is for a chronic condition, such as diabetes or high blood pressure, how often should you be monitored? To make informed decisions about your health, you need this important information. If you’re not sure, ask these questions and pick your doctor’s BRAIN.

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feature

FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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S T R AT H C O N A a journey through our city’s neighbourhoods Vancouver Special is a year-long journey through each of Vancouver’s unique neighbourhoods. Join us every two weeks in our weekend issue for another look at a different community in our city.

Buddhist temple provides solace in ever-changing world

THE NEIGHBOURHOOD AT A GLANCE As Vancouver’s oldest residential neighbourhood, Strathcona has a long and rich history that is stained with soot, fire and grinding poverty. Despite plots of gentrification, however, its residents have always held on to the working class soul of the community. Strathcona is bordered by Burrard Inlet to the north, Clark Drive to the east, False Creek to the south, and Chinatown to the west. Before European settlement, the Squamish, Musqueam, and Tsleil-Waututh First Nations people occupied the area. Strathcona began as a camp of cabins built around Stamp’s Mill (later renamed Hastings Sawmill.) The early neighbourhood served as a hub for labourers migrating from across the country, China, the U.S. and Europe, who were drawn to Canada’s western frontier. As a result of the mass influx of workers and their families, Strathcona was the location of Vancouver’s first school: Hastings Mill School, a single-room schoolhouse that also served the children of Moodyville (now North Vancouver.) The Hastings Sawmill was one of the few structures to survive the Great Vancouver Fire of June 1886 and its unlikely survival would later reflect the perseverance of Strathcona’s heritage throughout the next century. Strathcona takes its name from Lord Strathcona (Sir Donald A. Smith,) who drove the last spike completing the first transcontinental railway at Craigellachie, B.C. During the 1960s, Strathcona was considered a slum by many. City planners considered demolishing a large portion of the neighbourhood to make room for an interurban freeway that would have also affected much of Gastown and Chinatown. The first part of the freeway, the Georgia Viaduct, was completed and effectively destroyed a section of Strathcona called Hogan’s Alley. Hogan’s Alley was Vancouver’s predominantly black neighbourhood. The rest of the freeway never became a reality. Though many treat the neighbourhood as a temporary home before moving to other areas of the city, a sense of pride and activism remains. On April 1, 200 residents protested what they saw as a hastily made plan by the city to remove the viaduct. The result, they say, would be an increase in traffic and congestion in Strathcona, which remains one of the few affordable options for real estate in Vancouver.

WE

photo Dan Toulgoet

Bob Akume serves as president and assistant to the temple reverend at the Vancouver Buddhist Temple, which practices Jodo Shinshu Buddhism or “Buddhism of the family.” DREW MCLACHLAN Contributing writer

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lthough Strathcona carries a strong image of a working class monoculture, the shadow of a mostly forgotten community still lingers. The blocks between Jackson and Main to the east and west, and Cordova and the waterfront to the south and north were once a landing point for Japanese immigrants seeking a new start in Canada at the turn of the 20th century. This small district within Strathcona was once called Japantown. A few remnants of the lost neighbourhood still exist, such as the Vancouver Buddhist Temple. Located on 220 Jackson Ave. across from Oppenheimer Park, the three-storey, cream coloured temple stands out from the rest. The building moved across Strathcona, from its original place on

STRATHCONA!

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32 Alexander St. in 1906, to several other sites until the group purchased a Methodist church at its current location in 1954. In 1979, the Buddhist temple was built. Bob Akume, who serves as president for the Vancouver Buddhist Temple and assistant to Reverend Tatsuya Aoki, says that like Strathcona’s Japanese community, the membership of the temple has also dwindled. What was once a hub for Vancouver’s Japanese-Canadians now only has 370 members. “In the last 15 to 20 years, many children who grew up around the temple have chosen to build homes outside of Strathcona,” Akume said. “Many want the opportunity to raise families and buy homes in newer areas. In Strathcona and other neighbourhoods, housing can be very restricted. A lot of businesses and stores have closed or moved elsewhere as well… In a previous generation almost every [member] had some connection with the neighbourhood.” Continued on next page

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A28

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013

STRATHCONA

Japanese-Canadians make up most of temple’s membership Continued from previous page Jodo Shinshu Buddhism is the most practiced sect of Buddhism in Japan as it does not enforce many rules onto individuals. Akume said that a main drawing point for converts is the focus on self-reflection through meditation. Jodo Shinshu is a “Buddhism of the family,” as the temple is run by the community rather than monks or nuns. Reverend Aoki holds religious services, while an elected board of directors runs takes care of administration. The decline of Japantown began in 1942, during the Second World War. After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941, Japanese-Canadians were branded as “enemy aliens” by the federal government. Any Japanese-Canadians living within 160 kilometres of B.C.’s coast were relocated into internment camps in the province’s interior or Alberta. “After the ban was lifted by the government, most went back to Vancouver and the coast,” Akume said. “Many chose to go back to Strathcona, but it was reduced quite a bit — because of racial discrimination, some people chose to return to Japan.” Akume’s family was forced from their home in Steveston, just south of Richmond, and chose to move to Lethbridge, Alberta. Families who chose to stay in B.C. were often separated, as

photo Dan Toulgoet

A group of women in the “shigin” or Japanese folk singing club at the temple. men were required to work for the government on railways or labour camps. Akume moved back to Steveston after the ban was lifted in 1952 and resumed high school before studying dentistry at UBC. Enough members of the temple returned after the war for it to return to life. Akume’s wife’s family ran a tofu shop just across from Oppenheimer Park, and many Japanese businesses

were able to thrive in the neighbourhood until a few decades ago. Today, just over 30 of the temple’s 370 members are non-Japanese — residents of Strathcona and the Downtown Eastside, who have sought solace at the temple. However, Akume said these members can sometimes be transient. “It’s a shifting population, and the duration of attendance is limited,” Akume said. “In two

or three years many stop attending, and we don’t know the reason.” The temporary status of outside members in some ways reflects Strathcona’s population — people are drawn to the temple and to Buddhism when they need it, but will leave when they no longer do. Yet many who were born as members feel a sense of pride and community surrounding the temple. Greg Chor grew up on the city’s East Side and has been a member of the temple since 2007. Chor said that he was drawn towards Buddhism after reading a book by Buddhist author Kenneth Tanaka and found that both the temple and Buddhism have given him “an outlook on living life with gratitude.” “[The temple] is a place where people can discover themselves,” Chor said. “Their own views, sense of mindfulness and gratitude. It’s accessible to everyone, the door is always open.” The temple’s philosophy, said Akume, is about finding meaning in the individual. “Having large growth in terms of membership isn’t in our teachings. We’d like to show people what the temple can offer but it’s certainly not an aggressive stance we assume.” Drew_McLachlan@hotmail.com twitter.com/NotDrowzyD

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FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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SAVE UP TO 25% YOU SHOULD HAVE STAYED HOME ASSASSINATING THOMSON PEOPLE LIKE US HOTEL BETHLEHEM REUNION HIRSCH CHELSEA HOTEL PRISONER OF TEHRAN DANCING WITH RAGE BC BUDS SPRING ARTS FAIR THE CONCESSIONS and Dance from

JAMES GNAM & NATALIE LEFEBVRE GNAM PEGGY BAKER DANCE TARA CHEYENNE PERFORMANCE AMBER FUNK BARTON

OPEN HOUSE For a video and more photos, scan page with

Property for sale: 710 Union St. $799,000 Specs: Three bedrooms, 1,355-square-feet, MLS # V998505 Situated just two blocks from both Strathcona and Maclean parks, and with ample yard space, this three-storey townhouse is a great fit for families. Built in 2006, this home may not be indicative of Strathcona’s status as the city’s oldest neighbourhood, but the open cherry wood floors and large stone patio offer their own charm. Union Street is mostly residential and offers a quieter alternative that is still in proximity to shops and nightlife. The property holds a Walk Score of 88, as the many Strathcona businesses along Hastings Street are only a five-minute walk away, while Main Street, Commercial Drive and Granville Street can be accessed on foot in 10, 15, and 20 minutes, respectively. The nearest SkyTrain station is on Main Street and Terminal Avenue. Cyclists can take the popular Frances/Union bike route, which is part of the Adanac Bikeway that stretches from downtown to Boundary Road.

neighbourhood numbers

218 1873 250 18 1972 77 27,139

Flavours of gelato and ice cream served at La Casa Gelato, which opened on Venables Street in 1994 with 40 flavours.

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youth talent SHOWDOWN 201 3

13-20 YEARS OLD CREW OR SIGN UP SOLO

AS A

MAKE FRIENDS

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GAIN EXPERIENCE

REGISTRATION DEADLINE:

Monday June 24, 2013 at 5pm AUDITION: Saturday July 6, 2013

The year that Vancouver’s first school, Hastings Mill School, opened in Strathcona. The school originally consisted of only one classroom.

@ Vancouver Chinatown BIA Society

PRELIMINARIES: Saturday July 20, 2013, 8pm

@ Vancouver Chinatown Night Market

FINALS: Sunday, August 11, 2013 3pm

The number of unemployed men led by labour organizer Steve Brodie in the occupation of the Carnegie Library during the month-long sitdowners strike in 1938.

@ TD Vancouver Chinatown Festival, Main Stage Application and full contest rules are available at:

www.vancouver-chinatown.com TD Vancouver Chinatown Festival

@Chinatownfest

The number of studio albums released by hardcore punk pioneers D.O.A. Like many of Vancouver’s punk bands, their career began in Fort Gore, Strathcona. The year Strathcona native and NDP MLA Dave Barrett was elected premier of British Columbia. Barrett was B.C.’s first and only Jewish premier.

VANCOUVER

CHINATOWN BIA

ORGANIZER

There are 4 prizes to be won (approximate retail value of over $3,000). First place winner may win a prize consisting cash, a trophy and gifts with an approximate retail value of $1,500. Second place winner may win a prize consisting cash, a trophy and gifts with an approximate retail value of $900. Third place winner may win a prize consisting cash, a trophy and gifts with an approximate retail value of $700. People’s Choice Award

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winner may win a prize consisting cash and a trophy with an approximate retail value of $200 (the “Prize”). No purchase required. Chances of winning depend on the number of eligible contestants received. Please submit the application form with a non-refundable registration fee of $20 to the Vancouver Chinatown BIA Society by Monday June 24th, 2013, 5pm.

SUPREME SPONSORS

Percentage of Strathcona residents who consider Mandarin and/or Cantonese a dominant language in their lives, according to 2006 stats from the Vancouver Economic Commission. PREMIUM MEDIA SPONSORS

Average annual household income. Compared to a $64,889 average for Vancouver as a whole, according to 2006 statistics.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013

feature

Then and now...

STRATHCONA

Then (top): Looking west on Powell Street from Dunlevy Avenue, early 1900s. Photo: Vancouver Public Library, Phillip Timms, 13300.

Then (top): The Secord Hotel: Northeast corner of Powell Street and Dunlevy Avenue, 1890. Photo: City of Vancouver Archives, Major Matthews AM54-s4-:Hot P85

Now (right): Looking west on Powell Street from Dunlevy in June 2013. photo

Now (left): The Secord Hotel, known today as the Marr Hotel: Northeast corner of Powell Street and Dunlevy Avenue, June 2013. photo Dan Toulgoet

To see more photos, scan page with

See more Then and Now photos at vancourier.com

Dan Toulgoet

“The Giving Hearts Awards Program recognizes outstanding individuals and organizations who exemplify the true spirit of philanthropy.”

The Association of Fundraising Professionals, Vancouver Chapter, recognizes there are many individuals, families and groups that make outstanding contributions of time, leadership and financial support to countless organizations. The Giving Hearts Award Program was created to acknowledge the true expression of philanthropy. This is your opportunity to recognize and celebrate the individuals and organizations (volunteers, leaders, fundraisers, philanthropists, youth) that make a difference to your organization and the non-profit community. The awards will be presented at the National Philanthropy Day Luncheon on November 15, 2013 Submissions are currently being accepted; DEADLINE: Post-marked no later than June 30, 2013 If you have any questions please contact: Chair Ms. Cary Gaymond - cgaymond@shaw.ca

For guidelines, nomination forms, and more information please visit the Giving Hearts Award page at:

www.afpvancouver.org


FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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GOT ARTS? 604-738-1411 | arts@vancourier.com

1

2

OURPICKS JUNE 21 - 25

3 4 For additional video and web content, scan page with

1 2 3 4

Bassist and vocalist ESPERANZA SPALDING’s June 23 concert at the Vogue Theatre is one of dozens of highlights at this year’s VANCOUVER INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL, which takes over the city June 21 to July 1. Other performers include Michael Kaeshammer, Alex Cuba, soul singer Bettye LaVette, the swinging sounds of Gypsophilia and music legend Herbie Hancock, among others. More details at coastaljazz.ca. Some are calling Noah Baumbach’s latest film, FRANCE HA, a love letter to New York City. Shot in glorious black and white, it’s also getting plenty of comparisons to Woody Allen’s Manhattan for its dry sense of humour masking a big heart. Add the irrepressible GRETA GERWIG as a 27-year-old dancer going through a post-college identity crisis, and you’ve got one charmer of a film. FRANCES HA opens June 21 at Fifth Avenue Cinemas. We were somewhere around the Rio Theatre, on the edge of Commercial Drive, when the drugs began to take hold. Terry Gilliam’s adaptation of HUNTER S. THOMPSON’s hallucinogenic road trip FEAR AND LOATHING IN LAS VEGAS starring JOHNNY DEPP as Raoul Duke and BENICIO DEL TORO as Dr. Gonzo screens June 21, 11 p.m. at the Rio Theatre as part of ifs Friday Late Night Movie series. Paul Anthony hosts. More info at riotheatre.ca.

There isn’t a day that goes by that we don’t ask friends, family, loved ones, even strangers on the street, “Who’s got the funk?” Thankfully filmmaker-historian Nelson George aims to answer that age old question in his documentary FINDING THE FUNK, which explores the colourful and, dare we say, funky history and ongoing influence of funk music. It screens at Vancity Theatre June 23, 8:30 p.m. at as part of the BEST OF HOT DOCS series, which runs June 21 to 23. For more details, call 604-683-FILM (3456) or go to viff.org.


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013

FROM

PLAYING TO AUGUST 3!

$29!

STRATHCONA

MUSIC AND LYRICS BY ROBERT LOPEZ AND JEFF MARX. BOOK BY JEFF WHITTY

“Savvy, sassy, and eminently likeable…a breakthrough musical” —The New York Times PHOTOS BY EMILY COOPER

PLAYING AT

Under the Tents • Vanier Park

Tickets: 604-739-0559 or bardonthebeach.org

Studio Stage

ENTER TO WIN

screenshot Michael Kissinger

2 tickets to a BARD ON THE BEACH PERFORMANCE

WALL TO WALL: “Seeds of Change” by Nelson and Xochitl Garcia is one of dozens of murals brightening up

Mail or drop off your entry to: the Vancouver Courier, 1574 W. 6th Ave. Vancouver, BC V6J 1R2 Or email your entry to: contest@vancourier.com (Subject line: BARD). Include your name & phone number for a chance to WIN!

buildings, alleyways and overpasses in Strathcona as part of a city-wide initiative to celebrate the history, heritage and culture of Vancouver’s first urban areas. To watch a video on the murals of Strathcona and the East Side Mural tours curated by Esther Rausenberg and Richard Tetrault of Creative Cultural Collaborations Society, go to vancourier.com/ entertainment or scan this page using the Layar app.

Name: Phone #: Contest Deadline: Thurs. June 27 by noon. Winners will be contacted by phone.

DANCING ON THE EDGE

dancingontheedge.org

The Heart and Stroke Foundation thanks all our supporters for making the 2013 Heart of Gold Gala such a success again this year. With your support we raised $745,000. Hearts of gold were abundant as our Gala committee, generous sponsors and all our guests helped raise vital funds to support life-saving research, advocacy, health promotion and education programs, as well as patient and caregiver support resources. Healthy lives free of heart disease and stroke. Together we will make it happen. www.heartandstroke.bc.ca

Gratefully acknowledges the support of P R E S E N T I NG

RECEPTION

Q U E E N O F H E A RT S

Photo Marina Cavalcante

JULY 4 - 13

FESTIVAL OF CONTEMPORARY DANCE

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FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A33

STRATHCONA

At the Chinatown Night Market, save room for dessert SWEET SPOT

S

with Eagranie Yuh

ummer is here, and you know what that means: night markets. If you’re after sensory onslaught, head to Richmond for the sheer extravagance of food, dog costumes and knockoffs. But if you want something a bit smaller, more manageable, and dare I say it — more soulful — then head over to the Vancouver Chinatown Night Market. Nestled on Keefer Street between Main and Columbia Streets, the Chinatown market offers a patchwork of food and merchandise vendors, Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights, selling everything from crepes to socks (eight for $10!). New this year, there’s also hip, urban programming aimed at breathing new life into a market that, in the past, seemed a little bit stale. When I arrive, I make a beeline for an egg waffle or daan jai. It’s like an inverse waffle; instead of square hollows, it has oval puffs. Though they come in flavours such as green tea and strawberry, I opt for a plain one. After trading cash for a poker chip with the number 10 on it, I watch as the waffle maker bounces between four irons, pouring batter, spinning irons and depositing the finished waffles in paper bags. When they call my number, I trade in the poker chip for my prize — it’s crispy on the outside, soft and chewy on the inside, and it tastes like my childhood. I wander a few metres up the street to the wheel cakes: small cakes, cooked to order on an enormous griddle and filled with your choice of red bean, custard, peanut butter, or nutella. I ask the woman next to me what they’re like, and she says, “I don’t know, but I just bought six of them.” Next to the wheel cakes is CyCone,

which offers all things deep-fried: Mars Bars, Churros, Pop-Tarts. They try to coax me into a deep-fried Ferrero Rocher, but I decline and leave the booth with a deep-fried contact high. Closer to Columbia Street, I find Cocolico, featuring Wendy Boys’ addictive dessert sauces. Next to her, Patricia Yam is surrounded by tea — but it’s her ginger-lime caramels that catch my eye. They’re the real deal: spicy, sweet and delightfully chewy. Had I not started with dessert, I’d visit the smattering of food trucks lining Columbia Street. Instead, I ogle the beautiful people on the Keefer Bar patio as they watch the people on Keefer Street, and listen to a few stories from Rain City Chronicles. The Chinatown night market also has plenty more to offer: hip hop karaoke, ping pong tournaments, open-air movies, and a dumpling weekend, to name a few. “We want to attract new people and new energy,” says Ken Tsui, the market’s program director. He and Tannis Ling (Bao Bei) have partnered with the Vancouver Chinatown Merchants Association to invigorate the market. Given there are two night markets in Richmond, Tsui wanted the Chinatown market to be different. “We’re Vancouver. We have a lot of culture and independent vendors doing great work. We wanted to tap into that.” At the same time, Tsui is careful to acknowledge the role that the original vendors play. “The night market wouldn’t be the same without them. The energy wouldn’t be there. We’re just putting a fresh coat of paint on it… putting it back on the map as place to be.” With a constant rotation of vendors in the works, you never know what you’ll get at the Chinatown night market. But that’s sort of the point. Bring your appetite, plenty of cash and an open mind. You won’t be disappointed. twitter.com/eagranieyuh For more photos and web content, scan page with

photos Eagranie Yuh

Looking for something sweet at the Chinatown Night Market? You can’t go wrong with wheel cakes, filled with red bean, custard, peanut butter or nutella, or Wendy Boys’ addictive Cocolico dessert sauces.

