Page 1

OOK AROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVE MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOO ROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE IFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GE NVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENC OOK AROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVE MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOO ROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE IFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GE NVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENC OOK AROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVE MAKE Look A DIFFERENCE LOOKGet AROUND GET INVOLVED A DIFFERENCE LOO Around Involved MakeMAKE A Difference ROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE IFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GE NVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENC OOK AROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVE MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOO ROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE IFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GE NVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENC OOK AROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVE MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOO ROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE IFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GE NVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENC OOK 2013-2014 AROUND GETAnnual INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVE Report MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOOK AROUND GET INVOLVED MAKE A DIFFERENCE LOO

LIVE UNITED Valley United Way


THANK YOU! For taking the time to LOOK AROUND, GET INVOLVED, and MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

Valley United Way would like to take this opportunity to say thank you for all that you have

done for our COMMUNITY. Thanks to the generosity of our donors and the support from local businesses, corporations, community leaders, students, and volunteers, we are improving the quality of life for people living and working in the Valley and together we are making a difference! A community of connected individuals, all people, united and working together for the benefit of all, is at the heart of what United Way represents. Unlike charities that focus their energy on giving to the needy, the haves giving to the have nots, the us giving to them, Valley United Way understands that we are all part of something GREATER. Valley United Way is a place where everyone can come together and speak as equals. We may not be the experts in knowing all the solutions, but we know we can bring together the community and facilitate discussion to lead to the best strategies. Valley United Way stands behind the power of our community to create change. We recruit people and organizations from all across our community who bring passion, expertise, and resources needed to get things done. We invite you to be a part of that change. Thank you to those who give, advocate, volunteer, and help make a DIFFERENCE in our community.

2

LOOK AROUND


WHO WE ARE MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT AND BOARD CHAIR

In the grand scheme of things, twenty-five years may not seem like a long time. However, at Valley United Way

twenty-five years marks an

ENORMOUS amount of time and change that started with the creation of our Youth Leadership YOUTH

Program, that’s about to embark on their 25th year of leadership training. In many ways, the establishment of the

LEADERSHIP Program back in 1990 marked the beginning of a change from a United Way that did two basic things-and did them very well for the benefit of the entire Valley- fundraising and allocations.

In 1990, Valley United Way’s Board of Directors believed that United Way had to do more and be more to remain relevant

in a rapidly changing world that was still years away from the Internet, e-mail, You Tube and Facebook. United Way would have to continue to be

EXCELLENT at fundraising and allocations, but it would also have to become more involved as a day-to-day

leader in the life of the community. Though not necessarily sure what that would look like, they knew that change was coming, and they needed to get in front of it-and so they did.

Jack Walsh, President & COO Valley United Way

The Youth Leadership Program was the first indication that Valley United Way would expand its role in order to ensure that donors’ funds could have

an even bigger impact on the community. Soon thereafter came the establishment of a Volunteer Center which eventually added the incredible Corporate Volunteer Council and the High School Volunteer Council to its expanding role of marshalling complement and multiply the value of the financial support generated in the annual campaign.

VOLUNTEER activity to

About the same time, our Partner Agency Council was transformed into the Valley Council for Health and Human Services, an extraordinary collaborative of the Valley’s health and human service providers that has just celebrated its twentieth anniversary. It fostered the Healthy Valley Project and the eventual

RECOGNITION of the Valley as an All American City winner. The council

has established a high bar for cooperation and collaboration, difficult to find in most communities.

Today’s United Way is a center of sometimes dizzying activity. From building houses made out of food (Harvest House) to recruiting and training volunteer leaders for our community (Leadership Greater Valley) to fostering healthy lifestyles (Corporate Fred Ortoli, Board Chair & Owner of Fred Ortoli Photography

Cup and Healthy Team), we are fortunate to have so many friends and partners who also recognize the value of a common vision for a

BETTER community. Come to our offices on just about any day of the week, and you are likely to see someone teaching

first aid, conducting mental health trainings, working on a Valley food task force studying hunger or simply conducting a Board or

Committee meeting.

And yet, we can never forget that all of this community activity links back directly to the results of the Annual Community Campaign. What’s special

about that

CAMPAIGN is that it is for the entire community and not just one agency or cause, though donor choice does provide those opportunities as

well. United Way is that special place where we all come together, take off our individual hats and work together for the common good of the Valley.

Change is inevitable in life, and we always try to be on the cutting edge with new programs, new collaborative efforts and new technology. What

does not change is our common vision for a better community. Please take your time in reading through the pages of this annual report to see how we work to create that better community and who we work with to make it possible. The one word that binds all of the pages together is and volunteer support of the community, Valley United Way would not exist.

LOOK AROUND

THANKS. Without the financial 3


WHO WE ARE BOARD OF DIRECTORS Officers Fred Ortoli* Chair Fred Ortoli Photography Ronald Villani* Vice-Chair University of New Haven Gregory P. DeStefano* Treasurer Marcum LLP Jimmy Tickey* Secretary Jimmy’s World Network, LLC

Members of the Board Jean Axtell Energizer Personal Care Jennifer Bull Dworken, Hillman, LaMorte, & Sterczala, P.C. Adrienne Cabral** Community Volunteer

MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION

Michael Figueroa** Community Volunteer Daniel Fitzgerald Basement Systems

William Purcell Greater Valley Chamber of Commerce Kristen Urso-Rio GE Corporate

Michael Gnibus GE Global Patent Operation

Richard Rosen The R.H. Rosen Group

Johanne Henderson BIC Corporation

Janice Sheehy* Webster Bank

Joseph D. LoPresti Barnum Financial Group, An Office of MetLife

Thomas A. Steeves, Jr.* American IT Solutions Inc.

Carol Merlone Ansonia Board of Education John McFarland Hubbell Incorporated Edward W. Miller, Jr. Ned Miller Agency, A Division of Starkweather & Shepley

Thomas Sutnik Attorney-at-Law Dominick Thomas Cohen & Thomas Philip White Better Packages, Inc. *Executive Committee **Resigned

Patrick Charmel Griffin Hospital Eileen Lopez-Cordone UI Holdings Corporation John DeGray Point Energy Solutions

4

United Way Board of Directors

(Terms to Expire 2014) Joseph Andreana Judith W. Augusta Jean Axtell Kenneth Baldyga William C. Bassett William H. Bassett Bertha M. Belden Trish Bruder Richard Bshara Jennifer Bull Freeman Burr Adrienne Cabral William Carlson Lauren Casalveri Patrick Charmel Sharon Closius Maureen Coffey James E. Cohen Timothy Connellan Theresa Conroy Matthew Conway Eugene Coppola Eileen LopezCordone Marilyn Cormack Virginia Costigan Susan Coyle Joseph Crisco John Daniell Charlene DeFilippo James DellaVolpe John DeGray Ed DeMarseilles Gregory P. DeStefano Harry DiAdamo Angelo Dirienzo Julius Douglas Martha Dulla* William Dunlop Eleanor M. Duplese Frederick J. Elmy Richard Feher* Daniel Fitzgerald Jo-Lynn Flaherty

Thomas A. Gabianelli Chris Gallo James Geissler Linda Gentile Michael M. Gnibus David J. Grant David M. Grant Thomas I. Greene James Guarrera* Richard Haskell* Johanne Henderson Rob Kane Kevin Kelly M. Elizabeth Kennard Themis Klarides Richard Knoll David Labriola Mark A. Lauretti Joseph D. LoPresti Ernestine Luise Nicholas Luise Michael S. Marcinek Carol Merlone Edward W. Miller, Jr. W. Kurt Miller William M. Miller William M. Miller, Jr. Sue Millican H. Tom Nickse William C. Nimons Deborah Noack Fred Ortoli Frank Osak Joseph Pagliaro, Jr. Ruth Parkins William C. Partington Al Patuzzi* Mary L. Pepe Jason Perrillo Lynne Perry William C. Powanda Calvin K. Price Melissa Pucci William Purcell

Patricia Reynolds* Jack Ribas Arthur C. Rider Kathleen Riddle David M. Rifkin Kristen Urso-Rio Richard Rosen George J. Ryan Rob Saracino* Eileen Schumann* Kenneth V. Schwartz Paula Scinto Elsie Scott Brian Sexton Janice Sheehy Maria A. Smith Madeleine M. Sobin Ramon S. Sous Karen Spargo Colleen Spooner Anthony Staffieri Gregory J. Stamos Charles M. Stankye, Jr. Thomas A. Steeves, Jr. Diane Stroman Thomas Sutnik Christine Syriak Nicholas Tarasovic George R. Temple Dominick J. Thomas Jimmy Tickey Roseanna Tufano* Robert C. VanEgghen Robert J. VanEgghen Ronald Villani Thomas J. Welch Philip L. White Michael Wynne Teresa Younger* *2013 Agency Representatives to the Corporation

