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Valley Guide

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December 2008 - F ebruar Februar ebruaryy 2009 December

Visit us in color on line at www.valleyguideonline.com


A General Store filled with Gifts, Goodies, Buffalo & Highlander Meat

The Swinging Bridge Restaurant Antiques & Collectibles Primitives & Decorative Items Rt. 219 North — just north of airport road — Lewisburg, West Virginia www.therubyrooster.com • 304-497-2177 Wm. M. Grover Galleries Main St., Hot Springs, VA & Bacova, VA 540-839-6336 www.wmmgrovergalleries.com 19th/20th century American & European fine art, decorative objects, Napoleonic art & memorabilia

Food Service Hours:Mon-Tues-Weds 8am-2:30pm Thurs-Fri-Sat-Sun 8am-9pm Route 311, Paint Bank, VA 24131 info@paintbankgeneralstore.com 540-897-5000 fax 540-897-5005 Warmhearted hospitality at Train Depot Lodge nestled in a tranquil Allegheny Mountain village along Potts Creek

Luxury Bed & Breakfast 4 rooms, 1 Suite, & The Caboose all with private baths Fishing Hunting Hiking Quiet Relaxation Call for details on our Family-size Log Cabin Rental Highway 311 Paint Bank, VA 24131 540-897-6000 1-800-970-DEPOT

FIRST DAY INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL featuring

Ireland

Thursday, January 1, 2009 1:00 - 5:00 p.m. Food • Entertainment • Fun

Hunting & Trapping 2008-2009 Virginia

Crow through March 15 (Mon, Wed, Fri & Sat only) Squirrel: Gray, Red, Fox general firearms through Feb 28 Bear firearms Nov 24-Jan 23 for certain counties Opossum & Raccoon through Feb 28 Grouse through Feb 9 *Rabbit Rabbit through Jan 31 Quail & Pheasant through Jan 31 Deer & Elk firearms through Nov 28, Jan 5-March 28 in some counties, archery Dec 1-Jan 3, muzzleloading Dec 13-Jan 3 in most counties Turkey firearms Nov 27, Dec 8-Jan 3, April 11-May 2, May 4-18 - April 4 Youth Hunt Bobcat firearms through Feb 28 Fox through Feb 28 Trapping: Fox, Bobcat, Opossum, Raccoon through Feb 25 Beaver, Mink, Muskrat, Weasel, Otter Nov 30-Feb 25 Trapping Rabbit w/box traps through Jan 30 Continuous Hunting/Trapping Season: Groundhog, Opossum, Skunk, Nutria & Coyote in most counties

West Virginia Wild Boar archery through Dec 28 Deer archery through Dec 28 muzzleloader Dec 10-15 Deer: bucks only in select counties Nov 19-Dec 1 Deer: antlerless in select counties Nov 19-Dec 1, Dec 3-8, Deer: antlerless, youth class Dec 25 & 26 in select counties Dec 26-29 Bear gun select counties through Nov 25, Dec 3-29 Squirrel: Gray, Black, Albino, Fox through Jan 30 Bobwhite Quail, Ring-necked Pheasant through Jan 5 Ruffed Grouse, Raccoon through Feb 24 Cottontail, Snowshoe, Varying Hare through Feb 25 Crow only Thurs, Fri, Sat Dec 31-March 2 Spring Youth Turkey Hunt April 20 Trapping Raccoon, Rabbit, Hare, Red Fox & Gray Fox, Bobcat, Mink, & Muskrat through Feb 25 Trapping Fisher through Jan 30 Trapping Beaver through March 30 Continuous Open Season: Coyote, English Sparrow, European Starling, Opossum, Pigeon, Skunk, Weasel, Woodchuck Totally Protected • NO Open Season: Mountain Lion, Elk, Otter, Hawks, Owls, Falcons, Eagles, Song & Insectivorous Birds

Patrick O’Flaherty, talented musician Leah Trent, Celtic harpist Kim Weitkamp, humorist, singer, and storyteller Art • Craft • Games for children Body Painting by Cynthia Positive Personality Reading by an Irish Gypsy palm reader “Trace Your Ancestors” map • Rose’s Refuge and Tea Room Please Touch Museum organized by The New Greenbrier Preschool Raffle & Silent Auction of Local Artists’ Wares • Foods for Sale All Events are FREE to the Public - see story page 11 New River Community and Technical College, Lewisburg Campus, Lewisburg, WV Sponsored by New River Community and Technical College, The Levine Family Foundation, and First Day, Inc.

Ar tisan Crea tions Artisan Creations for YYou ou and YYour our Home

Sculp tur al F ur nitur e • Gangc hen T ibe tan Car pe ts Sculptur tural Fur urnitur niture Gangchen Tibe ibet Carpe pets Pott er y•W ood T ur nings tter ery Wood Tur urnings Rus tic Eleg ance & Antiq ues ustic Elegance Antiques Handmade Je w elr y Jew elry Cour thouse Hill, W arm Springs, V A Courthouse Warm VA

Fri-Sa t 11 am - 5 pm ri-Sat

Sun 1 - 5 pm or b y Appointment by

www.thegalleryatsevenoaks.com • aback@tds.net • 540-839-3054


Valley Guide

“There shall be no abridging the freedom of speech.”

For us to learn about ourselves ; For others to learn about us ...

TABLE OF CONTENTS

December 2008 - February 2009

Valley Guide SERVING SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA & WESTERN VIRGINIA Published bi-monthly yearly by Creations of Sorts P.O. Box 94 White Sulphur Springs West Virginia 24986 Your letters, stories, photographs, editorial contributions, comments and criticisms are welcome. All manuscripts and photographs should be accompanied by a self-addressed return envelope as

Valley Guide

can assume no responsibility for such items. Subscriptions are $16 a year. Send your check or money order along with your mailing address. For all new subscriptions, renewals, or change of address write to:

Valley Guide P.O. Box 94 White Sulphur Springs West Virginia 24986 phone/messages:

304/536-2500 e-mail:

Entertainment & The Arts

Exhibits at Alleghany Highlands Arts & Crafts Center: Clifton Forge page 4 Charleston Ballet is awesome ... hip ... page 4 Poetry’s Flying Alphabet: Power of Poetry by M.Ray Allen page 4 GVT’s New Voices: Playwrights Short Play Festival Opportunity page 5 A Broadway Christmas Carol at Greenbrier Valley Theatre page 5 White Sulphur Springs Christmas Open House, Christmas Parade, Fall Fling Art Show Winners page 5 A Thought… by Lena G. Hoke page 6 Diana’s Books Bookstore Opens in Giles County page 6 The Lewisburg Foundation page 6 page 6 Teenaged Zen by Edward Kennison Home Tours at Bramwell, West Virginia: The Millionaires Town page 7 page 8 Galleries Calendar A Historic Holiday: Christmas at The Barracks page 9 Virginia Junior Opry Stars: page 9 Kyle and Allan Kimmel page 10 Theatre & Music Calendar Thursday, January 1, 2009 First Day page 11 Festival: Ireland Lockbridge Pottery goes to China by Donna and Jeff Diehl page 12 Entertainment Calendar pages 13-15, 19, 26, 29 Garden Talk: Brightness, Patoonyas page 26 & Snowstorms by Barry Glick

Going Places

Lights Up for Christmas! Jim Wills, Mr. Christmas: The Jim Wills Tree page Memorial Dedication page The Twelve Days of Christmas Alderson’s Christmas Parade & 6th Annual page Christmas Homes Tour Martin Luther King Jr. Day March page Greenbrier Valley Chorale’s Festival page of Nine Lessons and Carols page Salem Holiday Homes Tour & History Ettore Boiardi aka Chef Boy-ar-dee page Examples of Some Successful page Italian Immigrants

Commentary

16 16 17 18 18 18 19 19

The Never Ending War on American Freedom by Thomas J. DiLorenzo page 20 page 20 Rubes by Leigh Rubin page 20 Lines Delivered by Martin Short Historical Secrets page 21 No Escape from New Generation of Speed Cameras that follow you for 30 miles by Ray Massey page 21

Clubs & Organizations Calendar, and Other Tid-Bits

Sports Calendar Book Review

pages 22 - 25

pages 28 & 29 page 30

Roland Layton’s Review of Witness by Whittaker Chambers NY: Random House, 1952

Food Quick & Easy Snacks

page 27

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on the web: www.valleyguideonline.com

On the Cover: A Child’s Curiosity At Left: Moving Pots!

Valley Guide is archived at Appalachian State University Belk Library Boone, NC 28608 828-262-2787 Fax# 828-262-2773

All day long these two men move pots, that is their job. photo by Jeff Diehl see story page 12

Watch money. Money is the barometer of a society’s virtue. When you see that trading is done, not by consent, but by compulsion—when you see that in order to produce, you need to obtain permission from men who produce nothing—when you see that money is flowing to those who deal, not in goods, but in favors—when you see that men get richer by graft and by pull than by work, and your laws don’t protect you against them, but protect them against you—when you see corruption being rewarded and honesty becoming a self-sacrifice—you may know that your society is doomed. ~ Ayn Rand


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VALLEY GUIDE December 2008 - FFe ebr uary 2009 bruary

ATTENTION!

Churches - Restaurants - Caterers - Family Reunions

Clifton Forge Wholesale Foods & Restaurant Supply 501 E. Ridgeway • 540-862-5951

Open to the Public - No Membership required Monday-Friday 10 am-6 pm all other times by appointment only

Bulk Foods • Split Cases • Sodas • Paper Goods Catering & Baking Supplies Concession Supplies:

cotton candy mix-snow cone syrups-funnel cake mix ...

Convenience Store Programs • Gift Boxes Don’t see it? ... We’ll do our best to find it for you!

White Sulphur Springs ... more than Third Thursdays

Exhibits at Alleghany Highlands Arts Center: Clifton Forge

The Fall Festival “open” show—no jurying required just keeps getting better and better. This year’s exhibit — the _title, presents _ works by _ artist continues through November 22. There’s always plenty of lively discussion about the prizes awarded in each of the many categories — as should be with lots of ideas, opinions and interests to consider, so find some time to stop in at the Center to view the exhibit and to place your vote on People’s Choice award. ”In the world of art, the artistic journey is an intuitive process of concealing and revealing, adding and subtracting, until the desired result emerges from the layers,” says Sandi D’Alessandro D’Alessandro, an abstract painter who uses recognizable objects as symbols. She often works in series which explore significant themes in her life. Ideas lie in wait under layers of paint and marks, images and implications, waiting to be deciphered like a coded message ... or just enjoy her color, form and composition. Sandi works primarily with acrylics and spends a great deal of time developing the idea, starting with thumbnail sketches, and evolving the abstract through many small pencil studies. Her medium of choice allows for versatility in creating textures, transparent and opaque effects which ‘scratch through and lift off to unveil images’ — an artistic process which encourages play, risk taking and exploration as part of the art making. Her goal is to achieve an overall painterly quality that allows the viewer to continue reaching beyond the obvious to find meaning each time the painting is viewed. Sandi holds Signature Membership status in the National and American, Baltimore and Virginia Watercolor Societies, has taught workshops at San Diego and National, been published in an art magazine as well as receiving regional recognition. She teaches art at Hidden Valley High school in Roanoke, VA. Sandi D’Alessandro’s work is on exhibit from Tuesday, November 25 through Tuesday, December 30. Plan a visit to Alleghany Highlands Arts and Crafts Center, 439 E. Ridgeway St, Clifton Forge VA, 540.862-4447.

Charleston Ballet is awesome ... hip ... cool, something that hundreds of young

Thursday, November 20

WSS Goes Green, Let All Heaven and Nature Sing, retail shops Christmas Open Houses offer treats 5-7pm, strolling carolers, drawing for cash or gas gift card

Saturday, December 6

Old White Garden Club Christmas Home Tour 2-5 pm, WSS Goes Green, Let All Heaven and Nature Sing Christmas Parade, line up 4 pm, parade 5 pm, to enter contact Garnett Haynes, WSS Main Street Promotions Chairman, at 304.536-2025. or a WSS Lions Club member Grand Marshals James & Kitten Burr

Thursday, December 18

Santa visits Old Mill Park, caroling, hot beverages available, Girl Scouts light bird friendly decorated Christmas tree, retail shops open 5-7pm, final drawing for WSS Goes Green Shop Local Grand Prize winner For more information on these events or other White Sulphur Springs events call Sadie Fraley, WSS Main Street Director, at 304-536-5060 or Ruth Miller, WSS Main Street Promotion's Chair 304-536-9206

www.wssmainstreet.org - 304-536-5060

The GENERAL LEWIS INN

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dancers have known for 53 years! The Charleston Ballet’s performance of Tchaikovsky’s The NUTCRACKER is accompanied by the WV Symphony Orchestra at the Maier Performance Hall at the Clay Center for 3 performances — Friday, December 19 ay 7:30 p.m. and Saturday, December 20 at 2:00 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. A full company of dancers, local adults and children, and guest artists — including principle and frequent guests Olivier Wecxsteen, Miguel Campaneria, Jose Rodrigues, and Freddie Fourie join the talented company to present this memorable ballet for you and your family. These fulllength performances are the only presentation of this holiday masterpiece in West Virginia with live music. Tickets for The Nutcracker range from $47 - $5, and are now available at the Clay Center Box Office by calling 304.5613570. To learn more, visit www.thecharlestonballet.com

Poetry’s Flying Alphabet : Power of Poetry by M. Ray Allen Powerful poetry can serve the poet the way a bare knuckle fighter’s fists serve to get his opponent’s attention. Both can leave their mark on the minds of those who experience them. The fact that anyone can write poetry lowers our society’s general perception of poets. However, not everyone can write powerful poetry. Poetry that moves its readers to laughter or tears. Poetry that grips the reader’s mind and squeezes it. I have read the works of many poets, and while living in Berkeley, California, one summer in the 1970’s, I read more than 50 books of poems. I compare poems to songs I hear on the radio. The songs I will sit and listen to after parking my car are like the poems that entwine their words within my mind. Unfortunately, most of the songs on the radio today are not memorable at all. That also holds true for many of the modern poems I read. One may ask, “What makes a powerful poem?” The answer to that question is not a simple one. It is, however, like enjoying your favorite dessert whenever you encounter one. Some poems have moved me to tears, and some of my listeners have cried while listening to my words. Others have laughed at some of my limericks. Once a man by the name of Pug Hayes. Owned a dog by the name of Orange Blaze. On a hunt on a hill, Tail went straight; dog stood still. But skunk spray left them both in a daze. I think a powerful poem should be one that serves as a stream that leads to a waterfall. It takes the reader on a

journey that has a powerful ending. One that will be memorable and thought provoking. One that will motivate the reader to go back and reread the poem again and again. Just like the songs on the radio that I look forward to hearing, there are poems that I have enjoyed reading over and over again throughout my life. Poems that have a powerful impact pass the test of time and are enjoyed by readers from one generation to another. Getting back to what makes a poem powerful, I believe it is the experience or imaginary world of the poet harnessed by words that enables the reader to share the poet’s experience whether it be real or imagined. Thus, the vicarious experience that the reader receives becomes meaningful and memorable at the same time. Rhyme, rhythm, repetition, refrain, imagery, metaphor, simile, personification, symbolism, alliteration, consonance, and assonance serve poets the way hammers, saws, levels, and nails serve carpenters. Both in poetry and carpentry, it is essential that all parts fit the way they should. Without the parts fitting properly, there can be no satisfying results. When setting out to write the powerful poem, remember that your words must be the stream that leads to the waterfall. To learn more about poetry, and to share your work with others, attend the free Alleghany Highlands Poetry Workshop that meets at 6:00 pm on the last Monday of every month — Monday, November 24, December 29, and in 2009 January 26, and February 23, at Clifton Forge Public Library, 535 Church Street, Clifton Forge VA, 540. 862-4502.


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Greenbrier Valley Theatre is pleased to announce an exciting new opportunity for local playwrights to submit their short plays in GVT’s New Voices Short Play Festival Festival. The best plays will be given a public performance at GVT’s Festival of Community Plays in January 2009. Plays should be 10-15 minutes in length and include between two and five characters. Plays should be appropriate for all ages and should be written to be played by adult actors. The deadline for receipt of entries is December 1, 2008. A panel of professional theatre artists will judge the pieces and winners will be chosen in early December. Who: Submissions are welcome from anyone but local playwrights in the Greenbrier Valley are especially encouraged to participate. What: There is no official theme for the plays. Plays should be suitable for all ages, with minimal offensive material. During the

VALLEY GUIDE

December 2008 - F ebr uary 2009 Fe bruary

New Voices: Playwrights Short Play Festival Opportunity

festival, adult actors (15 and up) will play the parts so characters should be geared towards that age range. Musicals will not be accepted. When: Entries must be received by GVT no later than December 1. The public festival performance dates will be announced at a later date. By submitting a play to the New Voices Festival you are granting GVT the rights to perform your play at the festival in January 2009, if chosen. Please do not submit an original copy of your play, as copies will not be returned. The number of winners selected to be performed will vary on the length of the selected shows. Anywhere from 4-7 may be chosen for performance. If an inadequate number of entries are received, GVT reserves the right to not select any play for performance. For complete details visit www.gvtheatre.org or contact GVT Education Director, Kurtis Donnelly 645-3838 or kurtis@gvtheatre.org.

A Broadway Christmas Carol at Greenbrier Valley Theatre

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(304) 645-0010

Monk’s Cloth used for Swedish Weaving New Christmas Prints arrive daily Moda, Northcott, Benartex, Timeless Treasures & other quality fabrics, plus Mettler Embroidery Thread - 108 colors 36” wide-by-yd Rubberized Flannel Sheeting - for bed pads & wheelchair pads Bring in this ad for 10% off purchase good through December 31, 2008

Mon-Thurs 10-7pm Fri 10-5pm Sat 9-4pm closed Sunday

In Loving Memory, 1925-2003 I will always love you, Momma Robert Baker, owner

Ebenezer Scrooge is back with all of his old holiday “bah humbugs” that also includes new side-splitting music for even further amusement. A Broadway Christmas Carol by Kathy Feininger blends Dickens’ beloved classic with parodies of Broadway show tunes. http://stores.ebay.com/Nancys-Homespun-Touches Perfect entertainment for the whole family, this vaudevillian show is full of cheap laughs, silly gags and satirical patter. With only three actors playing the whole cast, this show is a rowdy substitute to the traditional holiday fare that will have you rolling in the aisles and begging for more. Performance dates for this show include December 5, 6, 12, 13, 17, 19, 20 and 21 21. Home for Christmas, a musical presentation performed by GVT’s After-School Drama Program wraps up GVT’S 2008 season. The actual plot of Home for Christmas is a look at the boisterous commercialism of a modern Christmas compared to the plight of the homeless through the theme of “no room at the inn.” The story opens with Nicky and Paul who befriend Kate, a homeless person. The question is, can they convince their stressed-out single mum that Kate needs their help? Full of warmth, humor and powerful songs, this show captures the true spirit of Christmas. Performance dates are December 11, 13, 18 and 20 20. Regular Ticket prices are Adults/$20, Seniors/$17, and Students and Children/$12. GVT offers opening-weekend, matinee and multi-show discounts as well as special night discounts. If you would like more information or make reservations call (304) 645-3838 or visit our website at www.gvtheatre.org, or stop by Greenbrier Valley Theatre located at 113 E. Washington St., Lewisburg, WV. GVT is also handicap accessible and smoke-free.

