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January 2019 . Issue 8.1

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Steamboat Springs Hayden Oak Creek Yampa Photo by Gabriel T. Rogers


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January 2019

Valley Voice

Happy New Year!

Write it on your heart that every day is the best day in the year. - Ralph Waldo Emerson

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January 8th: 8-Ball League Party January 15th: 8-Ball League Team Registration Due January 22nd: Winter 8-Ball League Starts Tuesday Night: Pool League / Starts 6:30 pm Wednesday Night : Dart League / Starts 6:30 pm

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Valley Voice

January 2019

Contents It’s About High Time

Page 4

Rep. Dylan Roberts

Page 5

Paper or Plastic

Page 6

Reach for the Stars

Page 7

The Slave Who Opened Freedom’s Door

Page 8

Artist Profile: James Morgan

Page 9

What Goes There? Part I

Page 10

The Omega 3 “Fad”

Page 11

First Words, Missed

Page 11

By Scott L. Ford

By Brodie Farquhar By Scott L. Ford

By Dagny McKinley

By Ellen & Paul Bonnifield By Conner Shields By Karen Vail

By Dr. David S. Criste

Publisher/Art Director: Matt Scharf mattscharf1@gmail.com

By Francis Conlon

Business Manager:

Scott Ford

Hayden Round Up

Page 12

Sales:

Eric Kemper valleyvoicesales@gmail.com

New Ventures, Old Ways

Page 17

Event Calendar:

Eric Kemper valleyvoicesales@gmail.com

Happy New Year/ Single Types

Page 18

Valley Voice is published monthly and distributed on the last Wednesday of each month. Please address letters, questions, comments or concerns to: Valley Voice, LLC, P.O. Box 770743 or come by and see us at 1125 Lincoln Ave, Unit 2C, Steamboat Springs, CO 80477. Or contact Matt Scharf: 970-846-3801. Scott Ford: 970-819-9630. Website www.valleyvoicecolorado.com. Subscription rate is $40 per year (12 issues). All content © 2019 Valley Voice, L.L.C. No portion of the contents of this publication may be reproduced in any manner without the written permission from the Valley Voice.

Official Fine Print

Advertisers assume full responsibility for the entire content and subject matter of their ads. In the event of error or omission in the advertisement, the publisher’s sole responsibility shall be to publish the advertisement at a later date. Advertisements and articles are accepted and published upon the representation that the author, agency and/or advertiser is authorized to publish the entire contents and subject matter thereof. The author, agency, and/ or advertiser will indemnify and save Valley Voice, LLC harmless from all claims and legal action resulting from the contents of the articles or advertisements including claims or suits resulting from libel, defamation, plagiarism, rights to privacy and copyright infringements.

By Brodie Farquhar By Eric Kemper

By Mr Helpful M.D.

Four Fold Way Page 19 By Wolf Bennett

The Dawn of a Better Day

Page 20

What’s in Those Supplements

Page 21

By Patrick Curran By Monica Yager

Musical Rooms Page 21 By Aimee Kimmey

An Old Coal Miner/ Part II

Page 22

The Psyche of the Winter Driver

Page 22

With a Little Help from Our Friends

Page 23

By Ted Crook

By Mike Baran

By Shaney McCoy

You Are Safe Page 23 By Joan Remy

Calendar of Events By Eric Kemper

Page 24

Yepelloscopes Page 26 By Chelsea Yepello

Comics Page 27

Rants... Being old enough to have a Medicare Card… The proliferation of serious traffic accidents. No credit for being first if you arrive in an ambulance, or worse… A divided country… Police using the Hayden Holiday Stroll to patrol for revenue… Driving backwards through the drive-thru… Working while everyone else plays… Porch Light Wars… Old school doctor house calls...

Raves... Ski Patrol and Search and Rescue crews. They do hard work in even harder conditions… Routt County Road and Bridge. For keeping the county roads clear and safe… Receiving the Medicare Card in the mail Equal enforcement of the laws… Randy Baumgarder retiring. Good riddance… A new year full of promise and hope… When good friends visit… Empty pockets... Two Wheel Beasts: CR 500 or KX 500!

Say What?... Don’t do snow angels in a dog park. Beer doesn’t make you fat. It makes you lean… against table and chairs. “Cycling is the opiate of youth” – Eddie Merckx Fish and company spoil in three days. Oh Norton, you are just one up, four down. 30 million for a lift. “Will you change the channel?” “Heck yeah it’s flannel.”

We go to press January 28th for the February 2019 issue! Submissions always welcome!

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Rated 5 Stars for Patient Satisfaction www.SteamboatEmergency.com And now we welcome the new year. Full of things that have never been.—Rainer Maria Rilke


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January 2019

Valley Voice

Organic . Healthy . Fun

Council Voices

It’s About High Time By Scott L. Ford/ City Council Member - At Large After Five Years It is Time for a Change in Steamboat Springs Regulating Retail Marijuana Dispensaries Similar to Retail Alcohol Outlets

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In November 2012, the Citizens of Colorado voted for Amendment 64 which legalized the recreational use and sale of marijuana. In the State of Colorado, the amendment passed 55% to 45%. In Steamboat Springs it passed by 69%.

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The supporters of the amendment represented that the intent was to legalize the sale of small quantities of recreational marijuana, to the degree possible, the same as retail alcohol sales. Although the amendment ballot language does not reference “same as alcohol,” the intent was and has been well understood. Although the amendment passed in November of 2012, the ability to begin selling marijuana through licensed retail dispensaries could not occur until January 1, 2014. The reason for the delay in implementation was that it was going to take some time to put in place the regulatory and licensing infrastructure both at the state and local government levels. Colorado lawmakers had until July 1st of 2013 to come up with the state’s regulations, thus allowing local governments from July until October to adopt their own rules. One of the provisions in the state regulations was that existing licensed medical marijuana dispensaries were to have the first opportunity to be licensed recreational retail dispensaries. In Steamboat Springs back in 2013, there were only three licensed medical marijuana dispensaries. The state regulations did provide that local government could approve additional retail dispensary licenses, but only after July 1, 2014. Steamboat Springs City Council on September 3, 2013 approved an ordinance regulating retail marijuana dispensaries. That ordinance provided for the licensing of only three retail dispensaries. The ordinance established land use requirements in the Community Development Code for buffers that a retail dispensary needed to be 1,000 feet or more (as the crow flies) from day cares, schools and parks. In addition, retail dispensaries were only allowed in areas of the city zoned Industrial, Community Service or Community Commercial, and all subject to conditional use approval.

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For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

The buffering requirements has made it geographically very difficult to locate a dispensary in the south part of town. Another layer of location restriction is that a retail marijuana dispensary cannot be adjacent to any area in the city zoned residential. Currently the City’s marijuana ordinance requirements for retail marijuana dispensaries are different from what applies to retail alcohol outlets. Under retail alcohol regulations, there is no buffers regarding parks. The buffers for day cares and schools is only 500ft. In addition, the buffer distance is measured by using direct pedestrian access vs. as the crow flies. Also, under state rules for retail alcohol outlets, the residential zoning adjacency restriction does not exist. On December 11th, City Council held a work session and one of the topics that evening was current retail marijuana restrictions. The goal of council that evening was that after almost five years of experience with retail marijuana dispensaries, it was time to begin moving toward aligning its regulations to more closely align with that of retail alcohol outlets. Council gave staff the following guidance that they would like to see in a future ordinance: • Remove the three-retail licensed dispensary limitation. Like retail alcohol outlets, there would be no limit on the number of retail marijuana dispensaries. • Reduce the buffer zones currently at 1,000 feet to 500 feet for day cares, schools and parks. • Allow marijuana stores in the downtown and Gondola (Ski Area Base) zone districts • Remove the adjacency restriction for residential zones. • Include minimum distance separation of 1,500 feet between retail dispensaries. Under state law this is the same minimum distance separation new retail alcohol stores must have from each other. • Update the Community Development Code buffer measurements to use direct pedestrian access methodology, making it consistent with the State’s liquor code. Currently, City Council is scheduled to discuss these changes in a work session scheduled for February 12th. During a work session, Council does not vote on motions, resolutions or ordinances. Council will discuss a draft of a new marijuana ordinance but will only give staff direction. Based on the outcome of the work session, City Council could see an ordinance significantly changing how retail marijuana is regulated in Steamboat for first reading, likely in March.

(Although I am a member of City Council my opinions are my own and may not be shared by my fellow council members.)


Valley Voice

January 2019

5

Politically Speaking

Rep. Dylan Roberts a Rising Star in Colorado Democratic House By Brodie Farquhar

As for Rural Affairs, Roberts said Duran wants him to be “a strong voice for rural Colorado,” based on his experience and background.

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“We want Colorado to be water smart and to extend broadband Internet service into rural Colorado,” he said. With an over-appropriated Colorado River Basin, water will be a huge issue. “Equal access to broadband throughout the state is essential to economic development,” he added.

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The biggest legislative task Roberts is taking on is planning for, and then implementing, a health care public option for Colorado residents. The idea, said Roberts, is to create a state-backed insurance option that can be sold on the market, along with private plans that can offer ACA-compliant coverage at a lower cost and give residents more choices when buying health insurance.

Dylan Roberts may well emerge as a major player in Colorado’s 2019 legislative session. A native of Steamboat Springs, Roberts is a deputy district attorney in Eagle County and was tapped in late 2017 to replace Diane Mitch Bush as Democratic representative in House District 26, covering Routt and Eagle counties. A year later, he won that seat by a 60-34 percent margin in the Nov. 6, 2018 elections. In the weeks before the upcoming 2019 Colorado Legislature, he has been elected by his House Democratic peers to serve as chairman of the Capital Development Committee, and appointed by House Speaker Crisanta Duran to serve as chairman of the Rural Affairs Committee. He’ll also serve on the House Judiciary Committee. “I’ll be the first Western Slope chair in quite a while, for Capital Development. That committee is responsible for campus development, development of state parks, or buying lands for conservation,” he said in a December interview. “I want to make sure the Western Slope is treated fairly – such as Mesa, Ft. Lewis or Western.”

Beau Mills on a KTM Snow Bike

Essentially, Roberts said, “it will be run by the state, there will be no profit motive for the plan. Data shows that will create a much more affordable options for Coloradans and their families – especially for those who live in Western Colorado.”

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If passed by the Democratic-majority Legislature and signed by governor-elect Jared Polis, the public health care option would be the first of its kind in the nation. Asked if a public option would inevitably lead to singlepayer, universal health care, Roberts said the public option would be state-run and apply only to Colorado. “Singlepayer could only function at a national level,” he said. In the last session, Roberts sponsored a dozen bills – six of which advanced to the desk of Governor Hickenlooper and were signed into law. The other six were all bottled up by the Republican-led Senate. Those six are likely to emerge again, said Roberts. Some will not be changed, while others will be tweaked to greater or lesser degrees. Those bills focused on transparency for insulin drug pricing, improving protections for water quality from mineral mining, improving the Arbitration Services Provider Transparency Act, providing financial assistance to those struggling with health plan costs, and extending prosecution fellowships from 12 to 15 months.

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One of the greatest delusions in the world is the hope that the evils in this world are to be cured by legislation.—Thomas Reed


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January 2019

Valley Voice

Your Money - Your Life Located at Neste Auto Glass

Great Prices, Services & Parts

Paper or Plastic? The Answer is Clearly Plastic (Debt or Credit)

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By Scott L. Ford

programs, Millennials are becoming very comfortable with debt. These enticements must be working because during 2018 the percentage of Millennials that have outstanding credit card balances carrying over from the prior month exceeds the percentage that have student loans.