LOOK AROUND


WHO WE ARE COMMITTEES

CORPORATE VOLUNTEER COUNCIL Kathy Belanger Market Data Retrieval

Kate Feeley Kellie Hayden Benchmark Senior Living BIC Corporation at Split Rock Cheryl Biros Johanne Henderson Ned Miller Agency, A Gina Ferreri BIC Corporation Division of Starkweather Iroquois Pipeline & Shepley Operating Company Libby Hitchcock Sikorsky Aircraft Cathy Bork Marie Figueroa The Nielsen Company Sikorsky Aircraft Sue Hitchcock Sikorsky Aircraft Jennifer Brand Amy Fitzgerald Prudential Basement Systems Linda Hvizdo Homewood Suites by Harry Burlakoff Daniel Fitzgerald Hilton Minuteman Press Basement Systems Lynn Kieley Dana Cackowski Trish Fontes Newtown Savings Bank People’s United Bank First Niagara Bank Fran Leach Carolyn Cargnel Jessa Francis GE Corporate Prudential Sikorsky Aircraft Rochelle Liska Shayla Cody Maureen Funke Sikorsky Aerospace CBS The Whiting Turner Services Contracting Company Douglas Cormack Donna Mackey Benchmark Senior Living Thomas Gallo Altair Global Relocation at Split Rock Sikorsky Aerospace Services Charlotte Madar Virginia DeDad Professional Travel Royal Service Travel Arlene Gardella Planners Altair Global Relocation Sharon DeDonato Kate Marks DeDonato Building David M. Grant Marks of Design Contractors, LLC David M. Grant Caterer’s Michael Marques Brian Donohue Nancie Gray Hilton Garden Inn SSC, Inc. Greater Valley Chamber of Commerce Jennifer Martin Bryn Doyle Newtown Savings Bank Barnum Financial Group, Jill Griffin An Office of MetLife CDW-G Jennifer Martone Sikorsky Aircraft Denise Fantorella Maureen Grohe The Nielsen Company Prudential Michael Mattox The McIntyre Group Antionette Hallet Community Volunteer

LOOK AROUND

Sue Millican Iroquois Pipeline Operating Company

Michael Ragozzine Al-Lynn Sales

Kimberly Tabb Prudential

Tammy Mulrooney A Quick Pick Crane/QP Industrial Storage

John Ready Lex Products MaryEllen Samatulski TD Bank

Alexis Tomczak PerkinElmer

Fred Ortoli Fred Ortoli Photography

Michael Scala Lex Products

Joseph Pagliaro, Jr. Edward F. Adzima & Riverview Funeral Homes

Katie Scinto R.D. Scinto, Inc.

Heather Pantaleo BPA Worldwide, Inc.

Daniel Shea Wells Fargo Bank Janice Sheehy Webster Bank

Ruth Parkins Iroquois Pipeline Operating Company

Bonnie Sinclair Arson Productions

Suzanne Paternoster Pitney Bowes

Fernando Solis Hampton Inn Shelton

Sarah Peck The McIntyre Group

Thomas A. Steeves, Jr. American IT Solutions, Inc.

Richard Tortora First Niagara Bank Kathleen Turk BPA Worldwide, Inc. Kristen Urso-Rio GE Corporate Rob VanEgghen DRS Seismic Consultants LLC

“We invite you to be a part of the change. You can GIVE, you can

ADVOCATE, and you can VOLUNTEER. That’s what it means to

LIVE UNITED.”

Robert VanEgghen PerkinElmer Natalie Vetro GE Global Patent Operation

David Pendagast Keller Williams Realty Carol Pendagast Serra & DelVecchio Insurance Ramon Peralta Peralta Design Geraint Phillips PerkinElmer Nancy Pino Gexpro-Rexel Holdings Erin Rafferty GE Corporate

GE Volunteers at Ansonia Nature Center to help with the playground at Redwing Pond House, a nature based preschool

5


WHO WE ARE COMMITTEES MARKETING COMMITTEE

NOMINATING COMMITTEE

The R.H. Rosen Group

Fletcher Thompson

Dan Ianelo Sacred Heart University

Fred Ortoli Fred Ortoli Photography

Tim Koletsos BIC Corporation

Philip White Joseph Pagliaro, Jr. Better Packages, Inc. Edward F. Adzima & Riverview Funeral Homes

William C. Partington, Chair Naugatuck Valley Savings & Loan

Chair – Richard Rosen Michael S. Marcinek

Eileen Lopez-Cordone UI Holdings Corporation John McFarland Hubbell Incorporated

Melissa Pucci Yale School of Nursing Office of Admissions

VOLUNTEER CENTER ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Barbara Quinn United Methodist Homes

Jo-Lynn Flaherty City of Ansonia

Suzanne Reilly TEAM, Inc.

Terri Houghton

Shaye Roscoe Boys and Girls Club of the LNV

Chair – Melissa Pucci Community Volunteer Yale School of Nursing Office of Admissions Gail Catlin Seymour Board of Education

Ruth Parkins Iroquois Pipeline Operating Company

Martha Z. Denstedt Griffin Hospital

Carol Kirby Community Volunteer

Sue Westine TEAM, Inc.

Reina Marasco Valley Regional Adult Education

Board of Directors

Deb Noack Sacred Heart University Fred Ortoli Fred Ortoli Photography

Executive Committee

Allocation Committee

Finance Committee

John Ready LEX Products Thomas A. Steeves, Jr. American IT Solutions, Inc.

President & COO

Director of Development

Campaign Cabinet

6

Accounting & IS Coordinator

Marketing Committee

Administrative Assistant

High School Volunteer Council

Volunteer Center Director

Corporate Volunteer Council

Youth Leadership

Volunteer Center Advisory Committee

LOOK AROUND


WHO WE ARE CAMPAIGN CABINET

Chair – Thomas A. Steeves, Jr. American IT Solutions, Inc.

Robert Gambardella Concierge Tax Services, LLC. Michael Gnibus GE Global Patent Operation

MESSAGE FROM THE CAMPAIGN CHAIR This year’s annual report features stories, statistics and photographs

that capture the tremendous efforts of Valley United Way. They prove that when we look around and get involved, we can make a dramatic difference in our

VALLEY community.

The Annual Community Campaign lies at the center of Valley United Way

Chris Hill Paychex, Inc.

and provides the funding to make all our work possible. This past year, I had

Suzanne Major Treasured Time, Inc.

Members and the staff at Valley United Way, we were able to change the approach

Francis Michaud, Jr. Michaud, Accavallo, Woodbridge, & Cusano, LLC Alan Mogridge Valley YMCA

the honor to serve as the Campaign Chair. With my dedicated team of Cabinet of the campaign to make a measurable

DIFFERENCE.

Valley United Way is

Thomas A. Steeves, Jr. Senior Account Executive of American IT Solutions, Inc.

not just a fundraiser anymore, but a convener for community issues. We pull together all the necessary people to ensure that results happen. This year, we tried to show that to our community, to tell our story and the stories of people whose lives we impact every day. We no longer

Fred Ortoli Fred Ortoli Photography

raise money from Labor Day to Thanksgiving, but year round because people need our

Lauren Price-Kazzi HUB Healthcare Solutions

this innovative and

HELP year

round. We thought outside the box and held events like Fall Kids Fest and Denim & Diamonds. With

CREATIVE approach to the campaign, I foresee huge success.

Bill Pucci Community Volunteer

Melissa Pucci Yale School of Nursing Office of Admissions

Way offers. Being Campaign Chair was my opportunity to give back for all they have given me. Over the

William Purcell Greater Valley Chamber of Commerce Janice Sheehy Webster Bank

I pride myself on making the Valley a better place to live, work, and play. I am a lifelong

resident of the Valley and growing up, my

FAMILY used several services like the ones Valley United

past year, I have seen first-hand the influence this organization has on the community and until now, never realized just how much good Valley United Way does for the people who live and work here.

I would like to take a moment to thank our Board Members, volunteers, staff, and

DONORS!!!

Without you, we would not have been able to help the hundreds of people who benefit from our programs & services. As we move into next year’s campaign, your continued support is crucial to ensure that we

Thomas Sutnik Attorney-at-Law

can continue to help those in need. I’d like to especially thank Sara Aylward for all of her guidance

Jimmy Tickey Jimmy’s World Network, LLC.

DEDICATION to Valley United Way.

and new ideas to help change the way we approach our fund raising efforts and Jack Walsh for his

Ronald Villani University of New Haven

LOOK AROUND

ways to engage our donors, I aim to make the next campaign a huge success!

I am eager to take what I have learned & experienced and share that with the

COMMUNITY

as I take on the upcoming 2014-2015 Annual Community Campaign. With great new initiatives and

7


WHO YOU ARE LEADERSHIP GIVERS

TOCQUEVILLE SOCIETY*

United Way of America established this prestigious society as a national leadership recognition program to recognize individual donors who contribute $10,000 or more to their local United Way. William C. & Judy Bassett Ernestine & Nicholas Luise James Van Hoff Peggy & Ron Villani Bassett Family Fund The Friend A. Russ Fund The Raymond P. Lavietes Foundation

THE COMMODORE ISAAC HULL SOCIETY

Valley United Way’s leadership-giving program, The Commodore Isaac Hull Society, recognizes those caring individuals who commit themselves to providing substantial support to our United Way. Members of the Hull Society are caring and sharing people who lead by example in the community by ensuring that needed human and social services continue to be made available to all citizens of the Lower Naugatuck Valley. These are the people who are in the forefront of the struggle to provide a better way of life to every age and generation. 2013-2014 Commodore Isaac Hull Society Members (This list is accurate as of 3/31/2014): Admiral’s Circle*

Captain’s Circle*

Janet & Raymond Blanchette Ellen DiVerniero Shane Eddy An-Ping Hsieh

Stacey Abbott Jean Axtell Michael Barber Corey Barrette Bertha Belden Paige Bennett Kevin Bishop James Braun David Bruhn Jeffrey Bruner Jennifer Bull Freeman Burr Wayne Cable Joe Capozzoli William Chiarelli Kevin Comeau Virginia Costigan Mildred Davey Dawn DeLucia Patricia Desautels Diane & Greg DeStefano Daniel Dittmar Laura Donahue Lisa Johns-Elmy & Frederick Elmy

Annual gifts of $5,000$9,999

Commodore’s Circle* Annual gifts of $2,500$4,999 Joseph Emanuel Lawrence Janesky Stephen Mais Richard Matthies Stephanie & William Miller, Jr. Ned Miller Joseph Pagliaro, Jr. Louis Pizzoli Charles Slife William Sperry Jack Walsh