Super Fantastic Holiday Selections

for all those Special Dates

Cecilia’s Bridal & Formal Wear

White Sulphur Springs: Christmas Open House

OH GOSH, it has been 15 years since we posed for this picture, we had no idea, what we were getting into! But we have survived!!! Come and help Kitten’s Korner celebrate their 15th Anniversary on Thursday, November 20th. The party is complete with champagne and cake, plus to pass the gift along, 15% off everything, that's right EVERYTHING all day long. Don't miss this opportunity for great buys for holiday giving and to share our joy. Kitten’s Korner opens at 10 am. On Thursday, November 20, Kitten’s Korner is open until 8pm during Third Thursdays in White Sulphur Springs, Main Street White Sulphur Springs’ Christmas Open House. Hope to see you, for more info call, (304)-536-9206.

Christmas Parade

The Red Hat Ladies invite you to the Let All Heaven and Nature Sing themed White Sulphur Springs Christmas Parade on Saturday, December 6. Line-Up 4:00 pm; Parade 5:00 pm. Grand Marshalls James and Kitten Burr. To enter contact Parade Chairperson Garnette Haynes at 304.536-2025. Kitten Burr poses with her two daughters, Ruth Miller, left, and Anita Graham right, in front of their new business Kitten’s Korner.

108 E. Washington St. Lewisburg WV 24091 304-645-3633 Hope to see you soon!

wvciciora@suddenlink.net

We Clean The Green Way

Below: Shelby Kincaid Oreolt (at right) and Promotion Chairman WSS Main Street, Ruth Miller

Fall Fling Art Show Winners:

Shelby Kincaid Oreolt received 1st Place in Main Street's Fall Fling Art Show for her oil “Wildflowers of WV”. Other winners in Oils category were: 2nd place Lisa Saunders "Floral"; Honorable Mention Rebecca Keller "Bright Eyes. Watercolors’ category: 1st place Rose Dobbins "Rear View"; 2nd place Phyllis Crickenberger "Kate's Mountain Trillium”. ‘Pencil’ category: 1st place Ricky Hughes "Krystal's Turtle"; 2nd place Ricky Hughes "Dinner Time"; Honorable Mention Kim Ayers "Tiger". ‘Pastels’ category: 1st place Carl Pattison "Lily". Photography: 1st place Diane Mitchell "Queen's Anne Lace"; 2nd place Carolyn Lehrke "Great Blue Heron"; Honorable Mention Diane Mitchell "Two Bucks" Special thanks to the great success of this show goes to Main Street Organization, Chris Hanna, G.W. Lewis, Michael Christi and all the talented regional artist.

High Fashion at Affordable Prices

For more information on events in White Sulphur Springs call 304.536-9206, 304.536-5060, or online at www.wssmainstreet.org

Fresh, Clean, Non-Toxic House Cleaning with antibacterial, antifungal, germicidal, antiseptic, healing, deodorizing properties of 100% essential oils as Nature intended! For consultation call Mike & Carlena Reynolds 304.536.2200 • 304.667.4986 License#55-0665369 • ycs001@aol.com


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VALLEY GUIDE

December 2008 - F ebr uary 2009 Fe bruary

A Thought… by Lena G. Hoke

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Have you ever had a piece of good news you were so excited about that you just couldn't wait to tell someone? You could just “shout it from the rooftops”?! Imagine being the angels chosen to deliver their piece of good news. Oh, how excited they must have been to go and spread the good news of our Savior's birth! The shepherds may have at first been afraid at the sight of these angels, but they didn't dawdle when they went in search of the babe the angels had spoken about. We need to be like the angels AND the shepherds. Be excited about our Savior, and don't dawdle in our search for Him. Be excited. Go out and spread the good news about our Savior, Jesus Christ.

Diana’s Books Booktore Opens in Giles County

Laurel M. Thomas

Licensed Massage Therapist BY APPOINTMENT 304-661-3479 14 North Street ❖Union, WV GIFT Certificates available for any amount

This is the last issue of

Valley Guide

T TT

created by Creations of Sorts P.O. Box 94 White Sulphur Springs West Virginia 24986

SAVE ON PERSCRIPTIONS!!!

Many thanks to all of the 100s of people and business that have made 20 years of editions possible.

Diana Fields, Bookseller, opened her bookstore, Diana’s Books Books, bright side the Goodwill organization is all the better for the efforts. for business on Wednesday, October 1,2008 at 307 Main Street in As a result, I will no longer be listing the general fiction paperbacks Narrows, VA. on-line, as that market is already “My areas of preference are Apflooded, however I do still have in palachia, History, Literature, Art, the neighborhood of 5,000 of these Signed First Editions and Classics, titles available in my warehouse but my inventory is an eclectic colstorage, so if you don't see a title lection of rare and used books from on my shelves or on-line, please just all genres. I offer special order ask, it just may be right next door!” services for titles not available in If you are searching for a book my store. This service is dedicated and simply cannot find it, e-mail to those who are uncomfortable Diana with your request, or better with providing their credit card inyet, come by Diana’s Books bookformation on-line, as well as, those store, and have a look around. The trying to save some gas by not drivregular open for business bookstore ing to the big city,” states Diana hours for Diana’s Books are for the Fields. “This makes virtually any beginning of the week —Monday, book available right here, and right Tuesday and Wednesdays from 11 in Giles County.” am to 4 pm; and, end of week — Some folks may remember Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays Plan a visit soon to Diana’s Books in Narows, Virginia. Diana's first bookstore in Narrows, from 3 pm to 8 pm. which opened in July of 1997. After three different incarnations, in “These hours, hopefully, should accommodate any schedule, three different locations, and finally closing in 2004 for family rea- while allowing me time to go out and hunt for new literary treasons, Diana has come full circle and is now back where she started sures,” says Diana and, “ Please note the store is open everyday, from — conveniently located beside the post office in Narrows. except Sunday, from 3 pm to 4 pm, perfect for after school.” “I have had to really cull my inventory to make all of the books Other hours may be available by appointment, please call Diana fit on the shelves” continues Diana. “I am sure all the bibliophiles at 540-726-7578 ore-mail diana@dianasbooks.com. Inventory is out there can understand what a horrific task that was, but on the available on line 24/7 at http://www.dianasbooks.com/.

The Lewisburg Foundation

The Lewisburg Foundation operates on the belief that for our community to be healthy we must have a busy, successful downtown, and that requires tourists that are attracted to friendly, comfortable, convenient, interesting, and appealing places. Toward this end, we support the Historic District and now plant and maintain eight — Turley Park, Post Office, Dollar Store, Newspaper Office, Center Green, Academy Corner, West Entrance and Horton Park — In-Town Gardens in Lewisburg, in addition to both the north and south Gateway Open Spaces. This on-going maintenance costs approximately $20,000 per year and includes, mowing, fertilization, watering, pruning, replacing, mulching, weeding; the planting of trees, shrubs, and perennials, as well as beds of annual flowers in the spring and fall. This year, while the Gateways and the Street Parks were blooming, the Lewisburg Foundation also: • collaborated with the City of Lewisburg to design & build the first replacement Washington Street parket, which was made possible in part by Hollowell Foundation Grants. • pruned trees in the downtown business area of Washington St. • applied for Grants for eastern gateway, five other parketts, Cen-

ter Green completion and for new downtown planters • collaborated with the City of Lewisburg on a number of environmental details & urban scape improvements Funds for the Lewisburg Foundation are always hand-to-mouth and the cost of all of these on-going maintenance projects increases each year. Capitol projects are usually funded by Grants. Seventy-five per cent of the foundation’s annual maintenance was funded by memberships, in addition to $5,000 by a Hollowell Foundation 2008 grant. If you are a member and can increase your membership gift, please do. If you are not a member and would like to join in on the efforts of The Lewisburg Foundation, please contact Annabelle Galyean at TAG Studio belle@tagstudio.com The Lewisburg Foundation has no administrative expense. The Lewisburg Foundation is a nimble, get-it-done organization. The Lewisburg Foundation membership now totals 135. Loyal members renewed at ninety-three percent. Twelve new members joined in 2008. Presently, there are 37 downtown merchant members, and 13 out-of-state contributors. Please consider being a part of The Lewisburg Foundation now. The Annual Meeting is held annually in November.

side was in the low nineties. As I picked up the pizzas, I noticed the boys leaning over the open topped freezer. “Aw man, this feels good!” They said. I picked up the pizzas and turned to go. “Hey, wait on us! We’re still cooling off!” “I don’t even know you guys.” I jokingly called over my shoulder as I walked away. They caught up with me as I finished checking out. “Man that was cold! Dad, look at my fingers. There are white spots on my fingers and they sting!” “You’ve freezer burnt your fingertips.” I told him as we left the store. “You mean we could do that?” “Sure you can, if you had left your hands on the metal long

enough, especially if your fingers had been wet. Don’t you remember what happened to that boy in the movie who stuck his tongue on the frozen pipe?” “Ah, I forgot about that!” he replied, “Man, my fingers sting! When is it gonna stop?” “When they warm up. If you seriously freezer burn you skin, you are killing layers of skin, just like burning, hence the name freezer burn.” In the vehicle my son said, “Put your fingers on the outside of the door, it’s warm.” My son’s friend who was being macho said, “It doesn’t sting that much.” In my rearview mirror I saw him rubbing his hands on his pants. “How come you didn’t say anything to us about getting freezer burnt?” My son asked. “You’re a teenager; I thought you already knew everything.” I replied. Then he laid it on me. “When you tell me something, I already know it, but when you don’t tell me, I don’t know.” There it was — how to understand a teenager. Teenage Zen.

WHY PAY SO MUCH Teenaged Zen by Edward Kennison I have heard what I believe to be the most profound statement FOR ever uttered by a teenager. This came about after an incident in a grocery store. My son and another thirteen year-old boy and A PRESCRIPTION? local I had gone to buy frozen pizzas for dinner. The temperature outSave 20% to 50% ... call toll free to Clarksburg, WV 1-888-622-0957 mention COS and save!

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VALLEY GUIDE

Home Tours at Bramwell, West Virginia: The Millionaires Town

December 2008 - F ebr uary 2009 Fe bruary

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Lots of P orals • Co lllle ectib Prr imi imittives • Fl Flo Coll iblles

by Kathy Legg from a special to The Washington Post, courtesy of Mercer Co. CVB Quick quiz: At the turn of the 20th century, what the River's Bend Bed and Breakfast, a.k.a. the Hewitt House town boasted more millionaires per capita than any other (at left). Molly is also a former mayor of the town, former in the United States? Newdrama teacher, current Enport, R.I.? No. Palm Beach, glish teacher, gardener, Fla.? No. Bramwell, West stained-glass artist and Virginia? Yes, that would be community activist. When the one. I entered her garden, she When the statistic first stopped potting her geracame to my attention, I niums, wiped the dirt from said, “Not a town in West her hands and invited me Virginia, the state of my into her house that was birth, the butt of so many built in 1914 by the wife tired jokes involving poverty, of a coal operator who also Curio Cabinets • Lamps • Rockers • Bedding obesity and lack of dental hywas the town's first mayor. Furniture for EVERY Room giene.” But it's true. I learned that, regardless of Even a hundred years their current owner, all of You’ll Our Prices! after its heyday, Bramwell, the town's grand houses West Virginia, in Mercer are known by the name of County at the bottom of the state near Princeton and their original owner – perhaps it’s a West Virginia thing ... Bluefield, West Virginia, and the Virginia border, remains anyway, Frank Lloyd Wright's influence might be evident in Route 219 between Peterstown, WV & Rich Creek, VA a tiny Victorian testament to a time when coal was king and the design, but Robinette's hand is all over the place. The 540-726-2785 the geological riches of the state provided wealth to a col- 16-rooms are heavy with antiques and Robinette's vibrant lection of mine owners, men who built grand, beautiful personality. She barely hesitated before inviting me upstairs Mon-Tues-Thurs-Fri-Sat 9 to 5 • Weds 9 to 12 homes, many of which remain today to be toured and ap- for a view of the Wisteria and Lace and the Reeds and Roses preciated by visitors. rooms — two rooms that would make any die-hard Victorian At the end of the 1800s, there were 14 to 19 millionaires fan happy as a Victorian clam. — accounts do differ, living in Bramwell, whose population The most fun was to hear Molly’s oral history of the then was about 4,000 — today the populations is about 400. town. She told me that Buckingham Palace has always Back then fourteen passenger trains per day stopped in the been partial to Bramwell's coal and to this day imports it town and, other than Paris and New York, it was the only place because it burns hotter and cleaner than English coal — in the world where Chanel No. 5 perfume was sold. Accord- the same reason it was sought after for use on ships during ing to one account, the Bryant Pharmacy, now known as the both world wars. She told me about the Bank of Bramwell Corner Shop, sold about $25,000 worth of the Chanel No. 5 and how, on paydays, the bank's janitor would load leather perfume per year. That's about $300,000 in today's dollars. bags full of money into a wheelbarrow and wheel it up the There's nothing like the smell of success. street to the depot where it would be put on a train that Bramwell is believed to be the first U.S. town with stopped at each of the mines for disbursement. FOR INFORMATION CALL electric street lamps — the originals are still there. It had I wanted to listen to her all day, but she had things to 1-800-BY RADIO its own water company, electric company, phone company, do, and there was more town to see. So Robinette sent and a weekly newspaper. me up the street to see Curtis Bishop's beautifully mainA Broadcast Service of Pocahontas Communications The Corner Shop, though closed to complete restora- tained Victorian home. I found Bishop lolling away the Cooperative Corporation tion, stands at Main and Bloch streets. A peek through the afternoon in a front-porch rocker, while Sally, his giddy window offers a glimpse of the long soda counter, the little Boston terrier, licked everyone who walked by. To chicken-wire-pattern tile floor and the cherry cabinetry made my amazement, Bishop invited me in. on site by Welsh carpenters. Like many pharmacies of the Apparently that happens a lot. One person invites era, The Corner Shop served as ice cream parlor, phar- you in and then will call the neighbor up the street to see if macy and perfumery to the town and is a block from the they'd show you their house, too. It's great. rebuilt train station, the best place to begin a walking tour There were many more private homes I wish I could of Bramwell. Townspeople think the depot is the prettiest have invaded, but I had to be content with admiring them 2nd largest of its kind, and they might well be right. The station is from the street. The Perry House, for example, owned by commercial cave adorable, and now also serves as a museum to provide an Bishop's brother, is a graceful Queen Anne-style mansion. in Eastern U.S.A. overview of the area's coal history where relics and me- The turreted Cooper House has a vast copper roof, and its Daily Tours through end November: mentos bring to life the era when 100,000 miners worked yellow bricks were imported from England. The grand Mon-Sat 11:00 & 1:00, closed Sunday the rich and dangerous local coal seams without benefit of Goodwill House features a third-floor ballroom. These Winter Tour Schedule thru March 31st modern machinery and safeguards. These workers were, private homes are open for regular tours, and always for Mon-Fri 12:00 noon & 2:00 pm in large part, immigrants recruited right from the gates of the Bramwell Christmas Tour of Homes, with tours conSaturday Tours 11:00 am, 1:00 & 3:00 pm Ellis Island. Others were descendants of slaves who crossed ducted rain or shine beginning at 5:00 p.m. on Saturday, closed Nov 26, 27, 28, Dec 24, 25, 26 & Easter into the free territory of West Virginia when, at the height December 13. Tour fees are $15 per person, for group tours, extended exploring expeditions and special of the Civil War, in 1863, WV became a state. The miner Although the town is small, give yourself time to wantours to discover the ‘Wild Side’ call for reservations workers did not live in Bramwell. Their town, Pocahontas, der around. The residents are friendly, chatty and clearly Virginia, was about three miles up the road and bore abso- proud of their homes. It’s always the same temperature inside the cave! lutely no resemblance to Bramwell's affluent beauty. Once you've finished with Bramwell, don't leave the Pocahontas, the miners' town, is only minutes away, but area without making that short and winding drive to ZIP LINE $5 per ride - 8 rides for $25 economically miles apart. Pocahontas to explore the town and tour the Pocahontas What is most captivating about Bramwell are the houses. Fuel Co. Exhibition Mine and Museum, where you can acCLIMBING WALL Those of us who are suckers for house tours can find nir- tually walk deep into an old mine for a chilly look at the real & RAPPELLING TOWER vana in Bramwell. Twice yearly, on the second Saturday of thing. Claustrophobics, beware: Although the entrance is $25 per hour or $12 per climb or rappel May and December, the town's mansions open their doors tall and wide, the reality of having 260 feet of black mountain to the public. Many can be toured on any old Saturday pressing down on you is impossible to ignore. Combination Packages Available which is when I was poking around the town, looking into Take it easy on those mountain roads, too. They can the shops, checking out the cafe and sizing up the houses throw you a few unexpected curves ... but that's West Vir- Need a Sign? Call Organ Cave sign shop! when a flirty little black and white cat lured me into its ginia for you: much more than you'd ever expect. Vinyl & Magnet Signs, T-Shirts, Decals & More For more information on Bramwell call 30 4.2 48-838 1 garden. That's when I came face to face with the force known 304.2 4.248-838 48-8381 call for quote 304-645-7600 4.2 48.7 114. locally as Molly Robinette. Molly and Larry Robinette own or 30 304.2 4.248.7 48.71