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One of the things we likely will see during 2019 in the Steamboat Springs area is that at least one or more restaurants will stop accepting cash for payment. WHAT THE HEY! Whatever happened to “Cash is king?” Well, cash will still be king in some transactions, but increasingly in the food service industry it has been in the process of getting dethroned. “Plastic” in the form of debit or credit card transactions represent the majority source of payment. In 2017 Total System Services (TSYS), a debit / credit card processor, conducted an extensive survey sampling over 1,000 consumers. What they found is that consumers use either a debit or credit card for 75% of their “retail” spending in the following categories: Department Stores Discount Stores Gas Stations Coffee Shops Supermarkets Dine-In Restaurants Fast Food Restaurants Debit card is the preferred payment method for daily purchases at the gas station, supermarket and discount store. Credit card continues to be the preferred way to pay at department stores, most likely due to people preferring to use it for higher-value purchases. Preferred payment types varied by income, too. The TSYS survey found that people with more than $75,000 of annual income preferred credit cards, while those making less preferred debit. More than half of all credit card users use their cards for all their everyday spending. The research is also showing that Millennials, once credit-shy, have gotten over it. Enticed by low interest rates, no annual fee and reward

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Why will we see the move away from cash? Credit card companies do not automatically see each other as competition. However, they all see cash as their top competitor. Every time we swipe or insert the card – the processing company charges the merchant a fee. Depending on the volume of sales a merchant has, it can range from about 2.9 to 4.3 percent of the value of the purchase. Merchants with the highest volume of sales get the lower charge. These processing fees are viewed by the merchant as a cost of doing business and is reflected in their prices. I For a restaurant owner, it takes a lot more work to keep o track of cash. Counting all the cash, checking it against A receipts, sorting it, storing it, and taking it to the bank for C deposit all take time. The accuracy in every step of this O process is paramount. Another benefit to the restaurant b owner of going cashless is that it reduces the opportunity r for theft by either employees or outside thieves. B c There will be some folks that will protest this move to plastic only. They will point to the small print on all US I currency that states, “THIS NOTE IS LEGAL TENDER FOR D ALL DEBTS PUBLIC AND PRIVATE.” Essentially, federal A law requires people to take cash, right? b i No so fast, Sherlock. If the ‘transaction’ is instantaneous, t then anyone selling anything can refuse to take cash be- v cause no debt has been incurred. Most retail store trans- f actions fall into this category. However, if the payment is to settle a debt (a meal in a restaurant), then it is illegal O for the business to refuse cash. They are not, however, C obliged to give the payer that insists on using cash any change!! So, if someone wants to play the “You must take cash – it’s the law,” game, they better have a wide variety of bills to avoid leaving a big tip.

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Valley Voice

January 2019

7

Art in the ‘Boat

Reach for the Stars By Dagny McKinley Photos courtesy of Steamboat Creates

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In Steamboat, arts have been woven into the tapestry of our community since the first settlers arrived. The Depot Art Building has been home to the Steamboat Springs Arts Council, now known as Steamboat Creates, since 1972. Our flourishing creative scene can be credited to Steamboat Creates founders Eleanor Bliss and Carol Finoff who recognized the importance of expression through art. Because of their vision and passion, Steamboat’s creative community is poised to make a giant leap forward. In 2017, Steamboat was designated a certified Creative District by the Colorado Office of Economic Development. As a result of that designation, Steamboat Creates has been working feverishly to advocate for and grow creative industries. Community support has helped guide our direction, given us encouragement to help grow Routt County’s vibrant arts and culture scene and pushed creativity forward. Over the last year, the community’s belief in Steamboat Creates has resulted in: * Arts and Culture being named one of the top four economies in Routt County * New public art (fabulous murals) * An analysis of arts sector jobs for economic growth and artist housing

* Lost Art Revival festival celebrating Steamboat’s history & heritage * The launch of SteamboatCreates.org, a hub for arts & culture

* Scholarships for every Yampa Valley kid in need to attend Young at Art Creativity Camps

* Record participation in the Winter Carnival Snow Sculpture competition

* Expansion of Lost Art Revival, a festival celebrating Steamboat’s history and heritage, to a city-wide event

* The Riverwalk collective debuting their art in the Depot Gallery beginning January 2019 * Continued stewardship and investment in the historic train depot. *And this is just the beginning! None of this could be achieved without incredible and inspired board members, the creative community, volunteers and patrons of the arts. Each year Steamboat Creates recognizes people in our community who have made an outstanding contribution to the arts. 2018’s awardees were: • Board Member of the Year: Matt Eidt • Artist of the Year: Chula Beauregard chulabeauregard.com/

* Creative placemaking, reinventing the Yampa River Queen public space in West Lincoln Park

• Creative Leadership: Celina Taylor Steamboat Arts Academy steamboatartsacademy.com

* Steamboat Creates taking over management of First Friday Artwalk with new creative opportunities

• Volunteers of the Year: Margaret Kottman & Sandra White

* Our ability to serve 14 cultural nonprofits, 56 creative businesses and 180 independent artists * 256 Young at Art campers (51 scholarship students) inspired to share their unique voice * 45 years of Art in the Park & 36 years of Cabaret

Community support will make the following possible in 2019

* A new vision for West Lincoln Park (former home of the River Queen) by October 2019 * Energy efficient lighting at the Depot to better serve our community * Sustainable live-work/maker spaces for creatives * A voice for arts and culture at the city and state levels As Steamboat Creates launches this new and exciting phase in the creative life of Steamboat Springs there is no doubt creativity will flourish in the Yampa Valley. Together we can reach for the stars and beyond. Visit www.SteamboatCreates.org to find out more.

As Steamboat Creates moves into this new era, they are guided by a strong belief in the intrinsic value of the arts that was cemented as part of our legacy by Bliss and Finoff. Steamboat Creates serves artists and creatives, teachers and students. 2019 is a new beginning for the arts in Steamboat! And whether you are a practicing artist, an aspiring artist or an art appreciator, Steamboat Creates is committed to partnering with you to discover what sparks your passion and feeds your spirit.

Life begets life. Energy creates energy. It is by spending oneself that one becomes rich.—Sarah Bernhardt


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January 2019

Valley Voice

Bonnifield Files

The Slave Who Opened Freedom’s Door

By Ellen & Paul Bonnifield

Please excuse us for breaking from our thirty-year pattern of writing articles with local themes and significance, but the story of Phillis Wheatley just seemed to need repeating in the Valley Voice. We’ll be back to normal next month.

Her real name is lost somewhere in the pages of African history. The frail child is known as Phillis Wheatley – the name of her ship and her owner’s name. Phillis’s new owner Susanna, a deeply committed Presbyterian, held reservations concerning slavery. So, Susanna allowed the new servant a great deal of freedom. Mary, one of John and Susanna’s four children and a brilliant girl in her own right, began teaching English, Latin, and the Bible to Phillis. We can never know the bond formed between the women, but in a historical time when women, white or black, master or slave, had few political, economic, or social rights, the pair formed a union that slowly changed the course of history. A few years after arriving at Boston, Phillis, now a skilled poet, wrote, “On Being Brought from Africa to America:”

Twas mercy brought me from my Pagan land Taught my benighted soul to understand That there’s a God, that there’s a Savior too; . . . Their Col[or] is diabolic die, Remember, Christians, Negroes, black as Cain May be refin’d and join the Angelic train. History knows the event as the Boston Massacre where the British soldiers opened fire on Colonial protesters. Phillis Wheatley’s poetry first immortalized the fallen heroes in the cause of liberty. The slave ship Phillis, with its human cargo, anchored in the bay off Charleston, South Carolina. In the hole, a seven-year-old girl managed to survive the storm-tossed crossing, but she was so weak and frail that no one would buy her. Finishing its business, Phillis sailed on to Boston to fill its cargo space with rum and again sail the “Triangle Trade Route.” Rum from Puritan New England was traded for enslaved African prisoners. From Africa, slave ships sailed to either the British colonies or the Caribbean islands, and the final leg reached north to Boston. The Phillis carried the slave girl to Boston where the moderately wealthy and highly respected John Wheatley purchased her to serve his frail wife.

On the Affray on King Street Long as in Freedom’s Cause the wise contend Dear to our unity shall Fame extend; While to the World, the letter’s Stone shall tell How Caldwell Attack, Gray, and Mav’rick fell . . . “Amazing” described her poetry, but how amazing was it? European thinkers, including Thomas Jefferson, were convinced dark colored people were not fully human. They were a subspecies incapable of rational thought, creative art, or political analysis; therefore, they resembled oxen, horses, and mules, – owned, worked, and bought or sold property. What about this African slave girl?

Susanna invited guests and called upon Phillis to recite her poetry. John had the wealth and position, both political and religious, to require respect. Sometime in the early fall of 1772, while Phillis was seeking subscribers to her book of poetry, a group of Boston’s leading men met to examine her. Their ranks included Governor Thomas Hutchinson and Reverend Samuel Cooper, seven ordained ministers, three poets, eighteen Harvard graduates, and eventual royalists and signers of the Declaration of Independence. If ever a blue ribbon group assembled, it met in Boston. The stakes had never been higher. A small slave girl, less than ten years out of Africa, was being examined to determine if Africans were actually humans or a subspecies. We don’t know the questions asked or who asked them. We know the inquisition was lengthy and included questions on Latin, English, history, the Bible, and philosophy. She demonstrated her creative writing skill. Phillis convinced her examiners that she embodied all the artistic, creative, and Biblical skills of white men. On that October day in 1772, Phillis Wheatley proved Africans were complete humans. A mortal blow struck slavery, although it took a long time to die. Phillis passed the test, yet no one came forward to underwrite publication of her twenty-two-page book. John and Susanna Wheatley refused defeat, although it cost a pretty penny. John’s son Nathaniel and Phillis sailed to England where John had contacts and influence. Shortly after arriving, they met the evangelical George Whitefield and the Countess of Huntington. The Countess readily became the poet’s patron. The publisher wrote on September 13, 1773, “The book here proposed for publication displays perhaps one of the greatest instances of pure, unassisted genius that the world ever produced. . . .The author is a native of Africa, and left not the dark part of the habitable system, till she was eight years old.” Soon, Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral, by Phillis Wheatley; Negro Servant to Mr. John Wheatley, of Boston, in New England, Printer A. Bell, MDCCLXXIII, appeared on the streets of London and Boston. Phillis was the first African slave to publish a book successfully. Although the stay in England was cut short, she met and impressed several influential men including Benjamin

A diagram of a slave ship, similar to the one that carried Phillis Wheatley on her Trans-Atlantic journey to America.

For those who live here and for those who wish they did.


Valley Voice

January 2019

9

Mainstreet Voices

Artist Profile: James Morgan By Conner Shields Franklin and Voltaire. Briefly, on her return to Boston, the future held promise. While General Washington camped near Boston during the early months of the Revolution, Phillis penned and mailed:

There might be a massive landscape in front of them, but there’s also a small but equally awe inspiring landscape right at their feet. Take James’ oil and linen painting “Black Sage and Pronghorn Fawn,”for example. An impressive piece by all standards, however, most people would walk right past this in the wild without a second glance. To them, they would just see a bush, nothing special about it, and almost certainly wouldn’t see the little fawn hiding. It’s only when an observer stops and takes the time to look closely do they notice the fine details hiding in plain sight.

To His Excellency George Washington Celestial choir! Enthron’d in realms of light, Columbia’s scenes of glorious toils I write. While freedom’s cause her anxious breast alarms, She flashes dreadful in refulgent arms. See mother earth offspring’s fate bemoan And nations gaze at scenes before unknown! . . . Phillis later met with General Washington. Imagine a proud Virginia slave owner meeting with a slave woman! He later complimented her in writing. Hardship descended on the Wheatley family during the war, forcing them to flee Boston. When Susanna died, her death affected Phillis similar to losing her own mother, not a master. In the turmoil, she failed to find a patron for her second book of poetry leaving it unpublished. John freed her and she returned to Boston. Despite the hardship, she held to the silent prayer for real freedom. In the poem “On the Death of General Wooster,” we catch a glimpse of her hidden fear.

Divine acceptance with th’ Almighty mind – While yet (O deed Ungenerous!) The disgrace And hold in bondage Afric’s blameless race? After Independence was won and liberty was in fashion, America’s liberty clearly did not include Africa’s blameless race. Yet, Phillis held to the quest for freedom, equality, and love of country.