8

Annual gifts of $1,000$2,499

Linda & Robert Fiscus Linda Gabor Patricia Gaudreau Dorothy & Dennis Gleason Diane Goodman David Gray Sal Graziano Mario Guevara Rodriguez John Hill Barry Johnson III Jayne Johnson Rosemary Kelly David Kimball Joseph Koslowski Ami Kothari Ellen Kritemeyer James Lane Eugene Lasko Michael Law Araya Lindratsirikul Joseph LoPresti Joseph Lux John McFarland Norman Meldrum Francis H. Michaud, Jr. Mary Ann Miller Rosemarie Miller Christopher Mills

George Mitchell Deborah Noack Brian Noccioli Karen Olsen Joseph Perkowski Frank Pickman William Purcell John Putorti Kristie Raines Ellen Rinaldi Hector Rosario Scott Rupff Bea & George Ryan John Ryan Manish Shanbhag Kimberly Stellavato Diane Stroman Thomas Sutnik & Lynn Miller Patricia & Nicholas Tarasovic David Taylor Carlos Texidor Kevin Thom Dominick Thomas Carl Vensel Howard Wardlow Phil White Desiree Wolfe Keith Wulinsky

The following companies Michaud, Accavallo have one or more leadership Woodbridge & Cusano, LLC Miller Investment givers in the Commodore Ned Miller Agency, A Division Isaac Hull Society: of Starkweather & Shepley Aetna Insurance Barnum Financial Group, Oxford Public Schools An office of MetLife People’s United Bank Basement Systems Prudential Better Packages Shelton Public Schools BIC Corporation Sikorsky Aircraft Blanchette Sporting Goods TEAM, Inc. Boy Scouts of America – United Parcel Service – Housatonic Council East New England Cohen & Thomas United Technologies Dworken, Hillman, LaMorte, UnitedHealthcare Sterczala, P.C. Valley United Way, Inc. Edward F. Adzima & Webster Bank Riverview Funeral Homes Wells Fargo Energizer Personal Care First Niagra *This level has General Electric anonymous donors Greater Valley Chamber of Commerce Hubbell Incorporated ION Bank Iroquois Pipeline Operating Company

LOOK AROUND


WHO YOU ARE Valley United Way, its 25 Partner Agencies and thousands of Valley residents who use the many programs and services provided thank the following community individuals, businesses and professionals for their support of our 2013-2014 Annual Community Campaign. A Quick Pick Crane Service Inc. AAA Southern New England Abbott & Shapiro LLC Abbvie ACT – Spooner House AD-Merica Corp. Aetna Andreana, Joseph Anheuser Busch Ansonia Public Schools Ansonia, City of Apicella, Testa & Company PC Aquarion Water Company AT&T Augusta, Judy Averill, Richard Bank of America Barnum Financial Group, An office of Metlife Basement Systems, Inc. Bassett Family Fund Bassett, William C. Belden, Bertha Bertie, Sara Better Packages BHcare BIC Corporation Big Y Supermarket, #99 Blanchette Sporting Goods Blanck, Anne Blume, Hartwig Boy Scouts of America – Housatonic Council Boys & Girls Club of the LNV Bradley, Henry Bridgeport Correctional Center

LOOK AROUND

Cable, Violet Calvert Safe and Lock Capitol Barber Shop Carey & Guarrera Catholic Charities Cavagnuolo, Erma Center Stage Theater Clark, George Bush Clorox Company Comcast Comfort Keepers #325 Connery, James Coppola, Eugene Costigan, Virginia Cota Jr., Chief Andrew L. Curri, Michael Curtiss Ryan Inc. Dabkowski, Kathleen Daniell, John Davey, Mildred* DeGray, John Derby, City of Derby Day Care Center Derby Football Club Derby Public Schools DeStefano, Greg & Diane Dib, Donald Dirienzo, Angelo DiVerniero, Ellen Donahue, Laura Donohue, John Drennan, Joseph Dripchak, Stephen Duchess Family Restaurant Dworken, Hillman, LaMorte, Sterczala, P.C. Dziedzic, Charles Earthworks Excavating, Inc. Edward F. Adzima & Riverview Funeral Homes

Elmy, Fredrick &Lisa Energizer Personal Care Equifax First Niagra Fiscus, Robert Flynn, Joseph Frontier/Citizens Gambacini, Nelson Ganz, Glenn Gateway Community College General Electric Ghilardi, Madeline Giardina, Joan Girl Scouts of Connecticut Gleason, Dennis Glover, Leroy Goldson Sr., Bruce Grassy Hill Lodge Graziano, Salvatore Griffin Hospital Hannon, William HR Consulting/ Staffworks Hubbell Incorporated Hull Funeral Home Huntington Electric IBM Corporation & Retirees IDA International Industrial Wood Products Co. Inc. Innophos ION Bank Iroquois Pipeline Operating Company ITW Izzo, Markanthony Jenkins-King Funeral Home Jimmy’s World Network, LLC

THANK YOU DONORS!

Jones Family Farms Julia Day Nursery Klavins, Aldis Kligfeld Michael Kuzma, Alice Lamzi, Joseph Lerman, Robert LNV Parent Child Resource Center Luise, Nicholas & Ernie Macy’s Magellan Midstream Partners, L.P. Mahoney, Mary Maksymiw, Michael Mascolo, Louise Matthies, Richard McKane, Charles Michaud, Accavallo, Woodbridge & Cusano, LLC Miller Investment Miller Ward Funeral Home Miller, William Minuteman Press Moll, David Murphy, Robert Murphy, Maureen Naugatuck Valley Health District Naugatuck Valley Savings and Loan Ned Miller Agency, A Division of Starkweather & Shepley Insurance New Haven Legal Assistance Nickse, Tom Nimons, William Noack, Deborah Northeast Utilities Company

NPI Medical Ortoli, Josephine Oxford Liquor Shoppe LLC Oxford Public Schools Oxford, Town of People’s United Bank Perkin Elmer Precisely Pier 1 Imports Pitney Bowes Plastic Molding Technology Platt Tech High School Prudential Annuities Pucci, William R.D. Scinto, Inc. R.J. Slowik Consulting Reynolds, Patricia Ritch, Greenberg, & Hassan, PC Rogucki, Eileen Rosen, Richard Rte 67 Self Storage Ryan & Tyma LLP Ryan, George Sampieri, Robert Santa, Norman Schwartz, Kenneth Schwing, John Serra & DelVecchio Insurance Seymour Public Schools Seymour, Town of Shaffer, Beverly Shelton, City of Shelton Economic Development Corp. Shelton Public Schools Sikorsky Aircraft Sobin, Madeline SONCCA Splan, Shawn Stamos, Gregory

State Employees Campaign Stern, Samuel Sutnik, Thomas M. & Lynn Miller Tamis, Donald Target TD Bank TEAM, Inc. Testa, Andrew The Friend A Russ Fund The Yudkin Family Fund Thomas, Dominick Torrco Townline Self-Storage, LLC Tucker, Lewis Turski, Stanley UIL Holdings Corporation United Parcel Service – East New England United Technologies UnitedHealth Group Valla, Dominic Valley Chamber of Commerce Valley United Way Villiani, Ron & Peggy Vishay Americas, Inc. Volpe, Frederick Walmart Webster Bank Wellmore Behavioral Health Wells Fargo Wells, Royal Wells, Thomas Wheeler, Wesley White Hills Express Inc. *Deceased

Plus the hundreds of employees who generously contributed through their workplace. If we have inadvertently omitted or misspelled your name, please accept our apologies. (Accurate as of 3/31/14)

9


WHO YOU ARE Valley United Way is fortunate to have the support and cooperation of several other funders in carrying out much of our work in the community. We want to acknowledge the following funders: Graustein Memorial Fund:

GRANT FUNDING

State Department of Education:

The Valley Community Foundation:

Provided support for the early childhood initiative in Ansonia.

Provided support for the Valley Council for Health & Human Services and the early childhood initiatives.

Supported early childhood initiatives in Ansonia and Shelton through regular and matching grant The Friend A. Russ Fund: programs. Made an annual contribution that supports the full range of community programs supported by Katherine Matthies Foundation: Provided significant funding for early childhood Valley United Way. initiatives and for special projects of the Valley The Prudential Foundation: Council for Health & Human Services. Provided a grant to support the Valley Council of Health & Human Services Food Security Raymond P. Lavietes Foundation: Task Force. The Prudential Foundation has also This generous funding helped to support the made a generous grant to support the Youth Volunteer Center and the Youth Leadership Leadership Program. Program. They also provide a grant to fund our storyteller position which handles our graphics operations as well as some marketing and communications efforts.

Webster Bank: Provided a special grant for our campaign assistant to help us with our most important work – the Annual Community Campaign.

HERITAGE FUND Thanks to your generosity during our annual campaigns, Valley United Way has been able to fund health and human services programs that touch thousands of people in our community. But annual gifts alone cannot fund the future. As our community continues to change and grow, our Annual Campaign may be hard pressed to keep pace with emerging needs. It is for this reason – to prepare for our community’s future-that the Heritage Fund has been created. The Heritage Fund is a special fund, separate from our annual campaign that serves as Valley United Way’s permanent endowment. It is our promise to the community that we will always be here to help those in need. The Heritage Fund is your opportunity to leave your mark and to invest in your community’s future, by making a gift that will be remembered for its enduring benefits toward our community. Your attorney or financial advisor can help guide you in selecting what’s best for you.

10

Gift Opportunities Include: • A bequest through your will • Gifts of cash, stocks, or real estate • Life income gifts • Memorial & tribute gifts

For more information, please contact Valley United Way.

LOOK AROUND


WHAT WE DO ABOUT THE CAMPAIGN Change is exactly what Valley United Way needed this year and exactly what we plan to continue moving forward. This year we brought on a new campaign chair, Thomas A. Steeves, Jr. who is the Senior Account Executive at American IT Solution, Inc. With his fresh outlook, young energy, and desire to make the Valley a better place, he took the campaign by force. With a mix of seasoned veterans and new members to the campaign cabinet, monthly strategic planning took place to brainstorm ways to improve the campaign and help raise more revenue. Aside from the traditional annual appeal and workplace giving campaign, Valley United Way worked on several community events to help raise additional funds and brand awareness for the organization. Campaign is not over until June 30, 2014 so let’s work together and reach our goal of $1,050,000!