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8

VALLEY GUIDE

December 2008 - F ebr uary 2009 Fe bruary

Galleries

Posters & Prints by Max Hayslette in Mini Art Gallery, art Alderson's, 203 S deco treasures, native American crafts, Alderson's Monroe St, Alderson WV, 304.445-2851 19th & 20th c. paintings paintings, Parian Ware Bronzes & original prints; private collection of military art & equipage from Napoleonic era through Boer War War, Wm. M. Grover Galleries ies, by appointment, Rt 687, Bacova VA, 540.839-6336 WV artists exhibit, Tamarack Tamarack, Beckley WV, 304.256-6843 artist exhibits & receptions, Paine Gallery, Bluefield Area Arts Center Center, Bluefield WV, Mon-Fri 9-4, 304.325-8000 Regional Art works works, 10am-4pm weekdays & 10am-3pm Saturday, Gary Bowling’s House of Art Art, 701 Bland St, Bluefield WV, 304.327-9300 Fenton Glass & WV First Ladies exhibit, The Cultural Center Center, Charleston WV 304.558-0220 Close to Home: 100+ paintings, drawings, prints, sculptures by WV artists, through Jan 4, 2009; Art & Popular Culture from Permanent Collection Jan 7-July 5, 2009; Out of this World: Extraordinary Costumes from Film & Television Feb 7-May 10 - includes 43 costumes & artifacts from Star Wars, Batman, Blade Runner, The Terminator, Star Trek, Battlestar Galactica, The Wizard of Oz, Ghostbusters & others, giant format films; The Moon: Past, Present & Future; Space Oddities, Dinosaurs Alive! in ElectricSky Theater; Milton’s Marvels of Science; Kidspace, Avampato Discovery Museum, The Clay Center Center, One Clay Center, Charleston WV, 304.561-3570 Fall FFestival estival NonJuried Art Show— W orks in all media exNon-Juried Works hibited through Nov 22; Sandi D’Alessandro — abstracts Nov 25-Dec 30; Alleghany Highlands Arts & Crafts Center ter, 439 E. Ridgeway St, Clifton Forge VA, 540.862-4447 (Mon-Sat 10am-4:30pm; Jan-April Tues-Sat 10am-4:30pm) C&O 1895 restored freight depot, related historic artifacts, archives, rolling freight, C&O Railway Heritage Center ter, 708 Main St, Clifton Forge VA, 1-800-453-2647 Original oils & pottery by David Weaver, Midland Trail Gallery Gallery, Rt. 60/Rt. 41, Clifftop WV, 304.438-8649 Holiday Spree Times Three—1,2,3 Saturdays before Christmas guest artists including Belinda Anderson join Marcia Springsteen with her handcrafted pottery of duck terrines, candle stands, classic favorites favorites; Appalachian art & crafts, stained glass, cards, watercolors, demonstrations, refreshments, Saturday, December 6, 13, 20, 10am-4pm, Wakerobin Gallery Gallery, Rt 12, Forest Hill WV, 304.466-2227 Five Generations of Mennonite Quilts exhibit through December 29, Civil War Room, Children’s Room, Sewing Machines, Research Library, Virginia Quilt Museum Museum, Harrisonburg VA, 540.433.3818, www.vaquiltmuseum.org Nancy O’Farrell’s pottery & hand dyed shirts shirts, Creative Hands Gallery Gallery, 2nd Ave & James St, Hinton WV, Fri & Sat 10-6, 304.466-5559 John Henry Woodcarving Exhibit Exhibit: 100+ hand-carved figurines detailing railroad jobs in 1870, Hinton RR Museum Museum, 206 Temple St, Hinton WV, Mon-Sat 10-4, 304.466-5420 Cultural, artistic & educational exhibits, Sat 10-6, Sun noon-4pm, Campbell-Flannagan-Murrell Museum Museum, corner of 5th Ave & Summers St, historic Hinton WV, 304-466-1401 Wood Clock Museum Museum, 309 Temple St, Hinton WV, Fri & Sat 10-6, 304.466-3880 19th & 20th c. American & European paintings paintings, Parian Ware, Ceramic ware, Bronzes, original prints, oils, watercolors, Wm. M. Grover Galleries Galleries, Mon-Thurs 11-4; Fri & Sat 10-5, 2809 Main St, Hot Springs VA, 540.839-6336 McDonald; Auditorium: Birdhouses: Photographs by Rob McDonald Old Stone Room: Imagine: Works by Marietta Lyall; Museum: drawings by Donald Starr — all exhibits through Dec 22,, Mon-Fri 9-4:30, Sat 12noon-4, Carnegie Hall Hall, 105 Church St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-7917

Local History Exhibits Exhibits, City Hall Lobby Lobby, W. Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-4998 Shir Wooton : Explorations through Nov 30; New Works by Jessica Roczniak Dec 5-31— artist reception 5-8pm, Fri, Dec 5; works by Dave Berry, Evan Boggess, Lynn Boggess, Dr. Zack Comeaux, G.P. Cooper, Barry Fields, Charles Flickenger, Max Hayslette, Beverly McCoy & Barbara Nissman CD’s & books, Cooper Gallery Gallery, 122 E. Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-6439 Giclee Prints by local painters & photographers, Driftwood Sign & Frame Frame, 437 N. Jefferson St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-5854 Greenbrier Artists exhibits at Greenbrier County Public Library Library, Lewisburg WV, 304. 647-7568 Daywood Lobby features works by Brandon Fleshner Fleshner, Sharon Johnson Johnson, Shoshanna Schwimmer Schwimmer, Shirley Taggart Taggart, and photographer Gary Cooper Cooper; Pete Ballard’s Performing Artist Fashion Dolls, Greenbrier Valley Theatre Theatre, Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-3838 American Art & Craft Craft: distinctive jewelry, furniture, pottery & blown glass by our nation’s top artists, Harmony Ridge Gallery & Birdhouse Cafe Cafe, 209 W. Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-4333 Art & Antiques from Africa & China - Shona stone sculpture, Zulu pottery, North China baskets, chests & cabinets, Gallery, 122 American art jewelry & clothing, High Country Gallery W. Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-5222 Folk Art Works by Minnie Adkins, Black Joe Jackson, S.L. Jones, Addir Morgan, Cher Shaffer, Howard Finster, quilts, pottery, floor cloths, early country furniture; In Retrospect Antiques & Folk Art Art, www.inretrospecaniquesandfolkart.com Contemporary American craft art art, glass, pottery, jewelry, art to wear; art for living, New Horizon Gallery Gallery, 100 E Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-5600 Special exhibits, displays displays, North House Museum & Greenbrier Historical Society Society, 301 W. Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-3398 Photographs by Josh Lipton, Charles Garratt and other area photographers, Plants Etc., Jefferson St, Lewisburg WV, 304.647-3950 Original paintings, prints, notecards, Tuckwiller Gallery Gallery, 102 W. Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-2070; University Mall, Blacksburg VA, 540.552-2630 One of a kind works of art in contemporary painting and handmade print and ceramic genres of regional, national & international artists, call about featured artist show’s & reception, The Washington Street Gallery Gallery, 123 W. Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.647-4561 Lloyd Goad: My Path, photo exhibit focus on Rockbridge County landscapes through Dec 4, Kamen Gallery; Dave Anderson: Rough Beauty Beauty, photographic documentation of Vidor, Texas, through Dec 12, Weightless: works by ceramicist Satoru Hoshino & photographer Michael Kenna of profound unbroken, ordered & ample quiet sense of space, Jan 5-30, Staniar Gallery; Celebrating Dance Through Photography by Kevin Remington Remington, award winning photojournalist’s love of light, motion & emotion capture in dance; Celebrating Dance Through Photography by Frances Dowdy Dowdy, portrait photography has led her to portray dance & capture wide range of emotion communicated through this non-verbal art — both exhibits Jan 7-March 31, Kamen Gallery; William Christenberry: Site/ Possession Feb 9-April 10, 2009 - curated by Andrea Douglas to focus on his primary motifs, Straniar Gallery, Lenfest Center Center, Lexington VA, 540.458-8000 local artists works on display, Bistro on Main - featured in Southern Living September 2007, Main St, Lexington VA, 540.464-4888 Fall Shows Nov 22 & 28 at Beckley W omen’s Club on Park Women’s Avenue from 11am-4pm, Jeff Diehl’s handthrown pottery, high-fired stoneware, porcelain tableware & decorative pieces at home and studio of Jeff & Donna Diehl, Lockbridge PPottery ottery Studio Studio, 1274 Lockbridge Rd, Meadow Bridge WV, 304.484-7150, www.lockbridgepottery.com

ENTER TAINMENT & THE AR TS ENTERT ARTS Pete Ballard’s 19th/20th Century Historic Fashion Doll Exhibit Exhibit, Gertrude Smith House House, 708 North Main Street, Mount Airy, North Carolina, 1-800-576-0231 Highland County Museum & Heritage Center Center, The Mansion House House, Monterey VA, 540.396,4478 1829 Andrew Johnston House House, Museum & Research Center, Giles County Historical Society Society, Pearisburg VA, 540.921-1050 Folk Art Art, 1918 Princeton display, coins, The Bronze Look Look, Mercer Street, Princeton WV, 304.425-5005 regional art art, Dandelion Gallery Gallery, 506 Lazenby Avenue, Princeton WV, closed Mon & Weds, 304.877-3651 Paintings by Appalachian Artist Association Association, Jack’s Diner Diner, 801 Oakvale Road, Princeton WV, breakfast, lunch, dinner Monday-Saturday rinceton Shops by Steve Jesse, photographic display of Old PPrinceton replica depot houses, Virginian RR priceless artifacts, Princeton Railroad Museum Museum, E. Mercer St historic district, Sundays 2-5pm, Princeton, WV, 304.487-5060 area artists exhibits, The Gallery at the Jefferson Center Center, 541 Luck Ave, Roanoke VA, 540.343-2624, www.jeffcenter.org Historic N&W Passenger Service photographs photographs, O.Winston Link Museum Museum, Roanoke VA, 540.982-5465 The Auto Gallery, History in Motion, Railcar Rescue, The Virginia Museum of Transportation Transportation, Mon-Sat 105, Sun noon-5, Roanoke VA, 540.342-5670 Theatre History Gallery, History Museum & Historical Society of Western Virginia Virginia, Roanoke VA, 540.342-5770 Highlights from the American Collection, Folk Art selections, sculpture court, Art Museum of Western Virginia Virginia, Roanoke VA, 540.342-5760 Africa: The Serengeti through March 15, 2009; In The Glow: The Science Behind the Art of Neon; The Living River: coastal estuary touch zone; The Sky Above Mister Rodger’s Neighborhood: sing & dance about the day & night skies; Earth Treasures Mineral Gallery; Weather & Live Animals Galleries, The Science Museum of Western Virginia Virginia, Roanoke VA, 540.342-5726 Salem Holiday Homes Tour — a chance for all to see some of Salem’s absolutely most spectacular and historic houses, December 7 from 1-5pm; A History of Salem through 200+ Years , Community and Courage , The Brown House Parlor, Lakeside!, Walter Biggs: Artist & Gentleman, Pete Ballard Fashion Dolls, Salem Museum Museum, 801 E. Main St, Salem VA, 540.389-6760 New Harmonies, Historic Crab Orchard Museum Museum, Rts 19 & 460, Crab Orchard Rd, Tazewell VA, 276.988-6755 artisan creations for the beauty of home home, sculptural furniture, Gangchen Tibetan carpets, pottery, wood turnings, rustic elegance, antiques, jewelry, The Gallery at Seven Oaks Oaks, Court House Hill, Warm Springs VA, Fri -Sat 11-5pm, Sun 1-5pm, or special appointments 540.839-3054 original, hand crafted jewelry jewelry, tumbled stones, spheres, stone carvings, crystals, gem art, select Native American beaded pieces, McGraw Minerals Unique Jewelry & Gemstones Gemstones, Court House Hill, Warm Springs VA, ThursSat or by special appointment 540.839-2599 Phil Barter: oils & wood relief through Dec 1, Best of the Season exhibit, The Homestead Tower Suite Dec 24-Jan 1; fine art, pottery, silver; shows & receptions May-Dec: Warm Springs Gallery Gallery, Courthouse Hill, Warm Springs VA, Weds-Sun 1 am-4 pm, or by appt 540.839-2985 Works by master potter Tracy Brent Howard and Terri Howard, The Pottery of The Greenbrier Greenbrier, The Greenbrier, White Sulphur Springs WV, 304.536-4723 P.Buckley Moss Originals & Prints Prints, Donna Farlow’s originals, prints & jewelry eannie jewelry, Jeff Davis wood carvings carvings, Jeannie Brenneman Brenneman, Ron Resland Resland, Phyllis Crickenberger Crickenberger, Romney Shelton Collins Collins, Ann Tamea & Sharon Johnson artist works, Kittens Korner Gift & Custom Frame Shoppe Shoppe, 80 West Main St, White Sulphur Springs WV, 304.536-9206


ENTER TAINMENT & THE AR TS ENTERT ARTS

VALLEY GUIDE

A Historic Holiday: Christmas at The Barracks

A new and exciting event will be unveiled by the this event be selected by the Greenbrier CVB for promoGreenbrier Historical Society for the holiday season. The tional funding provided by their Mini-Grant Program. A Barracks at 200 North Jefferson Street in Lewisburg, Historic Holiday: Christmas at The Barracks is also supacross from the General Andrew Lewis Spring, will be ported by the Telford Foundation. The annual Stellar Evening Gala will be held on Saturtransformed into a historic holiday wonderland as memday, December bers of the Society’s Museum Committee and 6, 2008 from the local Garden Clubs lend their talents to deco7:30 p.m. to rate the main floor of the log structure. It will 11:30 p.m. at be a breathtaking experience to walk into The the Roland P. Barracks decorated for the holidays. Sharp Alumni As many know, the building was home to Center on the the Greenbrier Historical Society when the North campus of the House was being restored. Since the move back West Virginia to North House, The Barracks has been used School of Osteofor storage — quite a step down from its previpathic Medicine. ous importance. We hope to be able to bring Please call for life back into the building over the holidays, and more information the Board of Directors also has great plans for about sponsorthe future use of The Barracks, one of Judy Deegans looks at Silent Auction Items ship opportuniLewisburg’s oldest buildings. The grand opening of the holiday exhibit will be Fri- ties and tickets, but do save the date to come celebrate the day, December 5, 2008 during the monthly First Friday beginning of the holiday season with the Greenbrier Hiscelebration in historic downtown Lewisburg. The doors torical Society and staff of the North House Museum. The Esquires from Charleston, West Virginia, will again will be open from 5-9 p.m. for a joyous beginning to the Christmas holiday. This will not be the only time to visit serenade the crowd with their soulful tunes, and guests will the display as The Barracks will be open from 10 - 4 p.m. enjoy wonderful cuisine and great auction items. Don’t forget, you won’t have to miss the WVU football game as on December 6th, 12th, 13th, 19th & 20th. Admission tickets will be $5 and light refreshments we will have the Big Screen ready for you! Please come out and support the Greenbrier Historiwill be served. We hope you will plan to bring all of your family and holiday guests to The Barracks in December cal Society at this annual fundraising event used to conto make this special fundraiser a great gift to the Green- tinue the preservation of Greenbrier County History! Tickets are $50 in advance and $60 at the door. Sponsorships brier Historical Society. North House Museum’s staff is proud to have had are available by calling the North House at 304.645.3398.

Virginia Junior Opry Star’s: Kyle and Allan Kimmel Clifton Forge, Virginia — Kyle Kimmel, ten, and Allan Kimmel, seven, have com-

December 2008 - F ebr uary 2009 Fe bruary

9

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Clifton Forge, Virginia pleted their second season as fiddlers for the Virginia Junior Opry. Kyle attends Mountain View Elementary School, and his favorite subject is math. His hobbies are hiking and swimming. He said that he enjoys playing the fiddle with his grandmother, Peggy Kimmel and his dad, Karl. As for performing 304.645.5270 with the Virginia Junior Opry, he remarked, “The best thing is going on stage.” Allan is in the second grade, and he says his hobby is playing video games. Regarding the Virginia Junior Opry, he said, “The best thing is playing an instru- Eclectic Clothing and Accessories STYLE ment in front of a crowd.” As for practicing, he noted, “I like playing with Karl.” Beautiful Jewelry INSPIRATION Both Kyle and Allan are good students, and consistently bring home A’s and Wonderful Bath & Beauty Products B’s. Both boys also play with the Alleghany Junior Orchestra under the direction COMFORT of Marie Carpenter, Conductor, with whom Kyle also studied violin and piano Handbags Wallets Footwear privately. Presently, Kyle is studying viola and Allan is studying violin with Cynthia Penne at Washington and Lee University. Allan has been with Ms. Penne for almost 4 years. Both boys have also studied music theory with Kathy Merrill and continue this study with their grandmother, Margaret ‘Peggy’ Kimmel who is also teaching them voice. Peggy Kimmel, who has performed on keyboard with the musicians during the Virginia Junior Opry, is a member of Appalfolks of America Association’s Board Kyle Kimmel on the violin of Directors. Peggy is the director of the Alleghany Highlands Vocalists Workshop that she conducts weekly as an outreach for the non-profit organization. The workshop is held each Wednesday at the Clifton Forge Public Library at 5:00 p.m. Karl Kimmel, Peggy’s son, and Kyle and Allan’s dad is a professional musician who plays bass at The Homestead where Peggy often performs with him as a pianist. Teresa Kimmel, Kyle and Allan’s mother, shuttles her sons to and from soccer practice and musical rehearsals. Besides being a full-time parent, she enjoys reading and working crossProfessional Hair, Nails & Body Salon word puzzles. “Both boys are fairly accomplished soccer players,” she says, “ and have just finished up another season. We 304-536-5113 think they will want to get back into karate until soccer starts up again. They are both cub scouts although Kyle will be cross- 108 West Main St., White Sulphur Springs, WV 24986 Allan Kimmel on the violin ing over into the boy scouts soon.” Monday-Friday 9am-5:30pm • Saturday 8:30am-1pm M. Ray Allen, president and founder of Appalfolks of America Association, observed, “It is truly wonderful to see the Kimmel brothers on stage performing as soloists or joining Peggy who sometimes performs with them.” The Melanie Evans Cox, Owner Virginia Junior Opry performs three times in the historic Masonic Theatre in Clifton Forge during Appalfolks of America Courtney Bennett, Stylist Association’s 2009 performance season — April 25, August 1, and September 19, all at 7:00 p.m. Any student vocalist or musician who is interested in joining the Virginia Junior Opry may contact Allen at 877-301-3817.

Be ready for the Holidays with ...

Barbering by Kenny Evans on Thursday & Friday Soleil Tanning Monday - Saturday Visit us at historic Cabell House

melanie’s Styles & Profiles


10

VALLEY GUIDE

T heater &Music

The Dixie Hummingbirds, heavenly show of inspirational songs, Friday, January 30 at 8 pm The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee award-winning musical where 6 young people learn that winning isn’t everything & losing doesn’t necessarily make you a loser, Mon, Feb 2 at 7:30 pm Capitol Step - political comedy that attempts to be funnier than Congress, Fri, Feb 20 at 8 pm Ballet Hispanico - magnetic energy, sizzling choreography fuses Latin dance with classical techniques Alleghany Highlands Center for the Friday, February 27 at 8 pm

Performing Arts: The Masonic Theatre 877.301.3817 • 510 Main St • Clifton Forge VA

The Charleston Cultural Center

Want to perform on stage; call us! Happy 304.388-4250 • WV Capitol Complex • Charleston, WV Sones de Mexico Ensemble, Sat, Dec 13 at 8:00 pm Holidays! and see you in the Spring! Tannahill Weavers, Saturday, January 31 at 8:00 pm

Alleghany Highlands Arts Council

540.962-6220 • P.O. Box 261 • Curfman Hall, Covington High School • Covington VA 24426 Go Tell It On The Mountain featuring The Blind Boys of Alabama & local gospel choirs Wednesday, December 3 at 8 PM

Chuck Mathena Center

304.425.5128 • 2 Stafford Commons • Princeton WV, chuckmathenacenter.org The McKameys Friday, November 21 at 7:30 pm An American Christmas with Lee Greenwood Barter Theatre Thursday, December 18 at 8 pm 276.628-3991 • 133 W. Main St • Abingdon VA Message with Music Night - VA & WVA Christian 10:30am, 2pm, 3pm, 7pm, 7:45pm, 8:15pm shows musicians showcase areas exceptional indepenMiracle on 34th Street November 21-December 28 dent artists with varying genres, Sat, Jan 24 at 8 pm‘ Another Night Before Christmas... Nov 26-Dec 28 Charlotte Blake Alston’, speaking stories with exuThe Elves and the Shoemaker December 3-20 berant energy, Saturday, February 28 at 8 pm

Beckley Dance Theatre

304..255-5684 • Woodrow Wilson HS Audt, Beckley, WV The Nutcracker with guest artists from the New York City Ballet Friday & Saturday, December 5 & 6 at 7:30 pm Sunday Matinee December 7 at 2:00 pm

Carnegie Hall

304.645-7917 • Church Street • Lewisburg WV Tuesdays with Fran Belin - bring your lunch & enjoy the 12 noon free concert Tuesday, Dec 9 Ruthie Foster, blues, gospel, country, folk Wednesday, November 22 at 7:30 pm Jennifer Kirkland and Bert Carlson - sultry vocals & guitar wizardry, Friday, December 19 at 7:30 pm First Stage: A Concert Series, Sunday, January 4 Kate Long & Robin Kessinger, Fri, Jan 23 at 7:30 pm