Fifth Avenue Cinemas NOW PLAYING

VISIT CINEPLEX.COM FOR TICKETS AND SHOWTIMES

Park Theatre

NOW PLAYING

™/®

Cineplex Entertainment LP or used under license.


A34

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013

arts&entertainment

Stories and photos from your

community

Electric Company gets lost in space

~ In print and online all the time

YOU ARE VERY STAR

vancourier.com

FIFTH AVENUE CINEMAS 2110 Burrard St., 604-734-7469 BEFORE MIDNIGHT: Fri-Thurs 1:30, 4:10, 7:00, 9:40 FILL THE VOID: Fri-Thurs 2:00, 4:30, 7:30, 10:00 FRANCES HA: Fri-Thurs 1:45, 4:00, 6:30, 9:15 MUD: Fri-Tues, Thurs 1:00, 3:50, 6:40, 9:30 Wed 1:00, 3:50, 9:50 MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING: Fri-Thurs 1:15, 4:20, 7:15, 9:50 www.festivalcinemas.ca RIO THEATRE 1660 East Broadway, 604-879-FILM THE ROOM: Fri 9pm, 19+ only with bar service FEAR AND LOATHING IN LAS VEGAS: Fri 11pm, 19+ only with bar service THE SHEEPDOGS HAVE AT IT: Sun 7:30pm Mon-Tues, Thurs 7pm, 19+ only with bar service EVIL DEAD: Sun 9:30pm Mon-Tues, Thurs 9pm, 19+ only with bar service www.riotheatre.ca DUNBAR THEATRE 4555 Dunbar St., 604-222-2991 MAN OF STEEL 3D: Fri 3:30, 7:00, 10:00 Sat-Sun 12:30, 3:30, 7:00, 10:00 Mon-Thurs 3:30, 7:00, 10:00

At H.R. MacMillan Space Centre until June 29 youareverystar.brownpapertickets.com.

CINEPLEX PARK THEATRE 3440 Cambie St., 604-709-3456 MAN OF STEEL 3D: Fri-Sun 3:45, 6:45, 9:45 Mon-Thurs 3:50, 6:45, 9:40 MAN OF STEEL: Sat-Sun 12:50 www.festivalcinemas.ca VIFF: VANCITY THEATRE 1181 Seymour St., 604-683-FILM HOT DOCS: I AM BREATHING: Fri 6:30 HOT DOCS: BLACKFISH: Fri 8:15 Sun 4:00 HOT DOCS: TERMS AND CONDITIONS MAY APPLY: Sat 4:00 HOT DOCS: ANITA: Sat 6:15 HOT DOCS: THE LIFE AND CRIMES OF DORIS PAYNE: Sat 8:30 HOT DOCS: THE CONTINENTAL: Sun 6:15 HOT DOCS: FINDING THE FUNK: Sun 8:30 CAESAR MUST DIE: Mon-Tues, Thurs 7:00 AN OVERSIMPLIFICATION OF HER BEAUTY: Mon-Tues, Thurs 8:35 www.viff.org

JUNE 21 – 27

T

his eagerly-awaited offering from Electric Company is so far from what I expected that the day after opening night I’m still in a state of disbelief. I anticipated You Are Very Star, on location at the H.R. MacMillan Space Centre, would be lights and lasers and everything spacey and hi-tech. But the first hour — after we opening nighters, clutching hand-drawn “maps” and milling around the foyer in a state of confusion for 10 or 15 minutes — was spent in the lower level auditorium where creative writing professor “Dougie” (Michael Rinaldi) goes off on spaced-out tangents in front of his students Rachel (Dalal Badr), Winnie (Kathleen Duborg), Esther (Marsha Regis) and Frank (Chirag Naik). The date is Dec. 21, 1968 at 4:55 a.m. and Apollo 8 is just about to be launched. But due to the power being turned off by the building custodian (Patti Allan), Dougie misses the televised take-off. A fight breaks out and we go whirling back 10 minutes, then 10 days earlier, six weeks prior, three

days earlier. A puffed-up Earle Birney (Allan again) makes an appearance, Dougie tries to seduce the already pregnant Winnie, Esther goes on a rant about how stupid the class is and I’m so lost. Best lines from the first hour: “The Georgia Straight is looking for reporters comfortable with obscenity” and Allan (as Earle Birney) announcing, “I’m all into women stepping into men’s roles.” After a 20-minute “Interlude” during which we are encouraged to complete “stations” (like sticking your hand in a bag to “feel your personality”), we climb three flights of stairs to the big dome. Best part of the stations: Skyping with a woman who, after telling her how old you are, is supposed to recount what she had been doing when she was that age. Turns out she and I were exactly the same age so we talked about dogs. Up, up to the Big Dome. Starry skies. Three hundred and sixty degree horizon. Comfy tilt-back chairs with legroom that goes on forever. It’s now 2048. Humans are “augmented” — they can read minds. Communication with old, “pre-augmented”Starr(Allaninclearplasticraingearand carryingaclearplasticumbrella)isdifficult because language as we know it, seems to have gone extinct. Who needs it when you can read minds? Actor Rinaldi has become Neil, Ava’s dead (I think) father (I think).

But no, he comes back to life. My guest, discovering I’ve fallen asleep, is just about to nudge me awake when I come to. Soft reclining seats under a huge star-filled sky will do it to me. Best thing about this part of the program is the emergence of Harold, the gigantic star-projector from deep in the bowels of the planetarium. He rises, turns slowly and the dome fills with stars and asteroids streaking across the sky. Oh, if only the music had been Pink Floyd I would have gone hurtling back, back in time, to my younger, firmer self and to a concert of truly cosmic proportions. Part One, written by Craig Erickson with story development by Kevin Kerr, is called Orbiting the Cusp of Greatness. The Interlude is created by Georgina Beaty (with Kerr, Naomi Sider and Veronique West). Part Two, Transcendence, is written by Kerr with Sarah Sharkey. David Hudgins directs. YouAreVeryStar is, apparently, the name of a song by the Rheostatics; Rusty Ford, featured for what seems to be a very long time in a video clip, is a self-taught, amateur guitar player of whom I’ve never heard. Sorry, Electrics, but except for the fantastic online promo at yavs.electriccompanytheatre.com, I fear you’ve experienced a brown out. — Jo Ledingham

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May 1-Sept 2, 2013


FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

FRED

A35

EMAIL: yvrflee@hotmail.com TWITTER: @FredAboutTown

UNLEESHED

DIAMOND-DO: The Vancouver Canadians hosted its first Strike Out Heart Disease Celebrity Softball Classic. Yours truly, along with Courier sports scribe Megan Stewart, participated in the charity game at Nat Bailey Stadium. Club president Andy Dunn and St. Paul’s Hospital Foundation CEO Dick Volett welcomed fans to the event designed to raise funds and awareness on the risks of heart disease.

POOL PARTY: More than 500 guests shelled out $300-aticket to attend the seventh Night at the Aquarium Gala at Stanley Park. Tina Rowntree and Lindsay Lambert fronted the food and wine grazing, which raised more than $350,000 for the marine science centre’s education, research and conservation initiatives, including its Ocean Wise program, created to address overfishing. FARM HANDS: The city’s top young philanthropists gathered for the Youth Education Farms (YEF) Gala held at Birks. Founded by brothers Riley and Brandon Mari, the Vancouver-based charity provides tuition assistance to at-risk Swazi youth through the promotion of sustainable business enterprises. YEF funds, develops, and manages the growth of commercial farms in rural Africa. Farm profits support the education of orphaned children, a direct result of AIDS. Upon graduation, YEF provides loans to entrepreneurs to start a business, generate income, and create jobs in their community.

Clowning around at Night at the Aquarium were Pacific Institute of Culinary Arts executive chef Julian Bond and student Amanda Yu.

The Courier’s Megan Stewart picked up some base running advice from baseball hall of famer Tim Raines at the first Strike Out Heart Disease Celebrity Softball Classic.

Party chairs Tina Rowntree and Lindsay Lambert reeled in $350,000 for the Vancouver Aquarium’s research, education and conservation programs.

Riley and Brandon Mari’s Youth Education Farms microfinance model aims to provide youth with a hand up rather than a handout.

Vancouver Canadians Baseball League Commissioner Bill Maclagan and president Andy Dunn kicked off the 2013 Strike Out Heart Disease campaign with a charity softball game.

Shangri-la executive chef Wayne Harris and his son, Joshua, cook up a Farmers Market brunch on Father’s Day.

Goldenlight Entertainment’s Dancers Lila, Camille, Mariah and Vanessa greeted partygoers to Youth Education Farms’ Great Gatsby-themed gala at Birks.

Cactus Club owner Richard Jaffray now has two celeb chefs in his kitchen: Iron Chef Rob Feenie and recent Top Chef Canada season 3 champ Matthew Stowe.


A36

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013

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Make Music Vancouver takes over the streets of Gastown and Yaletown, June 21.

Make Music hits the streets SUMBUL VALLANI Contributing writer

M

Nostalgia

CONCERT SERIES

Starring SUSAN SKEMP & PHIL MORIARITY

ore than 150 bands and musicians will take over the streets of Gastown and Yaletown, rain or shine, for the third edition of Make Music Vancouver, Friday, June 21. With more than 25,000 people attending last year’s free street festival, organizers hope to see even more at this year’s event, which runs from 5 to 10 p.m., with parts of Water Street closed to traffic to create a public square. Professional and newbie bands will perform alongside one another on sidewalk stages and makeshift dance floors, playing everything from rock, metal and punk to classical, jazz, reggae and R&B. Local musicians playing this year include the Surfrajets, a four-piece band that plays vintage and contemporary surf; the Twitch, a five-piece rock act signed to Australian record label Blue Pie Records; jazz group Quintessential, which has played more than 250 gigs since forming in 2003; and We, The Sheeple, a four piece indie-pop rock outfit, which cites Arctic Monkeys, Two Door Cinema Club and the Ramones as influences. “We feel that since this festival is at very

convenient locations — Gastown, Yaletown and downtown Vancouver — that everyone can come see us and the other bands performing that night. Practically anyone can be exposed to our music,” said Joey Slithers, vocalist for the Twitch. Make Music Vancouver was inspired by Fête de la Musique, an initiative launched by the French Ministry of Culture in 1982. Since then, similar Make Music events have expanded to more than 460 cities in more than 100 countries around the world. The event is run entirely by volunteers, with organizers and musicians donating their time and skills in order fulfill the festival’s mandate of celebrating musical diversity for all. “I have been an audience member of previous Make Music Vancouver festivals in the past,” said Duncan Lee, guitarist and vocalist for We, The Sheeple. “And the thing that I like about it the most is the fact there is music for everybody. There are hundreds if not thousands of people walking around [so] someone’s musicality is bound to catch the ear of someone.” More details at makemusicvancouver.ca. For videos and added web content, scan page with

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A38

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013

STRATHCONA

SPORT SHORTS CANADIANS CLIMB TO .500 The Vancouver Canadians climbed their way back to .500 after dropping 1-2 early in the Northwest League season. The C’s secured their three-game series against Spokane Tuesday night, pushing the 5-4 win to the 12th inning, and then Wednesday afternoon with an 8-3 victory at Nat Bailey Stadium. The Canadians (3-3) sit tied for second in the Northwest League North behind division leader Everett AquaSox (51). They travelled to Kaiser-Salem Thursday for five games before visiting Spokane for three more on the road. The C’s return to Vancouver June 28 when they host Tri-City and Everett. — Megan Stewart

PRIESTS INTEGRAL TO 25TH DRAGON BOAT FESTIVAL Taoist priests will be at the docks in False Creek this Friday to perform the annual eye dotting and blessing ceremonies for the Rio Tinto Alcan Dragon Boat Festival. The 25th anniversary of the race will feature more elaborate rituals and celebrations, many which will take place near the water at Creekside Community Centre at the foot of Ontario Street. Priests and members of the Evergreen Taoist Church will take part in a 40-minute public service, which is performed each year by Stephen Kwong. Kwong and others will cleanse the racecourse by “awakening the dragons” from their winter nap to ensure speed and safety for paddlers on the water, according to information from festival organizers. Invited guests and dignitaries have the chance to officially wake the dragons by “dotting the eyes” on the dragon faces at the prow of each boat, which they will do with a pinpoint of red cinnabar paint. The event concludes when the priests throw 18 coins and coloured beans, representing the five elements and five directions (east, west, south, north and centre), into the air and water. The altar will be set up on the dock where paddlers board their boats before racing. According to festival organizers, the goddess of the sea, the saints and the immortals are invoked through the priests’ chanting, allowing for competitors and their boats to be charged with the strength of the dragon. The free, weekend-long festival kicks off Friday from 5 to 10:30 p.m. and dragon boat races follow all day Saturday and Sunday. Other happenings on opening night include a welcome barbeque, acrobat performances, paddling and boating demonstrations, a breast cancer survivor flower ceremony and a fire and light show. For more details visit dragonboatbc.ca. — Sumbul Vallani

GOT SPORTS? 604-738-1411 | sportsandrec@vancourier.com

Strathconafans popularityofkungfu MEGAN STEWART

Staff writer

W

hen Amy Pon talks kung fu with people who know little about the martial art, she asks if they’ve seen any movies. Inevitably, these same people — her prospective students — reference Bruce Lee, considered the most influential martial arts pop culture icon of the 20th century. “Depending if I was trying to recruit them, I would stress getting a good work out and working on flexibility,” added Pon. And there’s much more to the practice, she said. The discipline can tap physical and spiritual depths, promote health and respect, plus give more backbone to an individual’s self-esteem. “The benefit would be learning how to hit and kick to defend yourself and improve your self-confidence,” she said. “You feel powerful if you’re a woman and that’s always important.” Lee developed Gun Fan Gung Fu, a form of kung fu that takes his name. Pon practises Choy Lee Fut kung fu, a martial art that combines styles from northern and southern Chinese systems, including techniques from the Shaolin animal forms along with extended, circular body movements and nimble footwork. “I like that it has a variety of moves, short fists and long fists, different kinds of kicks,” Pon said of Choy Lee Fut kung fu. “I know a few styles that are just limited to a few moves and some weapons, so it’s broad-based. There are more areas you can focus on if you want to.” The kung fu Pon teaches was established more than 200 years ago through different sources and continued through a lineage of sifus, or master instructors. It also incorporates 53 different weapons, including the cane, single and double sword, knife, spears, staff and fan. The fan is used closed and can be brutal. “It’s more for striking, hitting pressure points,” said Pon, adding with a laugh, “only after you finish smacking the guy a few times, then you can use it to cool down.” Pon teaches at Hon Hsing in Chinatown and will soon start classes in Burnaby at Metrotown. Her sifus included Peter Wong and Matthew Wing, with whom she teaches Choy Lee Fut at the Strathcona Community Centre, where kung fu has been taught for at least 25 years. Pon and Wing teach one system at Strathcona while George Yung teaches another, My Jung kung fu. Strathcona’s recreation supervisor Har-

photo Dan Toulgoet

Amy Pon teaches Choy Lee Fut kung fu at the Strathcona Community Centre. vey Eng said different martial arts clubs brought their disciplines to the community centre nearly three decades ago. They may teach and practise different styles, but the kung fu community in Strathcona and Chinatown is close-knit although membership has slowly declined. “Both have been in the community centre for along time,” said Eng. “When they started, there were different forms [of kung fu], like most martial arts. They’ve created their own kingdoms and they can manage it that way.” Pon and other instructors will host a kung fu demonstration at the Chinatown Night Market June 28. “Many styles and many institutes all gather together to help for big events like the Chinese New Year parade,” she said. Martial arts could break through to an

even broader international stage if wushu, a broad term for standardized Chinese martial arts, is selected as an official Olympic sport. Wushu and kung fu differ in important ways, said Pon. “They’re not interchangeable. Wushu has more flowery, acrobatic moves […] but kung fu is more a fighting style.” Choy Lee Fut appealed to Pon when she was in her early 20s. Now in her 40s, she continues to compete — she won first place in the national trials and was selected to Team Canada in 2006 — and also judges bouts. A regional black belt champion, Pon has not been tested outside of training or sparring. “I have never had to use skills to defend myself,” she said. “And I’d kind of like to keep it that way.” mstewart@vancourier.com twitter.com/MHStewart


FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

The Courier presentsVancouver’s Elite Graduating Athletes of 2013

JillianeViña

Marc Magano

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illiane Viña did what almost no Vancouver athlete has done before. In the same winter season of her Grade 12 year, the Bruin competed in the high school provincial championship playoffs for two different sports. As a wrestler, she swept through the regional qualifier to win gold and advance to the B.C. finals. As a shooting guard, she hoped to defend back-to-back city basketball titles and a provincial AA championship. “Wrestling and basketball seem like the weirdest combination to me,” said Bruins basketball coach Mike Evans. “In some ways, it’s kind of odd.” However they differed, Viña excelled at both. “I was impressed,” said the coach. “Whatever she tried her hand at, she was very good.” As a Grade 8 student, Viña played on the junior basketball team. Once in Grade 9, she played senior for Evans and three years in a row was named the MVP of the city championship tournament, which Britannia won in 2011 and 2012. She was repeatedly named to exhibition, regional and provincial all-star teams for her high scoring percentage, relentless defence

and natural shooting talent. “I’d always have a ball in my hand,” she said. “Playing sports throughout school, I usually like the ones that were contact sports.” B.C. School Sports prevents high school athletes from stacking their schedule with two sports in the same season as Viña did, but Britannia and the Vancouver school board secured permission from B.C. sport associations. Viña plays in a women’s basketball league with other Britannia graduates and although she reluctantly stepped away from the hardwood, she is passionate about her place on the mat and will compete for Simon Fraser University. In February she qualified for nationals after only eight months in the sport. “It was a big accomplishment for me,” said Viña, 17, whose first bouts were against boys and whose nails are often painted bright pink and red. “She moves as if she was born for this,” said her Howard Gairy Academy wrestling coach Frank Mensah. Born for sport, whichever she chooses. ● q tezis onekipn

s a 13-year-old boy, Marc Magano was drawn to the flash and fame of the WWE, a scripted entertainment venture that could no longer be called a sport “federation.” Nearly five years later, the wrestler is a self-disciplined and committed athlete who won bronze for his country at the 2011 Pan Am Games and has twice won the Canadian national championship, once as a Grade 10 student and then two years later during his graduating year. Magano, 18, doesn’t have to fake anything. The Grade 8 boy who wanted to get jacked like his idols and run the ring is a mellow, soft-spoken older brother to five siblings. He has gained the confidence to know his dedication and hard work are reward enough. His national championships came two years apart because Magano walked away from wrestling to try boxing and to turn his back on the unreasonable demands of a former club. “I was overtraining,” he said in a characteristically low, hushed voice. “I burnt out and I just wasn’t having any fun.” Once again a spectator, Magano

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was drawn back into the ring. “I went to watch my friend wrestle at the B.C. Summer Games and it made me want to wrestle again,” he said. He connected with the coaches at the Frank Gairy Wrestling Academy. “Marc is the kid all Canadian coaches are fighting for but he has chosen to stay local,” said Frank Mensah, who coaches Magano along with Garfield Gairy. “I will be surprised if Marc is not a medalist at the Olympics if he continues to train this hard and smart.” Magano is enrolled at Douglas College in a business transfer program that will lead him to Simon Fraser University where he will train under Canadian Olympic coach Dave McKay. Greg Mar was the principal and wrestling coach at Killarney secondary when Magano walked into the school gym in search of a team. A year later he was its captain. “It was evident he was a very talented wrestler,” said Mar, who remembered Magano as “very interested and quiet.” No flash or bang needed. Magano is better than all the rest. ● q tezis onekipn

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A39


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*For more details, please see your Village on False Creek Sales Representative. The information, pricing, and availability contained herein is subject to change without notice. E.&.O.E.

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A40 THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013


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FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A41

INTERESTED IN ADVERTISING IN TODAY’S HOMES? Contact Linda Garner:

604-738-1411 | lgarner@vancourier.com

SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE

Condo buyers are invited to Shine MICHELLE HOPKINS Contributing writer

O

ne of East Vancouver’s oldest and most culturally diverse neighbourhoods will soon be home to an exciting new six-storey boutique building. Because of its blend of eclectic urban sophistication, South of Main Street (or SOMA) is emerging as one of the most sought-after postal codes in the Lower Mainland. This is where Shine will rise. Shine is a selection of 93 residence condominiums that combine the best of old-meets-new. Ranging in size from one-, two- and three-bedroom residences and starting from $268,800, Shine is unmatched for quality and great value. Designed by the leading edge, awardwinning firm of Shift Architecture, Shine offers everything the urban condo dwell-

er would want in a home. Every contemporary interior comes with exceptional standards such as highperformance GE Energy-Star stainless steel appliances, sleek high-gloss white upper cabinets with wood grain, quartz stone countertops, spa-inspired bathrooms and European wide-plank birch laminate flooring in the kitchen, living and dining area. Each home also comes with its own parking stall and storage space. Shine will feature green roofs, roof top patios, outdoor kitchen with barbecue, fire pit lounge, outdoor movie theatre and urban gardens bursting with lush landscaping; perfect for entertaining guests and family on those hot summer nights. Imagine living in one of the city’s most vibrant neighbourhoods with everything within a short walking distance. This landmark location will provide its

residents access to modern amenities, parks and recreational opportunities, all within minutes of their doorstep. It is also in close proximity to two main bus lines and the Canada Line. From your new home, you can step out the door for a short walk to coffee shops, eclectic restaurants, great antique shopping and fabulous little boutiques. For outdoor enthusiasts, Shine is minutes away from the False Creek seawall, which is one of Vancouverites’ favourite locations to take a stroll or a run. In order to engage the residents and community at large, Payam Imani, president of Vancouver based Imani Development, intends to use the showhome as a gathering place for local art events. The walls are adorned with art created by local and up-and-coming artists in the neighbourhood. It’s Shine’s way of contributing to the vibrant art scene. “There’s a very cool fusion of arts and

culture that is scattered along Main Street,” adds Imani. “We plan to rotate works of art every three to four months so that we can expose the talent of as many artists as possible.” In addition to the great value, Shine offers a terrific incentive program for the first time home buyers. Qualified first time home buyers can now purchase a home with only a five per cent down payment. Completion is expected by summer 2015. Beautifully appointed new homes at such value are rare today. This is an opportunity you definitely don’t want to miss. The Shine presentation centre is located at 2152 Main Street (corner of Main and East 6th Avenue) and is open Saturday to Thursday from 12-5 p.m., closed on Fridays or by appointment only. For more information or to register, call 604-874-7478 or visit www.liveatshine.com.

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Prices are subject to change without prior notice. This is not an offering for sale. Any such offering can only be made with a disclosure statement. e.&o.e.


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FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A43

real estate

Commercial rent controls debated GLEN KORSTROM biv.com

S

mall-business owners want B.C.’s new Christy Clark government to intervene in the marketplace and limit rent increases on commercial properties. The proposed changes to the province’s Commercial Tenancy Act would kick in when leases for small-business owners expire and would be aimed at providing property rent stability for independent businesses. The idea of rent control, however, has plenty of critics because it flies in the face of free enterprise. “There are reasons to regulate commercial leases,” said Mary Brookes, who owns Sophie’s Pet Palace on Commercial Drive. “One is to protect small businesses who employ locally, use local suppliers and create jobs, which has spinoff benefits.” Vancouver Island University geography professor Don Alexander, who has cowritten papers on the concept of commercial rent control, agreed. “Small businesses contribute an enormous amount to the local economy because the money circulates more than if it goes to a chain store,” he said. “Small businesses are a benefit to social well-being and possibly to environmental well-being, so there’s a rationale in not al-

file photo Dan Toulgoet

Mary Macintyre, the owner of Little Nest coffee shop on Charles Street, is closing down her business July 21 after her landlord increased the rent by $2,000 a month. lowing these guys to be as scarce as hen’s teeth.” Rent control on commercial property is rare in North America and falls primarily under civic government authority. New York City Council is currently considering a requirement for mandatory arbitration if a commercial tenant and landlord can’t agree on a market rent when a lease expires. Berkeley City Council in California had commercial rent control until 1988, when the state government banned cities from implementing such

“Being a RE/MAX Miracle office extends beyond the sale and embraces the community to bring passion purpose and life changing results. I am proud to be a part of a company where people come first, Integrity is taught by example and the focus is on being the best we can be for each other, our clients and extending beyond that, this awesome community found in Vancouver. Your life can be extraordinary, and we can make a difference in the lives of everyone we touch! Security, experience, freedom... whatever your big why is for being a REALTOR(R) or taking your career to the next level the people at RE/MAX Select can make those dreams a reality! Want to be a part of it?!! If you dream big, want more and have the tenacity to do more. Seek them out! I did and my life is on purpose as a result!

civic bylaws. Sacha Thompson, who owns Flowerbox on Charles Street near Commercial Drive, said the situation her neighbour Mary MacIntyre finds herself in is reason enough for the province to regulate commercial rate hikes when a lease expires. Macintyre’s Little Nest coffee shop is closing July 21 because she can’t afford to pay the $6,500 per month that her landlord recently imposed when her lease expired. In 2007, Macintyre’s monthly rent was

$2,900, less than half of what it is now. “There was an arbitration clause in the lease but going through that [to determine a fair market rent] would cost too much for a business of my size,” she said. “I’d have to hire a lawyer. Realtors told me that arbitration could go on for a long time so I just couldn’t afford it.” Thompson, who shares the building with Little Nest, said her landlord was “reasonable” when she last negotiated a lease for Flowerbox and that her rent has not doubled, as Little Nest’s has. “Shouldn’t there be a standard for which the [lease and] building is held, just like with a residence?” Thompson said. “I was able to negotiate a gradual rent increase. Why was that OK for me to do and not for my neighbour?” But not all small-business owners believe regulation is the answer. Ed Des Roches, co-owner of clothing company Plum, said business owners should vigorously negotiate a suitable lease when they initially take space. That lease should include a renewal option and arbitration if no agreement can be reached on a future lease rate at expiry. Neither Housing Minister Rich Coleman nor Minister of State for Small Business Naomi Yamamoto responded to interview requests by press time. gkorstrom@biv.com twitter/GlenKorstrom

3102-1238 MELVILLE ST. VANCOUVER $938,000.00

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Michelle Raymond 604-331-4663

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A newly renovated luxury property with stunning views. An executive style 3Bdrm, 2Bthrm condo (1242 sq ft). Sits high above Coal Harbor w/ stunning panoramic views of E. Bay - N. Shore Mountains. High end kitchen with Milele appliances, Built-in Miele cappuccino machine, offering elegant details for your every need. Brand new luxurious hard wood floors, walnut cabinets, fireplace and the solarium has been opened up to create more living space - Everything is almost brand new. Offering an immaculate view!!! 24 hr concierge, indoor pool, hot tub, gym, sauna, steam room, newly updated common areas- A solid concrete building at a perfect location in the heart of Coal Harbour.

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A MONTH

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$1,056

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$320,900

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$246,900 $918 $298,900 $1,111

$393,900

$247,900

$242,900

$254,900

$250,900

$281,900

2310

1 BR+FLEX

$932

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$298,900 $1,111

$250,900

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635 A12 1 BR+D+FLEX $333,900 $1,242 454 A5 1 BR+FLEX $242,900 $903

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A44 THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013


FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A45


A46

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013

SALES EVENT

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$

COUPE

INCLUDES: 2.0T I4 CVVT DOHC ENGINE • AIR CONDITIONING W/AUTOMATIC CLIMATE CONTROL • 18! ALLOY WHEELS • iPOD®/USB/AUXILIARY INPUT • SIRIUS XM™ RADIO WITH BLUETOOTH® HANDS FREE PHONE SYSTEM

2013

99 0 20,594

$

BI-WEEKLY

WITH

BI-WEEKLY

FINANCING FOR 96 MONTHS

WITH

%† $

SELLING PRICE:

"

$

INCLUDES

600

IN PRICE Ω FINANCING FOR VELOSTER 6-SPEED MANUAL. DELIVERY, DESTINATION ADJUSTMENTS Ω 96 MONTHS & $600 IN PRICE ADJUSTMENTS INCLUDED.

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SELLING PRICE:

%† $

GENESIS COUPE 2.0T 6-SPEED MANUAL. DELIVERY & DESTINATION INCLUDED.

VELOSTER

INCLUDES: 7" TOUCHSCREEN MULTIMEDIA SYSTEM WITH REARVIEW CAMERA • REAR PARKING ASSIST SYSTEM • HEATED FRONT SEATS • 3RD DOOR FOR PASSENGER ACCESS • SIRIUS XM™ RADIO WITH BLUETOOTH® HANDS FREE PHONE SYSTEM

HWY: 5.3L/100 KM CITY: 7.5L/100 KM! Tech. model shown

2012 BEST NEW DESIGN 2012 BEST NEW SPORTS/ PERFORMANCE CAR (UNDER $50K)

2013

"

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3.8L GT model shown

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TUCSON L

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HWY: 7.7L/100 KM CITY: 10.4L/100 KM!

99 0 20,509

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OWN IT FOR

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SELLING PRICE:

"

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INCLUDES

1,250

IN PRICE Ω ADJUSTMENTS FINANCING FOR TUCSON L 5-SPEED MANUAL. $1,250 PRICE Ω 96 MONTHS ADJUSTMENT , DELIVERY & DESTINATION INCLUDED.

NO MONEY DOWN

Limited model shown

5-year/100,000 km Comprehensive Limited Warranty†† 5-year/100,000 km Powertrain Warranty 5-year/100,000 km Emission Warranty

HyundaiCanada.com

The Hyundai names, logos, product names, feature names, images and slogans are trademarks owned by Hyundai Auto Canada Corp. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. †Finance offers available O.A.C. from Hyundai Financial Services based on a new 2013 Elantra L 6-Speed Manual/Genesis Coupe 2.0T 6-Speed Manual/Veloster 6-Speed Manual/ Tucson L 5-Speed Manual with an annual finance rate of 0% for 96 months. Bi-weekly payments are $77/$135/$99/$99. No down payment required. Cost of Borrowing is $0. Finance offers include Delivery and Destination of $1,495/$1,565/$1,495/$1,760. Registration, insurance, PPSA, fees, levies, charges, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. Delivery and destination charge includes freight, P.D.E., dealer admin fees and a full tank of gas. Financing example: 2013 Elantra L 6-Speed Manual for $15,944 (includes $1,500 price adjustment) at 0% per annum equals $77 bi-weekly for 96 months for a total obligation of $15,944. Cash price is $15,944. Cost of Borrowing is $0. Example price includes Delivery and Destination of $1,495. Registration, insurance, PPSA, fees, levies, charges, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. !Fuel consumption for 2013 Elantra Sedan L 6-Speed Manual (HWY 5.2L/100KM; City 7.1L/100KM)/Genesis Coupe 2.0T 6-Speed Manual (HWY 6.6L/100KM; City 10.0L/100KM)/Veloster 6-Speed Manual (HWY 5.3L/100KM; City 7.5L/100KM)/ Tucson L 5-Speed Manual (HWY 7.7L/100KM; City 10.4L/100KM) are based on Energuide. Actual fuel efficiency may vary based on driving conditions and the addition of certain vehicle accessories. Fuel economy figures are used for comparison purposes only. "Price of models shown: 2013 Elantra Limited/Genesis Coupe 3.8L GT 6-Speed Manual/Veloster Tech 6-Speed Manual/ Tucson Limited AWD is $24,794/$38,564/$24,694/$34,109. Prices include Delivery and Destination charges of $1,495/$1,565/$1,495/$1,760. Registration, insurance, PPSA, fees, levies, charges, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. ΩPrice adjustments are calculated against the vehicle’s starting price. Price adjustments of up to $1,500/$600/$1,250 available on 2013 Elantra L 6-Speed Manual /Veloster 6-Speed Manual/ Tucson L 5-Speed Manual. Price adjustments applied before taxes. Offer cannot be combined or used in conjunction with any other available offers. Offer is non-transferable and cannot be assigned. No vehicle trade-in required. †Ω"Offers available for a limited time, and subject to change or cancellation without notice. See dealer for complete details. Dealer may sell for less. Inventory is limited, dealer order may be required. ††Hyundai’s Comprehensive Limited Warranty coverage covers most vehicle components against defects in workmanship under normal use and maintenance conditions.

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dashboard

FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A47

INTERESTED IN ADVERTISING IN DASHBOARD? Contact Janis Dalgleish:

604-738-1411 | jdalgleish@vancourier.com

No shortage of space in Odyssey MINIVAN DOESN’T CONFORM TO ‘LAME’ STEREOTYPE

the machine I recommended to them. Here’s why.