AMOUNT ACHIEVED $829,070.90 (As of 3/31/14)

GOAL $1,050,000

100% 50% 107 companies•77 individual donors 40 employee campaigns•3 special events 0%

79%

Valley United Way CAMPAIGN UNDERWRITERS Webster Bank

GET INVOLVED

Dworken, Hillman, LaMorte, & Sterczala, P.C. • Edward F. Adzima & Riverview Funeral Homes • Fred Ortoli Photography • Griffin Hospital • Iroquois Pipeline Operating Company • Ned Miller Agency, A Division of Starkweather & Shepley Insurance • Townline Self-Storage LLC • Venman & Co. LLC

11


WHAT WE DO ACT Spooner House Susan Agamy Ansonia Public Schools Fran Perrotti

Carl Vensel Mary Wojiski Chris Mills, President, Bic North America

Ansonia, City of Jo-Lynn Flaherty

Boy Scouts-Housatonic Council Kevin Bishop

Basement Systems, Inc. Dan Fitzgerald Kellie Santiago

Boys and Girls Club of the LNV Shaye Roscoe Marie Ambrosini

Better Packages, Inc. Phil White Mary Ann Miskowitz

Catholic Charities Diane D’Amato

BHcare Trudy Higgins Joyce Macauda BIC Corporation Doris Main Elaine Bataille Don Castaldi Leslie Cullen Anthony DeRosa Laura Doyle Sue Feher Karen Georgia James Geraci David Gray Kellie Hayden Johanne Henderson Bill Hoagland Christian Keater Mary-Ellen Lacasse Jennifer Lysik Frank O’Connor Andy Rosato Dipesh Sugandhi

12

Curtiss Ryan Inc. Jennifer Keever Derby Day Care Center Gladys Lazurek Derby Public Schools Dina Gotowala Dworken, Hillman, LaMorte & Sterczala, P.C. Jennifer Bull Energizer Personal Care Jean Axtell Steven Charles Lisa Cook Mona Kadiwar Anthony Pietrini Cheryl Amicone Katrina Dinnebeil Melanie Martin Angela Sijuwade

Eric Bretan Michael Law Elizabeth Parady Jennifer Yomoah Alex Del Solar Kristine Koehler Christina Saikus General Electric Bob Smits, Site Champion Fran Leach, Co-Chair Kristen Urso-Rio, CoChair Val Bogner Stefanie Gavrish Matt Battaglia Diane Kosarko Olgo Lapinaite Lindsey Iacovacci Michelle DiNatale LaShanda Williams Natalie Vetro Peter DiMauro Vivek Shankam Marian Hampel Andrew Bond Mahender Padma Girl Scouts of Connecticut Erin O’Meara Greater Valley Chamber of Commerce Nancie Gray Griffin Hospital Christian Meagher Ken Roberts

CAMPAIGN VOLUNTEERS

HR Consulting/ Staffworks Robin Pedo

Serra & DelVecchio Insurance Carol Pendagast

Hubbell Incorporated John McFarland Nicole Clark Vic Flagello Chris McCarthy Kim Ramalho

Seymour Public Schools Pat Boyle

Iroquois Pipeline Operating Company Ruth Parkins

Shelton Police Trish Bruder

Julia Day Nursery & Kindergarten Sharon Kelly

Seymour, Town of Rory Burke

Shelton Public Schools Kathy Riddle

Target Melissa Fusco TEAM, Inc. Sue Westine

Vishay Americas Kim Boveri Paula Scinto Webster Bank Michael Sciamanna Yankee Gas Susana Trejo

SONCCA Patrice Baldwin

LNV Parent Child Resource Center Susan Kelly Naugatuck Valley Health District Colleen Lindholm NPI Medical David Kelly Susan Testone Oxford Public Schools Timothy Connellan

Campaign Volunteers of Energizer Personal Care

Oxford, Town of Kelly Weymer People’s United Bank Cathy Ferreira-Golino Mark Solorzano Mylena Vilaverde Joseph Perun

GET INVOLVED


WHAT WE DO 2013-2014 SPECIAL AWARDS #1 Overall Campaign Energizer Personal Care CEO Leadership Award Phil White Better Packages, Inc. Chairman’s Award General Electric CVC Corporate Citizen of the Year Prudential Annuities

Top Dollars Raised Campaigns (Combined Corporate and Employee Giving of $10,000 or more)

Bassett Family Fund BIC Corporation Energizer Personal Care General Electric Griffin Hospital Hubbell Incorporated Iroquois Pipeline Operating Company People’s United Bank Shelton Public Schools Sikorsky Aircraft Webster Bank

Consistently Outstanding Iroquois Pipeline Operating Company

Employee Giving Awards Gold

Most Creative Campaign Basement Systems, Inc.

Better Packages, Inc. BIC Corporation Boy Scouts of America – Housatonic Council Dworken, Hillman, LaMorte & Sterczala, P.C. Greater Valley Chamber of Commerce Energizer Personal Care Hubbell Incorporated Iroquois Pipeline Operating Company Valley United Way

Most Enthusiastic Campaign BIC Corporation Most Improved Campaign Webster Bank Outstanding Coordinator & Team Energizer Personal Care Top “Techy” Award Hubbell Incorporated

GET INVOLVED

(Employee per capita giving of $125 or more)

Bronze (Employee per capita giving of $50 - $74.99)

Basement Systems, Inc. NPI Medical United Parcel Service – East New England

Vishay Americas Webster Bank Employee Participation Awards Gold (Employee participation of 75% or more)

Better Packages, Inc. Boy Scouts of America – Housatonic Council Derby Day Care Center Dworken, Hillman, LaMorte & Sterczala, P.C. Energizer Personal Care Greater Valley Chamber of Commerce Iroquois Pipeline Operating Company Ned Miller Agency, A Division of Starkweather & Shepley Insurance Valley United Way Vishay Americas Silver (Employee participation of 50%-74%)

ACT- Spooner House BIC Corporation Hubbell Incorporated United Parcel Service Venman & Co. LLC Bronze (Employee participation of 25%-49%)

Basement Systems, Inc. BHcare Catholic Charities LNV Parent Child Resource Center SONCCA

CAMPAIGN AWARDS Corporate Giving Awards Gold (Corporate per capita gifts of $75 or more per employee)

BIC Corporation Energizer Personal Care Iroquois Pipeline Operating Company Ned Miller Agency, A Division of Starkweather & Shepley Insurance

Iroquois Pipeline Operating Company Top Dollars Raised Corporate Giving – Gold Employee Giving – Gold Employee Participation – Gold

Silver (Corporate per capita gifts of $60-$74.99 per employee)

Hubbell Incorporated Multiple Awards BIC Corporation Top Dollars Raised Corporate Giving – Gold Employee Giving – Gold Employee Participation – Silver

CDW-G competes in horseshoes for Corporate Cup 2013

Energizer Personal Care Top Dollars Raised Corporate Giving – Gold Employee Giving – Gold Employee Participation – Gold Hubbell Incorporated Top Dollars Raised Corporate Giving – Silver Employee Giving – Gold Employee Participation – Silver

13


WHAT WE DO 44th CHARLES H. FLYNN HUMANITARIAN AWARD Joe Andreana of Oxford has been selected as the 44th Charles H. Flynn Humanitarian Award (the Valley’s oldest and most prestigious community service award) winner by Valley United Way. It is named for the late editor of The Evening Sentinel and has been presented annually since 1971. The award is presented for a lifetime of service to the community, encompassing more than one town or organization. Andreana is a perfect example. His involvement with Valley nonprofits is almost LEGENDARY in scope, including time spent with Valley United Way where he was a member of the Board of Directors and the Executive Committee. He also served as Chair of the Annual Community Campaign in 2002 and 2003. He is currently a member of the Board of Directors and Chair of the Strategic Affairs Committee for Griffin Health Services. He is a member, serves on the BOARD OF DIRECTORS, and is a consultant for the United Methodist Frontier Foundation. He is also a former member of the Board of Directors for the United Methodist Homes Foundation. Joe serves on the Finance Committee for the Great Hill United Methodist Church and is a former Chairman of the Administrative Church Council. As a supporter of the BOYS & GIRLS CLUB of the Lower Naugatuck Valley since 1964, he serves on its Board of Directors, was President of the Board and was Chair of their Capital Campaign efforts. He has been a member of the Advisory Board to the Katharine Matthies Foundation and the Valley Advisory Committee to the Community Foundation for Greater New Haven. In the Town of Oxford, Joe was a member of the Oxford Economic Development Commission and also was Co-Chair of the Oxford bicentennial celebration. He has received numerous awards for his community service, including the 1994 Service to Youth Award of the Boys & Girls Club of the Lower Naugatuck Valley, the 2009 Sharon Bryce Holly Award presented by United Way’s Volunteer Center, and the 2002 Secretary of State Volunteer Award presented by the CT Secretary of State. Boys & Girls Club of America presented him with the National Service to Youth Award in 2013 and he was a 2001 recipient of the Greater Valley Chamber of Commerce’s prestigious GOLD SEAL AWARD. In his professional life, Joe held major managerial positions with GTE Service Corporation, Southern New England Telephone and AT&T. He also served as President and CEO of the Oxford Economic Development Corporation and was the Executive Director of the CT Alliance of Boys & Girls Clubs. Joe also put his talents to work as an Adjunct PROFESSOR at the PAST RECIPIENTS 2013-- Nick and Ernie Luise 1998-- William M. Miller 1983-- Richard L. Schuster College of Business at Sacred Heart University and as a Senior Associate 2012-- David M. Grant 1997-- Julius I. Douglas 1982-- Edmund P. Strang 2011-- Harry DiAdamo, Jr. 1996-- Mary L. Pepe 1981-- Anna L. LoPresti for Diversified Nonprofit Services LLC. He received a B.A. in Industrial 2010-- Domminick J. Thomas, Jr. 1995-- Madeleine Sobin 1980-- Joseph A. Doyle Administration from Union College and an M.B.A. from the University of 2009-- Fred Ortoli 1994-- John F. Costigan 1979-- Edward W. Miller 2008-- Jack Ribas 1993-- Raymond P. Lavietes 1978-- Franklin S. Harris Connecticut. 2007-- Diane Stroman 1992-- John W. Gatison, Jr. 1977-- Margaret C. Belden 2006-- William C. Nimons 1991-- Doris L. and G. Bush Clark 1976-- Audrey E. Heusser He currently resides in Oxford with his wife Patricia. They are the 2005-- David M. Rifkin 1990-- G. Jeffery Reynolds 1975-- Irene G. Smith 2004-- Janice Sheehy 1989-- Bartholomew J. Hennessey 1974-- Edward J. Cotter, Jr. parents of two children and four grandchildren. PROUD 2003-- Kenneth E. Schabile 1988-- Rev. Francis M. McKenna 1973-- Donald W. Mark 2002-- Joseph A. Pagliaro, Sr. 2001-- Norman Santa 2000-- William C. Bassett 1999-- William D. Coffey