Charleston Community Music Assn

ENTER TAINMENT & THE AR TS ENTERT ARTS

December 2008 - F ebr uary 2009 Fe bruary

304.342.8482•Charleston WV Municipal Auditorium Zat You, Santa Claus? a holiday show performed by Banu Gibson and the New Orleans Hot Jazz Saturday, December 6 at 8:00 PM Stay Tuned to relive the 50s & 60s on TV with Five By Design Saturday, January 10 at 8:00 PM

Garth Newel Music Center

540.839-5018 • Route 220 • Warm Springs VA Czech, Please! - Martinu: Madrigals for Violin & Viola; Suk: Piano Quartet in A minor, 3pm cocktails, 4pm concert followed by Thanksgiving Dinner, Thurs, Nov 27 Janacek: Fairy Tale for Cello & Piano; Dvorak: Piano Trio in E minor Dumky, 6 pm concert followed by dinner, Friday, November 28 Table for Two! - Dvorak: Romance in F minor for Violin & Piano; Dvorak: Rondo in G minor for Cello & Piano; Schulhoff: Duo for Violin & Cello, 11 am concert followed by lunch, Saturday, November 29 New Year’s Music Holiday - The jazz trio plays music for dancing until the Champagne toast at midnight, then start your year right with a concert and brunch on New Year’s Day - Bach: Art of Fugue for String Quartet, Vasks: Piano Quartet, Beethoven: String Quartet Op. 132, Wed, December 31 & Thurs, January 1

Greenbrier Valley Theatre

304.645-3838•113 E. Washington St•Lewisburg WV Weds & Thurs 7:30pm; Fri & Sat 8pm; Matinees 3pm West Virginia Jazz Orchestra Saturday, November 29 at 8 pm A Broadway Christmas Carol, created by Kathy Feninger, mixes Dickens’ story of Ebenezer Scrooge with side-splitting song parodies of Broadway tunes, 3 Charleston Stage Company actors play multiple roles to perform entire story at 304.343.5272 • WV Capitol Theatre • Charleston, WV break-neck speed — energetic, hilarious holiday fare, The Santaland Diaries by David Sedaris, adapted Friday-Monday, December 5-22 by Joe Montello, Thurs-Sat, Dec 11, 12, 13 at 8 PM Home for Christmas by J. Sands & R. Kenward - deDoubt by John Patrick Shanley lightful musical presentation of GVT’s After-School Thurs-Sat, Feb 19-21, 26-28 at 8 PM Drama program contrasts commercialism of modern Christmas with plight of the homeless — warmth, The Clay Center humour, powerful songs, Fri-Mon, December 5-22 304.561-3596•One Clay Square•Charleston WV West Virginia Jazz Orchestra Holiday Concert Harry Connick, Jr.: A Holiday Celebration - Sunday, December 15 at 7:30 pm Grammy-winner singer-pianist & his big band play special holiday favorites, sacred carols & original The Historic Fayette Theatre 304.574.4655 • 115 S. Court Street • Fayetteville WV tunes, Friday, November 21 at 8 pm Movin’ Out - dancers & rock musicians portray a showtime: 8 pm • *matinee: 2 pm shimmering portrait of an American generation, Yes, Virginia, There is a Santa Claus - the true story of eight-year-old Virginia O’Hanlon, who wrote a letter Wednesday, December 10 at 7:30 pm The Nutcracker performed by Charleston Ballet to the editor of the New York Sun in 1897 asking if Santa with West Virginia Symphony Orchestra, for gen- Claus exists, Nov 28, 29, 30*, Dec 4, 5, 6, 7* eral information call 304.342.6541, performances New River Youth Symphony & Chorus in Mehier Hall, Friday, Dec 19 at 7:30 pm & Saturday, Thursday, December 11 Dec 20 at 2:00 pm & 7:30 pm The Jefferson Center Ain’t Misbehavin’, 30th anniversary tour with Ruben Studdard & Frenchie Davis, Wed, Jan 7 at 7:30 pm 540.345.2550 • Shaftman Hall • Roanoke VA The Call of the Sea, performed by West Virginia Skaggs Family Christmas, Wednesday, December 3 Symphony Orchestra, Fri & Sat, Jan 16 & 17 at 8 pm Handel’s Messiah performed by Roanoke Symphony

Orchestra, Sunday, December 7 Russian-American Kids Circus Saturday, Jan 10 Arturo Sandoval, Saturday, January24 Esperanza Spalding , Thursday, February 5 Roanoke Symphony Orchestra Masterworks 4: Serenade to Music, Sunday & Monday, Feb 8 & 9 Ladysmith Black Mambazo, Thursday, February 12

Roanoke Civic Center

540.853.5483•Williamson Rd & Orange Ave•Roanoke VA Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, Tuesday, November 25 at 7:30 pm with Broadway Buffet on Weds Scrooge, Thursday-Saturday, December 4-6 Bill Gaither Christmas Concert Opera Roanoke Presents: Gala Fantasy Concert Saturday, Dec 6 with down home dinner buffet Saturday, February 14 The Nutcracker, Sat-Sun, December 13-14 Misbehavin’ featuring Ruben Studdard & Lenfest Center for the Performing Arts Ain’t Frenchie Davis, Tues, Jan 6 at 7:30 pm with 540.458-8000 • Lexington VA Broadway Buffet Applied Student Recital, no tickets, Nov 18 at 8 pm Hairspray Music for the Holidays, favorite holiday tunes per- Monday, Feb 9 at 7:30 pm with Broadway Buffet formed by Wind Ensemble, String Ensemble & University Chorus, tickets free, but required, Dec 3 at 7 pm Salem Civic Center 540.375-3004 • 1001 Boulevard, Salem VA University Jazz Ensemble Holiday Concert Roanoke Symphony Pops Concert tickets not required, Dec 3 at 6 pm Candlelight Service: Nine Lessons and Carols with with Vince Gill the Chamber Singers - prayers, lessons, hymns tell Friday, November 21 story of sacred history from creation to the incarna- Sesame Street Live: Elmo Grows Up tion, tickets not required, Dec 4 at 8 pm December 4, 5, 6, 7 Together: An Intimate Evening of Jazz and Dance Roanoke Symphony Holiday performed by Lula Washington Dance Theatre, with Picnic at the Pops, Friday, December 12 choreographer Lula Washington & drummer Marcus L. Miller , tickets required, Jan 19 at 7 pm Shenandoah Shakespeare Ode to the 60s - light-hearted look at 1960s cultural BLACKFRIARS Playhouse revolution performed by Lula Washington Dance The- 540.851-1733 • shenandoahshakespeare.com 10 S. Market St • Staunton, VA 24401 atre, tickets required, Jan 20 at 8 pm Knoxville Jazz Orchestra - performs old & new jazz Twelfth Night through Dec 5; King Lear & with highlights from Stan Kenton’s most popular years, Measure for Measure through Dec 6; Richard 1947-48, tickets free, but required, Jan 24 at 8 pm II through Dec 7; A Christmas Carol & Santaland Dec 9-28; Hamlet Dec 26; Rosencrantz and Applied Student Recital tickets not required, Feb 1 at 3 pm Gildernstern Dec 27; The Comedy of Errors Classical Geniuses, University-Shenandoah Sym- Dec 28; A Midsummer’s Night Dream Jan 2phony Orchestra, Saturday, Feb 7 at 8 pm March 26, Caesar’s Revenge Jan 16-March 27; Flournoy Playwright Festival 2009: The Apotheo- Henry 6 Jan 29-March 28 sis of Vaclav Drda, mysterious visitor reminds Joanna of what’s important, what she really wants & why she’s Showtimers Community Theatre an artist, tickets required, Feb 5, 6, 7, 8 at 7:30 pm; 540.774.2660 • Roanoke VA • performances The Nebraska Dispatches - historic trial of Chief Wed-Sat at 8:00 pm; Sunday at 2:00 pm Standing Bear, a contemporary Native American world Come Back Little Sheba & the place he once called home, tickets required, Feb a drama performed through November 23 7 at 2:00 pm; A Reading of The Robbers of Madderbloom - in Madderbloom, everyone seems to Summit Theater live by one simple rule, “What’s mine is mine! What’s 304.325.8000 • Bluefield Area Arts Center • yours is mine! If we ain’t caught, we’s made off fine,” a 500 Bland S • Bluefield WV, *buffet dinner village in fear, nothing is as it seems & no one is who theatre 6pm w/show 7:30pm; 2 pm matinee they pretend to be— a disguise in 2 acts, tickets not The Case of the Yuletide Log & Christmas Music performed by area choirs required, Feb 8 at 2 pm Senior Voice Recital: Julie Petersen ’09 & Matt December 5, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12 Amling ‘09 - repertoire of solos and duets with ac- Tamarack Sunday’s @ 2 & More companiment ranging from piano to harpsichord, 304.256-6843 • 1-88-TAMRACK • Beckley WV strings to jazz band— Baroque & Classical masterLive Performances Sundays @ 2 pm works, jazz standards, Broadway gems, tickets not Nov 23, 30, Dec 7, 14, 21, 28, Jan 4, 11, 18, 25, required, Feb 8 at 3 pm Feb 8, 15, 22 Rockridge Ballet: Paquita Feb 21-22 at 3 & 7:30 pm

Mill Mountain Theatre

540.342-5740 • 800.317-6455 • Roanoke VA Tue-Thurs,Sun7:30pm;Fri-Sat8pm;MatineesSat-Sun2pm A Simple Gift, - Nancy Ruth Patterson’s story of 10year-old Carrie who finds her answers in a Junior Library Guild selection called “a love song to the theatre… a love song to life,” Trinkle Main Stage December 3-28 Driving Miss Daisy, by Alfred Uhry, 25-year long ride with Miss Daisy & her chauffeur, Hoke Waldron Stage, January 21-February 8

Trillium Performing Arts Collective

304.645.3003 • Lewisburg, WV Friday Night Alive! dance, music, comedy, & the spoken word performed at Carnegie Hall’s Old Stone Room, Lewisburg, WV Friday, Dec 12 & Feb 20 at 7pm

Unkl Ray’s where music makes the difference 304.466-3550 • on the river • Hinton WV call for Dec-Feb live entertainment schedule

The Wild Bean

304.645-3738 • 1-81/I-77 Exit 73 119 E. Washington St • Lewisburg WV 24901 434.528.3397 • Lynchburg VA 24503 Opera Cabaret: an evening or dinner and enter- call for Dec-Feb live entertainment schedule tainment, Saturday, January 17 Wohlfahrt Haus Dinner Theatre 888.950.3382 • 1-81/I-77 Exit 73 Pocahontas County Opera House 170 Malin Dr • Wytheville VA 24382 Third Avenue • Marlinton WV A Wohlfhart Haus Christmas, unforgettable, 304.799.6645 • 800.336.7009 original revue conceived by Wohlfahrt Haus’ John Lilly and Rob McNurlin: A Tribute to Hank Williams, Saturday, November 22 at 7:30 pm Artistic Director, Michael Stanek features traditional to contemporary holiday favorites from Leah Trent, Christmas music performed on the harp around the world, through December 31 Sunday, December 7 at 3:00 pm

Opera on the James


ENTER TAINMENT & THE AR TS ENTERT ARTS

VALLEY GUIDE

Thursday, January 1, 2009 First Day Festival: Ireland Features Performing Artists: Leah Trent, Patrick O’Flaherty. Kim Weitkamp

December 2008 - F ebr uary 2009 Fe bruary

11

Something Sweet, Something Special

 PAULETTE’S PASTRIES LLC

Come sample sights, sounds and tastes of Ireland at the 7th annual First Day International Festival following the Shanghai Parade in Lewisburg, West Virginia. This free family event is held at The New River Community and Technical College from 1:00- 5:00 on Thursday, January 1st, 2009. To help us celebrate the heritage of Ireland, this year’s main presenters are talented multi-instrumentalist Patrick 216 W. Edgar Avenue Ronceverte, WV 24970 O’Flaherty O’Flaherty, Celtic harpist Leah Trent, and humorist, singer, and storyteller Kim Weitkamp Weitkamp. 304.645-CHOC(2462) Patrick O’Flaherty is acknowledged as one of the truly fine practitioners of Boxed Lunches  Custom Cakes Irish mandolin and harmonica, and also a highly respected player of the button ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ accordion and banjo. Patrick is one of the few composers today who writes Sat 8-4pm original songs in both English and Gaelic. One of his most recent songs is about Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri 7:30am-5pm the hurricane that hit Galveston, Texas. Patrick lives in Lewisburg and owns and manages The Irish Pub where he can be heard singing, joking, and playing many musical instruments. He is a bright light in the community. After performing solo for the Festival, he will lead a music session. Leah Trent, known throughout the area for her skill and musicianship, has been playing the harp for over 25 Call ffor or inf ormation on future w at er information wat ater ercolor color,, color years. She celebrates the culture and music of Ireland dr awing and oil painting sessions, drawing with her Celtic harp. Leah has performed at The Irish a Satur da ving session with Saturda dayy 1-da 1-dayy car carving Patrick O’Flaherty Pub in downtown Lewisburg and serves as Carnegie Hall’s J. Gail Geer Geer,, Education Director. Along with Susan Adkins, Carnegie’s Executive Director, both Susan and Leah recently formed an 18-member children’s choir of which Leah is both accompanist and and some Wint er & Holida oject Winter Holidayy Pr Project assistant director for the young singers age 9 through 11. Wor kshops & Classes orkshops One of the great gifts the Irish people have given the world is Leah Trent For information and to register contact: the art of storytelling. In keeping with this theme, First Day InterAlleghany Highlands Arts & Crafts Center national Festival presents Kim Weitkamp from Christiansburg, Virginia. For the past 15 years Kim has been a guest speaker, keynote speaker P.O. Box 274, 439 E. Ridgeway St., Clifton Forge VA 2422 and storyteller at camps, retreats, conferences, librar540-862-4447 ies, schools, leadership summits and festivals throughout the country. She is President of the Virginia Storytelling Alliance, the Virginia State representative for the National Youth Storytelling Showcase, and is founder of the Wrinkles Project, a nationwide program that helps raise awareness of the treasure we have within our 'seasoned citizens' and the stories that need to be shared. Kim writes and performs her original stories Kim Weitkamp which has resulted in two CD projects. The Please Touch Museum, sponsored by The New Greenbrier Preschool, is back with lots of fun activities for young ones. Other festival activities include art, crafts and games for children, a positive personality reading by an Irish Gypsy palm reader, a “Trace Your Ancestors” map, and Rose’s Refuge and Tea Room. Local artists and crafts people have donated items for the raffle and si- beautiful array of food lent auction. Scrumptious Irish food is available for sale along with goodies from Jeff’s Breads and The Crazy Baker. Come celebrate the first day of 2009 in what has become a family tradition — First Day International Festival, an event to make you smile. The non-profit organization, First Day Inc., was created to celebrate the Children’s Art Show cultural diversity of our community and to promote understanding and Cedar Hunt Levine invites everyone to First Day! acceptance among people of various cultural backgrounds. If you are interested in becoming involved with First Day Inc., contact Jo Weisbrod at 304.645-7615, or by email Follow the dragon to the First International Day Festival — joweisbrod@verizon.net.



 Alleghany Highlands Arts & Crafts Center

2008-2009 Classes & Workshops


12

VALLEY GUIDE

December 2008 - F ebr uary 2009 Fe bruary

ENTER TAINMENT & THE AR TS ENTERT ARTS

Lockbridge Pottery Goes to China

by Donna and Jeff Diehl

Donna and Jeff Diehl of Lockbridge Pottery (www.lockbridgepottery.com) in Summers County, West Virgina, recently returned from a visit to Jingdezhen, China, a city of half a millon people known for making porcelain pottery — the porcelain capital of the world since 1,000 BC. Here is a brief photo essay of their travels.

Jeff Diehl surrounds himself with large porcelain pots.

Donna Diehl admires a huge planter in progress.

The Great Wall of China viewed from near Beijing.

At left: The making of a large vase. At right: A climbing ‘dragon’ kiln whose fire is stoked at the ‘mouth’ opening. Below: Three different styles of pots are transported three ways across town.

For the millennium celebration, traffic lights and lamp posts were re-designed in porcelain using assorted historical patterns.

Mandy Ranck, daughter of Edgar & Ann of Lewisburg, WV, a student with the WVU China Exchange program,mimics the clay sculpture.

Vendors display their pots and shards at the weekly antique market which attracts curators and collectors from around the world.

Enjoying Korean delicacies with our friends Kyung Hee Son and Kang Hyo Lee in Korea before the long trip back home.


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December‘08-F ebruar er tainment December‘08-Februar ebruaryy ‘09 Ent Enter ertainment although presumed correct at the time of publication, do call ahead to verify information as times and events may change

VALLEY GUIDE

December 2008 - F ebr uary 2009 Fe bruary

Every Saturday & Sunday Meditation for Everyone

13

2-3pm, Enhansse Spa and Fitness Center, Rt 219 near Fountain Springs Golf Course, call Krysten Wall 304.772-4360

Every First Monday April-December Home School Days

programs for homeschoolers in groups or family units, Artists Studio Tours, view area artists’ works in progress, special Frontier Culture Museum, Staunton VA, 540.332-7850 discuss techniques, watch demonstrations, purchase direct, throughout November 304.645.1000 Ge ac Gettaw awaay PPac ackkages Bath County Historical Society , Fri-Sat 10am-4pm, free Pipestem Resort State Park, Pipestem WV, 304.466.1800 admission, Courthouse Hill, Warm Springs, VA, 540.838.2543 Vir ginia Indian Herit age Month Virginia Heritage Boxerwood Gardens Arboretum in observance of American Indian Month, tours & interpretive

7000 native & ornamental trees/shrubs, 6 distinct habitats in programs focus on culture of Virginia Indians and their history, Shenandoah Valley, 1 mile from Lexington VA, 540.463.2697 Jamestown Settlement & Yorktown Victory Center, Williamsburg Daily Movie Showings shows 10am-4:30pm VA, 888.593-4682 Tamarack,Beckley WV, 1.888.262-7225, www.tamarackwv.com Every Tuesday in November

Farm Tours at Thistle Cove Farms

Sun Gardens & Play Trail, do call to let us know you’re coming, Thistle Cove Farm, Tazewell Co, VA, www.thistlecovefarm.com Boxerwood Gardens, just outside of Lexington VA 540.463-2697 Graham House Tours & Dinner Lowell WV, 304.466-3321 Thursday, November 20 Gr al Phot ogr aph Graay Owl Digit Digital Photogr ograph aphyy Seminar Seminarss and nature photo Beaujolais Nouveau Wine Tasting & Dinner workshops with Charles Garratt, PO Box 301, Warm Springs VA 5-course gourmet meal paired with French wines, 7pm, Cafe 24484, 540.839-2016, charles@grayowl.com Michel, Lexington VA, 540.464-4119 Greenbrier Bunker Tours - public tours ($30) at 9:30, 11:30, Friday, November 21 1:30, 3:30 daily, meet at North Entrance of The Greenbrier, White Cooking Class & Luncheon: Turkey Day Leftovers Sulphur Springs, WV, 304.536-7810 10m class, 12:30pm luncheon, Wade’s Mill, Raphine VA, GVTs After School Drama Program for ages 5-17, GVT, 540.348-1400 Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-3838 Saturday, November 22 Hull’s Drive-In Theat er Theater