DESIGN

BRENDAN MCALEER Contributing writer

L

et’s face it: no one with a car-loving bone in their body ever woke up one day and said, “I can’t wait to get a minivan!” Rather the opposite, I’m afraid. To the gearhead, the speed-merchant, the weekend racer, and even the mom and dad clinging to that last vestige of cool factor they once had 400 million years ago, a minivan is giving up. It’s purgatory. It’s the automotive equivalent of sweatpants with baby-food stains. But it shouldn’t be. The young couple down the street from me recently decided to replace their faithful four-door VW hatchback with something a bit more commodious. They have a two-year-old son, a

photo Mike Wakefield

Hip parents may think a minivan spells doom for their street cred but the massive yet stylish Honda Odyssey may change your mind about what’s cool. desire to go on family trips, and overseasbased grandparents who visit regularly. A crossover? Well perhaps, but after measuring their needs against the space available in even the biggest such cars, a

K.I.S.S.

little more practicality was needed. The shopping began. I was not at all surprised to see a new Honda Odyssey end up in their driveway. After all, when they asked me, it was

Honda released the current-design Odyssey on the market in 2010, and it’s still a remarkably fresh-looking design. A large front corporate grille provides a handsome face and a trapezoidal dipsy-doodle in the rear gives some sort of character to the side-profile. It is also bloody enormous. “Mini” van my foot. At five metres long and two metres wide, the Odyssey is bigger than the boat which once propelled Homer’s classical hero on his epic journey around the Mediterranean. It’s hard to believe families once made do with regular sedans. Still, in a sea of SUVs and crossovers, even a vessel of such hefty proportions doesn’t look that big. Optioned in Dark Cherry Pearl paint, the Odyssey is large and imposing, but still a pretty good-looking rig. Continued on page 48

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A48

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013

dashboard

New Honda Odyssey is an instant classic Continued from page 47 Seventeen-inch wheels are standard on the LX model, moving up to similar diameter alloys right up to the EX-L trim. Eighteeninch wheels are standard on the top-spank Touring model. As tire-width doesn’t change throughout the range, a set of LX-level steelies will fit a higher-grade Odyssey for winter duties.

ENVIRONMENT

PLEASE READ THE FINE PRINT: Offers valid until July 2, 2013. See toyota.ca for complete details on all cash back offers. In the event of any discrepancy or inconsistency between Toyota prices, rates and/or other information contained on toyotabc.ca and that contained on toyota.ca, the latter shall prevail. Errors and omissions excepted. 2013 Corolla CE Automatic BU42EP-B MSRP is $19,635 and includes $1,645 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning federal excise tax. *Finance example: 0.8% finance for 84 months, upon credit approval, available on 2013 Corolla. Bi-Weekly payment is $99 with $2400 down payment. Applicable taxes are extra. **Lease example: 0% Lease APR for 60 months on approved credit. Monthly payment is $169 with $2,300 down payment. Total Lease obligation is $12,440. Lease 60 mos. based on 100,000 km, excess km charge is $.07. Applicable taxes are extra. Down payment, first monthly payment and security deposit plus GST and PST on first payment and full down payment are due at lease inception. A security deposit is not required on approval of credit. ***Up to $2,500 Non-stackable Cash Back available on select 2013 Corolla models. Cash back on Corolla CE is $2,000. 2013 Sienna LE 8-Passenger Automatic KK3DCT-A MSRP is $34,720 and includes $1,815 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning federal excise tax. †Finance example: 1.9% finance for 84 months, upon credit approval, available on 2013 Sienna. Bi-Weekly payment is $189 with $2850 down payment. Applicable taxes are extra. ††Lease example: 2.9% Lease APR for 60 months on approved credit. Monthly payment is $319 with $6,350 down payment. Total Lease obligation is $25,490. Lease 60 mos. based on 100,000 km, excess km charge is $.10. Applicable taxes are extra. Down payment, first monthly payment and security deposit plus GST and PST on first payment and full down payment are due at lease inception. A security deposit is not required on approval of credit. †††Up to $2,500 Non-stackable Cash Back available on select 2013 Sienna models. Cash back on Sienna LE 8-Passenger is $2,500. 2013 Tacoma Access Cab 4x4 Automatic UU4ENA-B MSRP is $32,440 and includes $1,815 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning federal excise tax. ‡Finance example: 2.9% finance for 72 months, upon credit approval, available on 2013 Tacoma. Bi-Weekly payment is $199 with $4500 down payment. Applicable taxes are extra. ‡‡Lease example: 4.9% Lease APR for 60 months on approved credit. Monthly payment is $329 with $4,350 down payment. Total Lease obligation is $24,090. Lease 60 mos. based on 100,000 km, excess km charge is $.10. Applicable taxes are extra. Down payment, first monthly payment and security deposit plus GST and PST on first payment and full down payment are due at lease inception. A security deposit is not required on approval of credit. ‡‡‡Up to $1,000 Non-stackable Cash Back available on select 2013 Corolla models. Cash back on Tacoma 4x4 Access Cab is $1,000.Non-stackable Cash Back offers may not be combined with Toyota Financial Services (TFS) lease or finance rates. If you would like to lease or finance at standard TFS rates (not the above special rates), then you may be able to take advantage of Cash Customer Incentives. Vehicle must be purchased, registered and delivered by July 2, 2013. Cash incentives include taxes and are applied after taxes have been charged on the full amount of the negotiated price.See toyota.ca for complete details on all cash back offers.Visit your Toyota BC Dealer or www.toyotabc.ca for more details. Some conditions apply; offers are time limited and may change without notice. Dealer may lease/sell for less.

Dr. Who’s Tardis is famous for being bigger on the inside than on the outside. As you’d expect from a barn-on-wheels (an attractive barn, mind you) like the Odyssey, interior space is exemplary. The Odyssey strikes a solid balance between adult-sized seating and usable space for kids. Both the mid and rear rows are less canted back than some competitor offerings, which allows for easy installation of both booster seats and rear-facing child seats. The mid-row seats are probably too heavy for smaller kids to tilt forward and squeeze past — luckily they can just scamper between the twin captain’s chairs.

Load-height levels are a bit higher, so smaller kids will again need to be lifted in. However, strapping in an infant is super easy for an average-height person to accomplish, and the ability to control all the power doors from either the key fob or driver’s seat (as well as switches mounted in the rear door jambs) is handy. Loading five adults into the Odyssey showed that the front four seats are plenty comfy and the rear seat is entirely workable if you’re not six-foot-plus. When it comes to cargo, this thing has more cubby holes and secret compartments than the Millennium Falcon. If it’s not a pocket, pouch, shelf or storage bin, it’s a cupholder. Oh yeah, the cupholders: if you put a water bottle in each one of these, you’d have enough H20 to fill an Olympic-sized swimming pool.

line, instead building up inertia and speed with strong midrange power. This is an exceptional long-distance tourer. Wind noise from the extra-large side mirrors is perhaps a bit noticeable, but with everybody comfortable and entertained, the driver won’t be bored either — this six-cylinder can be wound up easily to pass any lugging 18-wheeler and the steering isn’t as numb as others. For most vehicles, the dynamic assessment stops there, but let’s talk about parking. As land prices go up, parking spot width goes down, so manoeuvring a van into place can get tricky. Luckily, a backup camera is now standard on the Odyssey, and with an extra-large display screen, getting out of tight spaces is not the trial it could be.

PERFORMANCE

FEATURES

Well, it’s a minivan: we hardly even need this section, right? Actually, with a 248 horsepower V-6 mated to either a fivespeed automatic or a six-speed in Touring models, the Odyssey is quicker than you’d expect. It doesn’t burn off the

Probably no other vehicle segment can boast the kind of features you get aboard a modern minivan. The top-spec Touring Odyssey is like a luxury sedan hooked up to an air-compressor. At the peak of the range, you get a multi-view rear camera, an ultra-wide rear-entertainment system, 15 Gigabyte on-board hard-drive to load up with Sponge Bob sing-alongs and a 650watt system to blast them through. Of course the cost for all this is not inconsiderable: $47,190 plus freight. Better news for families who’ve got tuition to save up for is the enhancements made to the base-model Odyssey ($29,990) this year. A rear-view camera, USB connectivity, Bluetooth streaming audio, a seven-speaker audio system and two GB of on-board storage. Mid-range models add alloys, power-sliding doors and other amenities. It should be noted that Touring models have a slight mechanical advantage over the LX, EX ($34,090) and EX-L ($41,190) trim, with a six-speed automatic transmission. The sixspeed option gives slightly better in-city fuel economy at 10.9 litres/100 kilometres in-city versus the five-speed’s 11.7 l/100 km. mcaleeronwheels@gmail.com twitter.com/brendan_mcaleer

TOP SAFETY PICK

2013

corolla ce

Corolla S model with moonroof shown

OWN IT FROM*

99

$

169

$

OR

GET UP TO***

LEASE IT FROM**

OR

2,500

$

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per mo. / 60 mos. at 0%

bi-weekly / 84 mos. at 0.8%

2013 OWN IT FROM †

189

$

LEASE IT FROM ††

319

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OR

bi-weekly / 84 mos. at 1.9%

GET UP TO †††

2,500

$

OR

SIENNA V6 base model shown

CASHBACK

per mo. / 60 mos. at 2.9%

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The Vancouver Courier news app

2013 OWN IT FROM ‡

199

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GRANVILLE TOYOTA VANCOUVER 8265 Fraser Street (604) 263-2711 6978

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LANGLEY TOYOTATOWN LANGLEY 20622 Langley Bypass (604) 530-3156

JIM PATTISON TOYOTA SURREY 15389 Guildford Drive (604) 495-4100 6701

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OPENROAD TOYOTA RICHMOND Richmond Auto Mall (604) 273-3766

OPENROAD TOYOTA PORT MOODY 3166 St. John’s Street (604) 461-3656 7826

THE VOICE OF VANCOUVER NEIGHBOURHOODS STRAIGHT TO YOUR PHONE

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DESTINATION TOYOTA BURNABY 4278 Lougheed Highway (604) 571-4350 9374

PEACE ARCH TOYOTA SOUTH SURREY 3174 King George Highway (604) 531-2916 30377

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SUNRISE TOYOTA ABBOTSFORD Fraser Valley Auto Mall (604) 857-2657 5736

REGENCY TOYOTA VANCOUVER 401 Kingsway (604) 879-8411 8507

WEST COAST TOYOTA PITT MEADOWS 19950 Lougheed Highway (866) 910-9543 7662

VALLEY TOYOTA CHILLIWACK 8750 Young Road (604) 792-1167 8176

SQUAMISH TOYOTA SQUAMISH 39150 Queens Way (604) 567-8888 31003

WESTMINSTER TOYOTA NEW WESTMINSTER 210 - 12th Street (604) 520-3333 8531

The Voice of Vancouver Neighbourhoods

www.vancourier.com


FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

dashboard

Sunday September 8th

Red Bull leads the charge

Anything can happen and anybody can win #awesomerace #charitylove

ELECTRIC MERCEDES-BENZ SETS NÜRBURGRING RECORD

with Brendan McAleer

E

spoonful sTyle

of speed, it’s not just the drivers who risk everything, but the support workers who do a far less glamorous, and similarly dangerous job.

BRAKING NEWS

arlier this month saw the beautiful city of Montreal become a battleground for top-tier racing: Formula One came to town. After some interesting hijinks during qualifying, the race turned out to be an easy win for whiz-kid Sebastian Vettel in his Red Bull/Infiniti car, running out ahead early on and maintaining a lead through to the finish. Infiniti must be very happy that their sponsorship is working out so well, victory-wise. The real battles were farther back in the pack, particularly between Ferrari’s Fernando Alonso, who squeaked by Lewis Hamilton’s Mercedes-Benz to steal second. Not necessarily a clean victory for the Spaniard: rumours has it there was a pass under a yellow flag, which is a definite no-no. Sadly, while there would be much champagne sprayed post-race, there was also terrible news. A volunteer track worker was crushed by a crane while attempting to remove a crashed F1 racer from one of the corners. Details are slim, but apparently the veteran track worker slipped and fell out of sight of the moving crane, and was caught under its wheels. It’s worth remembering that in the fraternity

When it comes to performance-oriented electric vehicles, Tesla has been soaking up the spotlight for too long. Let’s turn that light on a growing battle between two traditional manufacturers locked in combat on the legendary Nürburgring. Audi threw down the gauntlet with its Etron R8 — an electric-only version of Ingolstadt’s supercar. With a lap time hovering around the low eight-minute range, the R8 made its bones as a fairly impressive machine, though slower than its gasoline-powered compatriots. However, Mercedes has firmly established itself as current electric King of the ‘Ring, shattering Audi’s times with a seven minute, fiftysix second lap that’s faster even than the V-8powered R8. They did so with their SLS Electric Drive, which is ... well, you can figure it out. With all-wheel drive and the equivalent of 751 horespower., the electric SLS is quite the machine, though it should be noted that it’s handily trumped by the normally powered version (which is also half the price). Still, with carmakers focusing on electric performance as well as efficiency, it’s good news for our inevitably battery-powered future. Watch this space for all the week’s best and worst of automotive news or submit your own auto oddities to brakingnews@gmail.com.

MORE fun

too much fun

fun

Only 75 spots available (Teams of 2) Cost is $50 per team member Team must raise a minimum of $500 No driving required

Challenges

2013 CR-V LX

DETOURS

PITSTOPS

INFO & registRATION: Awesomerace.ca

PREPARE FOR SUMMER ROAD TRIPS SUMMERMULTI-POINTINSPECTION

WITH GENUINE HONDA OIL CHANGE

139

$

*

bi-weekly for 60 months with

0 down

$ *

1.99

%#

MSRP** $27,630 includes freight & PDI

2,500

$ OR

cash purchase incentive* on select models.

• Oil & filter change. Check for fluid leaks • Battery load/charging test • Inspect coolant level and freezing point • Check cooling system, inspect hoses and clamps • Inspect all brakes for wear % and condition • Inspect brake calipers, wheel cylinders and parking brake • Inspect tire wear and pressure and tire rotation • Inspect drive belt condition (if applicable)

$

88

88*

• Top-up washer fluid • Inspect transmission fluid level, power steering fluid level (if applicable), brake fluid level, clutch fluid level (if applicable) • Inspect windshield wipers, washer jets and blades • Inspect all lights and bulbs • Inspect and lubricate door locks, latches and handles • Wash and vacuum, plus shuttle service

Ultra fuel-efficient vehicles that require 0W20 oils are additional cost.

Bonus* 6-month ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

Get 6 months of worry-free driving with your next Lube, Oil & Filter. Your Roadside Assistance Program gives you: • Traffic accident insurance • Emergency Transportation • Lockout service • Emergency message service • Trip interrruption benefits • Rental car coverage Offer available for every Honda - 2008 or older. • Tire road hazard coverage • Towing Service *Applicable taxes are extra. Special offer is valid only on 2008 model-year Honda vehicles or older. Offer valid from March 15th – July 15th, 2013 at participating BC Honda Dealers. Roadside assistance coverage begins once your BC Honda Dealer receives your validated Honda VIN; coverage limits apply to some services. Canadian VINs only. Offers subject to change without notice. See your BC Honda Dealer or visit BCHonda.com for full details.

2013 Autos.ca Top Pick

bchonda.com

PRIZES

Attn: Honda Owners

MODEL SHOWN: RM3H3DES

Lease a CR-V LX from

A49

*Limited time lease offer based on a new 2013 CR-V LX 2WD model RM3H3DES. #1.99% lease APR for 60 months O.A.C. Bi-weekly payment, including freight and PDI, is $139.00. Downpayment of $0.00, first bi-weekly payment, environmental fees and $0 security deposit due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $18,209.00. Taxes, license, insurance and registration are extra. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometer. **MSRP $27,630 including freight and PDI of $1,640 based on a new 2013 CR-V LX 2WD model RM3H3DES. PPSA, license, insurance, taxes, and other dealer charges are extra and may be required at the time of purchase. #/*/** Offers valid from May 1st through May 31st, 2013 at participating Honda retailers. Dealer may sell for less. Dealer trade may be necessary on certain vehicles. Offers valid only for British Columbia residents at BC Honda Dealers locations. Offers subject to change or cancellation without notice. Terms and conditions apply. Visit www.bchonda.com or see your Honda retailer for full details.

FREE SERVICE SHUTTLE (DOWNTOWN CORE) COURTESY CAR WASH FOR ALL SERVICE CUSTOMERS * All offers are effective until July 15, 2013. Taxes not included. Environmental levies extra. ˚Not to be combined with other offers. Please consult Kingsway Honda for more details. Please present coupon during write-up. Valid at Kingsway Honda only. Limit one per person. Coupon does not apply to prior purchases.

12th and Kingsway, Vancouver, BC

Member of Dealer the # D8508

CALL 604-873-3676

www.kingswayhonda.ca


THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 MMU

N Y • 190

IT

IN YOUR

CO

8

A50

classifieds.vancourier.com 604-630.3300

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Sales Centre Hours: Mon. - Fri. 8:30am - 5:00pm email:

CONNECTING COMMUNITIES

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ANNOUNCEMENTS 1010

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Coming Events

~ SALE ~

Jewelry, Watch & Designer Collections

Mon. - Fri • 7:30am - 6:00pm Saturday 8:00am - 5:00pm

Saturday, June 22nd 9:30am - 4:00pm

LFA 'UNGRADS of ’73' - We know who you are, but not where you are! REUNION! Oct 12 2013 Call Barbara 604-633-3012 or Request to join our FB Group

Hospice Cottage Charity Shoppe 1521 - 56 St., Tsawwassen

In Memoriam

In Memoriam Dr. Noni Howard Principal of Frontier University and lesbian poet. Noni passed away suddenly in Half Moon Bay, California. Her remains are interred in her parent’s plot, at Quebec’s Sherbrooke cemetery. She will greatly missed by her students, the Directors of Frontier University, and especially by one of her first students at Vancouver’s Free University circa 1975 on Commercial Drive, Vancouver East Prof. David Kilbey - Registrar of Frontier University West Vancouver, British Columbia.

1010

1031

REGGAE NIGHTS June 27-28 on the Drive 1739 Venables St, Van. 8:00pm. 604-209-5081

Announcements

place ads online @

Announcements

Announcements

The German Canadian Benevolent Society Of B.C.

Annual General Meeting June 24, 2013, starts 5:30pm 2010 Harrison Dr., Vancouver All members & friends of the Society are invited.