14

1987-- Edward Cowey 1986-- Frank Casalveri 1985-- George Berman 1984-- Helen T. Ragusa

1972-- L. Raymond Darling 1971-- Alice Russ Cochran

GET INVOLVED


WHAT WE DO PREPARING YOUTH TO SUCCEED

Valley United Way is committed to making our community a safe place for children to grow up happy, with confidence and leadership skills, and prepared to succeed in school and life. By working with our partner agencies, we can assure parents that their children have a fun, safe environment with caring mentors while they are at work.

DID YOU KNOW?

15 million kids nationally-a quarter of our youth population-are left unsupervised after school everyday.

163,111 families are in need of child care in CT due to both parents working full time or single parent households Julia Day Nursery & Kindergarten is open Monday-Friday 6:45 AM to 5:30 PM to accommodate the working parent Derby Day Care enrolls 33 3-5 year old children teaching them skills in science, art, music & movement, cooking, library, computers, critical thinking and outdoor play

2,300 kids in the Valley attend the Boys and Girls Club of the LNV Boy Scouts of America-Housatonic Council have 1,000 1st-5th graders enrolled There are 280 kids enrolled in SONCCA Over

GET INVOLVED

Statistics from Child Care Aware of America and AfterschoolAlliance.org

15


WHAT WE DO STRENGTHENING FAMILIES

Valley United Way is building strong kids, families and communities by working to strengthen families through health, wellness, and financial stability.

DID YOU KNOW?

Valley United Way and its partners work diligently to ensure that all Valley families have access to healthy food options, offer free financial literacy classes, and work with youth suffering from behavioral health issues to prevent future risky behavior. In our Valley community alone,

7,524 families receive help from

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) TEAM’s Meals on Wheels served over

52,000 meals to home bound seniors last year

49.5% of U.S. adolescents meet criteria for mental health disorders, which is why we have over 300 kids served at the Parent Child Resource Center Valley United Way offers 1 free class per month on financial stability & planning ranging from college planning to getting retirement ready Stats from PCRC, Findyouthinfo.gov


WHAT WE DO HELPING PEOPLE IN CRISIS Our United Way works with individuals and families during times of emergency or crisis and assures that Valley residents seeking help will receive the resources and support needed to meet their basic needs.

DID YOU KNOW? Valley United Way collaborates with local United Ways and the State of Connecticut to provide 2-1-1 a free 24-7 information line that connects the caller to a trained professional who will help match their health and human service needs.

1,127 Valley residents requested a need for housing assistance or shelter last year This winter, 1,138 Valley residents required heating or utility assistance Spooner House and TEAM, Inc. were in the Top 5 agency referrals of 2013 In 2013, 2-1-1 received 11,883 requests for services from Valley residents

GET INVOLVED

Stats from 211CT.org

17


WHAT WE DO CAMPAIGN KICKOFF EVENT

Electrified for the 2013-2014 campaign‌Hubbell Incorporated hosts The 46th Annual Community Campaign Kickoff, September 17, 2013!

115 community leaders, corporate representatives, residents and volunteers gathered together at Hubbell to celebrate Valley United Way and launch the start of the 2013-2014 campaign. Thomas Over

A. Steeves, Jr. took on his first task as the brand new Campaign Chair by announcing his team of volunteers, the Campaign Cabinet. With energetic and fresh new faces the campaign team launched into an exciting journey to raise

$1,050,000 to support Valley United Way and our 25 partner agencies working hard in Ansonia, Derby, Oxford, Seymour, and Shelton.

18

GET INVOLVED


WHAT WE DO KIDS FEST On Saturday October 5, 2013 Valley United Way teamed up with Wells Hollow Creamery to host FALL KIDS FEST! This one day event allowed kids to enjoy a day at the farm and participate in a ton of fall activities. Over 150 kids came out to enjoy: Hay Rides

Pumpkin Decorating

FACE PAINTING

Feeding the Animals

COSTUME CONTEST Coloring Pages SPIDER LEG RING TOSS Candy Corn

Bowling BOUNCE HOUSE Bean Bag Toss

K-Dog DJ Services

Volunteers included Echo Hose Hook & Ladder Co.1, Shelton Plumb Memorial Library and Valley United Way Youth Leaders SPONSORS: Al-Lynn Sales • Connecticut Basement Systems • Dental Associates of CT • Minuteman Press • Valley Karate

GET INVOLVED

DONORS: Big Y World Class Market (Ansonia) • Entertainment Cinemas • ShopRite (Derby) • Sports Center of CT • Stop and Shop (Ansonia & Shelton) • Walmart (Derby & Shelton)

19


WHAT WE DO DENIM & DIAMONDS EVENT

On MARCH 1, 2014 Valley United Way held their Second Annual Denim and Diamonds Fundraiser at Molto Bene Italian American Kitchen. Dressed in their favorite pair of jeans and their bling, guests danced, wined, dined and won beautiful diamond jewelry! Special THANKS to our donors and SPONSOR! Mountain Road Wine & Liquor

20

EVENTS COMMITTEE

Chair – Thomas A. Steeves, Jr. American IT Solutions, Inc. Tim Koletsos BIC Corporation Suzanne Major Treasured Time, Inc. Alan Mogridge Valley YMCA Joseph Pagliaro, Jr. Edward F. Adzima & Riverview Funeral Homes Lauren Price Kazzi HUB Healthcare Solutions Jimmy Tickey Jimmy’s World Network, LLC.

GET INVOLVED


WHAT WE DO CORPORATE CUP

CDW-G’s

At the start of this year’s Community Corporate Cup, Joe Simone vowed to win back the Corporate Cup title that they lost to Fletcher Thompson a year ago, and that’s just what they did! They posted an impressive win in what turned into a two-team battle with BIC for the title. In 2012, CDW-G finished less than a single point behind Fletcher Thompson. It wasn’t that close this time as the margin of victory was just over seven points. Along the way, CDW-G picked up individual event wins in Darts, Mini-Golf and Wiffle ball. TEAM, Inc. was the only other team to win more than one event with back-to-back victories in Corn Hole and Horseshoes. After three straight third place finishes, BIC moved up to second place this year and won the Bocce

TOURNAMENT for the second time. With

the exception of the first event when Griffin Hospital won the Bowling Tournament, CDW-G held the scoring lead throughout the year. Though BIC

CLOSE

did get as as 1 point after the Horseshoes Tournament. Defending Champion Fletcher Thompson dropped to third this year, but had the consolation of picking up the win in the Corporate Cup’s signature Healthy Team competition.

MULTI-YEAR

In the closest race this year, two former champions, Griffin Hospital and PerkinElmer, were separated by a little over one point, with Griffin taking fourth place. That marked a major turn around for Griffin who finished eighth a year ago and eleventh in 2011.

2013 Final Standings: 1. CDW-G 2. BIC Corporation 3. Fletcher Thompson 4. Griffin Hospital 5. PerkinElmer

197.94 190.78 170.27 165.25 164.21

6. BHcare 7. TEAM Inc. 8. Barnum Financial Group 9. NPI Medical 10. Gordon Rubber

LEADERSHIP GREATER VALLEY

134.94 115.18 92.99 89.13 19.25

2013 Corporate Cup Walk/Run

18

In November of 2013, Leadership Greater Valley congratulated its th class of graduates! Organized by a unique collaboration among Valley United Way, the Valley Council for Health & Human Services and the Greater Valley Chamber of Commerce, LGV provides adults the opportunity to build leadership skills and become better educated

17 adults were chosen for this program in 2013 that were aspiring to become community leaders. They underwent a 9 week course exposing within their community.

them to all aspects of life in the Valley, including its history, business ethics, economic development and nonprofit groups. Upon graduating the program, Valley United Way’s Volunteer Center helped to place each

17

Leadership Greater Valley Class of 2013

GET INVOLVED

of the participants into a volunteer leadership opportunity right here in the Valley. Several graduates are now members of our own Corporate Volunteer Council! Leadership Greater Valley is unlike other programs because it goes beyond the corporate world to develop the vision and drive for community change.

21


WHAT WE DO VOLUNTEER SOLUTIONS Volunteer Solutions provides Valley residents and nonprofits the one stop shop to find or list volunteer opportunities through our online database. Free to use and available 24/7, Volunteer Solutions links those looking to volunteer with those in need. Check us out at www.valleyunitedway.org and click volunteer!