VMI Cadet Full Dress Parade

two 1st-run movies every Fri, Sat & Sun April-Oct, Rt. 11 N from VMI parade grounds, 10:30am, Lexington VA, 540.464-7313 I-64 exit 55, Lexington VA, 540.463-2621 Youth Intern Thanksgiving Dinner Meadow Bridge Drive-In Theat er Theater Frontier Culture Museum, Staunton, 540.332-7850 two 1st-run movies every Fri, Sat & Sun April-Oct, Youth Intern Thanksgiving Dinner, Crab Orchard Museum, Rt. 11 N from I-64 exit 55, Lexington VA, 540.463-2621 Rts. 19 & 460, Crab Orchard Road, Tazewell VA, 276.988-6755 Mill Mountain Zoo Roanoke VA, 540.343-3241 American Herit age Music Hall Heritage National D-Day Memorial dedicated to the memory of valor, 4th Saturday music, dance, featured band 7-11 pm, welcome all fidelity and sacrifices of the Allied Armed Forces of Europe, June ages, family atmosphere, kids play area, donations appreciated, former Island Park Roller Rink, Ronceverte WV, 304.645-2298 6, 1944, Bedford VA, 1.800.351.D-Day WV Centr al Railr oad ride Cheat Mt Salamander Railbus along A Tribute to Benny Goodman & Peggy Lee Central Railroad 7:30pm, Blue Mountain Performing Arts, Bluefield High School, Shavers Fork River Thurs-Mon, 1.800.MTN RAIL Every Monday The Story Wizards for ages 3-5, 10:30- Bluefield WV, 276-326-4248 da rida Saturda dayy & FFrida ridayy, N Noovember 22 & 28 11:30 am, Princeton Pub Lib, 205 Center St, 304.487-5045; Satur pm, Open Stage Night at RiffRaff Arts Collective, Mercer St, Jeff Diehl’s 28th Fall Beckley Pottery Shows 11-4 pm Princeton, show 7 pm, all ages welcome — poetry, dance, all Beckley Women’s Club, 202 Park Ave, Beckley WV, 304.253-2626 genres of music encouraged, $3 donation for non-performers, Sunday, November 23 $2 for performers to help defray costs, complimentary snacks Lewisburg Holiday Open House decorations, refreshments, live music, carolers & choirs, cookie served at this family event. Every Tuesday Story Hour for ages 3-5, 11- noon, White decorating, ornament making, booksignings, holiday movies, Sulphur Springs Public Library, 304.536.1171; The Story Wiz- exhibits, Santa Claus!, downtown Lewisburg WV, 304.645-1000 son, The Open Book, Anderson ards storytime for ages 3-5 from 1-2 pm, Princeton Public Booksigning with Belinda Ander Library, 205 Center St, Princeton WV, 304.487-5045; Ameri- 113B E. Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-7331 uc kwiller Ar uckwiller Artt Galler Galleryy can Heritage Music Hall, open jam sessions, 7-? pm, former Open House at TTuc Sat 10am-6pm, Sun 12noon-5pm, Tuckwiller Art, 102 W. WashIsland Park Roller Rink, Ronceverte WV 304.645-2298 Every Wednesday Appalfolks Workshop for Vocal- ington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-2070 sar ation Anniversar saryy Celebr Celebration ists ists, FREE group voice lessons for children in grades 1-college Anniver with Peggy Kimmel, 4-5 pm, Clifton Forge Library Conference 1pm to 5pm, Cooper Gallery, 122 E Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-6439, 888.868-5129, www.coopergallery.com Room, 535 Church St, Clifton Forge VA, 540.862-4502 ednesda 1 Sundayy-W -Wednesda ednesdayy, N Noovember 23-December 331 Every Thursday Come Paint! with Greenbrier Artists: 9am- Sunda ver Holidayys at AAvvampat ampatoo Disco Discover veryy Museum 3pm, Carnegie Hall Art Studio, Carnegie Hall, Lewisburg WV, Holida 304.392-5525; International Buffet & Live Music Elk unique trees, wreaths, gingerbread houses created by local artRiver Touring Center, Slatyfork WV, 6-9 pm, 304.572-3771 ists, designers & chefs, holiday planetarium shows, Saturday Every Thursday-Saturday - The Yard Sale 9am-5pm, holiday plays, Holly Days Friday, Nov 28, Avampato Discovery Clifton Forge near Cliftondale Park, 540.968-2515; Pottery/ Museum, The Clay Center, Charleston WV, 304.561-3575 4 Mondayy, N Noovember 224 Sculpture lessons, 4-6pm, get s’mART, Bluefield WV, 304.3-2112 Monda Alleghany Highlands Poetry Workshop Every Friday Blue Ridge Backroads live at the Rex Historic meets last Monday of every month, 6 pm, all welcome, public Rex Theatre, Galax VA, 276-238-8130; Friday Night Jambo- welcome free of charge, Clifton Forge Public Library, 535 Church rees, Floyd General Store, Floyd VA, 540-745-4563 St, Clifton Forge VA, 540. 862-4502

Every Saturday through November Bartow Drive-In Talk: The Desegregation Struggle at R.E. Lee Church Flea Market Bartow WV, 304.456-4793; Bluefield Flea David Coffey, history professor at VMI, speaks to Rockbridge Mar ket, Bluefield, WV, 5am-3pm through Nov 24; Marlinton Historical Society, parish hall, 7:30pm, R.E. Lee Memorial EpisMarket Farmer’s Market locally produced fruits, vegetables, flowers, copal Church, Lexington VA, 540.464-1058 nursery stock, honey, eggs, baked goods, First Ave next to Mini Wednesda ednesdayy-Sunda -Sundayy, N Noovember 26-30 Park on banks of Greenbrier River, Marlinton WV, 304.799.6083 Thanksgiving Holida Holidayys or 304.799.6416; Pence Springs Flea Market , Pence lavish Thanksgiving buffet, craft classes, live music, Great Hall traSprings, WV, 6 am; Renick Flea Market 12 noon-4 pm, inside ditional Christmas tree lighting ceremony, The Homestead, Hot old school, Renick WV, 304.497-2992; WV State Fairgrounds Springs VA, www.thehomestead.com Flea Market 8am-early afternoon, WV State Fairgrounds, Rt. Canaan Thanksgiving Celebr ation Celebration 219 S, Fairlea WV, 304.645-1090;Tazewell Farmer’s Mar- Thanksgiving buffet, and other lovely amenities, Canaan Valley Reket , at Pisgah, 8am-noon, Tazewell VA, 540.988-9090 sort, Davis WV 304.866-3858, 1.800.622-4121 Every Saturday Flea Market 8am-early afternoon, WV State Thursday, November 27 Happy Thanksgiving Day Fairgrounds, Rt. 219 S, Fairlea WV, 304.645-1090; KidsCoiner Thanksgiving Buf fet & Package Buf fet Buff Pac ack Buff for children and youth ages 8-16 interested in coins and curbuffet 11am-6 pm, Thanksgiving Package from $176.46 per rency, 3pm-7pmThe Bronze Look, Mercer St, Princeton WV, couple for 1 hotel night; Thanksgiving buffet, breakfast buffet, 304.425-5005 tickets to Natural Bridge, Caverns, Wax Museum, Toy Museum,

Nine Lessons and Carols

performed by

Greenbrier Valley Chorale

December 13 at 3:00 pm For Tickets call Carnegie Hall Box Office, 304-645-7917 For more information about the Chorale visit www.gvchorale.com

Floral & Gifts for over 50 years “Flowers Make Scents”

Gift & Fruit Baskets • Singing Balloons • Leanin’ Tree Cards & Posters• Limited Selection of First Edition Books Live & Silk Arrangements for all Occasions WV Logo WINDCHIMES 303 Frankford Rd Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri 9:30-3:30 Ronceverte WV Weds & Sat 9:00-12noon

304.647-4300

Villas at the Meadows a restful retreat ... with you in mind

an exquisite selection of private villas for your personal vacation, corporate retreat or small group get-away comfortably appointed 1,2 & 3 bedroom suites nestled in the heart of the George Washington National Forest near the Jefferson Pools at Warm Springs, Virginia www.villameadowsva.com • 540-839-2124 • P.O. Box 153, Meadows Drive Warm Springs, Virginia 24484


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VALLEY GUIDE

ENTER TAINMENT & THE AR TS ENTERT ARTS

December 2008 - F ebr uary 2009 Fe bruary Natural Bridge VA, 800-533-1410 or 540-458-3750

Blue Ridge Story Tellers

Thanksgiving Dinner

Peterstown Annual Christmas Parade

Helve tia Thanksgiving Dinner Helvetia

Barnes & Noble, Roanoke VA, 540.776-2960 all invited, bring a covered dish, turkey supplied, 6 pm Com- WSS Main Street Committee meets open to public, 6 pm, WSS City Hall, 304.536-4787 munity Hall, Helvetia WV, 304.924-6435

Downt own Charles tW alk Downtown Charlestton Ar ArtW tWalk

line up at Little League Field 6 pm, judging of floats at 6:30 pm, parade at 7 pm, Peterstown WV, 304-753.4954, 754-5313

Downt own Lexingt on Chris tmas Pr ocessional Downtown Lexington Christmas Processional & TTree ree Lighting Ceremon Ceremonyy

Thursday, December 4 Annual Hor ses’ Chris tmas Horses’ Christmas

Open House at Alder son’s SSttore Alderson’s

Buena Vis tmas PPar ar ade Vistta Chris Christmas arade

Friday-Monday, November 28-December 31 A Handmade Season

Holiday Decorating Workshops: Learn from the experts!! Andre Viette, Jef Naunchik & Sam Harris

Twin Falls State Park, Mullens WV 304.294-4000

117 E. WASHINGTON ST., LEWISBURG, WV • 304-645-0000

KAREN LEE & MIKE MCCLUNG, OWNERS

A Store Like No Other

ALDERSON' S Art Re’Marques Fall & Winter Clothes up to 75% Off

Unigue WVU items WV Books Gifts for Everyone Jewelry & Accessories Home Accents Collectibles & Art

203 S. Monroe St. Alderson, WV Mon-Sat 9 - 5

(304) 445-2851

showcases Charleston’s art scene with best of local, regional Lighting Ceremony - Holiday Lights in the Park & nationally recognized artists, free reception 5-9pm, The Clay 6 pm, Glen Maury Park, Buena Vista VA, 800-555-8845 Center, Charleston WV, 304.561-3570 Tuesday-Thursday, December 2-4 Thur sda da 7-29 Thursda sdayy-Satur -Saturda dayy, N Noovember 227-29 EDTA ‘08 Conference & Exposition -electric drive indusCanaan Thanksgiving Celebr ation, Canaan Valley Re- try experts, policy leaders, transportation authorities exchange Celebration sort, Davis WV 304.866-3858, 1.800.622-4121 business on battery, plug-in, hybrid, fuel cell powering sustainThursday-Saturday, November 27-January 10, 2009 able transportation, W. E. Washington Convention Center, WashHoliday of Lights on 40+ acres to create 1.5 mi drive, 6-10 ington D.C., 240.408-0774, www.electricdrive.org pm weekdays, 6-11 pm weekends, Bluefield City Park, Wednesday & Friday, December 3, 5, 19 Pioneer Reading Program Bluefield WV, 304.327.2448, 1-800-221-3206 Boxerwood Gardens, just outside of Lexington VA 540.463-2697 Friday, November 28 Stonewall Jackson Cemetery to Hopkins Green Park, begins Glen Maury Park, 1 pm, Buena Vista VA, 800-555-8845 Ar Artt bbyy Night 5:15 pm, Lexington VA, 540.463-5375 Friday & Saturday, November 28 & 29 downtown Galleries, Roanoke VA, 540.342-2028 refreshments offered, pre-Christmas sale, 203 S. Monroe St, downtown Buena Vista, 7pm, Buena Vista VA, 800-555-8845 Thursday-Saturday, December 4, 5, 6 Alderson WV, 304.445-285 Artisans Center of Virginia, Waynesboro VA, 540.946-3294 how to preserve Christmas greens, make candle centerpieces, door swags, wreaths, boxwood kissing balls, 10:00 am, after workshop tour Claire & Andre’s home all decorated for Christarts, crafts, seasonal gifts, 10 am-8 pm, Highland County mas, $40 pre-registration, sign up early, limited space, André Viette Farm & Nursery, rt 608, Fishersville VA, 1.800.575-5538 Public Library, Monterey VA, 540.468-2958

Friday-Sunday, November 28, 29, 30 Mountain Magic Makers

Thursday-Sunday, December 4-7 27th Annual Holida ield: Holidayys at Smithf Smithfield: Salem Civic Center, Salem VA 540.375-3004 ginia Chris tmas Virginia Christmas Crock, Stock & Barrel Food preservation, all farms 9- Four Centuries of Vir Gem & Mineral Show

5 daily, Frontier Culture Museum, Staunton, 540.332-7850 information on evolution of Christmas in Virginia from colonists to modern day, tea & savory sweets in Susanna’s Tea Room, beginning at 10am, Tamarack, Beckley WV, 1.800.tamarack tours of 1774 home, children’s activities, museum shop open, greenery sale, 1-5 pm, advance tickets $15 adults, $7.50 chilSatur da Saturda dayy, N Noovember 29 dren 4-12, at door $18 adults, $9 children 4-12, tickets good Warm The Spirit of W arm Springs for 4 days with 1 visit to tea room Historic Smithfield Plantaspecial events & activities at the shops of Warm Springs, re- tion, 1000 Plantation Road, Blacksburg VA, 540-231-3947 freshments offered, Warm Springs VA, 540.839-2985 Thursdays, December 4, 11, 18

Ar tis tr ations Artis tistt Demons Demonstr trations

M & Tu 3pm-1am F-S-Sun 1pm-1am closed Weds & Thurs

PubPub Quiz Every Tuesday at 8 Irish Session Every Sunday at 6 pm irishpub24901@gmail.com www.irishpubonwashingtonstreet.com December—Buckle up for a fast & furious month Kiss Days, good things get even better December 7. 16+, 17, 24, 25, 27, 30, 31 Be warned, do not schedule anything important December 5, 6, 11, 12, 15

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Monthly Astrological Predictions for 2008-2009 Get ready for 2009, have a daily grind of astrological awareness every morning, with an astrological timing guide for all signs Learn more ... send $1 and a long S.A.S.E. to Skywatch PO Box 61045, Corpus Christi, Texas 78466 or read the latest at

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Book Signing: The Politically Incorrect Nite B4 Xmas Reading Ar Artt Book Club 10am-12noon, The Bookery, Lexington VA, 540.464-3377 Canadian artist, Emily Carr, defied societal conventions and Satur da rida Saturda dayy-F -Frida ridayy, N Noovember 29-December 20 the wishes of her father to forge her own artistic destiny. VenFant asyland antasyland ture with Emily from the coast of British Columbia and the in-

History Museum of Western VA, Roanoke VA, 540.342-5770 digenous people she depicted to the Salon d’Automne in Paris

Saturday-Wednesday, November 29-December 31 as she insures her place among the great modern artists., 1:30Lights Along the Midland Trail 3 pm, The Clay Center, Charleston WV, 304.561-3570 Hawks Nest State Park, Ansted WV, 304.658.5212 StarLab Thursdays Satur da sda Saturda dayy-Thur Thursda sdayy, N Noovember 29-Januar 29-Januaryy 11,, 2009 reservations suggested, 2pm, NRAO-National Radio Astronomy Chris tmas in the PPar ar Christmas arkk Observatory, Green Bank WV, 304-456-2150 free winter wonderland light displays dusk-10pm, donations Frida ridayy, December 5 accepted, Chief Logan State Park, Logan WV, 304.792-7125 Friday Night Lights

December 2008

downtown shops, restaurants, businesses, galleries 5-8 pm extended hours with special events, promotions, light refreshments, Lexington VA, 540-463-5375

through December 31 Fes tiv al of TTrees rees, Mon-Fri 8-5, Sat 10-3, Bluefield Area Arts Artist Reception for Jessica Roczniak Festiv tival

5-8pm at Cooper Gallery, 122 E. Washington St, Lewisburg WV, Center, Bluefield WV, 304.325-8000 Fes tiv al of TTrees rees, winter wonderland of 80+ Christmas 304.645-6439 Festiv tival rida Firsst FFrida ridayys Af Aftter 5, shops & galleries open til 9pm, trees& holiday music performances, Southwest Virginia Mu- Fir refreshments, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-4333 seum Historical State Park, Big Stone Gap VA, 276.523-1322

thr ough Januar through Januaryy 11,, 2009 Chris tmas in the PPar ar Christmas arkk

Frontier Christmas

through January 4, 2009 Holiday of Lights

Alderson Christmas Parade

Monda Mondayy-Sunda -Sundayy, December 1-7 Mountain Magic Makers

Holiday Treasures Market & Open House

caroling, music, storytelling, hot cider, cookies, visit from Santa & more, 6-9 pm, for admission bring can of food to benefit Food free winter wonderland light displays dusk-10pm, donations Pantry or gently used book for Reach Out and Read Program, accepted, Chief Logan State Park, Logan WV, 304.792-7125 Frontier Culture Museum, Staunton, 540.332-7850

Queen of Lights opens parade at 6:30 pm, line-up at 5:30 pm, anyone who would like to join the parade — walking units, horse or Monday, December 1 horse drawn units, antique car, float, or other parade type unit conPrince tmas PPar ar ade 6pm 304.487-1502 Princetton Chris Christmas arade tact Alderson City Hall at 304.445-2916, see story pg 17 Ronceverte Christmas Parade Film Fest Fridays, science related movie begins 7 pm, call dress appropiately! 6 pm, for information or to sign up for line-up, ahead for title, NRAO, Green Bank WV, 304.456-2150 call the Ronceverte VFD , 304-647-5233 Frida da ridayy & Satur Saturda dayy, December 5 & 6 at dusk, Bluefield City Park, Bluefield WV, 304.327.2448

3:30-6 pm, The Highland Center, Spruce St, Monterey VA, arts, crafts, seasonal gifts, Highland County Public Library, 540.468-1922 Monterey VA, 540.468-2958 Friday-Sunday, December 5, 6, 7

Monday - Sunday, December 1- 13 Boxerwood Holiday Greens Sale

Gardens, 1 mile from Lexington VA 540.463-2697

Tuesday, December 2

Ar tis tr ations Artis tistt Demons Demonstr trations

Boxerwood beginning at 10am, Tamarack, Beckley WV, 1.800.tamarack

Ballroom Dancing Weekend

learn ballroom dancing with professional instruction, Pipestem


VALLEY GUIDE

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December 2008 - F ebr uary 2009 Fe bruary

15

Resort State Park, Pipestem WV 304.466-1800, 1-800.CALL WVA Church, historic Alderson WV 304.445-2394

Saturday, December 6 Christmas Canteen Open House: Joyeaux Noel in Paris, France — 1917