604-713-6500 www.gcch.ca

1085

PUBLIC AUCTION:

June 22nd - 9 AM 6780 Glover Rd., Langley B.C. 80-100 CARS, LIGHT TRUCKS & RV’s Industrial, Construction, Forklifts, Farm & Turf Equip., Fleet Trucks & Trailers, Lumber, Boats, Tools

Industrial Smalls Welcome / Online Bidding Available Phone: 604-534-0901 www.canamauctions.com

HOT SPOT FOR SALE

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Education

1 DAY COURSES BEST VALUE GUARANTEED Downtown & Broadway locations Every Saturday, Sunday & Monday Public Health Inspector Instructors ADVANCE Continuing Education BC’s #1 FoodSafe Choice since 2003!

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Music/Theatre/ Dance

IN HOME OR STUDIO LESSONS Piano, Theory & other instruments. Allegro Music School 604-327-7765

ANTIQUE AUCTION

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26 @ 1:00 PM TH

Antiques, Collectables, Estate & Jewellery Viewing Times: Tuesday, June 25th: 9:00 am ’Til 7:00 pm & Wednesday, June 26th: 9:00 am ’Til Auction Time

Event volunteers required for Giro di Burnaby on July 11, 2013.

All advertising published in this newspaper is accepted on the premise that the merchandise and services offered are accurately described All advertising published in this newspaper is and willingly soldpremise to buyers themerchandise advertised accepted on the thatatthe prices.services Advertisers are aware of these conditions. and offered are accurately described Advertising not conform to these and willinglythat solddoes to buyers at the advertised standards or thatare is aware deceptive or misleading, prices. Advertisers of these conditions. is never knowingly If anyto reader Advertising that doesaccepted. not conform these encountersor non-compliance with these standards standards that is deceptive or misleading, is knowingly accepted. If any of reader wenever ask that you inform the Publisher this encounters with theseStandards standards newspaper non-compliance and The Advertising we ask that you OMISSION inform theAND Publisher of The this Council of B.C. ERROR: newspaper Advertising Standards publishers doand not The guarantee the insertion of Council of advertisement B.C. OMISSION ERROR: date, The a particular onAND a specified publishers do not guarantee the insertion of or particular at all, although every effort be made to a advertisement on awill specified date, meet the although wishes ofevery the advertisers. Further, or at all, effort will be madethe to publishers do notof accept liability for any loss meet the wishes the advertisers. Further, the or damagedo caused an error or inaccuracy in publishers not by accept liability for any loss thedamage printingcaused of anbyadvertisement beyond the or an error or inaccuracy in amount paid of for an theadvertisement space actually beyond occupiedthe by the printing amount paidofforthe theadvertisement space actuallyinoccupied by the portion which the the of Any the corrections advertisement in which errorportion occurred. or changes willthe be error Anyavailable corrections or changes will be madeoccurred. in the next issue. The Vancouver made thebe next availablefor issue. Courierinwill responsible onlyThe oneVancouver incorrect Courier will be responsible for only one incorrect insertion with liability limited to that portion of insertion with liability limited portion of the advertisement affected by to thethat error. Request the advertisement affected by the error. Request for adjustments adjustments or or corrections for corrections on on charges charges must must be made made within within 30 be 30 days days of of the the ad’s ad’s expiration. expiration.

For check your For best best results results please please check your ad ad for for accuracy the first day it appears. Refunds made only after 7 business days notice!

2005

Antiques

RETRO DESIGN & ANTIQUES FAIR 175 tables & booths of fun, fabulous finds for you & your eclectic abode! SUN JUN 23 10-3 Croatian Cultural Center 3250 Commercial Dr, 604-980-3159 Admission: $5

2060

For Sale Miscellaneous

ALGONQUIN FAMILY 5 person dome tent, used once, exc cond $60 obo. 604-228-9857 HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best Price, Best Quality. All Shapes & Colors Available. Call 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/newspaper

2095

Lumber/Building Supplies

STEEL BUILDINGS/METAL BUILDINGS - UP TO 60% OFF! 30x40, 40x60, 50x80, 60x100, 80x100 sell for balance owed! Call: 1-800-457-2206 www.crownsteelbuildings.ca

Musical Instruments

B-FLAT TENOR saxaphone, Super Grange Boosay & Hawkes, like new $800; B-flat soprano, Buescher, Elcarte Ind., 90 yrs old, exc cond, $2500. 604-534-2997

Volunteers Needed!

www.girodiburnaby.com

Tutoring Services

★ Computer Lessons ★ For Beginners & Revision Email, Internet, Digital Photo $30/hour OR $199 for 8 hrs ★ Call Sol 604-266-2414 ★

2105

Volunteers

)$&!'%#

SPROTTSHAW.COM

FOODSAFE

604-272-7213

604-630-3300

LEGAL SECRETARY

1420

www.foodsafe-courses.com

For information:

Lost & Found

("

gradorthoclinic@dentistry.ubc.ca

A division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership

AUCTION CALENDAR

LOST BLACK leather mens bracelet with silver detail in center made by Chan Luu. Lost Thurs June 13th on seabus or near Coal Harbour SMALL REWARD 778-960-4673

1110

classifieds@van.net

fax: 604-985-3227

2135 • Antiques & Collectibles • Gold & Sterling Jewellery • Victorian & Edwardian Furnishings • Sterling Silver Tea Sets, Bowls, Candelabras, Dresser Sets, Flatware & More • Royal Doulton Figurines, Dresden Candlesticks, Crystal, China & Porcelain • 20 Pieces Moorcroft Pottery • Oriental Jade & Soapstone Carvings • Several Dinner Sets • Oriental Panels, Screens & Scrolls • Bronzed Figures & Statues • Vintage Lighting • Grandfather Clock, Wall & Mantle Clocks • Several Persian Carpets • Artwork (Oil Paintings, Watercolours & Limited Edition Prints) Contents Of Several Estates & More...

OPEN TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC – EVERYONE IS WELCOME TO ATTEND

Wanted to Buy

Old Books Wanted also: Photos Postcards, Letters, Paintings. (no text books/encyclopedia) I pay cash. 604-737-0530

BUYING ANTIQUES & Vintage COLLECTIBLES, WW1 / WW2 Items Buying Antiques and Vintage Collectibles, Sterling Flatware, Ivory, Old Toys, Pocket Watches, Moorcroft, Old Coins, Estate Fine Jewelry, Gold Jewelry, Vintage Posters, Vintage Signs, Vintage Postcards, Mantle Clocks, etc etc. Also Buying WW1 and WW2 medals, knives, swords, daggers, etc. $$ CASH PAID $$ CALL: 604-401-3553

For more details & photos visit: www.lovesauctions.com

LOVE’S AUCTIONEERS & APPRAISERS LTD. 2720 #5 ROAD, RICHMOND, B.C 604-244-9350

Sell it in the Classifieds

604-630-3300

A tradition of excellence since 1907

A peace of mind

Pre-arranged funerals provide peace of mind and help avoid bitter disputes when a loved one passes. Contact us to speak to one of our pre-arrangement specialists about this no-obligation service.

778.330.7799

w w w. m b f u n e r a l s . c o m


FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

3508 3503

Birds

YOUNG CANARIES breed 5, $35 per bird. Baby Budgies $20 per bird. Call 604-939-5666

3507

Dogs

PB KANE Corso ready, m/f, dew claws/tails, 1st/2nd shots, deworm, $1300, 604-802-8480

Cats

3540

No Credit Checks! Cash same day, local office

www.PitStopLoans.com 604-777-5046

LUXURY PET HOTEL @ YVR New customer special $27/ night restriction apply www.jetpetresort.com

604-724-7652

3508

GOLDEN RETRIEVER pups CKC reg, vet ck’d, ch parents, health tested. Ph 604-794-3786

4005

Acupuncture

Professional Therapists Traditional Techniques Unbeatable Pricing

Reflexology: Acupressure: Fire Cupping: Acupuncture:

33/50 Mins 38/55 Mins $ 38/40 Mins $ 45/session

$

$

* GST Included in Price * 7950 Granville St., Van

MINI DACHSHUND Puppies CKC Reg’d, Vet ✔ 1st shots, health guarantee. $1000. 778-388-1057

You Want It We’ve Got It Find What You’re Looking for in the Classifieds.

604-266-6080 8179 Granville St., Van 604-558-3689

4060

Metaphysical

TRUE PSYCHICS For Answers CALL NOW 24/7 Toll FREE 1-877-342-3032

Mobile: #4486 www.truepsychics.ca

5040

!NO EARLY PREVIEWERS!

KILLARNEY ESTATE ART SALE Sat Sun June 22th & 23rd Sat & Su June 29th & 30th 10 am - 4pm

Body Work

3600 Block Commercial St Sat. June 22, 9AM - 2PM Multi-Complex / Family Yard Sale! Something for everyone! Household items; Baby & toddler gear & toys; Electronics; Furniture; Books & games; Camping gear; Sports gear etc. We are between 22nd Avenue and Stainsbury. Don’t miss it!

**RELIEVE ROAD RAGE**

604-739-3998

Escort Services

LEGALS 5505

Legal/Public Notices

NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE ESTATE OF TOMMASO PAULETIG ALSO KNOWN AS THOMAS PAULETIG DECEASED, LATE, OF VANCOUVER WHO DIED MARCH 16, 2013 TAKE NOTICE that all persons having claims upon the estate of the above named must file with the undersigned Executrix by the 15th day of July 2013 a full statement of their claims and securities held by them. OLGA PAULETIG EXECUTRIX 3361 Queens Avenue VANCOUVER, B.C. V5R 4T9 NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS RE: THE ESTATE OF YAEKO SUZUKI, Also known as YAE SUZUKI, and YAIKO SUZUKI, DECEASED NOTICE is hereby given that Creditors and others having claims against the Estate of Yaeko Suzuki, late of #238 - 2125 Eddington Drive, Vancouver, BC, who died on November 5, 2012, are hereby required to send them to the undersigned Executor c/o 700 - 401 West Georgia Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6B 5A1, on or before July 27, 2013 after which date the Executor will distribute the said Estate among the parties entitled thereto, having regard to the claims of which he has notice. Christopher James Torao Suzuki: Exectors Richards Buell Sutton LLP Attention: Patrick (Rick) Montens

Business Opps/ Franchises

A Great Janitorial Franchise Opportunity

Contact Coverall of BC A Respected Worldwide Leader in Franchised Office Cleaning!

604.434.7744 • info@coverallbc.com

www.coverallbc.com

GARAGE SALE

Empty your Garage Fill Your Wallet

MAKE IT A SUCCESS! Call 604-630-3300

5505

Legal/Public Notices

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS Re: BERTHA MARGARET MATHISEN, Deceased, formerly of 3989 Angus Drive, Vancouver, BC. Creditors and others having claims against the estate of BERTHA MARGARET MATHISEN who died on November 1, 2011, at Vancouver, BC, are required to send full particulars of such claims to the undersigned Executor at #2700 - 700 West Georgia St., Vancouver, BC, V7Y 1B8, on or before July 15, 2013, after which the estate’s assets will be distributed, having regard only to the claims that have been received. William John Mathisen, Executor. Alexander Holburn Beaudin + Lang LLP, Barristers + Solicitors.

classifieds. vancourier.com

2080

Garage Sale

2080

Garage Sale

2080

Garage Sale

VANCOUVER

Moving Sale Sat/Sun June 22 & 23, 10-4

8531 Shaughnessy St

Furniture, Bdrm ste, household items, ladders, bldg materials, assorted woodworking tools, collectibles, jewelry, etc. etc.

HUGE HUGE SALE! Sunday ★ June 23rd 10 am - 3 pm 2260 West 10th Ave. Electronics, household items, sports equip, kids stuff etc. All proceeds donated to Brazilian Children’s Society

MULTI FAMILY YARD SALE 900 blk of E 30th Saturday June 22 9am - 12pm

EMPLOYMENT 1240

General Employment

HELP WANTED - LOCAL PEOPLE NEEDED!!! Simple & Flexible Online Work. 100% Genuine Opportunity. F/T & P/T. Internet Needed. Very Easy... No experience Required. Income is Guaranteed! www.ezComputerWork.com

TRUTH IN ''EMPLOYMENT'' ADVERTISING Glacier Media Group makes every effort to ensure you are responding to a reputable and legitimate job opportunity. If you suspect that an ad to which you have responded is misleading, here are some hints to remember. Legitimate employers do not ask for money as part of the application process; do not send money; do not give any credit card information; or call a 900 number in order to respond to an employment ad. Job opportunity ads are salary based and do not require an investment. If you have responded to an ad which you believe to be misleading please call the Better Business Bureau at 604-682-2711, Monday to Friday, 9am - 3pm or email inquiries@bbbvan.org and they will investigate.

classifieds.vancourier.com

Goals: 1. Work from home. 2. Help a young person. 3. Be fulfilled. Priority: PHONE PLEA

See what’s possible.

Become a PLEA Family Caregiver. It just makes sense. PLEA provides ongoing training and support. 604.708.2628 caregiving@plea.bc.ca www.plea.ca JOB OPTIONS BC – OLDER WORKERS

Job Options Older Workers is a 12-week

employment program for

jobseekers ages 55+ Participants must be:

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SPACE IS LIMITED! CALL 604-895-5854 TO REGISTER TODAY Learn more at ywcajobseeker.org

Funding provided through the Canada-British Columbia Labour Market Agreement.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

RE: The Estate of Thomas Andrew Hood also known as Thomas A. Hood and Thomas Hood, deceased, formerly of 415 West 29th Ave, Vancouver, BC V5Y 2L1 Creditors and others having claims against the estate of Thomas Andrew Hood are hereby notified under section 38 of the Trustee Act that particulars of their claim should be sent to the Executor at: 510 - 650 West Georgia Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6B 4N7 on or before July 12, 2013, after which date the Executor will distribute the estate among the parties entitled to it, having regard to the claims of which the Executor then has notice. The Bank of Nova Scotia Trust Company, Executor Attention: Karen Peterson, Trust Officer

@

place ads online @

*Annual starting revenue of $12,000-$120,000 *Guaranteed cleaning contracts *Professional training provided *Financing available *Ongoing support *Low down payment required

classifieds.vancourier.com

Multi Family! Tools, Toys, Books, Sports Equipment, Household Goods, and much much more.

GENTLEMEN! Attractive discreet European lady is available for 604 451-0175 company.

Dogs

CKC 3 MALE black lab puppies, 8 weeks. Exc pets. 1st shots/ tattoo done. $800. 604-454-8643

10am - 4pm June 22 AND June 23

6693 Doman St. Oil & Watercolours, Landscapes & Florals.

7015 The Vancouver Courier has partnered with the BC SPCA to encourage responsible pet guardianship and the humane treatment of animals. Before purchasing a new puppy, ensure the seller has provided excellent care and treatment of the animal and the breeding parents. For a complete guide to finding a reputable breeder and other considerations when acquiring a new pet, visit spca.bc.ca.

Garage Sale

**GARAGE SALE** 650 WEST 30th Ave Rain or Shine

Money to Loan

Pet Services

Cares!

★CATS & KITTENS★ FOR ADOPTION !

2080

Borrow Up To $25,000

7005

HIMALAYAN Show Cats 5-6 Yr M/F $250.00 home w/no dog/cat Kittens $500.00 up + alter Port Moody Day 604 939-1231

GARAGE SALES

Need Cash Today? Own a Vehicle?

SAVE A LIFE. Wonderful rescue dogs from Foreclosed Upon Pets. Spay/neutered, regular vaccinations & rabies, microchipped. $499 adoption fee, avail at your local Petcetera stores.

BENGAL KITTENS, vet ✔ 1st shots dewormed, sweet natured, $460. Mission 1-604-814-1235

Legal Services

CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let your past limit your career plans!Since 1989 Confidential, Fast Affordable - A+ BBB Rating employment & travel freedom. all for free info booklet 1-8-now-pardon (1-866-972-7366) www.RemoveYourRecord.com

5070

3 indoor cats, 5 - 7 years old, require homes immed. Owner has passed away. Fur and Feathers Rescue 604 719-7848

ARABIAN-PERSIAN SIBS, imported rescues, in/outdoor, vet checked, go together: Donation. 778-297-4470, glauris@yahoo.ca

5060

A51

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS

RE: The Estate of Noel Joyce Taylor, otherwise known as Noel J. Taylor, Noel Taylor and Joyce Taylor, deceased, formerly of Broadway Pentecostal Lodge, 1377 Lamey’s Mill Road, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6H 3S9 Creditors and others having claims against the estate of Noel Joyce Taylor, deceased, are hereby notified under Section 38 of the Trustee Act that particulars of their claims should be sent to the undersigned Executor c/o Cohen Buchan Edwards LLP, Lawyers & Notaries, Suite 208 - 4940 No. 3 Road, Richmond, BC, V6X 3A5, on or before July 15, 2013, after which date the Executor will distribute the estate among the parties entitled to it, having regard to the claims of which the Executor then has notice. DATED at Richmond, BC, this 4th day of June, 2013. K. BRUCE PANTON COHEN BUCHAN EDWARDS LLP, Solicitors for Royal Trust Corporation of Canada, Executor

classifieds.vancourier.com • classifieds.vancourier.com

INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICIAN/ INSTRUMENT MECHANIC ERCO Worldwide is the world’s leading supplier of chlorine dioxide technology, and the second largest producer of sodium chlorate in North America. Our business headquarters are in Toronto, with six manufacturing sites in Canada, two in the US, and one in South America. ERCO Worldwide’s North Vancouver facility has immediate employment opportunity for a key position within our organization. This person reports to the Maintenance Manager, and must have the following qualifications. • A Grade 12 diploma, and dual TQ ticket as an Industrial Electrician / Instrument Mechanic, with a minimum of 5 years experience in a chemical or industrial manufacturing environment is preferable. • An Industrial Electrician with Industrial Instrument experience in a chemical or industrial manufacturing environment will also be considered. An industrial instrument mechanic apprenticeship would be available to the appropriate candidate. • Experience with general Industrial electrical systems including high voltage automated controls, DCS and PLC systems. • Computer systems including networking, addressing and associated equipment. • Experience with technical Electrical testing equipment. • Experience with industrial instrumentation equipment and systems. • Superior troubleshooting skills. Successful candidates will be well-organized, adaptable self-starters with strong communication skills and proven safety and environmental track records. Wages and benefits are competitive within the industry, including a four-day work week. The working environment encourages the achievement of personal best within an overall framework of effective teamwork. Submit your resume in confidence no later than July 2, 2013 to: Helene Holt, Administration Manager hholt@ercoworldwide.com Fax: (604) 929 8277


A52

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013

HOME SERVICES Appliance Repairs

8015

8030

Carpentry

Find it in the Classifieds!