22

GET INVOLVED


WHAT WE DO HIGH SCHOOL VOLUNTEER COUNCIL The purpose of the High School Volunteer Council is to unite Valley high schools which include: Ansonia, Derby, Emmett O’Brien, Oxford, Seymour, and Shelton to work together on community service projects that will meet the needs of our community. The goal is to provide the opportunity for high school students to learn and practice leadership skills, develop a wider knowledge of community needs and implement one major volunteer project a year that will make a great impact on the community, all while interacting with students from other schools. Ansonia High School Advisor: Jillian Durante Andrew Godfrey Jen Godfrey Louis Nicoletti Taylor Ross Derby High School Advisors: Brian Nutcher Jennifer Dunnuck Brianna Feola Matthew Kreiger Marissa Nicolari Benjamin Slowik Emmett O’Brien Advisors: Michael Varonka Marie Meresko Jenna Hoffman Lexi Mollica Kayla Thompson

GET INVOLVED

Seymour High School Advisors: Erin Scozzafava Caroline Sweeney Matt Cosciello Justine Inzero Katie Petroski Brett Wabno Jake Walkinshaw Shelton High School Advisor: Jerry Kelly Michelle Kellett Danielle Letendre Charlie O’Keefe Michele Siu Oxford High School Deyja Gentile Samantha Orner Brian Suto Jimmy Winger

The High School Volunteer Council met at the Sports Center of CT with collected items in hand to send to soldiers in Afghanistan (sponsored by First Niagara Bank)

23


WHAT WE DO YOUTH LEADERSHIP PROGRAM The Youth Leadership Program, since its start in 1990, unites Valley teens who have a desire to get involved with their community and learn the skills needed to become future leaders. The students learn about community needs in the Valley, the importance of nonprofit agencies, and the role volunteerism plays in addressing those needs. At the conclusion of their year, Youth Leaders are given the opportunity to allocate funds to teen-focused community programs.

Ali Dunne Co-President Sacred Heart Academy

Samantha Orner Co-Secretary Oxford High School

“Joining Youth Leadership was one of the best decisions we could have ever made as individuals. It has helped us to mature as young adults & leaders in our schools and communities. We have gotten much more involved in our schools & communities in a positive way and have made everlasting friendships & bonds with our fellow Youth Leaders in the program. ” ~ Ali and Louis “Youth Leadership has taught me to be a very outgoing and outspoken person within a small group of people. It taught me to be passionate about what I believe in and it has had a great effect on my life” ~Sam

“Being a youth leader means that you stand out among your peers while at school and in other activities. But when you come together with other youth leaders, you all are one unit and are able to work together as a team” ~Elise

Louis Nicoletti Co-President Ansonia High School

Elise Sullivan Co-Secretary Shelton High School

THIS YEAR:

24 YOUTH LEADERS 24

$74,000 ALLOCATED BY 917 VOLUNTEERED YOUTH LEADERS SINCE 1990

HOURS

GET INVOLVED


WHAT WE DO YOUTH LEADERSHIP PROGRAM Andrea Alabarell Derby High School

Emma Baker Hill Regional Career Magnet High School

Allison Rafferty St. Joseph High School

Devan Cargnel St. Joseph High School

Travis Pyka Oxford High School

Dan Barnard Holy Cross High School

Courtney Salinsky St. Joseph High School

“Being a Youth Leader means growing up. As life goes on, we mature and become more familiarized with the world we live in & the community that surrounds us. With this, we realize we are all being called to help spread love & awareness that good still exists.” ~Devan “To be a Youth Leader you don’t have to be the best. You have to be you; a special individual who cares about others more than you care about yourself.” ~Travis

GET INVOLVED

Bethany Catlin St. Joseph High School

Matthew Salinsky St. Joseph High School

Deyja Gentile Oxford High School

Michele Siu Shelton High School

Abbrianna MacGregor Derby High School

Sylwia Zamrizycka Hill Regional Career Magnet High School

“Youth Leadership has been one of the most rewarding experiences that I have participated in. Not only do you make lasting friendships with the people you meet here, but Chris Majchrzak you enhance and develop new qualities that are instilled in a Ansonia good leader.” High School ~Chris M.

Stacie Nolan Shelton High School

Alyssa Orlofsky Ansonia High School

“Youth Leadership has exposed me to a multitude of culture, ways of life, beliefs and interests & I have come to appreciate all of them.” ~Hudson

Hudson Boles Shelton High School

“Youth Leadership has given me the skills to be successful later on in life. It has helped me to develop and improve my techniques with talking among peers, speeches, cooperative groups and in Chris Pawlowski becoming a great leader overall” ~Chris P. Shelton High School

“Youth Leadership has helped me to grow as a person and break out of my shell. I have discovered who I am as well as what I would like to do with my life-help people. I cannot express how Gianna Tadduni Emma Schwarz truly thankful I am for this Oxford Oxford program.” High School ~Emma High School

“Being a Youth Leader has given me the opportunity to give back to my community. United Way has allowed our team to make such a great impact in such a small Valley. It allowed me to step-up and become a better & more passionate leader.” ~Gianna

25


WHAT WE DO CORPORATE VOLUNTEER COUNCIL

The Corporate Volunteer Council is a coalition of more than 50 Valley businesses who give back to our community through the spirit of volunteerism. The CVC coordinates food and clothing drives, plans and provides resources for large scale

COMMUNITY

projects, & shares best practices for corporate social responsibility. The CVC believes in the value of giving back to the communities where they do business and promote volunteerism among their employees. The Corporate Volunteer Council strives to make the

26

GREATEST community impact possible.

CVC Co-Chairs Lynn Kieley (Newtown Savings Bank), Katie Scinto (R.D.Scinto) and Kristen Urso-Rio (GE)

GET INVOLVED


WHO WE HELP

WHO WE HELP

BACK TO SCHOOL

Each August, members of the Corporate Volunteer Council join together for the Back-to-School Clothes for Kids Project. This project selects one town in the Valley (on a rotating basis) and provides low-income children from that town’s elementary schools with brand new clothes & school supplies to gear up for the first day. The goal of this project is to provide new clothing to children in need at the start of the school year in an effort to improve attendance on the first days of school and boost confidence. This year Chatfield-LoPresti and Bungay Schools in Seymour were chosen & children were presented with bins filled with two complete outfits, underwear, socks, sneakers, a winter coat and a backpack filled with school supplies. Thanks to the generosity of First Niagara, 200 $20 gift cards to the Sports Center of Connecticut were given out, as well as hundreds of sunglasses from Lex Products.

THIS YEAR:

TO DATE:

160 STUDENTS 41 COMPANIES 2,545 OUTFITTED

MAKE A DIFFERENCE

PARTICIPATED

$514,540 SPENT

STUDENTS ADOPTED ON VALLEY KIDS

27


WHO WE HELP WEEK OF CARING- HARVEST HOUSE V

Valley United Way and its Corporate Volunteer Council helped to alleviate hunger in the Valley by building & assembling the 5th Harvest House on Shelton’s River Walk. The House contained approximately

100,000 food items, which have now been distributed to the Valley’s food banks to help meet the needs of some of our most vulnerable citizens. This past September, HUNDREDS of volunteers helped to fill the shelves, constructed by the students at Emmett O’Brien Technical High School in Ansonia, with a bountiful supply of non-perishable food items. This year’s Harvest House featured great activities for all, such as a visit from some animal friends from the Beardsley Zoo, face painting, arts &

crafts, a comedy magic show, moon bounce and a huge amount of fun things for families to participate in. A great highlight was a performance by Center Stage who brought a cast of 100 students that performed an amazing play for the community to enjoy! A

“CAN”tastic Construction Competition was

held where teams constructed structures built out of non-perishable food items. Shelton Firefighters and Ambulance Corps served a Hot Diggity Dog and Harvest Soup Supper, as well as a Pancake Breakfast. An event created to

28

HELP feed Valley families became a community festival of caring.

MAKE A DIFFERENCE


WHO WE HELP HOLIDAY GIVING Valley United Way’s Corporate Volunteer Council (CVC) loved playing the holiday elf as they donated

75 Valley families! Led by CVC members, 26 Valley companies, bought, wrapped and delivered gifts valued at $10,000. These gifts allowed parents to enjoy the

hundreds of beautifully wrapped gifts to

spirit of the holidays with their children free from the worry of financial burden. The CVC’s spirit of giving

MAGIC of the holiday season and is woven through all of the projects they are engaged in throughout the year. So many children had their WISHES come true thanks to

allowed kids to experience the

the members of our Corporate Volunteer Council!

Priya Raghunatha

Valley United Way


WHO WE HELP BEYOND THE BACKPACKS

Valley United Way is recognized yearly for helping over 200 kids with our Back to School Clothes for Kids Program, but what happens after the backpacks?

Throughout the year, Valley United Way, our Corporate Volunteer Council & compassionate volunteers continue our efforts to PROVIDE students with the resources and skills needed to succeed. At the start of the 2012-2013 school year, 191 students from Irving School got the supplies and confidence to start the year off right. In the months that followed, volunteers returned to Irving to give the school a fun makeover by painting the halls and remodeling the library. Students are now excited to spend time reading. The students at Irving also benefited from the “26 Acts of Kindness” following the Newtown tragedy. With the help of our friends at State Farm Insurance, hundreds of TEDDY BEARS were delivered to the elementary school. Principal Jennifer Olsen was thrilled to receive the donation of teddy bears because it fit in perfectly with her new reading initiative, B.E.A.R (Be Enthusiastic About Reading). Each student was able to take their teddy bear home with them and practice reading to their new furry friend. By receiving school supplies, teddy bears and a library makeover, the students at Irving School found the excitement in learning again.