Salem Holiday Homes Tour

Chris tmas R emembered Christmas Remembered

Christmas Concert: Mark Templeton and Pocket Change

Bramwell Christmas Parade

Christmas Boat Parade

doors open to some of Salem’s most spectacular & historic houses from 1-5pm, $12 advance, $15 at door, Salem Mufree admission & live entertainment, beverages & Bon Bons, free seum, 801 E Main St, Salem VA 540.389-6760 tmas at the Andrew Johns Christmas Johnstton House crafts for Kids to make & send to servicemen & women in Iraq & Chris at ouille & Madeline’s Mee Afghanistan, free movies: Rat Ratat atouille Meett Me in a World War II Christmas at the Andrew Johnston House, 1-5 Paris, & other “French Twists” from when Cap. Marshall was sta- pm, Giles County Historical Society, 208 North Main Street, tioned in Gondrecourt, France, 9am-5pm, George C. Marshall Mu- Pearisburg, VA 24134, 540.921.1050 The Hillsboro House Christmas Open House seum, Lexington VA, 540-463-2083 Leah & Eugene Burford invite you to visit their B&B decorated for Christmas Around the World the holidays, 12 noon-5 pm, (call for a special Dec tour), The educational event to represent Christmas traditions from around Hillsboro House Bed & Breakfast, Hillsboro WV, 304.653-4895 the world, 10 am- 2 pm, downtown Lexington VA, 540-463-5375 free tours, children’s crafts & apple cider at Stonewall Jackson House, 10-3 pm, Lexington VA, 540-463-2552 11 am, Bramwell WV, 304.248-7188

Lewisbur tmas PPar ar ade Lewisburgg Chris Christmas arade

12 noon, Washington St, sponsored by the City of Lewisburg and the Lewisburg Volunteer Fire Department, Lewisburg WV

Buena Vista Fire Dept, 3 pm, Buena Vista VA, 540.261-7321 decorated boat parade, holiday cider, warm cookies, campfires, roasted marshmallows, ornament making, 8-11pm, Smith Mountain Lake State Park VA, 540.297-6066

Whit tmas PPar ar ade Whitee Sulphur Springs Chris Christmas arade

Monday, December 8 Options for Funding Your Business

Blues Education Foundation Gala

Tuesda uesdayy, December 9 Old Time Music Jam Live from Work Horse Cafe

Lexington Christmas Parade & Pictures with Santa

perts!! Andre Viette, Jef Naunchik & Sam Harris

& Feas ation Feastt of Sankt Nic Nickkolaus Celebr Celebration

Homestead Postcard Club

Let All Heaven and Nature Sing parade on Main Street at 5 pm with Grand Marshalls James & Kitten Burr, parade line up at 4 pm, after parade holiday party with Santa Claus, food, holiday singing at WSS Civic Center, White Sulphur Springs WV, 304.536-2025

explanations on different ways to get start-up capital, needed funds to expand business, traditional bank loans, micro-loans, SBA SOHO, 5:30-7:30 pm, Women’s Business & Training Center, Beckley WV, 304.253-3145, 1.800.-766-4556

FREE mountain music jam session, 6:00 pm, musicians welCharlie Manual, manager of Philadelphia Phillies & Buena come, audience encouraged to dance and sing, concessions Vista native, speaks & donates Phillies sport memorabilia for available, Virginia Horse Center, Lexington VA, 540.464-2950 the silent auction to benefit the local school system, 5pm, Parry Wednesday, December 10 McCluer High School, 540.261-2129 Holiday Decorating Workshops: Learn from the ex-

parade on Main Street 5:30-7 pm, pictures with Santa on Hopkins how to preserve Christmas greens, make candles centerpieces, Green 7-8:30 pm, Lexington VA, 540-463-5375 door swags, wreaths, boxwood kissing balls & exciting new Stellar Evening Gala at The N or th House Museum Nor orth ideas, 10:00 pm, after workshop tour Claire & Andre’s home all The North House Museum, 301 W Washington St, decorated for Christmas, $40 pre-registration, sign up early, Lewisburg WV, 304-645-3398 limited space, André Viette Farm & Nursery, Rt 608, Fishersville Helve tia’s Fir da Helvetia’s Firsst Satur Saturda dayy Square Dance VA, 1.800.575-5538 winter foods, hot wine, warm fire, traditional cookies & sweets, Reynolds Homestead, 7pm, Critz, VA, 276.694-7181 square dance at Community Hall 8-12pm, Community Hall, High Tech Wednesday, guided tours through normally Helvetia WV, 304.924-6149 off-limit spaces, 3:30pm reservations suggested, limited to Saturdays, December 6, 13, 20 15, NRAO, Green Bank WV, 304.456-2150

Holiday Spree Times Three

Holida Holidayy Bazaar

Cooking Class & Luncheon: Christmas Day Brunch opens Saturday, 9am-4pm; Sunday 12:30-2:30pm with $5 class 10 am, luncheon 12:30 pm, Wade’s Mill, Raphine VA, space limited so call 540.348-1400

Bluef ield Countr ain Chris Bluefield Countryy Mount Mountain Christmas tmas Rockbridge Vineyard Holiday Open House 55th Annual P ar ade Par arade free admission, sample award winning wines, enjoy holiday snacks

& shop for special wine lover gifts, 11 am- 5 pm, Rockbridge Vine- floats, cars, walking units, pageant queens, marchers, bands, VIPs, clubs, organizations, individuals, antique car owners, yard, Raphine VA, 888.511-WINE prizes awarded, 12noon, Bluefield WV, 304.327-9686 Rockbridge Ballet: Holiday Dance Concert oling PPar ar ty Caroling arty 3 pm & 7:30 pm at the Lenfest Center for the Arts, Lexington VA, Family Car guided tours, interpretations, 2 pm; reservations required, 540-464-5055 Frontier Culture Museum, Staunton, 540.332-7850 Sunda Sundayy, December 7

Sant a’s Chris tmas PPar ar ty Santa’s Christmas arty

photo courtesy of The General Lesis Inn

Business Af Aftter Hour Hourss

1, 2,3 Saturdays before Christmas, Marcia Springsteen’s handcrafted pottery of duck turrines, candle stands & classic 5:30-7:30 pm, First Community Bank, Stafford Drive, favorites, Appalachian art, stained glass, cards, watercolors, dem- Princeton WV, 304.327-7184 onstrations, & special guests include Belinda Anderson, refresh- Thursday-Sunday, December 11-14 ments, Sats 10 am-4 pm, Wakerobin Gallery, rt 12, Summers Co Holiday Lantern Tours WV at Seminole Rd between Hinton & Peterstown, 304.466-2227 evening family lantern tours 5:30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 8:30 pm nightly, refreshments, music, reservations reSaturday-Sunday, December 6 & 7 Holiday Decorating Workshops: Learn from the experts!! quired, Dec 11 is a dress rehearsal, Frontier Culture Museum, Staunton, 540.332-7850 Andre Viette, Jef Naunchik & Sam Harris 2 ridayy, December 112 how to preserve Christmas greens, make candle centerpieces, Frida door swags, wreaths, boxwood kissing balls, 10:00 AM & 1:30 Frontier Chris tmas, caroling, storytelling, hot cider, cookChristmas pm, after workshop tour Claire & Andre’s home decorated for ies, Santa visits & more family fun, 6-9 pm, for admission bring Christmas, $40 pre-registration, limited space, André Viette can of food to benefit Food Pantry or gently used book for Farm & Nursery, Rt 608, Fishersville VA, 1.800.575-5538 Reach Out and Read Program, Historic Crab Orchard Museum, Wintertide Tazewell VA, 276-988-6755 old-fashioned Christmas celebration with carolers in vintage Friday-Sunday, December 12, 13, 14 costumes in a Victorian community in the mountains, tree light- Ar tis tr ations Artis tistt Demons Demonstr trations ing service, Christmas concert, extended shopping hours & beginning at 10am, Tamarack, Beckley WV, 1.800.tamarack fabulous shopping experiences, Monterey VA, 540.468.2550 Saturday, December 13 lunch offered, Johnson Memorial United Methodist Church, Alderson WV, 304.645-3499 or 304.445-7814

Merry Christmas

Traditional Chris tmas in FFaayett Christmas tteeville

Santa’s grand Lakeview Restaurant entrance, photos with Santa, downtown Fayetteville WV, 304.574.1500 amwell Chris tmas TTour our of Homes Bramwell Christmas make a gift, shop at Christmas Shoppe, food, warm beverages, Br self-guided walking tours of designated homes, costumed 10am, Douthat SP, Clifton Forge VA, 540.862.8100 interpreters, decorations, begins from Bramwell Presbyterian Alderson’s Annual Christmas Homes Tour 5 beautifully decorated home, performances by Praise & Worship Church 5 pm, $15/pp, approximately 8 minutes north of Team, model train exhibit, 1-5pm, lunch offered at Methodist Entertainment Calendar continued on page 19

Furniture • Accessories • Interior Design

Lesia Campbell Interiors

104 West Main Street, White Sulphur Springs, WV 24986 • 304-536-5101


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December 2008 - F ebr uary 2009 Fe bruary

Jim Wills , Mr. Christmas: The Jim Wills Tree Memorial Dedication

Lights Up for

by Sally Higginbotham If Lewisburg ever developed a Hall of Fame for successful locals, Jim Wills would certainly be one of their first inductees! Anyone who milled around downtown Lewisburg very often could tell you about the tall, lanky, well-groomed young man striding up Washington Street to the post office. He was one of the strongest supporters of Lewisburg, having spent most of his life in the town. Jim was born James A. Wills in December 27, 1948. His mother was Jo Early Wills of the Mullins, Wyoming County Early family. His father, a member of the United Sates Navy, died at a very young age leaving Jo a widow with two young boys, Jim and his brother, Bob. The young family maintained their home in Lewisburg where Mrs. Wills’ sister, Polly Ruby, lived and who gave great support to them during their growing-up years. Mrs. Wills’ remained a single mother until well into her middle age. Jim was an active school boy and enjoyed especially the drama projects offered at Lewisburg High School. His mother worked for his Aunt Polly for many years in Mrs. Ruby’s decorating business which gave Jim a great deal of appreciation and savvy when it came to artful eye appeal. This gift of his permeated his whole life, both in the home on Lafayette Street that he decorated and in hi own personal dress. He had worked at Yarid’s Men’s Shop and learned to appreciate stylish dress. He was always well-groomed and colorfully dressed with the creases in his khakis absolutely perfect. In 1988, Jim purchased both the building and the business of Old Hardware Gallery at 115 West Washington Street in downtown Lewisburg. From that point on, he was a business leader of the community and became an integral part of the success of commerce in the area. His gift shop radiated his love of fine things and innovative home touches; his windows were always done up so elegantly and served as an example for other shops. Jim’s whole life was entwined in his business and he never burnt out with it — every day was a new challenge, a new idea to give to the community in some unusual way. As Carnegie Hall came to life again during the 1980s and 1990s, Jim came to life with it! The Board of Directors of Carnegie Hall initiated a tremendous refurbishing project for the hall which required many fund-raisers throughout the year, one of which was Taste Of Our Town, or T.O.O.T. This fund-raiser was Jim’s favorite and, for many years, his contribution from the sale of grilled shrimp during the festival was second only to The Greenbrier’s! With his birthday so near Christmas, Christmas was Jim’s special time of year. He loved the season and put all of his energy into it. His shop was always full of wonderful gift ideas for purchase and delightful displays of his own doing. One Christmas, Jim gave the town a very special gift. Many years ago, Mrs. North Caldwell was an exciting artist in Greenbrier County and she had created many beautiful works of art. For example, she painted a Old Hardware Gallery sets a lighting trend. mural of the town on the old vault door of the original Greenbrier Valley Bank — the door was moved to the new location in the 1970s and may possibly still be there. Mrs. Caldwell also made and painted a life-size nativity set for Old Stone Presbyterian Church which was used for many years. Time took a toll on the figurines, thought, and they ended up is a storage area of the church. Jim, a member of Old Stone, took this to heart and felt that the statues should once again be brought out and used. He spearheaded the project, did a beautiful job with them, and once again Lewisburg could enjoy that special blessing! Another of Jim’s pet projects was to select Old Stone’s sanctuary tree every year. He and Pastor Dextor Taylor would always trek out to the Alpine Shop and get the biggest and most perfect live tree available. Jim loved those times and it merely added to the blessing that he received from the Christmas season. There “The Holiday Tree at Lewisburg’s Center Green,” was also the annual Christmas Open House festival downtown and with Marianna states Tag Galyean of The Lewisburg Foundation, “was given by friends, fellow merchants and and Doug Hanna’s help, Old Hardware Gallery was one of the most popular visits the Lewisburg Foundation to remember and on the tour. Marianna had been Jim’s mentor and good friend from the beginning memorialize Jim Wills for his exceptional style of his shop and Doug would always chip in to help with the food for the open and commitment to downtown Lewisburg. house. No one ever left Jim’s Old Hardware Gallery hungry during those visits! Is The City of Lewisburg will decorate the tree it any wonder, then, that a perfect pine tree should be planted in Lewisburg’s for the holidays and it will be Green Space in honor of Jim Wills? I think not, because Jim was all about Christa gathering place for holiday events.” mas, not only in the business and commercial sense but also in his heart. The Jim Wills Memorial Tree will be dedicated during We lost Jim to a massive heart attach in May 2001, but if you close your eyes the festivities on December 5’s First Friday. and open your mind, you can still visualize that tall, lanky fellow striding up WashThe Red Drum will perform the gift blanket ceremony ington Street with a big smile on his face. Mr. Christmas, Jim Wills, truly loved for gifts for the Family Refuge Center. his town, Lewisburg WV!

The 12 Days of Christmas Does the Christmas Carol, the 12 Days of Christmas, baffled you? After all, what in the world do leaping lords, French hens, swimming swans, and especially the partridge who won't come out of the pear tree have to do with Christmas? Well, here it is ... From 1558 until 1829, Roman Catholics in England were not openly permitted to practice their faith. The carol, therefore, was written sometime during that era as a catechism song for young Catholics and, has two levels of meaning — the surface meaning and the hidden meaning known, at the time, only to church members. Each element in the carol has a code word for a religious reality which the children could remember. • The partridge in a pear tree was Jesus Christ. • Two turtle doves were the Old and New Testaments. • Three French hens stood for faith, hope and love. • The four calling birds were the four gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke & John. • The five golden rings recalled the Torah or Law, the first five books of the Old Testament. • The six geese a-laying stood for the six days of creation. • Seven swans a-swimming represented the sevenfold gifts of the Holy Spirit — Prophesy, Serving, Teaching, Exhortation, Contribution, Leadership, Mercy. • The eight maids a-milking were the eight beatitudes. • Nine ladies dancing were the nine fruits of the Holy Spirit — Love, Joy, Peace, Patience, Kindness, Gentleness, Goodness, Faithfulness, Self Control. • The ten lords a-leaping were the ten commandments. • The eleven pipers piping stood for the eleven faithful disciples. • The twelve drummers drumming symbolized the twelve points of belief in the Apostles' Creed. And that is the history of how the 12 Days of Christmas, December 25 through January 6, became a Christmas Carol.


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Christmas!

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Alderson’s Christmas Parade, Friday December 5 at 6:30 p.m, & Sixth Annual Christmas Homes Tour, Sunday, December 7 from 1 to 5 p.m. by Margaret Hambrick

Queen of Lights opens Alderson’s Christmas Parade

The “Queen of Lights” waves her magic wand to begin the magic of Alderson’s Christmas Parade — an Alderson tradition since the late 1940’s. The Parade festivities start at 6:30 p.m. on Friday, December 5 at the Historic 1896 C&O Depot when the Queen of Lights, selected from among Alderson’s young women, waves her wand to turn on the star, the Christmas tree, and the Alderson Memorial Bridge lights. Units in the parade then march across the bridge to the Alderson Community Center for the Arts and Humanities where a Christmas Party is held for all the children, and Santa gives out treats and gifts. Anyone who would like to join the parade with a walking unit, a horse or horse drawn unit, antique car, float, or other parade type unit is asked to contact Alderson City Hall at 304.445-2916. The line up for parade units will begin at 5:30 p.m.

Alderson’s Christmas Homes Tour

All photos — Christmas trees and decorated dining areas — are courtesy of Margaret Hambrick taken during last year’s Alderson Christmas Homes Tour

ebr uary 2009 December 2008 - F Fe bruary

Thanks to Alderson Main Street and the residents of Alderson, the Sixth Annual Christmas Homes Tour is to be held on Sunday, December 7, 2008 from 1 to 5 p.m. Tickets are $10 and are available on the day of the tour at the Historic Alderson C&O Depot starting at 12:30 p.m. This year, two new additions have been added — The Johnson Memorial United Methodist Church is offering a lunch of soup, sandwich, dessert, and beverage for $5, and Jill Highlander, an award winning local photographer, and Tom Dameron are coordinating a photography contest with the results on display in the Depot. Also available at the depot are delicious cookies and hot spiced apple juice refreshments provided by the Alderson Women’s Club. Lee Skaggs is again coordinating a model train show in the Council Room of City Hall to include exhibits by Rick and Zack Burns and the Praise and Worship Team from the Federal Prison Camp performs at 1:30, 2:30, 3:30, and 4:30 p.m. at the Alderson Presbyterian Church. There are 5 homes on the tour this year. The home of Cynthia Landrie, her daughter, Taylor, and partner, Vicky Bupuis, Bupuis is an American Foursquare style house with Victorian details built in 1902 for Dr. Mahood who had a medical practice in Alderson. Visitors can see the carriage gate on the right side of the house and imagine Dr. Mahood driving his horse and buggy down the lane to the carriage house at the back. Carrying out the Victorian theme inside will be a 9 foot tree in the living room. The chandelier in the dining room will sparkle over a table set with Christmas china by Spode. Nutcrackers on the stairs will lead up to the bedrooms including Taylor’s decorated in a sophisticated Parisian theme of black, white, and silver. The Alderson Hospitality House has been welcoming families of inmates at the Federal Prison Camp for 32 years. Now managed by Tina Marquart with the assistance of Phil and Joan Taylor, it continues to provide a place of refuge for adults and children. This three-storied, mansard roof building in the Second Empire style was completed in 1894 to replace the previous “boarding hall” of the Alderson Collegiate Institute (ACI) which burned in 1893. In 1888, ACI, composed of a classroom building, an activities building, and the boarding hall, was the first high school to open in Alderson. Architectural plans were provided by Frank Follansbee of Alderson. ACI began as a Methodist Church supported joint stock company and later was privately owned. At its peak, the school housed and educated students from many Virginia and West Virginia towns and from as far away as New York as well as many local citizens. Today, it houses visiting inmate families from all over the country. For Christmas, the Hospitality House turns into a Christmas Wonderland. The first and second floors are open to visitors with each room decorated is a different theme — Blue Christmas, White Christmas, Country Christmas, etc. Two banners on loan from a church in Seattle, Washington, titled “Hope” and “Alleluia” are featured highlights. These

exquisite works were made by the Textile Design Department of the University of Washington. The home of William “Bill” and JoAnna Jarvis is a two story, clapboard residence with a hip roof and dormers. The home has a one story, hip roof porch with Doric Columns and the second floor has a recessed bay with scroll garlands. This American Foursquare style circa 1905 has beautiful Victorian woodwork throughout and was once the home of Judge Mark Jarrett. Decorated with poinsettias and garland, the house will glow with Christmas cheer. The dining table will be set for a candle lit Christmas Eve Dinner. A potpourri of traditional Christmas decorations from past generations to the present will be on display throughout the house. A collection of antique dolls will make little girls and big girls wish they could be transported to a Christmas past. uilt circa 1894 by The home of Rodger and Betty Thomas was built Andrew Jackson Jones from bricks which were fired on the property. Mr. Jones was a prominent storekeeper and mill owner in Alderson. At one time Mr. Jones had three separate mills running. His large High Victorian Italianate house with 12 foot ceilings, solid oak woodwork, built in cabinetry, two story rear porch, and many fireplaces befitted his status as one of Alderson’s most prominent citizens. The matching pair of two story bay windows on the front is an unusual design feature, and the full front porch replicates their curves. When Mr. Jones died in 1936 at age 86, he was Alderson’s oldest citizen. This gracious home will be decorated though out with 10 rooms on display. The formal living room will have a tree decorated with poinsettias and ribbons while the family room tree will be trimmed with ornaments collected by the Thomas’ over the years. Children and adults alike will enjoy the children’s tree in the toy room (formerly the maid’s room) surrounded by vintage toys. Hize built The home of Frank and Louise Hizer, circa 1930 1930, has Craftsman style elements with clustered porch supports and a porch roof that is a separate gabled architectural feature. Due to extensive publicity in the magazines of 1930’s era, Craftsman style bungalows quickly became the most popular and fashionable of smaller homes in the country. The Hizer’s house serves as a good example, and will be decorated as befits its charming style. The Praise and Worship Team will be performing at the Alderson Presbyterian Church which was built in 1927 in the Gothic Revival style style. The church has a heavily rusticated coursed stone veneer, a steeply pitched gable roof, stepped buttresses, and pointed arched windows and door openings. The stained glass windows are particularly lovely. The Christmas tree will be decorated with symbols of Christianity using plaid ribbon reminiscent of the Presbyterian Scottish tradition, and the church itself will have decorations in the usual red with greenery to reflect the elegant anticipation of Advent and Christmas. Alderson’s Store, Wolf Creek Gallery, and other Alderson shops will have special hours to be open for shopping where visitors can find wonderful gifts to go under their own trees and complete their Christmas shopping. Alderson’s Mayor Luther Lewallen said, “I invite everyone to come to Alderson during this beautiful season. The Christmas Homes Tour is an important fund-raiser for Alderson Main Street and really puts everyone in a good holiday spirit.” Then he added, “Now where did you say they were serving the cookies? ... Ah! The Depot! Hope to see you there.”