Liberty and Peace Auspicious Heaven shall fill with fav’ring Gales Where e’er Columbia Spreads her swelling Sails; To every Realm Shall her Charms display, And Heavenly Freedom spread her golden Ray. (Commentators believe she was the first poet to describe the U.S. as “Columbia.” She spoke of Columbia in several poems.) On returning to Boston in 1778, Phillis married John Peters, a freed slave who ran a small grocery store and dressed and strutted like a gentleman. It is not clear if he abandoned Phillis after the birth of their child or if he was sent to debtor’s prison. Either way, he was gone and she endured a hard, degrading life. Despite her efforts to save her only living child, tragedy came. Soon afterward, her poetry was nearly lost to history. Yet, her greatest legacy will never die. Black people are not a subspecies. Phillis Wheatley proved beyond doubt that they are as intelligent and creative as white men are.

To the average person, a view of a frozen river is just that; a frozen river. To a man such as James Morgan, there is so much more to that view than just an icy waterway. For as long as he can remember, James has been an artist, and considers himself fortunate to be able to practice his craft for almost 39 years. James’ works of art can be found in galleries from New York City, to Santa Fe, to Denver, and now his spectacular pieces have found their way into the halls of Steamboat Art Museum as part of the “Moments in the Wild” exhibit. These striking images can be viewed at the Steamboat Art Museum from December 7th until April 13th. In addition, The Steamboat Art Museum, in conjunction with Yampatika, have created an upcoming interactive exhibit featuring skins, skulls and bones of the wildlife featured in the painting, allowing people of all ages to delve deeper into the paintings with a hands-on program. This program will be held on January 23rd and is free of charge. Growing up in a family of outdoorsmen, hunters and fishermen, James developed an appreciation for the natural world around him, and gained a keen eye for the often overlooked aspects of nature. According to James, “people are in such a hurry to see the big things, that they miss the little stuff.”

Cannabis Dispensary

James’ artistic focus is primarily centered on wildlife, but will often paint natural landscapes and the environment of wildlife. When it comes to painting preferences, his favorite thing to paint is whatever he’s working on at that moment. Basically, if it strikes a cord with him, he paints it. In order to capture the images in his paintings, he employs a variety of techniques, ranging from taking countless photographs to use for reference, making small sketches of the patterns he sees, and sometimes when he’s getting bogged down in the studio, he’ll use the old-fashioned method of taking an easel and a set of brushes into the great outdoors and paint there. With 39 years of experience, and art galleries across the U.S., James uses his unparalleled skill to bring the overlooked aspects of nature into the light. He hopes that when people see his work, they too will take a little bit of time out of their day to stop and appreciate the finer things in nature. Steamboat Art Museum is open Tuesday- Saturday 11 AM - 6 PM. Sunday by appointment only. Admission is always free. For more information on programs and exhibits at SAM, visit their website: sam@steamboatartmuseum.org

Cold enough for the Yukon Cornelius

Brewery of the Month:

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970-879-7355 Thursday - Saturday: 10am - 11pm Sunday - Wednesday: 10am - 10pm

A great poet is the most precious jewel of a nation.—Ludwig van Beethoven


10

January 2019

Valley Voice

‘Boat Almanac

What Goes There? Part I By Karen Vail

Photos by Karen Vail

Mouse tracks in snow. The snow is smooth as silk as you glide along a backcountry trail. Then a track appears, marring the velvety surface. Ooh, on to the fun of deciphering the story of “who goes there?” When it comes to reading tracks, there is “simple” and there is insanely complex. We will lean toward the “simple” in this article, and will also focus on winter, which is different than summer tracking. With those caveats, are you ready?? Tracking, to me, is reading the story of an animal and its relationship to its surroundings and stimuli. What an opportunity to enter an animal’s world of feeding, napping, socializing, play and more through interpreting their tracks and signs! Before we get to the nitty gritty, let’s see how we approach the process of tracking. Again, there you are gliding along the trail on Rabbit Ears through the spruce-fir forest when you spy the track. The most important thing to notice at this point is not the individual track, but the habitat. Look around. Notice the vegetation (or lack of) to give you clues about what food and shelter might be available for the animal. In the spruce – fir forest there will typically be different animals, and often very specific animals, than in, say, the mountain shrublands. Yes, often the animal is just passing through that habitat, but habitat is a good place to start. OK, now take a look at the tracks moving across the snow. Can you actually pick out an individual track, count every toe and see the fur between the toes? Hah! Good luck with that in our lovely fluffy snow. Rarely, in winter, can we get a detailed single track, which is technically referred to as a print. But we do have a series of tracks to follow that form a definitive track pattern. Take a good look all the way along the trail, as far as you can see it in either

direction, and notice any variations in the track pattern. Often an animal will change gaits as it emerges from a forest into a meadow, or if it sees a tasty tidbit or is frightened by something. By following the track pattern, the typical gait(s) for that animal begins to emerge. The gait is how the animal moves its legs and body to leave the series of track patterns. Think of how you move. You walk, run, jump, and if you were to look behind at the tracks you were leaving through these various gaits, you would be seeing your track pattern. Now think how differently you might move over smooth ground compared to a foot of snow. This is where visualizing animal movement comes in handy, and having knowledge of the shape and size of an animal (how long its legs are, how wide its body is, etc.) can really help with defining track patterns. In my first tracking course, the instructor had us on the floor moving like a squat, short-legged porcupine, or a slinky, long-legged coyote. Out in the field there is only one motion that created that particular track pattern. Work through the puzzle step by step and enjoy getting acquainted with your newfound friend. Look for these field guides to help. “Field Guide to Tracking Animals in Snow” by Louise R Forrest (c1988, Stackpole Books) is excellent in winter (it is, unfortunately out of print), “The Tracker’s Field Guide” by James C Lowery (c2006, Falcon Guides), “ A Field Guide to Mammal Tracking in North America” by James Halfpenny (1986, Johnson Books), “Tracking and the Art of Seeing; How to Read Animal Tracks and Sign” by Paul Rezendes (c1992, Firefly Books) and “Scats and Tracks of the Rocky Mountains” by James Halfpenny (c1998, Falcon Guides) offer a good variety of information. I am going to simplify the track patterns here, so if you are a more advanced tracker, my apologies. Alternating Pattern (Diagonal Walk) consists of evenly spaced single or slightly offset prints. This is often called perfect stepping or direct register because the hind foot is placed directly over, or sometimes behind, the front foot. Often in shallow snow the hind foot will fall slightly ahead, behind or to the side of the front imprint, creating an offset alternating track. But in deep snow the animal saves energy by placing its hind foot directly in the front imprint. In snow, most of the alternating tracks you encounter are animals walking, or, occasionally, trotting. and includes members of the dog, cat and hooved animals (rarely a badger in winter). To narrow it down, take a look at the distance between each imprint on the same side (toe to toe on the right or left side). This is the stride and often indicates the length of the animal’s leg. Longerlegged animals (coyote, elk, moose, etc.) will have longer spaces between imprints (longer strides), and shorterlegged animals (skunks, beavers, porcupines, etc.) will have closer spacing.

For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

Bear tracks in town. The Two-By Track Pattern is where two tracks appear close together, either side by side or slightly offset, followed by a distinct space, then another track pair, etc. Two-by tracks are the typical pattern for my favorite animals to follow in the winter: the mustelids, or weasel family members. These are often playful, curious animals that create erratic, crazy trails across the snow landscape and include the mink and river otter in and near waterways, pine marten in and near conifer forests and our wily weasel in open meadows. The two-by track is made by leaping forward off both hind feet, landing with both front feet together, then as they begin their next bound leading with their front feet the back feet land in the front feet imprints. Voila, 2 imprints showing, for the most part, the back feet. Occasionally, especially in deep snow, the tracks are connected by a trough made by the animal’s body, creating a dumbbell track. The curiosity and intense hunting drive of weasel family members creates trails under logs and disappearing into the snowpack for several feet, where they pop up again, bounding away in a crazy zig zag. The playful nature of river otters is revealed in slides down embankments and group chases over river ice with long slides along the ice. Other animals can mimic a two-by track pattern, especially in deep snow. Mice, voles, tree squirrels chipmunks and tree-dwelling birds make tracks where they are paired side by side. Except for the hopping bird, these animals are actually hopping and creating four-by tracks that merge in the soft snow into two-by tracks. Of course birds offer other fun surprises such as wing marks, and interesting landing and taking off marks.


Valley Voice

January 2019

Another Closer Look

The Omega 3 “Fad”: A Good Thing By Dr. David S. Criste

11

Poetry

First Words, Missed By Francis Conlon

My walk now finds first words missing, Your ear buds’ blog shuts out our meeting, Is this almost a civil dissing? Once a smile was a good greeting, Proof for sure I am not alone, Face to face a silent seeking. Now with electronics I seem to roam, Isolated a while in these days, Wandering feelings in an empty home.

Elk tracks on Emerald Mountain. Four-by Track Patterns tend to fall into two categories in winter snow; the hoppers and the lopers/gallopers. Four-by hoppers create a group of four imprints with a large interval space, then another group of four. These animals tend to have large muscular hind legs that propel them forward into a jump where they land first on their smaller front feet then bring the hind feet around the outside, and ahead of, the front feet (occasionally one back foot can land on one of the front foot impressions). Tree dwellers (squirrels) tend to place their front feet side by side and ground dwellers (hares and rabbits) tend to place their front feet at a diagonal. A mammal loping or galloping can create a group of four with a gap, but the grouping of four will be stretched out, not in the typical hopper pattern. Mammals rarely lope or gallop in winter snow unless they are frightened or possibly chasing prey. So, there are the basic track patterns. You have looked over your track pattern on Rabbit Ears and notice a grouping of four with a large gap, very large hind feet with smaller front feet at a diagonal. Other things to note would be the movement of the animals. Here the track is very direct from tree stand to tree stand, not in the erratic weasel crazy loopiness. There is no digging or burrowing, but when you follow the trail over to the forest edge the track pattern abruptly changes. Look around and chances are you could find browsing on the conifer branches near the ground, and looky there, two or three small round brown balls, just like Coco Puff cereal. Here you have a four-by track bee lining it from conifer stand to conifer stand, the animals browsing on low hanging conifer branches and leaving little scat presents. Guesses? You found a snowshoe hare. Lucky you!! Get out there and discover those tracks!! I’ll see you on the trails.

The essential fatty acids, also known as Omega threes and Omega sixes, are extremely important nutrients that are ESSENTIAL for nervous system health and proper function. This is not an exaggeration, nor is it hyperbole. Researchers have known for many decades that these fatty acids are absolutely necessary for the brain and nervous system to function properly. Because these fatty acids are not manufactured in our bodies, they must be taken in from the outside as food or in the form of a nutritional supplement. The research has shown us that these fatty acids are not interchangeable. They must be present in our bodies in an optimum ratio of 3 to 1: Omega 6 to Omega 3. Since Omega sixes are from plants, they are more prevalent in the diet of a person who consumes carbohydrates. Omega threes come from fish, making them less easy to obtain. The RATIO of Omega sixes to Omega threes is THE crucial factor. The ratio of Omega sixes to omega threes should not be more than 3 to 1. The majority of people who have their blood tested are wildly outside this range because of the over consumption of carbohydrates and under consumption of Omega three rich foods. The lack of omega threes causes neuron (nerve cell) death, and nervous system dysfunction. This process leads to diseases of the nervous system i.e. Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, and Parkinson’s disease. There are approximately two hundred recent, peer reviewed, published studies that show us that there is an overwhelming need for Omega threes to be added to the diet of the majority of people who are blood tested for these essential nutrients.

We pass each other, a zombie phase, Unseen persona, no soul is listening, The setting is foggy: we merely gaze. I’ll touch a self in a moment glistening, Believing a greeting has a place, To invite the other person, insisting. And install again a social grace, A solipsist, alone, can have no space. (So for this day I still say hello, As we glide, pass and go.)

The “LOCAL’S” choice for Personalized Health Care

Winter toys, sleds and snow shovels. Coloring books and puzzles for those snow days. Scrapers and gloves. Oh, how about vitamins and immune boosters plus Flu Solutions!