Without the help of valley united way, none of this would have been possible -JENNIFER OLSEN

360° OF HELPING

Paul spent the majority of his career working at Ansonia Copper & Brass. Each year Paul DONATED a portion of his paycheck to the Valley United Way campaign. As he learned more about the organization, he fell in love with our mission and desire to help the community. With each annual community campaign, Paul became an ADVOCATE for Valley United Way and served as an employee campaign coordinator at Ansonia Copper & Brass. He rallied employees in support of Valley United Way and helped to increase the giving in the work place campaign. Little did he know that his $5 a week contribution would eventually go to save his life.

30

MAKE A DIFFERENCE


WHO WE HELP 360° OF HELPING(CONT’D)

In 2007, Ansonia Copper & Brass had a major layoff and Paul lost his job. In a time of economic crisis, Paul felt all the effects of unemployment and spiraled downhill. Recently Paul has been residing at the Valley YMCA. Still with no source of income, he struggled to pay his rent. With no other options, the YMCA was going to have to evict him. With perfect timing, Valley United Way issued the YMCA a $2,500 special needs grant that the Y chose to use on Paul’s backed rent and ultimately kept him from being HOMELESS. As we tell all of our donors, give while you can, because you never know when you may need our help. Paul learned this firsthand and is so GRATEFUL Valley United Way was able to keep him off the streets.

I gave to United Way all my life and never thought I’d need it back -PAUL SCHUMACHER

REALIZING A DREAM

Meet Fred Dapp, a senior at Shelton High School and a club member at the Boys & Girls Club. Just 4 years ago Fred was struggling in school, dealing with a rough single parent home life and had no dreams for the future ahead. Little did he know that a 10 hour community service requirement would CHANGE his entire life. Those 10 volunteer hours spent at the Boys & Girls Club turned into 4 months and then into a part-time job in the 6 & 7 year old room. Through teaching those kids simple tasks like tying their shoes or doing their homework, he learned just how much of a difference he can make and through that, the value of his own SELF WORTH. Fred began getting involved in teen programs at the Club teaching him leadership skills, GIVING BACK to the community, and that he can accomplish anything he set his mind to. Since joining the Club, he has gone from being a struggling student to an honors student, from never seeing college as an option, to having been accepted to 8 schools of his choice, and recently being awarded Youth of the Year with the honor of representing the Valley in a statewide competition.

Without the Boys & Girls Club I wouldn’t be the person I am today -FRED DAPP

MAKE A DIFFERENCE

31


WHO WE HELP FOOD SECURITY TASK FORCE

Since 2005, Valley United Way’s Corporate Volunteer Council has been collecting hundreds of thousands of food items at their biennial Harvest House project.

100,000

After food items were distributed in just 6 weeks in 2011, we knew the need for assistance had grown in our Valley community. At this year’s Harvest House, even more food was collected but it still wasn’t enough. As a direct result, the major concern for our Valley’s food insecure was brought to the table at the Valley Council for Health & Human Services Executive Board meeting. These crucial conversations led to the creation of the Food Security Task Force, led by Valley United Way & TEAM, Inc. The Food Task Force will work to identify the current organizations & systems that are addressing food insecurity in the Valley region & gain an understanding of the current capacity to address the issues. Parrallel to the creation of the task force, Prudential had contacted United Way with a desire to provide financial assitance for the hungry. Rather than their funding going to a one time food purchase, Prudential decided to give a substancial grant to research the issue of and access to food in the Valley. This spring, the Valley Hunger Study will kick-off and run for the next 4 months. The Food Security Task Force will become a model for other communities as we move forward in researching the causes, extent and solutions for hunger issues in the Valley. Check back with us soon for !

SECURITY

HUNGER

RESULTS

HOWE AVENUE FIRE RELIEF

The recent tragic fire on Howe Avenue in Shelton has brought with it a very touching and effective response from

INCREDIBLE

the community. The main story is the job done by Echo Hose Hook & Ladder Co. 1 firemen and other first responders in saving the lives of all the tenants. Echo Hose then used the fire house as a base for providing the short term needs of those affected, while also setting up the Howe Avenue Relief Fund. In the days after the fire, many community organizations began actively assisting in the lives of those displaced.

32

EFFORTS to restore normalcy to the MAKE A DIFFERENCE


WHO WE HELP HOWE AVENUE FIRE RELIEF(CONT’D) Valley United Way’s biggest concern was, what next? What would happen to the near displaced tenants, many of whom were considered low income? Valley United Way decided to award to TEAM, Inc.- who did an amazing job serving as case managers for the fire victims- to help cover the expense of relocation. Valley United Way knew that we weren’t going to be able to solve the problem single-handedly. C.O.O. Jack Walsh, was in communication with the Valley Community Foundation who was eager to by matching our $5,000 grant. In addition, VCF contacted Photo captured and donated by Kevin J. Czarzasty professional fire photographer of onscenefirephoto.com the Katherine Matthies Foundation who generously donated $10,000 to the cause. To add to the efforts, Griffin Hospital contacted Valley United Way to see how they could make the best impact on the situation and after learning that TEAM, Inc. was helping to re-place tenants, made a generous contribution of up to $10,000. As a result of one concern, one initial phone call & one Valley community all working together, up to were able to provide assistance to the Shelton fire victims and help bring back normalcy to their lives. A special thank you to all of the first responders and TEAM, Inc. for a job well done!

30

$5,000

HELP

$30,000

ALICE

ALICE

Meet ALICE (Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed). represents the men and women of all ages & races who get up each day to go to work like all of us, but who aren’t sure if they’ll be able to put dinner on the table each night. These people are 1 emergency away from . They are our child care workers, our mechanics, our home health aides, store clerks & office assistants – all workers we cannot live without. The United Way ALICE Report provides the detailed analysis & data that explains why so many are struggling and gives us a research based model to identify and best respond to the needs of our community. Valley United Way has joined forces with other United Way’s across the state to participate in this study of financial in Connecticut. Continue to check our website for results and action items.

CRISIS

HARDSHIP

MAKE A DIFFERENCE

33


HOW WE DO IT VALLEY UNITED WAY IN ACTION

34


HOW WE DO IT VALLEY UNITED WAY IN ACTION

35


HOW WE DO IT MESSAGE FROM ALLOCATIONS CHAIR LAST

This past year marked my as Chair of the Allocations Committee, as I have moved on to a job outside the area. However, it was an important year for the Committee as the process underwent a significant change with the addition of the “third leg” of the allocations stool – the Priority Issue grants. Valley United Way’s Board of Directors has identified early childhood education as a priority for United Way funding and set aside $25,000 from the allocations pool to address the issue. United Way has been working in collaboration with others on the issue for years. The Allocations Committee was that the new process worked so well in its first year, and we look forward to continuing success with this effort. The Committee also continued to provide special funding outside of the normal allocations funding for a variety of agencies who identified other special needs not normally addressed through their regular budgets. This year over were distributed to agencies through this process. The funds for this process come from funds designated for special areas of need identified by the donors at the time they made their gifts. The bulk of the Committee’s work during the period covered in the audit in this report is the traditional agency allocations. Over were distributed through this process. Our volunteer

PLEASED

$20,000

$475,000

reviewers continue to report that the funded agencies are doing incredible work with the dollars allocated to them, but that there is never enough funding to meet all the needs that exist. That is what makes the work of the Committee so daunting, yet so . It is important to note that the growth of designations during the campaign continues to reduce the pool of dollars available for traditional allocations. During Adrienne Cabral Allocations Chair the fiscal year, that amounted to $93,125 paid to over organizations separate from the partner agencies. Partner agencies also received an additional $20,000 in designations over and above the $475,000 through regular allocations. I want to thank all of our Committee members for their service during the allocation process this year, and for all the years that I have served on the Committee. I want to especially thank our panel heads who work year round on all three of our funding processes. It has been a to serve the community and I wish them well in the future.

REWARDING

150

DEDICATED

PLEASURE

ALLOCATIONS COMMITTEE MEMBERS Richard Bshara City of Ansonia Adrienne Cabral Community Volunteer Mark Daconto Basement Systems, Inc. Peter Galla Naugatuck Savings Bank

James Geissler Valley Regional Adult Education Jim Geissler Valley Regional Adult Education David J. Grant David M. Grant Caterers Robert Hilliard Community Volunteer

36

Billy Holt Youth Leadership

Sharon Massafra Brian Sexton Home Instead Senior Care Community Volunteer

Tracy Hussey Shelton Board of Education

Jennifer Mezzapelle Youth Leadership

Phyllis Sochrin Community Volunteer

Kurt Miller Town of Seymour

Carla Sullivan Community Volunteer

Patricia Reynolds Conti Associates

Robert VanEgghen PerkinElmer

Rob Lesko DiMatteo Group Joseph LoPresti Barnum Financial Group, An Office of MetLife

Richard Rosen The RH Rosen Group

Rob VanEgghen DRS Seismic Consultants LLC Laura Wabno City of Derby Thomas Welch Welch, Teodosio, Stanek & Blake Phil White Better Packages, Inc.

MAKE A DIFFERENCE


HOW WE DO IT PREPARING YOUTH FOR SUCCESS

PARTNER AGENCIES

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southwestern CT Matches children age 6-14 with a caring adult mentor who provides the support needed for a child to grow and mature.

Boys and Girls Club of the Lower Naugatuck Valley

Special Allocation Designation Allocation $6,000 $245

$93,900

$1,224

$2,773

$43,500

$1,329

$1,500

$3,000

$27

Works with young girls to encourage self esteem, leadership skills, academic success, and community service.

$6,000

$94

Julia Day Nursery & Kindergarten

$2,000

$299

Works with youth after school to provide a positive place to play and learn.

Boy Scouts- Housatonic Council Works with youth to build leadership skills and community service abilities.

Derby Day Care Center Educational preschool with loving care for children whose parents work or attend job training.

Girl Scouts of Connecticut

Provides full time, before and after school care for children ages 3-8.

Recreation Camp Offers an affordable summer camp experience, teaching children swimming, boating, canoeing, and windsurfing on the Housatonic River.