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December 2008 - F ebr uary 2009 Fe bruary

Martin Luther King Jr. Day March

At 11:00 AM on January 19 19, a throng of warmly dressed and happy people will gather at the Greenbrier County Courthouse in Lewisburg for the beginning of the 2009 Martin Luther King Jr. Day March and Celebration. Celebration While they sing songs of freedom, they will walk together to the Lewisburg United Methodist Church. In Wesley Hall at the church, all the celebrants will then have a delicious complimentary lunch catered by The Bakery. Afterwards, they will proceed to the sanctuary for music, readings of winning essays by school children, and thrilling speeches.

Salem Holiday Homes Tour & History

Thanks to the Salem Museum and Historical Society The Salem Holiday Homes Tour opens doors to some of Salem’s most spectacular and historic houses on Sunday, December 7 from 1:00-5:00 pm pm. Tickets are available for $12 in advance and $15 at the door from the Salem Museum located at 801 East Main Street, Salem, Virginia — or call 540.389-6760 540.389-6760.

Salem’s Story: A Brief History of Salem, Virginia

First explored by Europeans 64 years after Jamestown was settled in the 1700s, Salem developed as a town to serve travelers along the Great Road westward. By 1802, Salem, began the history of a community within the context of state, nation, and world events — a narrative every American city touched by wars, economic upheavals, and civic challenges can tell. Yet, Salem, Virginia, USA, and the way Salem and its residents faced the world in which they have found themselves over the years makes their history distinctive. The earliest history of Salem exists simply as archaeological evidence of Native Americans, dating from 8000 B.C. until the middle of the 18th century. Although the first Indians only passed through the area in hunting parties, Native Americans began establishing semi-permanent villages shortly after discovering they could cultivate agricultural products such as corn and beans. The Totero people, a friendly, Siouan-speaking group settled near the Roanoke River, probably on the site near Salem's Moyer Sports Complex. European explorers Thomas Batts and Robert Fallamn came upon this settlement in 1671 and gave the area its first recorded name: Totero Town, after the Indians who lived there and who supplied them with a guide to help further their explorations. Contact with Europeans drastically changed the Native Americans' lives. Besides introducing the native population to new technology, colonists also brought with them diseases — smallpox and influenza which killed them in significant numbers. Those Indians who survived often joined other tribes to the north and south. According to First People: The Early Indians of Virginia by Keith Egloff and Deborah Woodward, attacks by the Iroquois drove the Toteros and their allies, the Saponis, out of their villages. By the early 1700's, few Native American tribes remained in the region. Skirmishes between settlers and Native Americans heightened during the last half of the 18th century. Fort Lewis, named in honor of Andrew Lewis, was constructed to protect area settlers to the west of what became Salem in 1752. Andrew Lewis distinguished himself in the French and Indian War, serving under George Washington in 1754 at Fort Necessity. Lewis later led Virginia troops against the Confederacy of Indian Nations in the Battle of Point Pleasant in 1774 — a precursor to the Revolutionary War. During the Revolution, Lewis drove Lord Dunmore, the last British Governor, out of Virginia. After the American Revolution, Salem began to make the transition from an insular settlement into an emerging town. In 1800, General Lewis's son William sold to his neighbor James Simpson a thirty-one acre tract of land for $100. At this time, fewer than twenty-five families inhabited the area between the Roanoke River and Fort Lewis Mountain. Simpson subdivided the land he bought from William Lewis into purchasable lots on each side of the area's main roadway. Through the sale of those lots, Salem quickly grew into a prosperous community serving travelers as they headed west. In the first decades of the 1800's, local businesses included taverns, stables, blacksmith shops, wagon and buggy repair facilities, groceries, clothing stores, a horse racing track, and a canal navigation company. With the impending creation of Roanoke County in 1838, Salem citizens saw the opportunity to benefit from becoming Roanoke's county seat. John McCauley, a resident of Salem who had served in the House of Delegates, was commissioned by the town to lobby the legislature in Richmond. Three months after his successful efforts, Salem obtained county seat status and eighteen justices commissioned by Governor David Campbell gathered at Faris' Tavern, where Salem Presbyterian Church now stands, to set the governmental machinery in motion. Three days later, the County Court convened and swore in six lawyers to practice in the new territory. In 1847, the Virginia Collegiate Institute, later renamed Roanoke College, moved from Augusta County to Salem in a single wagon. The Lutheran school soon grew into a thriving academy for young men, and a thriving college for both men and women of today. In fact, Roanoke was one of the few colleges in the south which operated throughout the Civil War, with a home guard troop of students drilling weekly on the campus lawn.

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Greenbrier Valley Chorale’s Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols

Sunday, December 14, at 3 p.m. at Carnegie Hall in Lewisburg, WV, tthe Greenbrier Valley Chorale performs traditional and contemporary Christmas selections in a Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols Carols. The newly formed Carnegie Hall Children’s Choir debuts as special guests on the program, and audience members are invited to sing along on familiar carols. The Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols is a format for a service of Christian worship celebrating the birth of Jesus, the story of the fall of humanity, the promise of the Messiah told in nine short Bible readings, interspersed with Christmas carols and hymns. The Chorale features 65 singers, advanced high school students to retirees, directed by Barbara Wygal Lutz and accompanied by Teresa Bryant on the piano. The Carnegie Hall Children’s Choir is comprised of children ages 9-11, selected by audition, and directed by Susan Adkins, Executive Director of Carnegie Hall and a long-time music Greenbrier County music educator. Tickets to the Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols are available from the Carnegie Hall Box Office, (304) 645-7917, or online at www.carnegiehallwv.com. While hardships and losses during the War Between the States were many, Salem managed to avoid complete devastation. Two Union attacks on the town resulted in the destruction of railroad lines, depots, barns, storehouses, horses, and supplies, but, thankfully, in relatively few deaths. The most active engagement occurred on June 21, 1864. Retreating Federal forces under Major General David Hunter met up with Confederate cavalry under Brigadier General John McCausland at the Battle of Hanging Rock. Both sides suffered casualties: the North lost about 30 men — killed, wounded, and captured and 10 pieces of artillery; the South lost a fraction of that amount. The locally organized Salem Flying Artillery fought for the South in several Civil War battles, including Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Spottsylvania Court House and Cold Harbor. By the war’s end, with Lee's surrender at Appomattox, the Salem Flying Artillery is recorded as having fired the final Confederate shot. Great civic change followed the Civil War. In addition to repairing streets and bridges after years of neglect, the town worked to establish free public schools for both white and black children. Electricity, a public waterworks, and telephone lines were all advancements which came to Salem, and by the 1890s, hundreds of new buildings were erected. The town's population swelled to 3,279 — almost doubling the 1880 census. While Salem never quite regained the 1890 ‘boom’, the town grew steadily through the new century. During World War I, Salem won national prominence as one of the few towns in the country in which every child owned at least one War Saving Stamp. Due to fuel shortages, churches suspended Sunday night services. The mayor called on residents to pray silently at the sound of church and fire bells during a lights-off moment at nine o'clock each night. Before the vigils stopped, 15 Salem men were killed in World War I. After the War, Salem adopted a council-manager form of government, paved its streets with concrete, built new business buildings, including Salem's first federal post office, renovated older stores, and Lakeside Amusement Park opened its ‘concrete lake’ swimming pool on the outskirts of town. By 1923, rides and a roller coaster were added. In the 1930’s The Great Depression stunted the burst of growth, the stock market crash created economic setbacks, and Salem workers lost paychecks during a two-week shutdown of the Norfolk and Western railroad shops. Roanoke County welfare recipients increased from 263 families to 1,407. In response to the need, a volunteer predecessor to the Chamber of Commerce was formed to seek new industries and to stimulate trade. The efforts, along with the arrival of the Veteran's Hospital, gave Salem's economy enough strength to pull itself out of the depression and face the approaching challenges. World War II years exacted a mixture of perseverance, zeal, and grief. Salem residents enacted Mayor Charles Brown's proclamation that “every American should now consider himself a soldier” by participating in salvage drives, rationing food and gasoline, harvesting victory gardens, buying bonds, knitting garments, preparing surgical dressings, and practicing blackouts. Some local factory workers cast and machined bomb casings for atomic bomb work, while others sewed ‘White Swan’ uniforms for nurses. Andrew Lewis High School sponsored pre-induction training for draft-age boys, and first aid and nutrition courses for girls. Of the hundreds sent into battle, 43 Salem men died. Those who returned found a different hometown — with the annexation of South Salem in 1953, an eastern tract in 1960, Salem became Virginia’s largest ‘town’ — population 16,058. On December 31, 1967, the Town of Salem officially became Salem City. Population: 22,500. Today Salem maintains an old-fashioned, small-town community feel. The opening of the Salem Civic Center in 1967, Lewis-Gale Hospital in 1972, Salem High School in 1977, Salem Stadium in 1985, the Salem Museum in 1992, Memorial Stadium in 1995, and the Salem Visitor's Center in 1997 — all have contributed to making Salem a thriving, progressive city.


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Ettore Boiardi aka Chef Hector Boy-ar-dee 22 October1897-21 June1985

Chef Boyardee was a real person, a businessman, an entrepreneur and a world renowned chef known for his many Italian dishes. Ettore Boiardi was a native of Piacenza in northern Italy where he was an excellent cook and could be found working in kitchens even before adolescence. In 1915 he emigrated to New York City, taking the name ‘Hector’ as he passed through Ellis Island. With the help of his brother, he got a job as a waiter and then chef in the Plaza Hotel’s kitchen. He also worked at other top-notch hotel restaurants, including the Ritz-Carlton and the Greenbrier in West Virginia where he prepared a large celebration dinner for President Woodrow Wilson ... “You worry about your guests, President Wilson, and I will handle the food.” Often the youngest chef on the line, he grew his stylish mustache to make himself look older. In the early 1920s, he moved to Cleveland, Ohio, as chef for the then new Hotel Winton until 1924 when he and his wife Helen opened their own restaurant, Il Giardino d'Italia — Garden of Italy. At Il Giardino d'Italia, diners walked through his kitchen to get to the dining room and garden dining. Before long, patrons began to ask for take-home portions of his popular spaghetti sauce; therefore, Hector began to sell the sauce in milk bottles for those customers. These customers then decided Boiardi’s sauce really wanted more of his tasty food so he then began to sell them dry pasta with packets of his special cheese along with the sauce. The ‘takeout business’ expanded so rapidly that Hector and Helen Boiardi acquired additional space to produce the products where he packaged the spaghetti in a box featuring his face and the slogan: “Just 12 minutes to prepare.” This original dinner for four included spaghetti sauce, uncooked spaghetti and some Parmesan cheese for 60 cents. By 1928, he moved his combination cook-at-home meal business operation to a larger location and by 1937, he had built a special processing plant to continue the line of products — now a two million dollar a year business. When nationwide distribution began to be discussed, Hector, weary of explaining the correct pronunciation of his last name, decided to change his name to a more ‘Americanized’ version — Boyardee. “Everyone is proud of his own family name, but sacrifices are necessary for progress,” he said at the time. Business was especially good, and he moved from Cleveland, where the operation had grown too large for the facilities, to Pennsylvania where his nearby farms were producing his products. During WWII, he contributed to the war effort by using his factory to make food rations. The company merged with American Home Products, later known as International Home Foods, in 1946. Chef Boyardee worked with the company and remained an important part of and adviser to the business, now know as ConAgra of which Chef Boyardee is the registered trademark, until his death in 1985. Chef Hector Boyardee is forever linked with products such as ravioli, spaghetti and make-at-home pizza. A scholarship in his real name was established for students studying in the area of culinary arts and/or hospitality management. Today, these scholarships are offered at many colleges. “Thank goodness for Chef Boyardee!” Sources: www.chefboyardee.com; www.chefboy.com; Walker Percy: A Life After Woodrow Wilson, then president of Princeton, presented him with his ... the group had come together to renew friendships made at the Greenbrier, ... www.nytimes.com/books/first/s/samway-percy.html; British Royalty 06:03: 56 William H. Taft and Woodrow Wilson get in carriage ... views golf course, building and surrounding area at Greenbrier Resort in West Virginia ... www.footagefarm.co.uk/Footage%20Farm%20website/ Web%20lists/British%20Royalty.htm; 1948 LIFE Magazine Issues ... Big weekend at Greenbrier Hotel, White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia

Examples of Some Other Successful Italian Immigrants:

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In 1890, nineteen-year-old Domenico DeDomenico emigrated from Italy, settled in California, and started a pasta company called Gragnano Products in 1912. In 1934, the company was renamed the Golden Grain Macaroni Company and later became famous for its Rice-A-Roni products. In 1889, twelve-year-old Amadeo Obici emigrated from Italy. In 1904, he opened a fruit stand in New York City, offering bags of roasted peanuts for The Greenbrier, White Sulphur Springs, WV in the late 1930s. a nickel each. His roasted peaphoto courtesy of Joe Feury nuts were so popular, that in 1906, Amadeo Obici established the Planters Peanut Company Company. In 1900, Vincent Taormina emigrated from Sicily and settled in New Orleans. He began a small importing business, bringing the foods of Italy to America. In 1927, his successful business merged with another food company to form the Progresso Italian Food Corporation Corporation. In 1915, seventeen-year-old Hector Boiardi emigrated from Italy and settled in Cleveland, Ohio. Hector's spaghetti sauce was so popular that he packaged it in milk bottles for his customers to take home. Later, when Hector combined his bottled spaghetti sauce with pasta and offered the combination as a cook-at-home meal, he had the makings of a new company. Hector Americanized his name and called his new company Chef Boyardee Boyardee.

December 2008 - F ebr uary 2009 Fe bruary

Bluefield WV on Rt 52, Bramwell, WV, 304.325-8438 or 1-800-221326, see story page 7

A Victorian Christmas Open House

Campbell House Historical Society, 5-7:30 pm Lexington VA, 540-464-1058

Murder Mystery Weekend

A Groovy Kind of Murder dinner theater, Pipestem Resort State Park, Pipestem WV 304.466-1800, 1-800.CALL WVA Geminids Me Metteor Shower: 50 per hour for 3 days

Monday, December 15 Carnegie Hall Film Series

7pm, Lewis Theater, Lewisburg WV, 304.645.7917

Tuesday, December 16 12 Da tmas Pla Dayys of Fitness, A Chris Christmas Playy

based on the carol, The Twelve Days of Christmas, and the story, The Christmas Carol, Scrooge wants to sell the gym to candy mongrels who want to take out all of the equipment and put in candy machines, performed by Clifton Forge Middle School Drama Club at 7 pm, Gleason Forum Hall, Clifton Forge Middle School, Low Moor VA, 304.536-3736

Wednesday, December 17 Live Music & Dinner

live music every 3rd Wednesday monthly, 7-9pm, no cover, Original Italian Restaurant, Lexington VA, 540.261-3136

Wednesda da 7-20 ednesdayy-Satur -Saturda dayy, December 117-20 Lexington-Rockbridge Christmas Basket Program Virginia Horse Center, Lexington VA, 540.464-2950

Thursday-Sunday, December 17-23 Holiday Lantern Tours

evening family lantern tours 5:30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 8:30 pm nightly, refreshments, music, reservations required, Dec 11 is a dress rehearsal, Frontier Culture Museum, Staunton, 540.332-7850

Thur sda 8 Thursda sdayy, December 118 Third Thursdays in White Sulphur Springs

shops open late, refreshments, entertainment & special offers by merchants, White Sulphur Springs WV, 304.536-9206 NAMI New River/Greenbrier Valley , all welcome, meet at 7 pm, Old Stone Church, Lewisburg WV, 304.445.7866

Downt own Charles tW alk Downtown Charlestton Ar ArtW tWalk

showcases Charleston’s art scene with best of local, regional & nationally recognized artists, free reception 5-9pm, The Clay Center, Charleston WV, 304.561-3570

Friday-Sunday, December 19, 20, 21 Ar tis tr ations Artis tistt Demons Demonstr trations

beginning at 10am, Tamarack, Beckley WV, 1.800.tamarack

Saturday, December 20 Breakfast with Santa

Santa & Mrs. Claus stop by North Bend for breakfast-join them, North Bend State Park, Cairo WV 304.643-2931, 1-800.CALL WVA

Family Caroling Party

guided tours, interpretations, 2 pm; reservations required, Frontier Culture Museum, Staunton, 540.332-7850

Lexington-Rockbridge Christmas Basket Program Virginia Horse Center, Lexington VA, 540.463-7744

Bath County Chamber of Commerce Open House hot drinks & warm cookies, 1-4 pm, Hot Springs VA

Annual Hot Springs Christmas Parade

through the village of Hot Springs at 2 pm, Hot Springs VA

Star Party, all welcome to look through optical telescopes, begins at dusk, NRAO, Green Bank WV, 304.456-2150

Christmas & New Year’s Holidays

enjoy a very special Christmas in the mountains, many family activities, visit from Santa then ring in the New Year with elegant dining & dancing at one of our fabulous celebrations for an evening you will never forget, The Homestead, Hot Springs VA, www.thehomestead.com

Wednesday & Thursday, December 24 & 25 Christmas Get-Away

special get-away package, Natural Bridge VA, 540.463.3777

Thursday, December 25 Happy Christmas Day Friday-Sunday, December 26, 27, 28 Ar tis tr ations Artis tistt Demons Demonstr trations

beginning at 10am, Tamarack, Beckley WV, 1.800.tamarack

Satur da 7 Saturda dayy, December 227 American Herit age Music Hall Heritage

4th Saturday music, dance, featured band 7-11 pm, welcome all ages, family atmosphere, kids play area, donations appreciated, former Is-