Since 1989

RENOS • REPAIRS 9129 Shaughnessy St., Van.

732-8453

MR. BUILD - Renos and Repairs. Est 1989. 9129 Shaughnessy St. Please call 604-732-8453

HOUSE CLEANER needed Kitsilano area, prefer university student; $20 per hour. Call: (604) 736-9343

8060

6005

6008

Condos/ Townhouses

6008-42

Rates are going Up! Call Now. 2.60% 5 year Variable 2.79% 5 year Fixed Self Employed, Credit Damage OK, Commercial & Residential Martinique Walker, AMP Verico Assent Mortgage Corp Call: 604-984-9159

6008

S. Surrey/ White Rock

PARTIAL OCEAN view, 920sf 2br+den 2ba quiet condo, kids, pets ok. $309,000 778-294-2275 see uSELLaHOME.com id5575

For Sale by Owner

6015

Concrete

A Concrete Specialist sidewalks, bsmts, paving stones, patios. Santino 778-892-5559

REAL ESTATE Real Estate Services

Cleaning

A QUALITY CLEANING exp res /comm. low rate’s senior’s disc 778.239.9609 or 778.998.9127

VAN APPLIANCE SERVICES Repair home appl. Low rate guar. Permit/Lic. Tom 604-323-8063

Need help with your Home Renovation?

8055

6020

Abbotsford

IMMACULATE TOP fl 963sf 2 br condo, insuite laundry, +55 building, $121,500 604-309-3947 see uSELLaHOME.com id5565

TOP FLR 762sf 1br condo, in-ste laundry, 45+ building Mt. Baker view $85,000. 778-822-7387 see uSELLaHOME.com id5553

6008-18

SMALL PEACEFUL farm set up for horses right beside South Langley riding trail. Bright & comfortable older 2 bd home, f/p, barn, riding rings, pastures. $849,900. Call 604-323-4788 See Propertyguys.com ID: 76788

6020

Houses - Sale

6020-14

6020-01

Real Estate

At WE BUY HOMES We CASH YOU OUT FAST! We Also Take Over Your Payments Until Your Home is Sold. No Fees! No Risk! Call us First! (604)- 626-9647 www.webuyhomesbc.com

6020-06

ALDERGROVE SXS DUPLEX 80K below assessment. $3100mo rent $529,900 firm 604-807-6565 see uSELLaHOME.com id3428

6020-34

Surrey

6008-40

Reasonable rates. 35 yrs. exp. For free estimates call Mario

604-253-0049

A 1 Retaining Walls, Foundation, Stairs, Driveways, Patios, Sidewalks. Any concrete project. Free Est. Since 1977. Basile 604-617-5813

6040

Okanagan/ Interior

Concrete

L & L CONCRETE. All types: Stamped, Repairs, Pressure Wash, Seal Larry 778-882-0098

8068

Demolition

DEMOLITION

Excavating - Drain Tile Old garage, carport, house, pool, repair main waterline, break concrete & removal. Licensed • Insured • WCB

8073

Drainage

RNC DRAINAGE

−Augering −Water & Sewer line repair & replacement −Sumps −Drain Tile −Concrete Work −Foundation, −Excavation −Retaing Walls −Site restored Call Ron 778-227-7316 or 604-568-3791 10 ACRES OF OKANAGAN VIEW PROPERTY FOR SALE Located 6 km from Penticton Hospital on the eastern hillsides above the city. Numerous building sites with view to the north up Okanagan Lake. One of the few remaining 10 acre country residential parcels that has not been developed. On paved road with power to the lot line. For sale by owner at only $289,000. Contact donaclair11@gmail.com or 250-493-5737

TROY TEATHER DRAINAGE & SEWER 15% OFF - 604-722-1105

8075

Drywall

W.End/Down/Yaletown

OPEN SUNDAY, 2-4PM • MLS# V994147 #401 - 1132 HARO ST., WEST END VAN. FABULOUS 2 BDRM., 2 BATH APT. • $649,000

• 1088 Square Feet • New Pipes 2012, Wood Floors • 1 Block to Robson Street • 2 Secured Parking Spots • 1 Large Storage Locker • Full Size Washer/Dryer • Quiet South-East Facing, Bright • Sundeck for Sitting • Walk to Stanley Park, Shopping

JUDY KILLEEN • 604-833-8044 Personal Real Estate Corporation

732-8453

MERRITT HERITAGE style 3070 sf 4br 5ba on 9.9ac lot detached shop, view $895K 250-378-8857 see uSELLaHOME.com id5592 GUILDFORD 1900SF 3br 2ba w/basement suite on huge 8640 sf lot, $489,000 604-613-1553 see uSELLaHOME.com id5608

6020-38

6050

Out Of Town Property

Vancouver East Side CRANBROOK 2060SF 4br 3ba reno’d home w/side suite on 2 lots $239,900 778-887-4530 see uSELLaHOME.com id5304

WESTSIDE HOME in 'Vancouver Heights'. Open House Sun June 23rd 2-4pm Brand New Custom 4200sf Residence, incredible views, 5 patios, roof top deck, 800sf legal ste, 3 car gar w/bath, 18ft folding glass walls expands the main flr. Exotic Italian Marble & Caesarstone countertops! Call: Marla @ Sutton 778-896-5972

6030 RARE CUSTOM built 2146 sq ft rancher in very desirable Sardis Park neighbourhood. 3 large bedrooms plus den, 2 1/2 baths. Master bedroom boasting 2 large walk-in closets, ensuite with walkin tub. Rec Room with gas fp. New furnace, A/C, HWT, elec air filter. and new thermal windows and wooden blinds. Huge garage, lots of storage, crawlspace. Workshop. Rear yard access, RV parking. 12 x 24 covered patio in back yard. .23 acre. Asking $479,900. Call 604-858-8354.

RENOS • REPAIRS 9129 Shaughnessy St., Van.

FLEETWOOD RENO’D 2140sf 4br 3ba, large 7100sf lot, bsmt suite $529,000. 604-727-9240 see uSELLaHOME.com id5617

Chilliwack

TOP FLOOR quiet side of bldg 650sf 1br+den condo nr Hosp, & Sky train $244K 778-241-4101 see uSELLaHOME.com id5580

STEVESTON VERY large 1284 sf 2br 2ba top fl condo amazing mtn views, $455K 604-275-7986 see uSELLaHOME.com id5376

Sidewalk, Driveway, Patio Exposed Aggregate, remove & replacing

Langley/ Aldergrove

Houses - Sale

New Westminster

Richmond

CONCRETE SPECIALIST

8060

Since 1989

CULTUS LK gardener’s dream 1160 sf 2 br 1.5 ba rancher, a/c 55+ complex $63K 604-858-9301 see uSELLaHOME.com id5400

6008-28

Concrete

604-716-8528

Condos/ Townhouses

6008-02

8060

Lots & Acreage

6052

Real Estate Investment

LANGLEY RENOD sxs duplex +1/2ac lot, rental income $2,300 /month $489,900 604-807-6565 see uSELLaHOME.com id3186

Recreation Property

LANGLEY NR town fully reno’d 2474sf home on 5ac ppty, bsmt suite $1,150,000 604-825-3966 see uSELLaHOME.com id5582

604-630-3300

Contact us today for a free estimate.

Max: 604-341-6059

Lic. 22308

ALL YOUR electrical & reno needs. Lic’d electrician #37940. Insured, bonded & WCB. Free est Reasonable rates 604-842-5276

ALP ELECTRIC #89724 Low price, big/small jobs, free est Satisfaction guar 604-765-3329

HATZIC LAKE 1 hr drive from Vanc, 2 vacant lots 1 is lakefront $65K is for both 604-240-5400 see uSELLaHOME.com id5588

Apartments & Condos

ROCHE POINT Tower, nice clean, view ,1 bdrm+den, 2 bath, patio, ugrnd prk, 5 app, 1000sf, close to shop/bus/library $1180/mnth 604-460-1125 Ann

A Lic’d. Electrician #30582. Rewiring & Reno, Appliance/ Plumbing. Rotor Rooter and Hydro Pressure Jetting Service, 778-998-9026 or 604-255-9026 Free Est / 24/7 YOUR ELECTRICIAN $29 service call. Insured. Lic # 89402. Fast same day service guar’d. We love small jobs! 604-568-1899

8087

Excavating

# 1 BACKHOES, BOBCATS, EXCAVATORS & DUMP TRUCKS Drainage, Paving, landscaping, stump / rock / cement / oil tank & demos, dirt removal, paver stones, Jackhammer, Water / sewer line / sumps. Slinger avail. 24 hrs. Call 341-4446 or 254-6865

Concrete ★ driveway, drainage, sidewalk, pavers, excavation, retaining walls, landscape, backhoe & bobcat services 604-833-2103 Excavating - Drain Tile Demolitions. Fully insured • WCB 604-716-8528

8090

Fencing/Gates

S&S LANDSCAPING & FENCING Cedar Fence Install Call 604-275-3158 FENCES & DECKS front steps, retaining walls, repair or renew, John 778-998-5591 tarasoffconstruction.com KB METAL PRODUCTS LTD. FENCE & GATES : CHAIN LINK & ALUMINUM ORNAMENTAL. ✫Free Estimates: 604-619-8434 West Coast Cedar Installations New, repaired or rebuilt ★ Fences & Decks ★ 604-435-5755 or 604-788-6458

8105

Flooring/ Refinishing

Hardwood Floor Refinishing

6508

7th & Clark, East Van. Lrg 2 BR, hardwood, reno’d. VIEW. Av July 1. $1100 + utls. 604-218-7660

Oak & West 14th Studios (Avail. July 1) 1 BR’s (Avail Now & July 1) Well maintained building close to all amenities and VGH. Some pets ok.

604-731-2714

8105

Flooring/ Refinishing

Artistry of Hardwood Floors

Refinish, sanding, install, dustless Prof & Quality work 604-219-6944 CELTIC HARDWOOD FLOORS Installations & refinishing. Quality work. Reas Rates. 604-293-0057 Golden Hardwood & Laminate & Tiles. Prof install, refinishing, sanding & repairs. 778-858-7263 ** HARDWOOD FLOORS ** Installed, Repaired, Refinished Free Est. Peter 604-329-4498 INSTALLATION REFINISHING, Sanding. Free est, great prices. Satisfaction guar. 604-518-7508

8120

Glass Mirrors

Commercial/Residential

Store Fronts • Windows & Doors Broken Glass • Foggy Glass Patio Doors • Mirrors • Etc. 2837 Kingsway, Vancouver

Tel: 604-603-9655

8125

Gutters

AT YOUR HOME GUTTER SERVICES

No More HST! BOOK NOW! • Gutter Installation, Cleaning & Repairs • Roofing & Roof Repairs • Moss Control, Removal & Prevention 25 year Warranteed Leaf & Needle Guard

WCB – Fully Insured 100% Money Back Guarantee

604-340-7189 ACCREDITED BUSINESS

atyourhomeservicesgroup.ca DIRTY WINDOWS? DIRTY GUTTERS? Black Bear Window Cleaning does windows, gutters & siding. Insured & Guaranteed. Commercial & Residential. Call: 778 892-2327

Repairs & Staining Installation Free Estimates

Gutter & window cleaning, power washing. Prompt, professional. 30 yrs exp. Simon 604-230-0627

604-376-7224 www.centuryhardwood.com

TROY TEATHER GUTTERS 15% OFF - 604-722-1105

Century Hardwood Floors

HENRY’S

HARDWOOD FLOOR SERVICES Sanding & Refinishing Installation Quality Workmanship Free Estimates Fully Licensed & Insured

604-771-8885

ANYTHING IN WOOD Hardwood flrs, install, refinishing. Non-toxic finishes. 604-782-8275

6508

Apt/Condos

1 BR Furnished Coal Harbour $2500-$3000 Available NOW www.rentYVR.ca 778.888.8888

8130

LANGARA GARDENS

Handyperson

AaronR CONST Repairs & Renos, small repairs welcome. Insured, WCB, Licensed. 604-318-4390 aaronrconstruction.com

6540

Houses - Rent

2BDRM/1BTH CENTRAL Lons. Coachhouse w/d, f/s, dw, on de -mand hw,fp,strge,pkg.Aug1 N/P 2495+Ref sec dep.604.349.2083

6602

Apt/Condos

AMBER LODGE

HATZIC LAKE Swans Point, 1 hr from Vanc incl lot & 5th wheel ski, fish, $134,500. 604-209-8650 see uSELLaHOME.com id5491

Electrical

RENTALS 1 BR’s - Kerrisdale, great location! Close to shops, transit & schools. $1010-$1165 Available Now. 604-677-3205 www.lougheedproperties.com

One call does it all!

To advertise:

Electrical

The current choice serving the Lower Mainland for more than 15 years. All Kinds of Work and Reasonable Rates.

6505

GALIANO EXECUTIVE Home & Cabin on priv beach, completely furn’d, many extras, ready to move in. Reduced to $849,000! Global Force Rlty. 604-802-8711 www.yourlinktorealestate.ca

2&3 BDRM MOBILES in Surrey & Langley. $19,900-$65,000. Call for great mobile! Lorraine Cauley Royal Lepage 604-889-4874

8080

LIC. ELECTRICIAN #37309 Commercial & residential renos & small jobs. 778-322-0934.

LANGLEY BUILD your dream home, secluded 5 ac view ppty, well inst $630,000 604-825-3966 see uSELLaHOME.com id4513

Mobile Homes

Wayne The Drywaller

Quality Drywall Finishing. Textured Ceilings & Repair. Renov Specialist. No job too small. 837-1785

Licensed & Bonded

6065

6035

VINCE’S MAGIC Drywalling & textured ceiling repairs. Complete drywall & taping. 604-307-2295

8080

Suites/Partial Houses

1 BR rear bsmt ste, priv entry, patio, Langara area, nr amen., no w/d, np ns, suits 1 person, lease, $660. July 1. 604-322-0639

#101 - 621 W. 57th Ave, Van Spacious 1, 2 & 3 BR Rental Apartments & Townhouses. Heat, hot water & lrg storage locker included. Many units have in-suite laundry and lrg patios/balconies with gorgeous views. Tasteful gardens, swimming pools, hot tub, gym, laundry, gated parking, plus shops & services. Near Oakridge Centre, Canada Line stations, Langara College, Churchill High School & more. Sorry no pets. www.langaragardens.com

1BDRM GROUND level, 51st & Fraser, bus stop in front, n/s, n/p, ref’s. $750 plus util. Avail Now. Call after 6pm 604-708-0589

info@langaragardens.com

classifieds.vancourier.com

Call 604-327-1178

Managed by Dodwell Strata Management Ltd.

2 BR Dunbar garden level, in quiet area, w/d, parking, suit couple or single. N/S, cat ok. $925 + utils. Jul 1. 604-224-6268

2BDRM/2BTH 1328 Camridge Place West Van Kitchen, patio $2800/mth. No pets/non-smoke. Utilities included. 604-446-8466.

@

place ads online @


HOME SERVICES 8130

8160

Handyperson

Lawn & Garden

8185

Moving & Storage

FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Call ThE Experts RENOVATIONS & CUSTOM HOMES

Patios/Decks/ Railings

8200

Renovations & Custom Homes

GET OUT YOUR LIST! We do all the fussy little jobs no one else wants to do. Complete home repairs. Workmanship and your Satisfaction Guaranteed. Est 1983. Ralph 682-8256

Tree Topping, Clean-Up, Planting, Trimming, Power Raking, Aeration, etc. • Westside & Eastside

West-side Lawn & Garden Since 1989

RENOS • REPAIRS 9129 Shaughnessy St., Van.

732-8453

DUSTTIN’S HANDYMAN Service All jobs Large and Small. Competitive Rates 604-562-5711

HANDYMAN, reno, kitchen, bath, plumbing, countertop, flooring, painting, etc. Mic, 604-725-3127 HOME REPAIRS & Improvements Lipstick renos & painting; decks & fences. Walter 778-837-2518 R’s Vinyl Windows Flooring, Entrance Drs, Pressure Washing, Welding, Free Est. 778-863-1944 THE HANDYMAN CAN Professional Home Services Big or small - we do them all Free Est. Sr.Disc. 604-340-4633

8135

Hauling

604-RUBBISH - ’’ We do all the loading & cleanup and we remove almost anything'' 604-782-2474

8155

Landscaping

● Landscaping ● Gardening ● Pruning & Planting

604-261-9697 Free est WILDWOOD LANDSCAPING Hedge Trimmimg & Tree Pruning & Hedge Removal Spring Clean Up Lawn Restoration. Planter Box, Garden Installation. Comm/Strata/Res Free Estimates. 604-893-5745 GB GARDENING - lawn cut, trim, prune, clean up, power wash, free est. 778-847-9412 604-322-9412 JAPANESE GARDENER Landscape & maintenance, clean-ups, trimming. Reas, free est, 25 yrs exp 604-986-8126 Ny Ton Gardening Trimming, Shrubs, Pruning, Yard Cleanup, 604-782-5288 ★ SD ENTERPRISES ★ Lawncare, power raking, landscaping, pruning, clean-up, cedar fencing. Terry, 604-726-1931 SENIOR EXP’D GARDENER Pruning, Trimming, Landscaping 604-354-8382 or 604-879-6019 ENGLISH LAWNS, new lawn installs, replace old, drainage, landscaping, pavers, etc. Any size job. Nick, 604-929-7732

8175

Low Budget Moving.com

★ 604-652-1660 ★

8193

FLECK CONTRACTING LTD.