There is also a significant body of peer-reviewed research showing that reversal of neuro-degeneration is possible. The return to nervous system and brain health is possible by limiting carbohydrate intake in addition to increasing the intake of Omega threes.

In business or in life, don’t follow the wagon tracks too closely.—H. Jackson Brown, Jr.


12

January 2019

Hayden Round Up By Brodie Farquhar

Hayden residents can plan on many more opportunities for healthy activities such as walking, biking, hiking and horseback riding in the future. Town council has approved a three-year plan for building a modern, six-foot wide sidewalk on both sides of Hwy. 40, from one end of town to the other. In addition, Peabody Coal has donated an old railroad spur and 200 acres on the southeast side of town, to create a four-mile trail. The spur runs out to an old tipple site south of the racetrack, where an old coal mine used to load coal. Peabody workers have removed the rails, but won’t have to reclaim the raised railroad berm. Town Manager Matt Mendisco said the two projects will enhance exercise opportunities and safety for residents who want to walk along the main street of town or enjoy the new trail opportunity on the east southeast side of town. “We know from other communities that encouraging pedestrian access can improve health and economic activity,” he said, as much as five to six percent.

Valley Voice

The proposed sidewalks are part and parcel of facade improvement plans for Hayden. A revolving loan fund can assist business and home-owners who just need a bit more money for paint jobs, signage improvements and more. He said the concept is based on a Paint/Clean/Fixit programs in Oak Creek, Fairplay and Gypsum. Highway stripping and bike lanes are also planned for the Hwy. 40 corridor. Mendisco said there’s also plans for a real estate accelerator program – bringing together owners of vacant lots with other players, such as town officials, bankers and developers. The idea is to brainstorm about what Hayden needs, he said, and see who’s interested in development, and where. Mendisco said he’s heard nothing about whether anyone’s interested in the 10 acres of the current middle/high school site, which will become vacant when the students, teachers and administrators move to a new site adjoining the elementary school site in 2020. “My advice is to start planning now, because development of the current site will be complicated,” he said. It will take both time and money to develop plans. There’s a real opportunity that the demolition of the current school site could dove-tail nicely with development plans.

For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

Hayden Schools Development of final design plans for the new middle/ high school complex have about hit the halfway mark, said Hayden Superintendent Christine Sinner. About 50 community members have viewed the overall schematics and it looks like construction ground can be broken, as planned, in March, with an opening set for the fall of 2020. See drawing below. Meanwhile, the school district is actively considering a four-day school week. Research from other schools with a four-day week shows that it increases attendance of students and allows for greater professional development for teachers. Some 104 of the 178 school districts in Colorado are on four-day schedules. That typically means a 7.5 hour day for 144 days, compared to a normal six hour day for 180 days. Fridays are used for sports, medical appointments or other family business. Teachers get a day for lesson plans, rather than spend weekends on that task. The school district website has research about the f our-day work week, at haydenschools.org.


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W. Jackson Rd.

N. 2nd St.

RCR 53 Hayden Valley Elementary School

N. 3rd St.

S. 3rd St. . Blvd asin ze B Bree

8 N. 4th St.

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N. 5th St.

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Buff Pass Fish Creek Res. Fish Creek Falls

Ski Time Square

Map under construction

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Spring Creek Fish Creek Falls Rd.

Steamboat Blvd.

Valley Voice, LLC 1125 Lincoln Ave. Unit 2C Steamboat Springs, CO 80487

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Burgess Creek

Rollingstone Golf Club

Fish Creek

E. Maple Street

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Map Disclaimer © 2019 Valley Voice, LLC. All rights reserved. NOT TO SCALE! No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any manner without the written permission of the publisher. The publisher does not guarantee the accuracy of this map.

Tamarack Drive

Amethyst Drive

Amethyst Drive

Hill Top Parkway

2

RCR 36

Anglers Drive

2

Memorial Park Fish Creek Falls Rd.

Strawberry Hot Springs

Old Town Hot Springs

Maple Street

Missouri Ave.

5

Lincoln Avenue

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et l Stre Laure

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12 Cheapest Drinks in Town!

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Ice Rink

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Come In and Check Our Daily Specials!

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Merrit Street

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January 2010 - 2018

Dumont Lake

New Snowfall Accumulations by Date Measured in Inches Day

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4 1 2 1

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Whistler15 Road 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Gondy

Meadows Parking

2010

Core Trail

Yampa River

Fetcher Park

3 6

2012

1 1 1 8 4 1 1

2014

7 4 3

7 3

4 6

6 11 3

1

2013

2

2

2 1 4 3 1 11 1 7 6 1 131 1 1

1

11

2015

5 9 2

2 1

2 1 6 9 1 8 7 1

1 4 1 1

2

1

5 7 1 1 2

2 2

4

1 24 3 14

2016

Haymaker Golf 4 8 7

RCR 22

3 4 2 7 1

3 5 9 5 3 4 8 1 7 4

2017

2018

5 8 20 2

1

2 8 9 4 3 5 3

10 4 6

2 2 4 Catamount 9 6 1 3 3 1 8 3 5 1 3

1 5 10

Number of Snowy Days

13 20 11 11 16

7

18 19 10

Snowfall Total for Month

40 68 45 63 80 11

82 98 43

RCR 14f

Stagecoach Res.

RCR 14

Source: On the Snow

RCR 14

Howelsen Hill/ Ski for Free Days 2018/ 2019 12/2/2018

12/9/2018

12/16/2018

Alpine Nordic %

Alpine Nordic %

Alpine Nordic %

Steamboat Springs (City)

128

16

57%

164

23

68%

238

21

55%

Steamboat area

18

2

8%

15

2

6%

25

2

6%

Oak Creek

6

3

4%

6

0

2%

9

0

2%

Yampa

6

0

2%

6

1

3%

16

0

4%

Clark

15

0

6%

1

0

0%

2

0

0%

Hayden

12

0

5%

7

0

3%

18

0

4%

Craig

23

0

9%

14

0

5%

7

0

2%

Other Colorado

18

0

7%

35

0

13%

73

1

17%

Out of State

0

0

0%

0

0

0%

45

0

10%

International

4

0

2%

0

0

0%

0

0

0%

Total

230

21

251

248

26

274

433

24

457

Numbers provided by the City of Steamboat Springs

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District 1 Road & Bridge

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1st Street

Meyers St. Community Center

RCR 27 Main Street

W. Main Street Post Office

Colfax Street

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Bell Avenue

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Moffat Ave.

Town Hall

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Dodge Ave.

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© 2018 Valley Voice, LLC. All rights reserved. NOT TO SCALE! No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any manner without the written permission of the publisher. The publisher does not guarantee the accuracy of this map.

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Valley Voice, LLC 1125 Lincoln Unit 2C Steamboat Springs, CO 80487

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Valley Voice

January 2019

17

Drink of the Month

New Ventures, Old Ways By Eric Kemper There is now a brewery in Northwest Colorado entering this frontier. Yampa Valley Brewing Company is currently building their Barrel Cathedral in downtown Craig, Colorado. Christian Dufresne and Erica Tieppo are expanding the venture that began originally in Hayden. The plan is to have the facility up and running by spring and producing beer by summer.

Foeders sit lined up at the Rodenbach brewery in Belgium. Yampa Valley Brewing Company’s foeders will be neither as large or as numerous. Beer, for all of its complexity and ubiquity, is such a simple beverage. It starts with only four ingredients, yet in every glass is contained a history of the world from which each beer originates. Water, malt, hops and yeast are what it takes to make this most popular of drinks worldwide. The type of grains, hops and yeast strains the brewer selects determines the characteristics in each glass, and what story that particular beer will tell. Beer’s story always gets more complex when you combine the finished product with time spent in wood. Barrel aged and sour beers are the new forefront of American brewing, and both rely on the interaction between beer and the wood they temporarily reside in. The interplay of wood and beer changes the overall complexion, while time itself does its work. I talked in a previous column about what makes a beer suitable for aging, and it can be generalized by the Three S’s: Smoke, Strong, & Sour. The same principle applies to putting beer into a barrel for any length of time. Smoke beers, having been brewed with smoked malts, retain that distinct character and generally don’t require wood aging for anything more than storage purposes. Therefore the two most likely styles of beer to be barrel aged for any length of time are strong beers and sours. Strong beers are a natural for barrel aging; flavors infuse the beer, while the beer itself oxidizes slightly and deep fruity characteristics evolve. Sour beers, beyond the quickly developed kettle sours, may be the styles most dependent on barrels. It’s the microbes inside that make the beer the tart, earthy, layered and complex finished beer it will be.

YVBC’s goal is to be a community gathering place and source of beer knowledge and culture, in addition to being a dusty keep in which their liquid treasures mature. Craig is one of the largest communities in Colorado to not have a brewery of its own, and the Barrel Cathedral would represent a giant leap forward on that front. In addition to their current lineup of beers, which includes Space Dog IPA, Valley Girl Blonde & Sandhill Crane Red, the brewery will produce a low alcohol Belgian-style table beer exclusively for the Cathedral, meant to be shared. When it comes to the fruits of the Barrel Cathedral itself, expect the unexpected from the ever changing list. Christian’s specialty will be the barrel aged beers; a bourbon barrel imperial stout for example. This is the type of barreled beer that most people are familiar with. A strong beer of any suitable type (stout, barleywine, old ale, etc.) ages and takes on characteristics of the barrel it’s in. If the wood is particularly pronounced, there will be more oak character, with more vanilla and tannic flavors. If the barrel had whiskey that was recently emptied, there will be strong whiskey flavors and aromas. These are the bold beers that you have with friends for special occasions, and usually not to start the evening off.

The Barrel Cathedral, located in the heart of downtown Craig, will have a kitchen and features an outdoor patio, a deck and private event area upstairs, and a 15 to 20 foot communal table at the heart of the taproom. But to see through a vision of this scope takes the participation and buy-in of the community. To fund the creation of this new venture, YVBC has undertaken a fundraising campaign through IndieGoGo. There are a number of benefits that can be purchased, but the feature has to be the bottle club membership, known as the Disciple’s Society. Other Colorado breweries, such as Casey Brewing, have done similar programs to raise capital. The idea is that a member of the Society would receive their beer quarterly, starting sometime in mid-2019. There would be 2 types each release, either in 500mL or 750 mL bottles, 4 to 6 bottles per release. The brewery gets the capital they need for expansion, while consumers get rare beers on a regular basis before anyone else gets a chance. To learn more about the program, go to:

https://igg.me/at/barrelcathedral I would encourage everyone to check it out, and if possible, support the growth of this exciting new venture that will expand the breadth of beer culture here in Northwest Colorado. Cheers!

Erica will handle the sour program. Sour production requires a greater degree of patience and monitoring. Too soon and the beer shows its flaws; a premature sour can actually take on flavors or aromas reminiscent of solvents or bile. The plan in Craig is to create sharply tart lacto kettle sours and blend them with beers fermented by wild yeast strains, such as Brettanomyces. They will even have foeders (FOOD-ers), all wood open fermentation vessels that produce Old World-style sours. There are even plans to develop a local strain of Wild yeast collected on Black Mountain. One of the sample recipes would be an Orange Cherry Gose aged in tequila barrels; a refreshing, fruity beer reminiscent of a Tequila Sunrise.

A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.—Antoine de Saint-Exupery


18

January 2019

Valley Voice

Mister Helpful’s Dating Guide

Happy New Year Lovers and Single Types!