SONCCA

$4,000

$10,000 $1,500

$40

Provides before and after school care at six school-based licensed sites and all day kindergarten childcare at two licensed sites in Seymour and Oxford.

Valley Family Resource Center- TEAM Inc. Provides a relaxing atmosphere where families can come together and share in the exhilarating experience of parenthood.

MAKE A DIFFERENCE

$10,000

37


HOW WE DO IT STRENGTHENING FAMILIES

PARTNER AGENCIES

Catholic Charities Offers counseling for those facing hardship or mental health issues.

International Institute Provides technical immigration and citizenship assistance to new Americans as well as language skills, job training and assistance to refugees.

LNV Parent Child Resource Center Provides assessment and treatment of children and families with psychological problems.

Meals on Wheels - TEAM, Inc. Delivers hot, nutritious meals and a friendly visit to home bound seniors.

United Services Organization (USO) Serves non-military needs of members of our armed forces throughout the world.

Special Allocation Designation Allocation $40,000 $437

$1,400

$50,000

$1,280

$3,204

$10,000

$450

$168

$45,000

$1,840

$12,000

$535

Valley YMCA Offers aquatics, childcare, preschool, health & fitness, youth & adult sports, summer camp/sports clinics and SRO housing opportunities to Valley residents.

Visiting Nurse Association of South Central CT Provides comprehensive home health and community services, specializing in cardiac, oncology, pediatric, maternal, rehab and mental health care.

Wellmore Behavioral Health

$4,000

$18,000

Offers substance abuse education, prevention, therapy and support services.

38

MAKE A DIFFERENCE


HOW WE DO IT PARTNER AGENCIES HELPING PEOPLE IN CRISIS American Red Cross - CT Region

Allocation Provides Valley wide disaster services, blood donations, CPR training, and many other $21,000

Special Designation Allocation $236

services.

Area Congregations Together - Spooner House Offers shelter for the homeless and provides hunger relief & aid to those in need through the Valley Food Bank.

BHcare - Center for Domestic Violence Services Provides domestic violence counseling for adults, families, and children.

$30,000

$225

$29,000

$2,022

$8,750

$624

$4,600

Father McKenna St. Vincent de Paul Society Offers tangible assistance on a person-to-person basis for Valley community members in need.

2-1-1 A free service which provides informational resources to those in need.

$8,778

New Haven Legal Assistance Provides free legal advice, representation, community education & policy advocacy for low-income residents of Greater New Haven and Lower Naugatuck Valley areas.

$2,000

Rape Crisis Center of Milford Works to eliminate sexual assault through risk prevention and violence prevention education; empowers victims to regain control of their lives through counseling and advocacy.

MAKE A DIFFERENCE

$23,000

$74

39


HOW WE DO IT MESSAGE FROM TREASURER The audited figures for the period ending JUNE 30, 2013 are reported elsewhere in this report in more detail, but a review will show that it was a CHALLENGING year for United Way. After three straight years with a surplus, we ended the fiscal year with a deficit of approximately $32,000. Though Greg DeStefano we held the line on our operating Marcum LLP costs, a drop in campaign coupled with an increase in donor designated funds resulted in a deficit. The audited figures for the period ending June 30, 2013 reflect a year in which total revenue dropped from $1,246,828 to $1,075,274. Valley United Way saw net campaign revenues drop from $882,377 to $844,560. Non-campaign revenue, which includes grants, special events and in-kind revenues, dropped dramatically during the year, amounting to $230,714, down from $364,451. However, almost that entire amount was related to grants running out and in-kind support related to the previous year’s move to new office space no longer being needed. During the fiscal year, $599,180 were allocated to the community through ALLOCATIONS, grants and designations. Direct allocations to partner agencies

40

amounted to $475,278. An additional $123,902 were distributed through grants and designations with nonpartner agencies receiving $93,125 of the total. The growth of donor DESIGNATIONS is an area of concern as they continue to rise as a percentage of total giving. However, they remain below national averages. During the fiscal year, our total expenses dropped from $1,113,859 to $1,107,476 resulting in a deficit of $32,202 for the year. Our reserves remain strong at $559,779 within the PRUDENT three to six month operating reserve guidelines established by the Board of Directors. It is significant to note that the audited figures do not show the full financial impact of Valley United Way. Many of the activities conducted by Valley United Way - and highlighted throughout this annual report result in SIGNIFICANT additional resources benefitting the community. Those activities primarily carried out by our Corporate Volunteer Council included clothing children for the new school year, conducting monthly food and clothing drives and carrying out a wide array of special holiday projects that benefit the neediest in our community. The value of those efforts is enormous, even though not reported as part of the audited figures. It has been my PLEASURE to serve as Treasurer and to work with a very talented and devoted Finance Committee.

MAKE A DIFFERENCE


HOW WE DO IT STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES (Per audit 6/30/13) June 30, UNRESTRICTED NET ASSETS UNRESTRICTED REVENUES AND OTHER SUPPORT Campaign contributions-current Less donor fields of service-current Less donor designations-current Provision for uncollectible pledges Foundation grants Special events and other Investment income In-kind

2013

TOTAL CAMPAIGN

$985,237 (28,319) (96,103) (16,255) 844,560

$1,053,759 (36,283) (76,922) (58,177) 882,377

TOTAL UNRESTRICTED REVENUES AND OTHER SUPPORT

173,177 55,818 94 1,625 $1,075,274

216,320 68,048 425 79,658 $1,246,828

ALLOCATIONS AND FUNCTIONAL EXPENSES Allocations Functional expenses (including donated services, and facilities of $10,625 and 79,658) Community program services Management and general Fund raising Total functional expenses TOTAL ALLOCATIONS & FUNCTIONAL EXPENSES (DECREASE) INCREASE IN NET ASSETS NET ASSETS at beginning of year restated for 2011 NET ASSETS AT END OF YEAR

MAKE A DIFFERENCE

2012

475,278

479,449

349,784 106,332 176,082 632,198 $1,107,476

348,402 116,074 169,934 634,410 $1,113,859

(32,202)

132,969

591,981

459,012

$559,779

“A community of connected

INDIVIDUALS, all people, united and working TOGETHER for the benefit of all, is at the HEART of what UNITED

WAY

represents.

$591,981

Youth Leaders act as Santa’s helpers as R.D. Scinto hosted “Pictures with Santa” and a toy drive for TEAM’s Toys 4 Kids program.

41


HOW WE DO IT FINANCIAL POSITION

(Per audit 6/30/13) ASSETS June 30,

2013 2012

CURRENT ASSETS Cash and cash equivalents Investments Accounts receivable Contributions receivable, less allowance for uncollectible amounts of $111,344 and $160,845 Grants receivable Prepaid expenses

$297,376 99,941 700

$307,558 41,240 2,700

TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS

293,052 31,200 18,420 740,689

328,891 36,200 39,189 755,778

TOTAL ASSETS

100,555 $841,244

107,612 $863,390

Equipment less allowance for depreciation of $86,551 and $140,425 LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

Gregory P. DeStefano – Chair Marcum LLP Jennifer Bull Dworken, Hillman, LaMorte & Sterczala Michael S. Marcinek Fletcher Thompson

CURRENT LIABILITIES Accounts payable and accruals Designations and allocations payable Deferred revenue – grants Deferred revenue – other TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES NET ASSETS- UNRESTRICTED

FINANCE COMMITTEE

$11,734 117,023 123,698 29,010 281,465

$24,869 118,258 95,073 33,209 271,409

559,779

591,981

$841,244

$863,390

William M. Miller Jr. Miller Investment

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

Allocation/Designations/Focus Areas Payouts per audit 6/30/2013 10% 2%

Allocations - $475,278

9% Designations - Partner Agencies - $10,700

79%

Designations - NonPartner Agencies $52,706 Special Needs - Focus Areas - $60,496

Emmett O’Brien students building Harvest House V

42

MAKE A DIFFERENCE


Jack Walsh President & Chief Operating Officer

Carol Anzidei Administrative Assistant

Sara Aylward Director, Resource Development

Samantha Kelly Chief Storyteller 2013

Patricia Tarasovic Director, Volunteer Center

Find us online at www.valleyunitedway.org

Allissa Rhodes Raymond P. Lavietes Storyteller 2014

Nancy Roshka Accounting and Information Systems Coordinator

Joyce Saltes Office Volunteer

LIVE UNITED

Whitney McClendon Campaign Assistant

43


Valley United Way A leading philanthropic organization serving the towns of Ansonia, Derby, Oxford, Seymour, and Shelton. Our Mission: To improve lives by mobilizing the caring power of our community through philanthropy, volunteerism, and collaboration. Our Goal: To improve the quality of life for people living & working in the Valley by funding programs and organizations that make a measurable difference. Our Purpose: To raise, invest, & leverage funds annually to support 25 health, human, & social service agencies whose work benefits those living and working in our 5 Valley towns. We Focus Our Efforts On: Preparing youth to succeed, strengthening families, and helping people in crisis. We pride ourselves on our initiative to collaborate with all sectors of society (individuals, business, nonprofit and government) to create long-term social change that produces healthy, educated and financially stable individuals & families. Although United Way is an internationally recognized organization, each branch of United Way is completely localized. All the money raised by Valley United Way stays in our local community. We hold ourselves accountable for dollars raised and the causes that these dollars are invested in (the fields of income, education, and health) by utilizing a team of highly skilled community volunteers to allocate funding where it is needed most in our community.

UNDERNEATH EVERYTHING WE ARE, UNDERNEATH EVERYTHING WE DO, WE ARE ALL PEOPLE, CONNECTED, INTERDEPENDENT, UNITED. AND WHEN WE REACH OUT A HAND TO ONE, WE INFLUENCE THE CONDITION OF ALL. THAT’S WHAT IT MEANS TO

LIVE UNITED


Annual Report 2013 - 2014  

Valley United Way's Annual report for 2013 - 2014

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you