• Oil Tank Removal • Work complies with city bylaws • Always fair & BC Mainland reasonable rates • Excellent references For Free Estimates Call

Off: 604-266-2120 Cell: 604-290-8592 Serving West Side since 1987

STORMWORKS OIL Tank Removal. Certified, Insured, Reasonable Rates. A+ BBB. 604-724-3670

8195

Call for a Free Estimate

604-220-5296

Painting/ Wallpaper

ROMAN’S PAINTING

•Interior/Exterior •Reasonable Rates •Warranty •Free Estimate 604-339-4541 www.romanpaint.com

Masonry

www.englishlawns.com

Greenworx Redevelopment Inc. Hedges, pavers, ponds & walls, returfing, demos, drainage, jackhammering. Old pools filled in, decks, concrete 604.782.4322

8160

Lawn & Garden

Services

SAME DAY SERVICE

“More than just mowing”

8185

Moving & Storage

AFFORDABLE MOVING

310-JIMS (5467) HEDGING GARDENING CLEAN-UPS PRUNING

DUNBAR LAWN & GARDENS

Free Estimates

604-266-1681

WCB • FULLY INSURED

EST. 41 YEARS

HEDGE SHRUB TREE & STUMP REMOVAL FREE ESTIMATE INSURED

3 Rooms $250 Exterior Special on NOW

Give us a Call We’re Tough to Beat

Free Estimates

604-771-7052

A-1

PAINT CO.

45 We accept Visa, Mastercard & Interac

Summer 10% OFF Special Exterior Repainting

Licenced & Insured Local & Long Distance

604-723-8434

604-537-4140

www.jimsmowing.ca

THE REAL DEAL

1 to 3 Men

Seniors Discount

www.affordablemoversbc.com

B&Y MOVING Experienced Movers ~ 2 Men $55 ~

Over 10 yrs. Exp. • Licenced & Insured • Professional Piano Movers

604-708-8850

BEST RATE MOVING Experienced Movers with Affordable Rates! Starting $40/ hour FLAT RATE also available Licensed & Insured • Seniors Discount

604-787-8061

TCP MOVING 1 to 3 men from $40

• Licensed & Insured. • Local & storage. • Ca & US long distance.

604-505-1386 604-505-9166 ABBA MOVERS bsmt clean 1-4 ton Lic, ins’d from $35/hr, 2 men $45/hr, 24/7, 26 yrs 604-506-7576

• Sunrooms • Aluminum patio/deck covers • Aluminum railings • Glass railings • Aluminum fencing • Auto gates Free Estimates 604-782-9108

Paving/Seal Coating

8205

Free Est. - 15 Years Exp. Insured /WCB

ALLQUEST PAINTING Quality Work You Can Trust! Interior & Exterior ★ UNBEATABLE PRICES ★ Free Est. / Written Guarantee

Insured/WCB

778-997-9582

D&M PAINTING

Driveway, Walkway & Parking Lot Garage Apron / Speed Bump / Pot Hole / Patch Commercial & Residential www.jaconbrospaving.com

604-724-3832

Marty’s PAINTING LTD.

Colour Consultant in-House

No job too small • 1973

BBB Rating A+ • Free Estimate 604-733-2865

PAUL’S PAINTING • Painting • All wood, stucco & drywall repairs

778-865-0370

224-3669

ABE MOVING & Delivery and Rubbish Removal $35/HR per Person • 24/7 604-999-6020

30% OFF all painting. Goodwood Painting Services. 20 years experience. Call 604-723-1643

604-723-2468; Tran the Gardener. Lawns, cutting, weeding, trimming, cleanups. Reliable. 604-723-2468

EXP PROF movers fully equip, piano specialist. Evening moves available. George 778-875-8202

DUSKO PAINTING, Int/Ext. Com/ Res. Drywall repair. Free ests. 604-417-5917, 604-258-7300

Save $25 on Your Next Hydro Flush Service

Have Your Perimeter Drainage Flushed of Dirt and Debris Before Back Ups Occur

604-618-2949

Save $100 on Perimeter Drainage Replacement

ALLEN ASPHALT concrete, brick, drains, foundations, walls, membranes 604-618-2304/ 820-2187

8220

Includes the Installation of PVC Piping, Catch Basins and Sumps

HILLCREST PLUMBING AND HEATING OFFER

Hillcrest Plumbing & Heating Offer Expires September 30, 2011

604-879-1415 (Vancouver, BC) 604-596-1077 (Surrey, BC) or OR 604-244-0220 (Richmond,BC) BC) 604-879-1415 (Vancouver,

CLIP ‘N SAVE! Vancouver 604-879-1415 Richmond 604-244-0220

Plumbing

YOUR WAY

www.hillcrestplumbing.com

Plumbing & Renovations Full Kitchen & Bath Reno’s • Plumbing Service - all types • H/W tanks • Plugged drains No job too small!

‘Old Home Specialist’

Steve ✔

604-830-8555

HOME SERVICES 8240

10% Off with this Ad! For all your plumbing, heating & reno needs. Lic Gas Fitter, Aman. 778-895-2005

Actual Plumbing & Heating, Boilers, Furnaces, Tankless, Hotwater tanks, 24/7, Seniors Disc. Lic. BBB, 604-874-4808

8225

Power Washing

POWER WASHING GUTTER & WINDOW CLEANING

Renovations & Home Improvement

AaronR CONST Repairs & Renos, general contracting. Insured, WCB, Licensed

604-318-4390 aaronrconstruction.com

Simon 604-230-0627 Ken’s Power Washing Plus SUMMER SPECIALS • Pressure Washing • Gutter & Window Cleaning • Painting • Free Estimates • Insured

Call Ken 604-716-7468

8240

Renovations & Home Improvement

•Interior / Exterior •New Construction/ Renovations/ Additions Drywall • Plumbing Electrical • Foundations/ Framing • Flooring • Lic. & Insured • Free Estimates Call 604-220-7422

We specialize in Home Renovations, Kitchens, Baths, Decks, Fencing, etc.

Renovations & Home Improvement

MOZAIK MOZAIK HANDYMAN HANDYMAN SERVICES SERVICES LTD.

• Painting • Electrical • Plumbing • Tiling • Carpentry Carpeting

Tel: 739-8786, Cell: 716-8687 ~ FREE ESTIMATES ~

Since 1989

RENOS • REPAIRS 9129 Shaughnessy St., Van.

732-8453

A-1 CABINETS, suites, granite, bathrooms, c-top, tiles, flooring, paint, blinds. Bob 604-366-7042

drytech.ca

ALLQUEST PAINTING Quality Work You Can Trust! 778 997-9582

RENOVATIONS

D & M RENOVATIONS, Flooring, tiling, finishing. Fully Insured. Top quality, quick work 604-724-3832

22-BUILD (222-8453) Showroom: 1230 West 75th Ave.

FERREIRA HOME IMPROVEMENTS Additions ★ Renovations Concrete Forming ★ Decks Garages ★ Bathrooms Ceramic Tile ★ Drywall Hardwood Flooring ''Satisfaction Guaranteed''

NORM, 604-466-9733 Cell: 604-841-1855

HOME IMPROVEMENT CENTRE Construction Services

8240

WE CAN FIX IT

Prompt Professional Service 30 years experience

Interior/Exterior Specialist Many Years Experience Fully Insured Top Quality, Quick Work Free Estimate

Hydro Flushing • Perimeter Drainage Field/Yard Drainage • Sumps/Catch Basins Foundation Crack Repairs • Compact Excavator Services VALUABLE COUPON! VALUABLE COUPON

ASPHALT PAVING

★ 3 Licensed Plumbers ★ 66 years of exp. 604-830-6617 www.oceansidemechanical.com

1, 3, 5, 7 or 10 Ton $ From FREE ESTIMATES

JIMM218

Lawn Mowing • Yard Clean-up Aeration • Fertilizing • Hedges Pruning • Gutters Fences • Decks Rubbish Removal Odd Jobs

MASONRY and REPAIRS •Stone Walls •Bricks •Chimneys •Slate •Fireplaces •Pavers •Landscaping •Concrete. George • 778-998-3689

604.254.1760

www.PatioCoverVancouver.com

Oil Tank Removal

Need a Great New Lawn?

New Lawn Installation Turf • Seed • Artificial Excavation Drainage • Pavers

www.rjrrenovator.com www.rjrconstruction.ca

Local & long distance Call 604-720-0931 brothersmovingservice.com

Vcr West & East D/Town

A53

GET OUT YOUR LIST! We do all the fussy little jobs no one else wants to do. Complete home repairs. Workmanship and your Satisfaction Guaranteed. Est 1983. Ralph 682-8256 Vcr West & East D/Town

EXTERIOR/INTERIOR Painting Custom Cabinet/ COUNTERTOP low rate. Isaac 604.836.1648 GET OUT YOUR LIST! We do all the fussy little jobs no one else wants to do. Workmanship & Satisfaction Guaranteed. Vancouver D/town & West & East side. Est 1983. Ralph 682-8256 High United Construction New build, complete renos, drywall, tile, stucco, patio cover. Big/ small. Randy 604-250-1385 Moon Construction Building Services Additons, Renovations, New Construction, Specializing in Concrete Forming, Framing & Siding. 604-218-3064 ★PAUL’S PAINTING★ Painting, Reno’s, Handyman Call 778-865-0370 ★RENOVATIONS - Over 25 yrs exp. Drywall, Painting, Kitchen, Bath, Tenant Improvement that meets code. Call 604-722-4411

604.240.9081

hansv@shaw.ca

Renovations • Repairs

BATHROOM• KITCHEN • BASEMENT Structural ★ Water Ingress Kelly Construction 604-738-7280

TOTAL HOME A RENOVATIONS Since 1983

FROM DESIGN TO FINISH Complete Renos & Additions, incl.: Kitchen & Bath Improvements • Roofing • Sundecks • Door & Window Replacements

Bill 604-298-1222 www.chrisdalehomes.com

www.RenoRite.com

Save Your Dollars

✓ RenoRite 604 451 0225

Bath Kitchen Suites & More

RNC RENOVATIONS Ins, WCB, Member of BBB, 778-227-7316 www.rncrenovations.com ROMAN’S PAINTING Interior/Exterior 604-339-4541 www.romanpaint.com SN TOTAL HOME RENO Basements,bathrooms,decks. For free estimates 604-318-4054

8250

Roofing

AT YOUR HOME ROOFING SERVICES

No More HST! BOOK NOW! • Roofing & Roof Repairs • Duroid, Cedar, Torch-on • Moss Control, Removal & Prevention • Gutter Installation, Cleaning & Repairs

WCB – Fully Insured 100% Money Back Guarantee

604-340-7189 ACCREDITED BUSINESS

atyourhomeservicesgroup.ca

drytech.ca ROOFING/ RE-ROOFING Leak Repairs & Chimney Repairs

SAVE $ 604-222-8453 Showroom: 1230 West 75th Ave.

Bros. Roofing Ltd. Over 40 Years in Business SPECIALIZING IN CEDAR, FIBERGLASS LAMINATES AND TORCH ON.

Liability Insurance, WCB, BBB, Free Estimates

604-946-4333

STORMRIDER ROOF REPAIRS • Concrete Tiles • Skylights • Rain Gutters

604-803-2808 10% DISCOUNT. MG Roofing & Siding. WCB. Re-Roofing, New Roof, Gutters. 604-812-9721 A EASTWEST Roofing & Siding Reroofing, Gutter, BBB Member, 10% disc, Seniors Disc, 604-783-6437 ★ MCNABB ROOFING ★ ALL TYPES OF ROOFING 40 years exp. Call 604-839-7881

AMBLESIDE ROOFING

All types - Reroofs & Repairs Insured/WCB 778-288-8357

Roofing

cont. on next page


A54

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013

HOME SERVICES Roofing

cont. from previous page

8250

Roofing

8250

8255 A-1 Contracting & Roofing ReRoofing & Repair. WCB. 25% Discount. Jag, 778-892-1530

Canam Roofing 778-881-1417 Residential roofing, new, reroofing & repairs. Peace of mind warranty. www.canamroofing.ca MCR Mastercraft Roofing Right the 1st time! Repairs, reroofing, garage, decks. Hart 322-5517

8255

Roofing

Samra Bros. Roofing Ltd. 40 yrs+ Cedar / Fiberglass / Torch On Free Estimates. 604-946-4333

Rubbish Removal

bradsjunkremoval.com • 95% Recycle Rate • No Landfills EVER

Rubbish Removal

Collectibles & Classics

WE LOAD OR YOU LOAD

“Haul Anything ... but Dead Bodies”

604.220.JUNK (5865)

Serving the Lower Mainland since 1988

1988 FLEETWOOD Brougham d’Elegance Rare, orig owner car! 83km! Perfect cond Collector Car Status 25-yrs! $10,950. D# 10578 Auto Depot NVan 604-727-3111

2005 PONTIAC Sunfire SE, 99 kms! ac/windows, warr $4,350 D10578. 604-727-3111 Auto Depot, NVan.

Student Works

Disposal & Recycling Trips start at

2008 CHEV Aveo H/back 4cyl Auto silver 64,000kms $6800 D#30332 . MJ Auto Wholesale.com 604.466.6007

John 778-288-8009

10% OFF with this ad w w w.student worksdisposal.com

9125

2005 PONTIAC WAVE LT, 104,000 kms, black, a/c, auto, newer brakes, timing belt and tires, sunroof, $4595. 778-846-5275

Rubbish Removal

Stucco/Siding/ Exterior

8300

'Haul anything...but dead bodies!!'

J. PEARCE STUCCO CONTRACTING. 604-761-6079 www.stuccocontracting.com

EASTSIDE RUBBISH Removal. Best Rate, 12 Years Straight! Friendly & Cheap. 604-266-4444 JACK’S RUBBISH Removal. Household Junk Specialist! Fast, Friendly & Cheap. 604-266-4444

RUBBISH REMOVAL Reasonable rates - Free Est. Pat 604-224-2112, anytime

9155

Sport Utilities/ 4x4’s/Trucks

1997 LANDROVER Defender(s) 90, 5 spd diesel, mint, 160,000km, from desert $23,900 1-780-945-7945 604-926-7087 lancebright@hotmail.com

8309

Tiling

2011 LEXUS IS350c V6 Better

2002 FORD Mustang Convertible,

2011 Hyundai Sonata Limited Affordable Luxury 35,600 kms. 2.4L GDI DOHC. $19,999. Email: sjscot@shaw.ca (604) 794-3428.

8315

Tree Services

Wildwood Tree Services, Exp Hedge Trimming and Removal & Tree Pruning. Free Est. 604-893-5745

8335

Window Cleaning

A & Wes Tile top European quality Tile install custom bath-kitch 604-657-0343 AandWesTile.com

WHITE ROSE Window Cleaning. Inside and out. Gutters cleared and cleaned too! 604-274-0285

PTV TILE INSTALLATIONS Ceramic Tile, Porcelain, Slate, 25 Yrs Exp. Santo 778-235-1772

classifieds.vancourier.com

9160

Sports & Imports

1994 AUDI Cabrio A4 Rare Offering! $6880. Pwr convertible top; alloys; service records; 1yr Warranty incl ; Showroom Car! Auto Depot 604-727-3111 #10578

2001 NISSAN XTerra 4x4; local; V6; 5sp; 1 yr Warr, No Accid ! Sale $5880. Rugged & Reliable! D10578 Auto Depot 604-727-3111 NVan

Place your ad online:

9160

Sports & Imports

2006 MINI Cooper, Grey, 58k, loaded, $16,988. Downtown.nissan.ca 604-257-8900

2006 SMART 'DIESEL' auto

1998 VOLVO S70 sports sedan T5

lthr & pwr s/roof; local NO Accid, auto, 1yr Warr incl! $3999. #10578 Auto Depot 604-727-3111 NVan

9145

Scrap Car Removal

Removal FREEScrap/Car

2001 YUKON 'XL' 7-pass 4x4,

small V8, Tow & Go! lthr 1-owner! $5450. incl 1Yr Warr All options! D10578 Auto Depot, 604-727-3111

74MPG or 3.8L per100kms! $6950. with 1-yr warr incl! Sale D10578. 604-727-3111 Auto Depot, NVan.

2008 LEXUS AWD IS250 Navi, 110 2000 ACURA Integra 2dr 4cyl Auto

black $3800 D #30332 MJ Auto Wholesale.com 604.466.6007

HOUR 2Service From Call

(604) 209-2026

FREE

2002 F-150 Ford Super Cab 4x4

'XTR', 1 yr warr, $7850 D10578. 604-727-3111 Auto Depot, 1397 Welch NVan.

2000 LEXUS RX300 AWD local BC luxury V6, Warr 1-yr! Lthr, New Tires! $6880. Safe!- LEXUS! D10578 Auto Depot 604-727-3111

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL

604-257-8900 • WWW.DOWNTOWN.NISSAN.CA

HUGE FLEET SALE!

No Wheels, No Problem

CASH FOR ALL COMPLETE CARS OPEN 24 HRS. INCLUDING HOLIDAYS

MIKE: 604-872-0109

2002 HONDA CRV 4cyl manual 4wd black $7900 D#30332 MJ Auto Wholesale.com 604.466.6007

THE SCRAPPER

2005 CHEV Astro Cargo Van, Ladder rails, 68k, a/c, $13,900 Downtown.nissan.ca 604-257-8900

2003 JEEP Wrangler In-line 6cyl Auto red $6800.D#30332 MJ Auto Wholesale.com 604.466.6007

SCRAP CAR & TRUCK REMOVAL

2002 KIA Rio Wagon; 4cyl 5-sp &

only 95kms! Clean/Safe affordable 1-yr Warr incl $4650. D10578. 604-727-3111 Auto Depot, NVan.