It’s all about your Happiness

By Mr. Helpful, MD

The cycle of life goes this way round = death, decay, fertilization, gestation and rebirth. Let’s start the New Year off right and talk about Breaking Up. Usually not pretty, fun or what anyone wants to do, but there will come a time when it HAS to be done. Be brave, be true, be kind, honest and damn it – break up with them already! The reasons we break up with significant others varies. I knew a guy who broke up with a woman because she was a dog person and he was a cat person. She had a shotgun concussion laugh and in public he was embarrassed about it. She wanted kids and he liked to use his money for other things (like not paying for kids). Yuppers – we all have our reasons to NOT be with them anymore. The time together has come to an end. Yours are valid, reasonable and in-line with your preferences. Sometimes there is a need to break up with someone because of how they treat you. If physical violence is the case and police or the courts need to be involved, do it. No hesitation – save your life and get out of there. If the reason to break up is that they are not treating you the way you would like; then a conversation needs to take place well in advance of breaking up. A couple I met had a fabulous, romantic sexually charged first three months of

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their relationship. But the next three months “date night” was cut down to once a month. She had a career, a family and was so sensitive at times that when he said something slightly harsh, she recoiled emotionally. The distance physically made him start looking elsewhere. Because he did not bring up the problem, it ended when he just outright said “we’re done.” No warning. Horrible thing to do to someone who deserved far better communication. Breakups happen TO people. Either someone did it to you or you are doing it to them. Rare is the breakup that both parties bring it to the table and agree this is the best course of action for us. Like most humans, we want to avoid pain. Heartache is one of the greatest on earth. When someone we cherish, desire or truly love tells us that they no longer want us to see them naked, it hurts. And we get sad. A crazy painful sad that makes us want to break things against the wall or drive our car into theirs. All bad ideas gang, please do not do those stupid things. Now, our idiot friends will tell us that breaking up with that person (or when they break with us) has a silver lining; that it’s all for the best and there are other fish in the sea. You terrible person, for saying that out loud to someone who is freshly broken up and in awful pain. Doesn’t matter if it was hours ago, days or weeks later. Shut the

Happy 2019! Hayden

Steamboat Springs Walden

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For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

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Arthur C. Clarke

hell up and be a better person by distracting them with bowling or helping you buy a new car. But for the love of Zeus do NOT say anything so stupid and callous. Getting over a relationship takes time. Your time, not theirs. You will get over the pain when you get over it and not a day sooner. Honest, it will take its sweet fricking time. Distract yourself with whatever you like to help the time go by.

M

F

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Story Time:

They loved each other for a short 6 months. Deeply, deeply loved one another. Then she had to go away. The distance and circumstances in her life were too challenging for them to be together. A year went by; he pined for her, never knowing if she thought of him. One day she called. They spoke passionately about how much they missed each other, but she was not ready to get back together. For a few days they chatted and then, she stopped all communication. Months went by and he was a wreck; thinking there was hope for them. But without being able to connect, he didn’t know what the truth was. Then it happened again; she called, they connected over a week and then she disappeared. This cycle happened 5 times over a year and for a whole year he held hope in his heart. Will they be together as he had hoped and will true love prevail as they had spoken of some many times? They made plans to meet up. She didn’t show and it finally broke him. He could not keep his life on hold while she “got her shi*t together.” If she truly wanted to be with the man of her dreams, that year would have been spent together. He wrote her a final goodbye. One of the saddest things I ever read. True loved died. If there is a “Big Picture” to see in a metaphysical way, we have to read the signs. A great, dear friend of mine told me once “if she really knew the true you and wanted to be with you for how amazing you are, nothing would keep her away.” My friends, when you discover an amazing person and they discover you; nothing will keep you apart. Just make sure you both have talked it out and understand what this means. (Unfortunately, I have to bring up stalkers here because those nut jobs have a one-sided story in their mushy heads and it’s not the truth) The purpose of this column is to give you permission to think Safety First. To put the oxygen mask on yourself, first. To tell another adult that you are no longer happy with how things are going between you and that you are going to walk another path. AND that THAT is perfectly OKAY. Breaking Up with someone can be one of the healthiest events in your life. I believe in you and you can do it. I didn’t say it was going to be easy. I’m just saying it can be the right thing to do. Talk it out with them, with friends, with anyone smarter than you who can be objective. In time, you will breathe again. In time, you will love again.

Find Mister Helpful’s Dating Guide on Facebook, hit the LIKE button and read the expanded versions of this column. Up next from Mr. Helpful – Levels of Fitness in the Dating World – Science tells us flabby belly boys have better stamina in bed. Get out there and test those theories kids!


Valley Voice

January 2019

19

Mensan Musings

Four Fold Way By Wolf Bennett

I like ideas that encompass other ideas. Umbrellas, if you will, that cover and explain. Subsets of larger subsets. One of those ideas was developed in multiple cultures around the world, long, long ago (20,000+ years or more if Anthropology studies are accurate). Essentially, you have four main things that define you as human. They all interlock and work together to balance a person. If one aspect is developed more than the others, then the balance is off, sometimes disastrously. This seemingly simple framework provides a method to balance ourselves and better see failings and successes. It can also provide a tool for seeing others moving through life. The four basic parts of being human are the Physical, the Mental, the Emotional and Wisdom. Without all four in balance you will experience more difficulties. Many versions of the four surround us: “earth, air, fire and water”, Meyers-Briggs personality types, ancient Greece’s four humours, medicine wheel concepts, “warrior, teacher, healer, shaman” and many more. Looking around at other cultures and philosophies you will see they all are looking at and measuring the same basic qualities, thus, a four fold way. Over-develop or under-develop any of them, just like balancing a plate on a stick, and you will throw the things on that plate into disarray. The goal is to learn to listen to all aspects of yourself and develop the parts that have been out of balance, so you can then build more reliably in the future. To describe this four fold way, recognize that each aspect “speaks” to you in a different way, so learning to “listen” in different ways will help ground thinking and life. The Physical: When tired, injured or hungry, you don’t “think” or “feel” it, the “language” of your body lets you know in no uncertain terms in a physical way. The body provides the “knowledge” to keep you living and growing. The Emotional: When you hold a baby, or cute puppy or feel love or anger, you don’t “think” it, you have a “feeling” that touches you deeply. View emotion as a cloud, with no real form, but instantly recognizable and yet impossible to hold or measure. Feelings are necessarily “messy” and without structure, but they provide the color to your rainbow and power to the thoughts.

What does it all matter to you? The answers to these questions provide purpose, a sense of being, internal peace and deep directions. To use this method a little, let’s look at some stereotypes. Remember these are not real people or actions, just some common themes that we see in the world to describe people and things that are simply not balanced. Look at the higher number of spousal abuse and psychological issues near military bases or with sports stars (I love the military; my dad was a navigator in B17’s in WW2, and he was definitely not emotionally present for my family). I like lots of sports but that doesn’t mean that problems and abuse are not present. So are their physical skills high? Yep, way off the charts, and yet it often throws the plate out of balance emotionally or mentally, leaving abuse, addictive behaviors, suicide issues and more, relatively commonplace. Ask them about their feelings, which rarely happens in interviews for obvious reasons, and you will see simplistic, almost defiant answers at best. Again, these are not bad people, just out of balance, and our culture does little to change these outcomes, so we all lose. Stereotypical college professor (I love them too). Health wise, emotional? Remember this is not a description of all professors. Intellectually off the charts, awesome, right? Physically, not so good and, um, family life was over long ago as they moved into their shell of intellectual pursuits. The saint? Lives in a cave, a hermit eschewing human contact, so they can develop their spirituality to a high degree, all good, but the other three aspects of being human? Ooops, out of balance indeed. All this is not an indictment against anything you choose to do, nor am I saying there are no exceptions to stereotypes that you might know, but it is a challenge for you to be balanced and to learn ways to center yourself to better achieve anything you choose. Living life in balance is way more fun and you can accomplish so much more than by simply focusing on one way of being with only one way to measure life. Four fold way can give a great tool to check in.

The Mental: When working on an issue, reading a new set of ideas or learning a new skill, you focus and “think” in a linear, logical, structured fashion, this is your mental part. It provides skills to organize life, plan ahead and evaluate mistakes and successes. Our culture often emphasizes the thinking realm above the others and often leads to great confusion and conflict as we are rarely trained “how” to think and very often taught “what” to think. Wisdom (often called spirituality) is not a religious thing, but is actually connection to the universe. What grounds you? Where do you see yourself in the grand scheme of things? What is your purpose? Who are you, really?

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20

January 2019

Valley Voice

Poetry

The Dawn of a Better Day 1. A hard time we had of it A hard night for a journey And, a weary lot we were Three headstrong alpha males on horseback No wives, no dependents. Ta! Da! Cold, lonely survivors Slogging through heavy snow Mountain Men clinging to the bluffs Searching for the homeland Ink not dry on the Louisiana Purchase I held the flag, down from the high country Down for the Rendezvous Three weary Magi bearing a gift 2. We rode out of the clouds at dawn Into a temperate valley Smelling of hope and decay Into a camp, and three trees Stood on the low sky And three flags Flew above the meadow The French Tricolor, The Bandera de España, And The Union Jack All trappers, all mountain men, all friends, Gaming and wenching, amidst teepees and pelts Smelling of sin, searching for salvation Mountain Men, still festering with colonial intent, And we passed a tavern And saw six hands at an open door Dicing for pieces of silver And yes, crops had gone to rot, fields gone fallow, In this new land of promise and abundance Still searching for a better God 3. And we three Weary, fallible mountain men Jim Beckwourth, a former slave, Pierre Dorion and I Dismounted at the shrine Of Sangre de Cristo A simple hewn alter Above Henry’s Fork on the Green River Millenniums after the Birth of Jesus A century after the birth of our nation A fitting time for a celebration And perhaps a Renaissance Were we led all this way for a birth or a death? And then it started, the bickering Oh, we’d agreed on the gift

By Patrick Curran

A Latin cross, a graven elk horn cross And we’d agreed to wrap it In beaded doeskin Yet we bickered. Oh yes, mountain men bicker Without the blessed civility of women. Ta! Da! Bicker as we always had in the frozen streams On where to place the trap Or how to skin the cat But nothing like we bickered About the ribbon on the wrap 4. We’d swapped for three ribbons At the trading post The colors of our flag Pierre Dorion loved the color white For purity and innocence And Beckwourth, his mother a slave, and father a Brit Loved the color black but settled on red No black ribbon at the post, you see Yes red, for hardiness and valor, and the blood and pain of conception And I chose blue for vigilance and justice So far so good! But where was the blue ribbon? 5. Then Pierre Dorion blanched, You see, Pierre, the piggish French-man. Ta! Da! Had forgotten his wife Marie, of the Iowan tribe That’s Sweet Marie Dorion! The toughest Mountain Woman alive. Ta! Da! Left her at the trading post door, they say Well, when he’d heard the bell ring or the toll, or was it an elk horn clap? “Sacre bleu! Sacre Blue! He cried “It was late. I’m screwed!” Then he nimbly jumped from the verse and reflected Pleased with the rhyme… blue… screw…Nice! Back again into the verse, he flew down the trail to the post Head down, cowering chauvinist, Ta! Da! So, where was the blue ribbon? 6. He found her by the campfire, hatchet in hand Need I say, Sweet Marie, fiercest Mountain Woman of the land My Heavens! She’d shredded his sacred Tricolor, she had

For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

She kissed him on the cheek And smacked him to the ground. Ta! Da! Then cried in native Iowan, “No need for old world jingo, Not in my homeland, paleface! Yes, we need white, but also blue for vigilance and justice If America is to be truly just!” By then, as you can see, things were looking up Pierre, quite my accident and with the help of yes, Sweet Marie With her blue ribbon had saved me, An aging Spanish Conquistador, “Hola! Como estas?” Oh sure it was late, but not too late for rejoicing and redemption 7. Good things happened around the campfire that night That holy night of the Nativity The graven cross, wrapped in beaded doeskin Tied off with red, white and blue ribbon Was laid on the altar of Sangre de Cristo And we prayed and wassailed That’s three daunted Magi and yes, Sweet Marie Liberated from the chains of chauvinism and oppression. Ta! Da! We toasted the Nativity, And sang, and yes we fumed and bickered And as the night wore on We joked and lied and lingered Yet, with a caring heart And an open mind And as the dawn broke we awoke Full of human kindness Wrapped in the colors of our flag The dawn of a better day! Ta! Da!

P.S. And so it came to pass through out the land, no more would people talk of three wise men going it alone, but about three reborn Mountain Men: one former slave, set free; one aging Spanish Conquistador; and one reformed Frenchman; and yes one wondrous Iowan Indian Princess, Sweet Marie. A woman and her helpers. Ta! Da! Adapted and barrowed from: The Journey of the Magi, T.S. Eliot


Valley Voice

A Closer Look

What’s in Those Supplements?

January 2019

Tales from the Front Desk

Musical Rooms By Aimee Kimmey

By Monica Yager

Consumers buy dietary supplements for various reasons; to improve health, or insurance of not getting sick, or for just general well being. Whatever the reason or intention, there is a belief that the supplements are safe and the expectation that whatever the label says is in the supplement is exactly what the consumer is getting. But some supplement manufacturers add extra ingredients to supposedly make the supplement work better. These special ingredients are actually prescription drugs, which are not listed on the label, which means consumers are unknowingly ingesting an unknown amount and variety of prescription medication. Worse is the harm to consumer health, with an estimated 23,000 emergency room visits and 2,000 hospitalizations a year attributed to tainted supplements. Those numbers might actually be low, as dietary supplements are generally not considered as the culprits in sending someone to the hospital. Remarkably, there are no regulations that could protect consumers. At one time, dietary supplements were regulated under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, but the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 changed all that. Supplement manufacturers carved out a deal that excluded them from the regulations that prescription and over-the-counter drugs come under. As it is, supplement manufacturers do not have to list their ingredients nor prove safety or effectiveness of their products. Rather, it is up to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to prove harm for a particular supplement. The absurdity is that by removing consumer protections, supplement manufacturers could more easily produce and sell their special products. It worked: The supplement industry is at a very robust $35 billion.

“The cell service is okay in this one, but the carpet is wet and I’ll just never be comfortable...”

“Well, lets see... 203’s still close to the wi-fi, and it’s been empty for a few days, should be dry as bone.” Angeline smiled and nodded. The clerk processed the change, switched her key, and sent her on her way. Twenty minutes later the clerk glanced up to find the tiny woman peering at her from the end of the line. Suppressing an internal scream, she finished checking in the next guest and pulled out a notepad. Thursday. Front Desk. 12:38 p.m. The tiny woman stood at the edge of the lobby staring timidly at the front desk. She nibbled nervously at her fingers, as though steeling herself against some dreaded task. When the front desk clerk came out of the back with her cup of coffee, the woman twitched like she was barely containing the urge to flee. The clerk smiled as encouragingly as possible, “Hi, what can I do for you?” She recognized the woman, Angeline Workman. She’d checked in less than a half hour ago. She was wispy thin and couldn’t have been more than 5’5”, a mild breeze would’ve carried her away. Taking a deep breath, Angeline stepped forward, “I-I just checked in, and well, I was wondering, would it be possible to switch rooms?” “Uh, sure.” The clerk set her coffee down scrolling through her computer to find empty rooms. “Is there something wrong with the one you’re in now?”

https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/sda/sdNavigation.cfm?sd=tainted_supplements_cder

“Oh, yes. Thank you.” Angeline looked somewhat relieved. The clerk suspected this might be as close to pleased as the woman got.

A Closer Look is the culmination of witnessing first-hand the wackiness of the alternative health world from the perspective of a former owner of a health food store. Everyone can and should take a closer look, especially when it comes to their health.

The clerk sighed internally, but painted on a smile. “Hi again.”

“Alright.” Ignoring the whine, the clerk turned back to her computer to search out another room--one with a dry carpet, but also excellent cell service. Her computer database needed more categories!

With the three biggest sellers, supplements for sexual performance, weight loss, and muscle enhancement, a single product can contain as many as six different unlabeled, prescription drugs. Consumers, believing they are taking something that actually “works” or does what it is claimed to do, also believe they are taking something safe and natural and will happily buy more. At least, that is what supplement manufacturers and sellers are counting on. In this bizarre scam, it is up to consumers to find out what is in those supplements. A good resource is an FDA database, Tainted Products Marketed as Dietary Supplements. It currently contains 923 records, is 19 pages long and “only includes a small fraction of the potentially hazardous products with hidden ingredients marketed to consumers.”

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/ fullarticle/2706496

21

Most people didn’t care which room they stayed in. Truth be told there wasn’t much difference between the rooms. But this wasn’t the first time she’s been asked for a room change. Although it might have been the strangest reason the clerk had ever heard. “It’s-it’s just, the cell phone coverage is bad in that room-I’m nomophobic.” “Um...” What?! “Okay, room 201’s right over our wi-fi spot?”

After she re-keyed the room card, and sent Angeline on her way, the clerk rushed to the internet: nomophobic--it’s a real thing! Some people have an irrational fear of being without their cell phones. First world problems! Not more than twenty minutes later, little Angeline was back hovering at the edge of her lobby, once again bolstering herself.

Angeline stepped up to the counter, “I-I’m dentophobic, the trees outside the window--I just can’t.” “Okay,” The clerk said as she jotted down a list of available rooms, “Let me grab my keys and we’ll go look at all the rooms, then you can choose which ever one you like the best.” “Oh thank you!” Angeline heaved a sigh of relief. For the next half hour the clerk walked the timid little woman around to each of the open rooms in the entire hotel. They all looked the same to the clerk, just slightly different configurations and views. Angeline found one thing or another wrong with each of them. Finally they came to room 135. “Well, this is the last one.” Angeline stepped into the room and looked around, checked her phone, smelled the air... She made a few tiny noises at the back of her throat. It looked like she was going to turn this one down too. “There’s nothing else?” She whined. “’Fraid not.” By this point the clerk was wondering how this woman had made out of her house at all. Angeline took a deep breath, “I-I guess I can make this work.” Grinding her teeth, the clerk leads Angeline back to the front desk to re-set her room key again. Hopefully for the last time. As she handed Angeline the key, the little woman smiled, “Thank you, I know I’m... Difficult. It’s-it’s the first time I’ve ever been out on my own...” Suddenly it struck the clerk how hard it must be to live with that much fear all the time. She felt a great deal of pity for the twitchy little woman. “Well I’m glad we got you settled, if you need anything else, just give me a call.” Angeline smiled warmly at the clerk as she walked away from the front desk. The clerk waved, surprised to discover she was glad to have taken the extra time to help this poor creature find a tiny bit of comfort.

I can’t change the direction of the wind, but I can adjust my sails to always reach my destination.—Jimmy Dean


22

January 2019

Valley Voice

Globally Speaking

An Old Coal Miner Looks at Global Warming Part II - the Players By Ted Crook

The actions of all the players in the global warming game are making things difficult. Winning is often more important than solving, one camp says “yes” just because the other says “no”...and no one wants to give up their car. Environmentalists: Environmentalists must realize that they are part of the problem. Stridency, arrogance, and lack of effective focus are powerful factors helping those who deny the reality of climate change. Environmentalists have been screaming about doomsday scenarios for decades. I remember reading a bestselling book in 1968 which predicted the death of the oceans by 1979. There never has been a silent spring either. Cry wolf too many times and people stop listening. Most environmentalists are no better at the actual science than the deniers, but they are usually better educated (except for the dreaded statistics, of course). I own a pair of Birkenstocks, too, but I try not to feel superior to those who don’t.

Environmentalists cannot seem to focus. Get rid of cars (not Subaru’s of course), recycle (bottles [PET], but not caps [styrene]!), fix the water, wilderness trails, public lands, bicycles, drain the dams, fish, birds, bears, prairie dogs, water logs, spills, permafrost. The list is infinitely extensive. Each foray away from climate change vitiates the message. Don’t lose focus. Keep the eye on the ball. Hammer one nail at a time. Environmentalists must focus on: 1.Technology which produces all the power needed without increased carbon. 2. A new, low carbon, sustainable transportation infrastructure (electric trains are the only potentially nonpolluting transport currently available--I can discuss this with anyone who thinks otherwise). 3. A revenue stream to support the infrastructure for the above (I suggest a gently installed gasoline tax somewhat

Country Driving

The Psyche of the Winter Driver By Mike Baran

An excerpt previously printed in the Valley Voice February 2017 by Mike Baran. Illustrations by Matt Scharf.

In the winter, our driving skills change to suit the conditions in our bubble. It becomes very apparent that we become very different from each other on how we choose to navigate our changing road conditions. As the lines painted on the roads begin to disappear, we start to see these personalities shine. Let’s take a look at a few of them for the sake of better understanding how to handle ourselves out there. These observations are made on rural roads usually south of the city (I imagine that these people exist elsewhere though!).

The Tortoise

As taught to us as little children, the tortoises usually win the race. This individual generally does not break 30 mph anywhere! They are the leading cause of road rage in the winter as all of the above personalities experience them. These people, however, have some really endearing qualities. They are fully aware that they are grossly under the speed limit and tend to hug the side of the road to allow themselves to be passed. They generally have a nice wave and smile to counter act all of the birdies flying their way. Often, they will duck into a turn, intersection, driveway or other wide area to allow the caravan built up behind them to pass. Something to remember about the tortoise… They are the most likely to make their destination consistently. Also, punctuality is a very strong trait here as the drive for them is generally double dry weather time.

The Authority

Yep…These individuals are actually best equipped for the roads. As they are so wise, condescension is the popular car talk. These people come up with clever names for other drivers and tend to critique all around them. They have been given the power of judgement to use how they see fit and can morph into any of the types above depending on conditions and the need to show how good at driving they are. They tend to have snow plows on their vehicles…Oh crap…It’s me isn’t it… Well, I did write this brain candy, so I guess it applies. The shoe fits…I’ll work on it! Twelve steps to recovery right? In the end, it seems most important to drive safe! All of us are so different as well as our vehicles which leads to so many different driving habits in bad weather so… Let’s be courteous, patient, and leave a little early as we brave our rural roads.

For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

like the one that produced the interstate highway system: each time fuel drops twenty cents, impose ten cents of tax. No one will ever notice the change.) Environmentalists attack people who could help. A coal fired power plant can be made totally non-polluting in any of a number of ways (cf., http://www.calera.com/ beneficial-reuse-of-co2/process.html). It may be that coal fired plants can be better than solar or wind power with proper improvements. The environmentalist’s attack on nuclear waste is specious. While it is true that some waste lasts a long time, the longer the waste lasts, the less of a problem it presents. The half life is long because the materials are not very radioactive. The really dangerous waste is the part with the shortest half life--the part that remains radioactive for the least amount of time. Instead of millions of years, a safe storage plan for a hundred years is quite feasible. Environmentalists should examine these facts before opposing everything in true NIMBY fashion. The Industry Guys: The coal industry is managed by people used to a defensive posture. My great grandfather was driven out of Oak Creek because he was a union organizer. There are examples of heavy equipment in the world with bullet holes in the glass. Mines have been shut down in spiteful attempts to destroy unions.

If coal industry managers were to (gasp!) accept the science, they could go far toward eliminating the threat of climate change, becoming heroes in the process. It would require moving from a reactive mindset to a proactive one, of course--something they often talk about but seldom do. The technology is (or can be) available. They just need a different mindset to become environmental heros. Even if the technology didn’t work, the public relations benefit (from working with the scientific consensus instead of engaging in the usual fight) would be astounding. The oil producers need to realize that it really is in their best long term interest to slow the consumption of oil. There will probably always be a need for some gas, diesel, and oil. We should make an effort to preserve these for the important uses for future generations. Airplanes and ocean-going ships may always require fossil fuels. One would think some oilmen could be farsighted enough to want their grandchildren to take over the business. Natural gas, the current environmental darling, is likely a worse offender than coal. Methane leaks are endemic to the industry. Methane is a horrendous greenhouse gas. The leaks must be stopped before natural gas can be helpful in reducing warming. There are, of course, many other concerns and points to be made on this complex subject, but hopefully this is enough to push buttons on both sides of the issue.