2006 DODGE Caravan Cargo, 70k, shelves, ladder rack, $9,900 Downtown.nissan.ca 604-257-8900

CASH FOR ALL VEHICLES

604-790-3900 OUR SERVIC 2H

9155

E

Sport Utilities/ 4x4’s/Trucks

2005 DODGE Dakota 6cyl Auto 4x4 116,000kms black $9800. #30332 MJ Auto Wholesale.com 604.466.6007

2002 VW GTI 4cyl Auto 129,000kms black $6800 D#30332 MJ Auto Wholesale.com 604.466.6007

All vehicles include 90 day comprehensive warranty and safety inspection with ICBC report, air conditioning, power group, automatic, antilock brakes, cruise control, am/fm stereo, tilt steering, cd player, 2.2L 4cyl.

$4,995 $5,395 $5,995 $82.00 $87.00

*

80-90 kms 3 to choose from

2007 COBALT

60-80 kms 10 to choose from

2007 COBALT

50-60 kms 11 to choose from

2007 COBALT

1990 FORD F-150 Short-box 4x4

manual; New wheels & tires; Canopy 1-yr Warr incl ! $3880. A/Cared! #10578 Auto Depot 604-727-3111

1997 EURO Van Camper or Westfalia Week-Ender $8880. Travel Van or $18,888. Winnebago V6 Camper Van? Warr D10578. 604-727-3111 Auto Depot NVan

2001 SUBARU AWD Outback LTD Wagon, lthr, dual sunroofs; alloys; 1yr Warr , $7850. Lux/#10578. 604-727-3111 Auto Depot, NVan.

#1 FREE Scrap Vehicle Removal Ask about $500 Credit!!! $$ PAID for Some 604.683.2200

30 TO CHOO FROMSE

2007 COBALT

Vans

Family Owned & Operated

VANCOUVER

*

km, Bal of Lexus warr! Loaded; Lease/Buy! D10578. 604-727-3111 Auto Depot, 1397 Welch NVan.

9173

No Wheels No Problem

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DOWNTOWN

90,000kms plus Last one!

Tiling

STONE & tile setting, embellished tile decorating. Call Steve 604-888-1285

than New! NAVI, lease or Buy? $45888. Bal 6-yr & 110km. Lexus Warranty D10578 AutoDepot 604-727-3111

2006 CHEV Cobalt LT, White, 69k, alloys, power group $6,495. Downtown.nissan.ca 604-257-8900

2007 COBALT

8309

Luxury Cars

2008 FORD EDGE Limited AWD local; V6; 50kms! 1 yr Warr incl d $22,888. Pano-roof; lux Lease or Buy? #10578 Auto Depot 604-727-3111 1397 Welch NVan

Domestic

6cy, auto silver, $4900. D #30332 MJ Auto Wholesale.com 604.466. 6007

Domestic

2013 FORD Flex AWD Limited 7-pass 16 km, loaded! $35,500. Lease/Buy! Warr! D10578. 604-727-3111 Auto Depot, 1397 Welch NVan.

9129 1989 Bentley Turbo R V8 LWB, impressive 37K kms. Service records, A/C Certified. $24,500. Call: (604) 802-2203

$49

B i n s f ro m 5 - 3 0 y a rd s a v a i l .

9125

Domestic

8255

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Bulldog Disposal Co

9125

Domestic

Rubbish Removal

bradsjunkremoval.com

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• We remove any kind of junk & recycling • Resident, Commercial, Industrial • Basement, Garage, Yard Clean-up • Old Furniture, Appliances

Home & Yard Clean Ups Residential/Commercial No Job Too Small Free Estimates- 7 Days/Wk Call Tony 604-834-2597 www.bulldogdisposal.ca

8255

WESTSIDE RUBBISH Removal. Household Junk Specialist! Friendly & Cheap. 604-266-4444

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9125

Rubbish Removal

604-RUBBISH 782-2474

AUTOMOTIVE 9110

8255

2007 FORD DIESEL F350 Super Crew 4x4 local 6-pass; 1yr Warr, lease or Buy? Sale $19,500. Exc service records; NO Accid ! Trades? 604-727-3111 Auto Depot #10578

2002 VW Jetta ’GLS’ local 4cyl & 5sp S/roof; 109Kms! 1 yr Warr, clean,local; NO Accid, $7,450. Lease or Buy? Auto Depot Nvan 604-727-3111 D# 10578

2009TOYOTA VENZA AWD JBL & NAVI pkg! Spotless in/out! Lease or Buy? Sale $22,888. Trade-up & D10578. 604-727-3111 Auto Depot

2003 PASSAT Wagon ’GLS’ 4-cyl

9515

Boats

1989 19’ Bayliner Capri Blue, 2.3 litre IO Fresh water cooled, new windshield/canvas/swim grid, trailer. $6,975. 604-837-7564

9522

RV’s/Trailers

40-50 kms 6 to choose from

1996 TOYOTA T100 4x4 manual *$82 bi-weekly financing based on 9.9% for 60 months, total paid $10,660 / $87 bi-weekly financing based on 9.9% for 60 months, total paid $11,310.

green $5800 D #30332 MJ Auto Wholesale.com 604.466.6007

5-spd, local VW Serviced! $6880. 1yr Warr, lthr & roof rack! D10578. 604-727-3111 Auto Depot, NVan.

1979 FORD M/H, 23 ft, cozy, bunk beds, fully equipped, low k, hi way usage, $4,950. 778-737-3890


FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

Y ONLIA at K uver o Vanc

r r u u o o y y r WI N B UY ca car

All new vehicles financed, leased or purchased from today through to June 30/2013 will be entered into a draw to win your purchase. S NNDD E R FE LY 2 F O JU

EN S JUNE D 30 th! Do

9

ONLY at

KIA Vancouver

ODDS WINNINOF 1 in 350G:

n’t Miss Out

See Dealer for details.

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DAYS REMAINING

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A55

THE NEW 2014s ARE HERE

THE ALL-NEW 2014s ARE HERE

Ask About Our New Car Buyers Package:

Lifetime s Oil Change Lifetime s Car Washe Lifetime vice er Airport Shuttle S Locking s Wheel Nut Only at Kia Vancouver!

Forte SX shown!

THE ALL-NEW 2014

OWN IT FROM

HWY (M/T): 5.3L/100KM CITY (M/T): 8.0L/100KM

WITH

AT

96 0 0

$

"

BI-WEEKLY

$

DOWN

%

APR

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FOR THANIKNSG US M AK

bi-weekly for 60 months, amortized over 84 months with $0 DOWN PAYMENT. Offer includes delivery, destination and fees. Offer based on 2014 Forte LX MT with a purchase price of $17,502.

#1

Rondo EX Luxury shown!

Sorento EX shown!

AVAILABLE ALL-WHEEL DRIVE

THE NEW 2014

HWY (A/T): 7.1L/100KM CITY (A/T): 10.4L/100KM

OWN IT FROM

WITH

AT

DOWN

APR

156 0 0

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THE ALL-NEW 2014

OWN IT FROM

HWY (M/T): 6.2L/100KM CITY (M/T): 9.4L/100KM

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APR

129 0 0%

$

"

BI-WEEKLY

$

SRFbCFTC qBFRQTBS fbDdQCBU 16" SI``[ O^``[J X F]K DNYm]I]NY]Y_ g`pI`m qKNYI S`pIJ X e`l[`JJ BYIKl E[H`INNI^° X q[`G SI``K]Y_ SI``K]Y_ O^``[ cNHYI`m FHm]N DNYIKN[J bi-weekly for 60 months, amortized over 84 months with $0 DOWN PAYMENT. Offer includes delivery, destination and fees. Offer based on 2014 Rondo LX MT with a purchase price of $23,482.

bi-weekly for 60 months, amortized over 84 months with $0 DOWN PAYMENT. Offer includes delivery, destination and fees. Offer based on 2014 Sorento 2.4L LX AT FWD with a purchase price of $28,482.

WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED

*5-year/100,000 km worry-free comprehensive warranty. Offer(s) available on select new 2013 models through participating dealers to qualified customers who take delivery by May 31, 2013. Dealers may sell or lease for less. Some conditions apply. See dealer for complete details. All offers are subject to change without notice. Vehicles shown may include optional accessories and

upgrades available extranew cost. pricing through includesparticipating delivery anddealers destination fees upcustomers to $1,650,who other and certain (including levies) $100for A/C charge applicable) anddealer excludes licensing,details. registration, insurance, other variable dealer administration feesinclude (up to optional $699). Other dealer and charges may available Offer(s) available on atselect 2013Allmodels to qualified takefees delivery by Aprillevies 30, 2013. Dealerstiremay sell and or lease less. Some(where conditions apply. See for complete All offers are subject to taxes changeandwithout notice. Vehicles shown may accessories upgrades be required at the time of purchase. Other lease and financing options also available. **0% purchase financing is available on select new 2013 Kia models O.A.C. Terms vary by model and trim, see dealer for complete details. Representative financing example based on 2013 Sportage LX MT FWD (SP551D) with a selling price atof extra cost.financed All pricingat includes and destination fees up to $1,650,equal other$295 feesper andpayment certain levies tire levies) and $100 A/Cofcharge (where applicable) excludes registration, insurance, other taxes, variable dealer administration fees (up to $699)between and down (if applicable andfrom unlesstheotherwise specified). $23,767, 0% APRdelivery for 36 months. 78 bi-weekly payments with a(including down payment/equivalent trade $0. Ω“Up to $4,000 cashand savings” offerlicensing, is available on the cash purchase of select new 2013 models from a participating dealer Maypayment 1–31, 2013, is deducted selling price before taxes and cannot be combined with special lease and finance offers. Some conditions apply. Cash purchase price for 2013 Optima LX MT (OP541D)/2013 Sportage LX MT FWD (SP551D)/2013 Soul 1.6L MT (SO551D) is $19,072/$19,992/$16,467 and includes a cash savings of $4,000/$2,775/$1,500 and a Clearout Bonus of $500/$1,000/$500 (which is deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes and cannot be combined with special lease and finance offers). Retailer may sell for less. ‡$4,000/$2,775/$1,500 cash savings on the cash purchase of an eligible new 2013 Optima LX MT (OP541D)/2013 Sportage LX MT FWD (SP551D)/2013 Soul 1.6L MT (SO551D) from a participating dealer between May 1-31, 2013, is deducted from the selling price before taxes and cannot be combined with special lease and finance offers. Some conditions apply. ¥Clearout Bonus of $500 is available on all cash, finance and lease offers of new 2013 Optima LX MT (OP541D)/2013 Soul 1.6L MT (SO551D) or $1,000 on 2013 Sportage LX MT FWD (SP551D) from a participating dealer between May 1–31, 2013, and is deducted from the selling price before taxes. Customers will receive a cheque in the amount of $500/$1,000 (excluding taxes) or can apply it to the selling/lease price before taxes. See your dealer for complete details. Model shown Manufacturer Suggested Retail Price for 2013 Optima SX Turbo AT (OP748D)/2013 Sportage 2.0T SX Navigation (SP759D)/2013 Soul 2.0L 4u Luxury AT (SO759D) is $35,550/$39,145/$27,345 and includes delivery and destination fees of $1,455/$1,650/$1,650 and A/C charge ($100, where applicable). Licence, insurance, applicable taxes, other fees and certain levies (including tire levies), variable dealer administration fees (up to $699) and registration fees are extra. Retailer may sell for less. Available at participating dealers. See dealer for full details. Highway/city fuel consumption is based on the 2013 Optima 2.4L GDI 4-cyl (A/T)/2013 Sportage 2.4L MPI 4-cyl (A/T)/2013 Soul 2.0L MPI 4-cyl (M/T). These updated estimates are based on the Government of Canada’s approved criteria and testing methods. Refer to the EnerGuide Fuel Consumption Guide. Your actual fuel consumption will vary based on driving habits and other factors. Information in this advertisement is believed to be accurate at the time of printing. For more information on our 5-year warranty coverage, visit kia.ca or call us at 1-877-542-2886. Kia is a trademark of Kia Motors Corporation.

The All NEW

Here to Serve You

KIA VANCOUVER

KIAVANCOUVER.COM

604-326-6868 1-888-742-3177 CORNER of CAMBIE and MARINE DRIVE • 10 minutes from Delta • 15 minutes from Surrey • 5 minutes from Richmond • 5 minutes from Burnaby • minutes from Downtown

WE SPEAK YOUR LANGUAGE: French, Romanian, Mandarin, Cantonese, Korean, Spanish, Farsi, Italian, Hindi, Punjabi, English


A56

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013

WEEKLY SPECIALS 100% BC Owned and Operated Prices Effective June 20 to June 26, 2013.

We reserve the right to limit quantities. We reserve the right to correct printing errors.

Grocery Department

Meat Department L’Ancetre Organic Cheese

Nutiva Organic Extra Virgin Coconut Oil

SAVE

33%

SAVE

assorted varieties

2/7.00

4.49

34%

product of Canada

750ml

Deli Department

product of France

47%

Valley Pride Organic Half and Half Cream

Orangina Beverage

SAVE

37%

SAVE

25%

2/3.00

Attitude Eco-Friendly Diapers

35%

2/6.00

SAVE

32%

6.49

SAVE

34%

regular or spicy

regular or chipotle

4.69

2.79

227g • product of USA

Applesnax Apple Sauce

Sophie's Kitchen Frozen Vegan Fish Dinners

assorted varieties

assorted varieties 796ml

4.99

product of Canada

20% off regular retail price

Health Care Department

250g

Organic Multigrain Bread

25.99

from .50 off

regular retail price

6” or 9” Sour Cherry Rhubarb Pie

from 1.50 off

WOW!

regular retail price

PRICING

Rice Bakery Trio O’Chocolate Biscotti 50g or Rice Banana Bread 150g

! New

1.00 off regular

SierraSil Joint Formula 14™

26.99

Inno-Vite Inno-Q-Nol AquaSorb™

32.99

30 soft gels

Inno-Q-Nol AquaSorb™ is the most bioavailable and bioactive form of CoQ10 available to maintain and support cardiovascular health. T

retail price

250g • product of Asia

90 capsules

Reduces pain and stiffness and promotes active lifestyles by aiding the body's healthy anti-inflammatory response.

WOW!

PRICING

Seminars & Events at 3248 King George Blvd, South Surrey. Wednesday, June 26, 7:00-8:30pm.

Look for our

Improve Your Health with Reflexology

WOW! PRICING

with Heike Walker, RCRT. Cost $5. Register online or call 604-541-3902.

2010, 2013 Awards. Your loyalty has helped Choices achieve these awards. Thank you!

240g

Organic Wheat Grass products are made up of nature’s most potent and powerful sources of green leafy vegetable nutrition.

regular or half loaf

2/7.00

142g • product of USA

bags or bins

Bakery Department

250g product of England

Boulder Canyon Rice Chips

Bulk Department

Amazing Grass Organic Wheat Grass

assorted varieties

12.99

Flamous Organic Falafel Chips

284g product of USA

product of Canada

Choices' Raw Energy Mix

reg 7.49

King Soba Organic Noodles

product of Canada

PRICING

20.00

Bari Mozzafina di latte Cheese

6 pack • 112-126g product of Canada

Texas or California

assorted sizes

SAVE

All of this for

4.99

2.98lb/ 6.57kg

WOW!

PRICING

WOW!

454g bag

B.C. Grown

500ml

Amy's Frozen Veggie Burgers

473ml +deposit +eco fee product of USA

2.98

Hot House On the Vine Organic Red Tomatoes from Origin Organics

product of Canada

assorted varieties

500ml product of Canada

20%

Mexican Grown

WOW!

PRICING

Roasted Chicken with a Family Size Salad

SunRype Fun Bites

2.39

SAVE

A Mouth-Watering Meal : Specialty

3.99

3.98

170g pkg product of USA

Organic Limes

4.99lb/ 11.00kg

+deposit +eco fee

SAVE

4L

product of Canada

7-11%

WOW!

PRICING

value pack

assorted varieties

4.99

SAVE

grilled, natural, buffalo and herb

Spring Creek Lean Ground Beef

Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream

skim, 1, 2 or 3.25%

Artichoke Hearts from Monterey Farms in California

product of Canada

assorted varieties

SAVE

650g

Dairyland Milk

2/7.00

200g

Efferve Sparkling Lemonade or Orangeade Beverages

Olympic Organic Yogurt

30%

4.99

34-38%

1.53kg product of USA

SAVE

11.29lb/ 24.89kg

assorted varieties

26.99

Produce Department

Double Loin Lamb Chops

Find us on Facebook: facebook.com/ChoicesMarkets Best Organic Produce

Best Grocery Store

Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/ChoicesMarkets

2010-2012

www.choicesmarkets.com Kitsilano

Cambie

Kerrisdale

Yaletown

Rice Bakery

South Surrey

2627 W. 16th Ave. Vancouver 604.736.0009

3493 Cambie St. Vancouver 604.875.0099

1888 W. 57th Ave. Vancouver 604.263.4600

1202 Richards St. Vancouver 604.633.2392

2595 W. 16th Ave. Vancouver 604.736.0301

3248 King George Blvd. South Surrey 604.541.3902

Choices at the Crest

8683 10th Ave. Burnaby 604.522.0936

Kelowna

Floral Shop

1937 Harvey Ave. Kelowna 250.862.4864

2615 W. 16th Vancouver 603-736-7522


Vancouver Courier June 21 2013