Valley Voice

January 2019

23

Ready to Feel Good

With a Little Help From Our Friends By Shaney McCoy, CMHC, LPC

Humans are social animals. For most of human existence we have lived in tribes or clans in which survival was a group effort, and to be isolated from the group likely meant death. We produce feel-good hormones when we spend time with others in shared activities, and a large body of research has shown that social connectedness leads to greater satisfaction with life, improved mental health, and even longer lives. So why is it, in our culture of uber-connectedness, that rates of loneliness have doubled since the 1980s? In our society, where there is so much focus on the individual, it’s easy to blame loneliness or isolation on the lonely person. A lot of the problem, however, has to do with the way our Western culture has evolved. Modes of transportation, the way our neighborhoods and homes are constructed, materialism, income inequality and countless other factors have played a role in increased isolation. Many activities that build a sense of connection and belonging have been unwittingly phased out of our daily lives. In his book “Bowling Alone,” political scientist Robert Putnam discusses lots of ways people used to interact with each other that are either basically nonexistent or on the decline, including bowling leagues, church attendance, involvement in PTA or local charity groups like Rotary or Lions Club, even getting together with friends for weekly card games. New technologies can also contribute to isolation. We naturally seek convenience, which makes sense given that food abundance is a recent and geographically limited phenomenon. Historically, we’ve needed to expend as little energy as possible to ensure survival. But this tendency, and the means to pursue it, has also led to fewer face-to-face interactions. When we pull into our garage and close the door behind us before we even get out of the car, we cut off daily opportunities to see neighbors. When we order food delivered to our homes, use the bank drive-thru and shop online, we drastically reduce our contact with other people. This isn’t to say that all of these missed interactions would be meaningful, in fact some may be frustrating or irritating, but they all contribute to the experience of being human and being connected to others.

The jury is still out on the effects of social media on loneliness and isolation; however, a study published last year in the American Journal of Preventative Medicine reported that of nearly 2,000 adults, those who reported spending more than two hours a day on social media had twice the odds of feeling socially isolated as people who spent a half hour a day or less on the same sites. This doesn’t prove, of course, that heavy use of social media causes loneliness or social isolation – after all, someone who is already lonely may turn to social media to try and feel connected. However, it does show that being digitally connected, while not necessarily causing a sense of isolation, certainly doesn’t cure it. So how are we supposed to develop more connection in a culture where the odds seem stacked against it? First, it’s important to note that “feeling connected” doesn’t necessarily mean having tons of friends and joining lots of groups – for some people it’s enough to have two or three close friends who are supportive, understanding and generally available. A good place to start is by fostering and nurturing friendships that already exist but may get pushed to the background because of other commitments. Additionally, we’re lucky in the Steamboat Springs area to have lots of opportunities for involvement in the community, whether that’s volunteering, joining with others who share a similar hobby or interest, or finding a spiritual home. Finally, if anxiety, self-doubt, or other personal challenges are getting in the way of building and maintaining relationships, finding a counselor to help you deal with these struggles could be a great next step. Hopefully as we become more connected individuals, we can work together toward a society where isolation and loneliness are on the decline instead of on the rise.

Shaney McCoy is a mental health counselor in private practice in Steamboat Springs. Learn more about her at www.ReadyToFeelGood.com.

Evelyn,

Our little love, you bring us joy we never could have imagined every single day. May all Your Dreams come true! Happy 4th Birthday!

Happy New Year!

2570 South Copper Frontage 970•879•5717

“Let us be lazy in everything, except in loving and drinking, except in being lazy.”

Gotthold Ephraim Lessing

The Original Local’s Liquor Store On the corner of US40 and Hilltop Pkwy

Poetry

experiments resulting in the contamination of about 1.6 trillion gallons of underground water. The last Plowshare test (1973) occurred in the natural gas west of Meeker. Now that gas may be radioactive and unsafe.

You Are Safe

Joanin Remy Thus closed anotherBy chapter uranium mining.

It’s hard to be Listening to so many thoughts If your heart hurts It’s ok to cry Wear clothes no one likes It’s your light Let your hair fall gently Speak up always You are free In a world of ice Break through Survive

Love, Danny, Mommy and Daddy

Friends show their love in times of trouble, not in happiness.—Euripides


24

January 2019

Valley Voice

HappyHours Last minute changes can and do occur - Mother Nature, illness, tour malfunction, whatever - the accuracy of this calendar is not guaranteed! 8th Street Steakhouse 4:30 - 6:00 p.m. & 9:00 p.m. Aurum Food & Wine 4:30 - 6:00 p.m. daily Azteca Taqueria 4:00 - 5:00 p.m. & 8:00 - 9:00 p.m. daily

McKnight’s Irish Pub 3:00 - 6:00 p.m. & 9:30 - 11:00 p.m. daily Off the Beaten Path After 4:00 p.m. daily Old Town Pub 3:00 to 6:00 p.m. daily

Back Door Grill 4:00 - 7:00 p.m. daily & All day on Sundays

O’Neil’s Tavern and Grill 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. & 10:00 p.m. - 12:00 p.m. daily

The BARley 4:00 - 6:00 p.m. daily

Rex’s American Grill & Bar 4:20 - 6:00 daily

Big House Burgers 4:20 - 6 p.m., Mon-Sat. & 2 - 6 Sunday

The Rusted Porch 2:00 p.m.- 6:00p.m. daily

Carl’s Tavern 4:00 - 6:00 p.m. daily

Salt and Lime 3:30 p.m.- 5:30 p.m. & 10:00 p.m.- 11:00 p.m.

Circle R Bar 4 - 6 p.m. Thurs., Fri.,Sat.

Sake 2 U 3:30 - 5:30 p.m.

Cuginos Italian Restaurant and Pizzeria 3:00 - 6:00 p.m. & 9:00 - 11:00 p.m. daily

Sambi Canton 5:00 - 6:00 pm Monday - Saturday

Double ZZ BBQ 2:30 - 6:00 p.m. daily Dude & Dan’s Bar and Grill 3:00 - 6:00 p.m. daily Late Night Happy Hour: 10:00 - 12:00 p.m. daily E3 Ranch & Chophouse Restaurant 4:00 - 6:00 p.m. daily Harwigs & L’Apogee: 5:00 - 6:30 p.m. daily Laundry 4:30 - 6p.m. Tues.-Sat. Low Country 4:30 - 6 p.m. daily Mahogany Ridge 4:00 - 5:30 p.m. Late night happy hour: 9:00 to 10:00 p.m. daily Mambo Italiano 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. daily Mazzola’s Majestic Italian Diner 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. daily

Schmiggitys 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. daily Slopeside Grill 10:00 p.m.-12:00 a.m. Steamboat Smokehouse 3:00 to 6:00 p.m. & 9:30 to 11:30 p.m. daily: Sunpies Cajun Bistro 3:00 to 6:00 p.m. daily Table 79 Foodbar 5:00 - 6:00 & 9:00 - 11:00 daily The Tap House Sports Grill 3:00 - 6:00 p.m. weekdays Truffle Pig 2:00 - 5:00 p.m. daily The V 4:00 - 6:00 p.m. & 10:00p.m. - 12:00 a.m.

RECURRING WEEKLY EVENTS: SUNDAY

THURSDAY

Ski Free Sunday 10AM-4PM @ Howelsen Hill Mid-Dec to March 10 Steamboatsprings.net/ski

Steamboat Springs Writers Group Noon @ Art Depot.FREE www.steamboatwriters.com

Latin Dance Night 7PM @ Schmiggity’s (Free Salsa Lessons). FREE. www.schmiggitys.com MONDAY Piano Bar Night 7PM @ Schmiggity’s. FREE. www.schmiggitys.com TUESDAY Ski with a Naturalist January 1- January 31 1:30PM @ Mt. Werner, Meet at the large trail sign at the top of the Gondola where the “Why Not” trail starts. Lift ticket not included. No registration required. Sponsored by Steamboat Ski & Resort Corporation. yampatika.org Pool League 6:30PM @ The V Two-Step Tuesday 7PM @ Schmiggity’s (Free Country Dance Lessons). FREE. www.schmiggitys.com WEDNESDAY Dart League 6:30PM @ The V Karaoke Night 9PM @ Schmiggity’s. FREE www.schmiggitys.com

To submit your free events or calendar information e-mail to: valleyvoicesales@gmail.com Events may be edited for length or content. Calendar entries must be received by the 15th of each month.

TUESDAY JANUARY 1

Ski with a Naturalist January 1- January 31 1:30PM @ Mt. Werner, Meet at the large trail sign at the top of the Gondola where the “Why Not” trail starts. Lift ticket not included. No registration required. Sponsored by Steamboat Ski & Resort Corporation. yampatika.org

City Offices Closed Special New Year’s Day Snowshoe Tour 10AM-1PM @ TBC Registration required. Sign up online! $30, includes snowshoes (Ages 18+) yampatika.org

SATURDAY JANUARY 5 P C Rabbit Ears Snowshoe Tour 5 10AM-1PM @ Rabbit Ears s Pass a Registration required. Sign up online! J $30, includes snowshoes w (Ages 18+) 6 yampatika.org F w TBA e 10PM @ Schmiggity’s. www.schmiggitys.com T

Live Band Karaoke/ Schmiggity Jam 9:30PM @ Schmiggity’s. FREE. www.schmiggitys.com

THURSDAY JANUARY 3

SUNDAY JANUARY 6

FRIDAY Uranium Mine Snowshoe Tour January 4- January 25 10AM-1PM @ Fish Creek Falls Parking lot ($5 parking fee) FREE, Registration required. (Ages 16+) Sponsored by the US Forest Service yampatika.org SATURDAY Emerald Mountain Snowshoe Tour January 5- January 26 10AM-12PM @ Howelsen Hill/Emerald Mountain $20 includes snowshoes and lift ticket (Ages 16+) Registration required. yampatika.org

A Grinch under the Gondy

Vaqueros Mexican Restaurant & Taqueria 2:00 - 6:00 p.m. daily

Calendar of Free Events

New Years Day

Bud Werner Memorial Library’s Community Sand Painting Noon-5PM @ Library Hall. FREE. All-ages, but children must be accompanied by an adult. www.steamboatlibrary.org/ events Wild Films: “A Heard of Orphans” 6:30PM @ Library Hall. FREE www.steamboatlibrary.org/ events FRIDAY JANUARY 4 Bud Werner Memorial Library’s Community Sand Painting Noon-5PM @ Library Hall. FREE. All-ages, but children must be accompanied by an adult. www.steamboatlibrary.org/ events First Friday Art Walk 5PM @ Downtown Steamboat. Self-guided tour of local art galleries, Museums and alternative venues. FREE. First Friday Artwalk Reception Sari Davidson Artist Reception 5PM@ Arts Depot. FREE www.steamboatcreates.org

Photo by Crash Sterne For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

Tnertle 10PM @ Schmiggity’s. $5. www.schmiggitys.com

P 5 Community Yoga Practice s “Shiva Rea in Greece” a 10AM @ Bud Werner Library. FREE but donations H greatly appreciated G www.steamboatlibrary.org/ w events 1 w MONDAY JANUARY 7 F Rabbit Ears Snowshoe Tour 9AM-12PM @ C Rabbit Ears Pass 7 Registration required. s Sign up online! $40, includes snowshoes K (Ages 18+) 1 yampatika.org w

Ryan Wilcox S 6PM @ Steamboat Whiskey Company C W TUESDAY JANUARY 8 h 1 City Council Meeting C 5PM @ Centennial Hall s steamboatsprings.net a

Buck Fuffalo S 6PM @ Steamboat Whiskey w Company 1 w 8 Ball League Party 6:30 PM @ The V M

Ben Marshal Band T 9PM @ Schmiggity’s. FREE w www.schmiggitys.com 9 w WED. JANUARY 9 T Behind the Scenes Tour of Collections A 1PM @ Tread of Pioneers F Museum A treadofpioneers.org o b


Schmac and January Cheese2019

Valley Voice

25

Calendar of Free Events What do you want to do today? I don’t know. What do you want to do? Parks & Recreation Commission 5:30PM @ Centennial Hall steamboatsprings.net/ agendas Jazz at the Library with Hearding Cats 6:30PM @ Library Hall. FREE www.steamboatlibrary.org/ events THURSDAY JANUARY 10 Planning Commission 5PM @ Centennial Hall steamboatsprings.net/ agendas Horseshoes & Hand Grenades w/ Buffalo Commons 10PM @ Schmiggity’s. $10 www.schmiggitys.com FRIDAY JANUARY 11 Coffee with Council 7:30AM @ Centennial Hall steamboatsprings.net Kris Lager Band 10PM @ Schmiggity’s. $5. www.schmiggitys.com SATURDAY JANUARY 12 City Council Town HallWest Steamboat Neighborhoods Annexation 10AM-12PM @ Centennial Hall steamboatsprings.net/ agendas Supersuckers w/ The Hangmen 10PM @ Schmiggity’s. $10 www.schmiggitys.com MONDAY JANUARY 14 The Floozies w/ Maddie O’Neal 9PM @ Schmiggity’s. $30 www.schmiggitys.com TUESDAY JANUARY 15 Applications for the Farmers Market Open Applications available online @ mainstreetsteamboat.com

City Council Meeting 5PM @ Centennial Hall steamboatsprings.net “Women in Music” A concert at the Bud Werner Library with Tera Johnson & Neil Marchman 6:30PM @ Library Hall. FREE www.steamboatlibrary.org/ events 8 Ball League Registrations Due 6:30 PM @ The V The Floozies w/ Maddie O’Neal 9PM @ Schmiggity’s. $30 www.schmiggitys.com WED. JANUARY 16 Bud Werner Memorial Library’s Foreign Film Series at the Chief “The Third Murder” 7:00PM @ Chief Theater. FREE www.steamboatlibrary.org/ events THURSDAY JANUARY 17 City Council Town HallWest Steamboat Neighborhoods Annexation 5:30-7:30PM @ Centennial Hall steamboatsprings.net/ agendas Library Author Series: Susan Orlean “The Library Book” 6:30PM @ Library Hall. FREE www.steamboatlibrary.org/ events Nappy Roots @ Schmiggity’s. All Ages 8 pm. $15 21+ 10:30 pm. $10 www.schmiggitys.com FRIDAY JANUARY 18 Russ Liquid w/ special guest Funkstatik 10PM @ Schmiggity’s. $10 www.schmiggitys.com

SATURDAY JANUARY 19

SATURDAY JANUARY 26

White Water Ramble 10PM @ Schmiggity’s. $10 www.schmiggitys.com

Bud Werner Memorial Library and the Steamboat Weather Summit Present: “The Human Element,” a film and conversation with James Balog of the Extreme Ice Survey 4PM @ Library Hall. FREE www.steamboatlibrary.org. events

SUNDAY JANUARY 20 Moonlight Snowshoe Tour Times vary call or email for details! @ Emerald Mountain Registration required. Sign up online! $20, includes snowshoes (Ages 18+) yampatika.org Jay Roemer Band 10PM @ Schmiggity’s. FREE www.schmiggitys.com MONDAY JANUARY 21 Martin Luther King, Jr. Day TUESDAY JANUARY 22 City Council Meeting 5PM @ Centennial Hall steamboatsprings.net Winter 8 Ball League Starts 6:30PM @ The V WED. JANUARY 23 Parks & Recreation Commission 5:30PM @ Centennial Hall steamboatsprings.net/ agendas Wild Films: “Queen Without Land” 6:30PM @ Library Hall. FREE www.steamboatlibrary.org/ events THURSDAY JANUARY 24 Planning Commission 5PM @ Centennial Hall steamboatsprings.net/ agendas

Schism 10PM @ Schmiggity’s. $10. www.schmiggitys.com MONDAY JANUARY 28 Bud Werner Memorial Library & Tread of Pioneers Museum Present: “Who Was the Sculptor in Buckskin” w/ Dave Lively, a talk about Alexander PhimisterProctor 6:30PM @ Library Hall. FREE www.steamboatlibrary.org. events TUESDAY JANUARY 29 Behind the Scenes Tour of Collections 3PM @ Tread of Pioneers Museum treadofpioneers.org Bud Werner Memorial Library’s Health Perspectives Series Presents: “Alternative Approaches to Managing Pain” w/ Dr. Barbara Novotny 6:30PM @ Library Hall. FREE www.steamboatlibrary.org. events THURSDAY JANUARY 31 Library Author Series: Tim Johnston “The Current” 6:30PM @ Library Hall. FREE www.steamboatlibrary.org/ events

821 Lincoln Ave - schmiggitys.com tle 10 pm op) $5 n. 4 - Tner -H Friday, Ja , Dance, Funk, Hip ic n ro t (Elec BA , Jan. 5 - T Saturday 9 pm hall Band FREE!! rs a M n e B coustic) Jan. 8th Tuesday, e; Rock and Roll; A des iv nd Grena es) - $10 a H (Alternat & s e o Horsesh (High Energy Blu , Jan. 10 Thursday Commons 10 pm w/ Buffalo 10 pm ger Band 5 a L s ri K l) - $ n. 11 Friday, Ja Rock & Heavy Sou t s li a (Reviv ckers w/ - SuperSu ountry) - $10 2 1 . n Ja , Saturday en (Rock, Punk, C m The Hang / Floozies w . 14 - The lectro-Funk) - $30 n Ja , y a d Mon m (E 'Neil 10 p Maddie O ozies w/ 5 - The Flo tro-Funk) - $30 1 . n Ja , y Tuesda m (Elec 21 Plus 'Neil 10 p ges 8 pm/ A ll A Maddie O s t o Nappy Ro 15/21 + $10 $ , Jan. 17 Thursday ip-Hop) All Ages (H m p nkstatik 10:30 uid w/ Fu iq L s s u R 0 n. 18th Friday, Ja ctronic Funk) - $1 m Ele rn mble 10 p e d o (M water Ra e it h W h s) - $10 , Jan. 19t Saturday ntain Dance Gras u o 0 pm (Rocky M er Band 1 m e o R y n. 20th - Ja Sunday, Ja ) - FREE! s 0 pm (Bluegras p & Live 1 U e k a W n. 25th Friday, Ja y Tribute) $5 e rl (Bob Ma 10 pm - Schism h t 6 2 . n , Ja Saturday te) $10 u b ri T l o (To t 7 pm

Nigh tin Dancse8 pm) a L : y a d n Su a Lesson (FREE Sals pm ar Night 7 B o n ia P Monday: long Good Time$3 Wells) (A Sing-Ar Hour 11-12 pm & Powe y 7 pm ep Tuesdssaons 8 pm t S o w T : Tuesdayountry Dance Le $3 Wells) (FREE C r Hour 11-12 pm & Powe ht 9 pm araoke NGigood Times) K : y a d s e 0 pm Wedn e, Costumes & y Jam 9:3 it g k ig o a m r h a (K aoke/Sc Band Kahr a live band) e iv L : y a Thursd play along wit (Sing or

Oh Schmiggity!

FRIDAY JANUARY 25 Wake Up And Live 10PM @ Schmiggity’s. $5. www.schmiggitys.com

Schmappy Steamboat's ONLYHour Happy7-9 HourDaily from 7-9 pm $3 Wells, Beers & House Wine $3 Hot Dogs Tickets online at schmiggitys.com or at All That. Genesee Cans

$1

Sliders History is the version of past events that people have decided toSchmiggity-ball agree upon.—Napoleon Bonaparte


26

January 2019

Valley Voice

Yepelloscopes

Your Monthly Message By Chelsea Yepello Aries

March 21 - April 19

While in the delivery room, it quickly occurs to you that there might be a small chance that the baby may not be yours. It became kind of obvious when you noticed the baby had a tail and oddly your dog was shaking the doctor’s hand and giving out cigars.

Taurus

April 20 - May 20

And somehow you decide to go against your better instincts and re-enter into the partnership. It’s a totally healthy decision, seeing how you have a fondness for punishment and are a glutton for pain.

Gemini

May 20 - June 20

Somehow after many hours of experimentation, you will gain a new understanding for microwavable dinners and if it is really necessary to keep the plastic on while cooking.

Best

Marijuana Store 2018

Cancer

June 21 - July 22

The hand of time will play a role in your life this week as it pushes you into puddles, presses every button in the elevator and grabs your coworker’s butt, promptly blaming you.

GOLDEN LEAF WILL

MATCH

Leo

July 23 - August 23

When the therapist told you to get your frustration out by putting your head in a pillow and yelling, he didn’t mean to keep your face in the pillow until you lose proper air flow and pass out.

ANY PRICE

IN STEAMBOAT *

Virgo

August 23 - September 22

You decide to get all those people back by showing up to your surprise party through the kitchen window. That will show them for trying to surprise you. You are the king of trickery.

* Excludes flower. Not to be combined with any other discounts.

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Oso volunteers every year at the Cowboy Downhill

For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

Libra

September 23 - October 23

When a popular wildlife show contacted you: you figured you would be invited to track a beautiful and majestic creature somewhere in the dark corners of the world. You didn’t expect a camera man and a narrator to follow you around all day describing what you are doing at every moment.

Scorpio

October 24 - November 21

Everyone has that aunt that will give sugary treats with total disregard of ruining your appetite, take you to your first concert and get you that piercing that your parents refused to allow. Everyone that is, but your nephew.

Sagittarius

November 22 - December 21

Somehow your relationship with your sister will take a shaky turn when you both have different opinions on what “sisterly love” really consists of.

Capricorn

December 22 - January 19

Remember that one time, when they said they would love you unconditionally? Who would have thought that unconditionally has a condition?

Aquarius

January 20 - February 18

The stars need to warn you this week that although famous musicians are on TV convincing you to buy a blemish cream, it does not necessarily mean that when you buy it you will become BFFs with them. Seriously, that restraining order is really not a joke.

Pisces

February 19 - March 20

Your love for the strange and unfamiliar has driven you to get your passport and travel to a different country. So you can understand how odd it is that you find yourself sitting at a McDonalds in Paris after you went shopping at the Walmart in Rome.


Valley Voice

January 2019

“You better get some rest. Work starts at 5 am”

27


28

January 2019

Valley Voice

ce! i o V y e l Val e h t n i oice V r u o Y Get

Call Today!

A Monthly Publication

2019 Advertising Display Sizes & Rates for the Valley Voice • Intensely local. The Valley Voice is distributed throughout Routt County at nearly 100 different locations • Long shelf life. The Valley Voice, as a monthly publication, enjoys a 30 day shelf life for each issue. Circulation 4000/6000 per month. • A wide variety of readers. The Valley Voice is picked up by readers as diverse as the family staying at a hotel from out of state, to the local rancher picking their copy at the feed store in Phippsburg • Design services for your ad are included at no additional charge

Single/ Actual Size

Single 3.1667” x 2.625”

Triple Vertical 3.1667” x 8.375” Quad Vertical 3.1667” x 11.25”

Double Vertical 3.1667” x 5.5”

Four Squared 6.5833” x 5.5”

Triple Horizontal 10” x 2.625”

Double Horizontal 6.5833” x 2.625”

Ad Name

Ad size

Per Issue

Ad Name

Ad size

Per Issue

Single

3.1667” x 2.625”

$ 100.

Four Squared

6.5833” x 5.5”

$ 400.

Double Vertical

3.1677” x 5.5”

$ 200.

Triple Horiz.

10” x 2.625”

$ 300.

Triple Vertical

3.1677” x 8.375”

$ 300.

Half Page Vertical

3.1677” x 8.375”

$ 600.

Quad Vertical

3.1677” x 11.25”

$ 400.

Half Page Horiz.

10” x 5.5”

$ 600.

Double Horizontal

6.5833” x 2.625”

$ 200.

Full Page

10” x 11.25”

$ 1200.

Contact Eric Kemper at valleyvoicesales@gmail.com For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

Or contact Matt Scharf at mattscharf1@gmail.com

Profile for Valley Voice Steamboat

Valley Voice January 2019  

Steamboat Springs, Colorado

Valley Voice January 2019  

Steamboat Springs, Colorado

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