Ent er Enter erttainment Calendar continued on page 26


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COMMENT AR Y COMMENTAR ARY

December 2008 - F ebr uary 2009 Fe bruary

The Never Ending War on American Freedom

From the beginning of the American Republic there has been a group of influential people who have devoted their lives and careers to putting more P ower I n G overnment (PIGs). As soon as the American Revolution ended Alexander Hamilton schemed to overthrow the first Constitution, the Articles of Confederation, and replace it with a document that would legitimize a permanent president who would appoint all the governors and have veto power over all state legislation. He wanted a king, in other words, who could force British-style mercantilism and an imperialistic foreign policy on America without any significant resistance by the citizens of the states. He failed during his lifetime, but that is essentially the system Americans live under today. We now live in “Hamilton’s republic,” as his idolaters gleefully remind us. As soon as Hamilton’s party, the Federalists, gained power, one of the first things they did was to rescind the First Amendment to the new Constitution with the Sedition Act during the presidency of John Adams. Hamilton authored several long-winded reports as Treasury Secretary in which he invented the insidious notions of “implied” powers in the Constitution along with such an expansive interpretation of the General Welfare and Commerce Clauses that the Constitution would become useless as a restraint on governmental tyranny. Hamilton’s political compatriot, Chief Justice John Marshall, turned Hamilton’s legalistic mysticism into legal precedent during his long tenure on the Court, with many other PIG lawyers following suit over the succeeding generations. And of course Abraham Lincoln established a French Revolutionary/Stalinist-style regime that imprisoned tens of thousands of Northern political dissenters, employed an army of spies and informers (on Northern citizens), shut down hundreds of opposition newspapers, illegally suspended habeas corpus, deported an outspoken member of the opposition party, confiscated firearms, illegally created the state of West Virginia, censored all telegraph communication, and myriad other assaults on the Constitution, including waging war on his own country after promising to defend the lives and liberties of the very people he was waging war on. The brilliant John C. Calhoun explained the inevitability of all of this — and more — in his Disquisition on Government , written in the late 1840s and published shortly after his death in 1850. Calhoun wrote that it is an error to think that “a written constitution, containing suitable restrictions on the powers of government, is sufficient, of itself, without the aid of any organism ... to counteract the tendency of the numerical majority to oppression and the abuse of power.” All democracies are broken down into two basic groups — net taxpayers and net tax consumers, said Calhoun. And the latter group (PIGs) will inevitably prevail, as history teaches us. The party in favor of constitutional restrictions on governmental power at first “might command some respect” but “would be overpowered.” It is mere folly, he argued, to suppose that “the party in possession of the ballot box and the physical force of the country [i.e., the military], could be successfully resisted by an appeal to reason, truth, justice, or the obligations imposed by the constitution.” Moreover, “the end of the contest [between net taxpayers and tax consumers] would be the subversion of the constitution” whereby “the restrictions [on state power] would ultimately be annulled, and the government be converted into one of unlimited powers.” This is why Calhoun embraced the Jeffersonian idea of nullification during the sectional dispute over the 1828 “Tariff of Abominations.” As explained by Ross Lence in the Foreword to Union and Liberty: The Political Philosophy of John C. Calhoun Calhoun, the former vice president was “seeking a means by which [disunion] could be avoided,” and so he “turned to the doctrine of interposition, which defended the right of a state to interpose its authority to overrule federal legislation. The seeds of this doctrine were introduced by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison in the Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions of 1798 and 1799.” Of course, such ideas as nullification, interposition, secession, and federalism were snuffed out by the Lincoln administration as a result of the War to Prevent Southern Independence.

by Thomas J. DiLorenzo

Calhoun’s prediction of a government of unlimited powers eventually came true. The Jeffersonian strict constructionists did more or less prevail for a while, but were nearly wiped out by 1865, and were nowhere to be found by the turn of the twentieth century. At that point numerous notorious PIGs gleefully thumbed their noses at the Constitution and the freedoms it was supposed to protect. This story is told in great detail in the new book by Tom Woods and Kevin Gutzman entitled Who Killed the Constitution? The Fate of American Liberty from World War I to George W. Bush. Woodrow Wilson resumed the totalitarian attacks on free speech that Adams and Lincoln had pioneered with the Espionage Act of 1917 and the Sedition Act of 1918. These laws literally criminalized opposition to going to war in Europe, as Woods and Gutzman explain. In addition, the creepy-sounding “Committee on Public Information” portrayed Germans “as subhuman savages”; and sauerkraut even became known as “liberty cabbage,” an early precedent for the moronic “freedom fries” language adopted by the Bush administration after its invasion of Iraq in 2003 when the French government refused to participate. During the Lincoln administration roving gangs of Republican Party thugs destroyed printing presses, intimidated Democratic voters in the Northern states, and generally behaved like twentieth-century brownshirts. Woods and Gutzman write of how the exact same thuggish behavior was an integral part of the Wilson administration. A Christian minister was sentenced to 15 years for distributing a pamphlet to five people explaining that Jesus Christ was a pacifist (reminiscent of how Congressman Ron Paul was loudly booed by an audience of “evangelicals” when he reminded them in 2008 that Jesus was known as The Prince of Peace). Men were tarred and feathered for not spending enough of their income on “Liberty bonds” that helped fund the war; German language Bibles were burned; and the producers of a movie about the American Revolution that portrayed America’s “ally” Great Britain in an unflattering light were sentenced to ten years in prison. By the 1950s American presidents clearly thought of themselves as dictators who were not constrained one iota by the Constitution. Consequently, Harry Truman felt justified in having the government seize and operate the steel mills so that he could better prosecute the undeclared war in Korea. Truman insisted that he had absolute, dictatorial power to “do whatever is for the best of the country.” Constitution schmonstitution. The Supreme Court eventually ruled against this particular act of theft, but it had little effect in deterring future dictatorial behavior. Today, American presidents think of themselves not just as unrestrained dictators but as emperors of the world. Woods and Gutzman provide a scholarly analysis of why Brown vs. Board of Education was unconstitutional. The Supreme Court “set itself above the Constitution” for what the majority believed was a good cause. Constitution schmonstitution. There is no constitutional authority for the myriad pork-barrel spending projects that Congress funds year in and year out with tax dollars, but so what? Woods and Gutzman describe the evolution of this particular power grab, from the time when the “father of the Constitution,” James Madison, vetoed an “internal improvements” bill as unconstitutional to today’s anything-goes mentality in Washington, D.C. Then there is the theft of privately-held gold by FDR. The Supreme Court never even bothered to comment on this grossly unconstitutional act of thievery. Nor is there any constitutional basis for the government’s ban on prayer in public schools or military conscription. Not to mention the dictatorial implications of presidential “executive orders.” Teddy Roosevelt receives special mention with regard to this latter authoritarian tool. He issued 1,006 executive orders compared to 51 and 71 for his two predecessors, write Woods and Gutzman. The “Bush Revolution,” discussed in chapter 12, proves that modern American presidents and their advisors have nothing but absolute contempt for the Constitution. Upon reading Who Killed the Constitution ? the Jeffersonian wing of the founding fathers, were they alive today, would be reaching for their swords, preparing for another revolution. The Hamiltonians, on the other hand, would be popping champagne corks, high five-ing each other, and smiling very broadly. Calhoun would be deeply saddened that his dire predictions about the fate of an American democracy that is stripped of its Jeffersonian, states’ rights moorings have all come true in spades. Thomas J. DiLorenzo [send him mail] is professor of economics at Loyola College in Maryland and the author of The Real Lincoln; Lincoln Unmasked: What You’re Not Supposed To Know about Dishonest Abe and How Capitalism Saved America America. His latest book, Hamilton’s Curse , was published on October 21. Copyright © 2008 LewRockwell.com

Great line delivered by Martin Short on TV a few Friday nights ago ...

He said, "I believe Jesus IS coming ... He may first stop off at the three trillion planets that did not nail him to a cross...but eventually... He will be here."


COMMENT AR Y COMMENTAR ARY

Historical Secrets

Free energy? No utility bills? — It could have

been if Nikola Tesla had had his way. Who was Tesla? You may know if you’re reading The Hollow Earth Insider, but for those who haven’t, he was the inventor and genius who blistered the path that electrical development has followed and continues to follow until this day. Every elementary school student in America learns about Thomas Edison and his most important invention, the electric light bulb. However little is taught about Nikola Tesla who developed the AC (alternate current) electrical system that carried electrical service across America and most of the world. At the time, Edison was trying to sell the world his inferior DC (direct current) system that required a generator station every 200 yards. Tesla’s superior system could be carried over many miles of wire. Of course Edison would have made more money selling a generator system to be placed every 200 yards. Tesla teamed up with George Westinghouse, and against the backdrop of a bitter battle of words and accusations from the Edison camp, convinced the financial backers of the superiority of AC current. His system is still in use worldwide today. Nikola Tesla was born in Yugoslavia in 1856. He received his highest education at the polytechnical school at Graz and the university of Prague. He designed and introduced a prototype of a new electric motor having no commutator as DC motors have, and worked on the principle of rotating magnetic field produced polyphone alternating currents. He couldn’t find anyone in Europe, who was interested in his invention, so he immigrated to the United States in 1884. After a short, unhappy stint with Thomas Edison, Tesla established his own lab and obtained patents on polyphone motors, dynamos and transformers for his complete AC system. After forming the alliance with George Westinghouse, not only did they convince the public of the efficiency and safety of AC over DC and gain acceptance as the electric power system worldwide, but Tesla and Westinghouse also supplied the light and power for the Worlds Fair of 1893, built Niagara Falls’ hydro plant, and installed AC systems at Colorado silver mines and other industrial sites. By the early 1900’s Tesla was a celebrity. In 1900, with encouragement and the promise of $150,000 from financier J.P. Morgan, Tesla next turned to the goal of building a radio transmitter to broadcast around the World using another Tesla invention, magnifying transmitters. At this point Tesla’s luck and fortune began to turn sour. On December 12, 1901, the Italian electrical engineer, Guglielmo Marconi, sent the first transatlantic signal, the letter “S” from Cornwell England to Newfoundland. He did this with, as the financiers noted, equipment much less costly than that envisioned by Tesla. Of course it wasn’t mentioned that Marconi built his equipment using Tesla’s fundamental radio patent #6451576 filed in 1897, but not issued until March 20, 1900. In 1902 Tesla applied for another group of patents pertaining to the “art of transmitting electrical energy through the natural medium.” By 1903, Tesla was in drastic need of funds to finish his massive planned transmitting tower and finish his project. Hoping to get another investment from Morgan, and because of Maconi’s success, Tesla told Morgan that the major purpose in building his tower was not to just send radio signals but to transmit wireless electrical power anywhere in the world, virtually free. Morgan must have realized that this could destroy the earning potential of the many utility companies in his control and dropped Tesla like a hot, live wire.

VALLEY GUIDE

December 2008 - F ebr uary 2009 Fe bruary

21

No Escape from New Generation of Speed Cameras that follow you for 30 miles By Ray Massey

A new generation of speed cameras that can track drivers for up to 30 miles and cannot be dodged are being tested by police. The devices stop motorists evading a ticket by braking suddenly before a camera and then speeding up immediately afterwards. The new cameras could cover whole areas of cities or suburban housing estates, guarding any number of entry and exit points. By ‘talking’ to each other down phone or internet lines, they calculate a car’s average speed – even if it makes a series of left and right turns down a variety of roads. The cameras are already in use, but mainly on the motorways. They are now likely to appear on rural and urban roads, spelling the end for the 6,000 yellow ‘Gatso-style’ box cameras currently in use. Transport minister Jim Fitzpatrick yesterday told a road safety conference that the latest cameras would be a key weapon in the fight to reduce road casualties. Supporters say they are ‘fairer’, have so far reduced casualties by 50% and encourage a smoother traffic flow and safer, more consistent driving behaviour. But critics say it is merely a new chapter in the Government’s war on motorists, who paid £106million in fines last year. One system, costing £200,000 to £1million depending on the size of the area covered, could replace many fixed-point speed cameras. But although the number of cameras might reduce, greater areas of the road network would be covered. One of the providers of average speed cameras, SPECs, told the conference that the cameras could be networked together, could be forward or rear facing, could scan multiple lanes and cover areas from 250 yards to nearly 30 miles. The cameras photograph a number-plate as a vehicle enters the speed restriction zone, and then again when it leaves. The system then calculates the car’s average speed between the two points. If it is higher than the speed limit, the driver is automatically sent a fixed penalty fine and receives three points on their licence. Mr Fitzpatrick said: ‘Trials have shown very good results. Wherever there are average speed camera signs, traffic moves at a uniform speed and crashes reduce.’ Approval for the new generation of cameras is imminent. It will be up to local authorities to decide whether to buy the system. Electronic signs that sense when a car is speeding and switch traffic lights further down the road to red, forcing it to stop, are to be introduced in Britain. The system, already in use as a traffic calming measure in Spain, will be installed on Camden High Street in North London. In 1904, Tesla wrote an article for Electrical World entitled, “The Transmission of Electrical Energy without Wires.” Tesla explained that the globe, even with its great size, responds to electrical currents like a small metal bell. Tesla’s system would in effect “charge” the earth with power that people could access directly from the ground — and we are not talking about some fanatical “mad scientist” shouting out a theory that doesn’t make sense to anyone. Nikola Tesla was arguably the number one genius in the world when it came to understanding and harnessing the natural powers of the earth. Prior to his death in 1943, Tesla had filed over 700 working patents worldwide. He also predicted microwave ovens, TV, cosmic-ray motor beam technologies, interplanetary communications and wave-interference devices that since have been named the “Tesla Howitzer” and the “Tesla Shield.” In 1933 Tesla held a press conference on his 77th birthday and declared that “electric power” was everywhere present in “unlimited quantities” and could “drive the world’s machinery without the need of coal, oil, gas or any other fuels.” A reporter asked if the sudden introduction of his principle would “upset the present economic system.” Tesla replied knowingly, “It’s badly upset already.” In stark contrast, one of Thomas Edison’s popular quotes of the time was that “he could always tell the importance of one of his inventions by the number of dollars it brought in and nothing else concerned him.” Could this difference of philosophy be the major reason why Thomas Edison’s light bulb shines on, while the real father of electrical power, Nikola Tesla is seldom mentioned? Sources: Tesla: Man out of Time © 1981 by Margaret Chency. The Inventions, Researches and Writings of Nikola Tesla (1992) Edited by Thomas Commerford Martin. Tesla: The Lost Inventions © 1988 by George Trinkaus

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22

VALLEY GUIDE

December 2008 - F ebr uary 2009 Fe bruary

WEDNESD AY Dec 3, Jan 7 & Feb 4 WEDNESDA

MOND AY Dec 11,, Jan 5 & Feb 2 MONDA

Marie Ruritan Club•Community Building, Michael Allen 304/466-4149 Inter Agency Council • Carma 304/445-7309, 9 am AA•U. Methodist Church, Pocahontas & Walnut, Ronceverte WV, noon Adult Basis Education & Literacy Programs • Lewisburg Rotary Club • The Elk’s Club, Lewisburg WV, free computer class in Microsoft Word, Excel, typing, writing & math John MCCaffrey 304/392-2371, 12 noon

PATCH • WV School of Osteopathic Medicine, Lewisburg WV, April L. Vestal 304/438-6188 ext. 131, 3 pm

Adult Basic Education Classes, GED's & more •

Peterstown Library,Peterstown WV, 304/772-3038, 5:30-8:30 pm

Civil Air Patrol (CAP) Composite Squadron WV 100 • aerospace

education, cadet programs, emergency services, CAP Squadron facility, Greenbrier Valley Airport, Maxwelton WV, cadets - youth 7th grade and up, 6 pm; adults 7 pm ARES (Mountaineer Amateur Radio Emergency Service) • Rm 203, old Rivermont School, Covington VA, 6 pm AL-A-NON • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm Alvon Arrows 4-H Club • Old Anthony Creek School Building, Joy Bland 304/536-2444, 7 pm Greenbrier County Cattlemen's Association • Jim McCutcheon 304/645-1525, 7 pm GFWC of White Sulphur Springs • Emmanuel United Methodist Church, Shirley Hicks 304/ 536-3794, 7 pm Lewisburg Boy Scout Troop 70 • Lewisburg United Methodist Church, Cliff Baker, 304/645-6131, 7 pm Smoot Ruritan Club • Smoot Elementary School Cafeteria, Gene Campbell 304/392-6717, 7 pm (if holiday 2nd Mon) Peterstown Ruritan Club • Call Trent Chinault 304/753-4452, 7 pm Marlinton City Council•City Hall, Marlinton WV, 304/799-4315, 7:30 pm USABDA-Ballroom Dancers of Lewisburg • St. James Episcopal Church, 218 Church St, Lewisburg WV, 7:30-9:30 pm, 304/536-1337 AA • St. James Episc Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm closed AA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church Annex, Maple Street, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

Those who don’t read good books hold no advantage over those who don’t read.

A

Around the corner there may wait a new road 5 5 or a secret gate. 5

AA • Lewisburg United Methodist Church, 214 E. Washington St, use

entrance off Lee St, Lewisburg WV (no smoking on church property) 10 am closed meeting: step study, Janeal Q 304/645-6070 Delta Kappa Gamma • Emmanuel United Methodist Church, WSS WV, Beatrice Harvey 304/645-2138, 10am Honnahlee Saturday Playdays • activities for preschool and elementary age children, Honnahlee, 117 East Washington Street, Lewisburg WV, 304/645-6123, 10:30 am Story Time & Crafts for ages 3 to 5 • WSS Public Library, 304/536-1171, 10 - 11 am Spa City Energizers 4-H Club • WSS Public Library, Mendy Jones 304/536-1400, 1 pm AA• Monroe Co. Lib, Rt 219, Union WV, Dwight 304/772-3487, 4 pm Bingo • Ronceverte Firehouse, Ronceverte WV, 6 pm NA • St. Andrew's Episcopal, Clifton Forge VA, 6:30 pm AA• Big Clear Creek Baptist Church, Anjean Rd, Rupert WV, Doc 304/ 392-5456, 7 pm AL-A-NON • St. Andrews Episcopal, 516 McCormick Blvd., Clifton Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • OD, LS, SO, St. Andrews Episcopal, Clifton Forge VA, 8 pm

First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win. ~ Mathatma Ghandi

- J.R.R. Tolkein

THURSD AY Dec 4, Jan 1 & Feb 5 THURSDA

SUND AY Dec 7, Jan 4 & Feb 1 SUNDA

Bath County Chamber of Commerce Board Meeting • open to all NA • Emmanuel Episcopal, Covington VA, 6:30 pm AA • St. Thomas Epis Church, Rt. 60, White Sulphur Springs WV, 7 pm members, Chamber office, Hot Springs VA, 8 am, 1-800-628-8092 AA • Alderson Presbyterian Church, basement on Monroe County side, Adult Basis Education & Literacy Programs •

- Mark Twain

TUESD AY Dec 2, Jan 6 & Feb 3 TUESDA Story Hour for 3, 4, 5 year olds •

skills, GED prep, college level tutoring, services available 9 am-7 pm, Monroe County Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038 Children's Story Hour • C.P.J. Memorial Library, Covington VA, 540/962-3321, 10:30 am AA • St. James Episcopal Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon Grief Support • Alleghany Regional Hospital, Covington VA, 3-4 pm, call 540/862-6214 Bingo • early bird 6pm, Bingo 6:30pm, door prizes, Douglas Center, 108 Douglas St, Princeton WV, sponsored by Concord College Athletics G.E.D. • Ronceverte Public Library, 304/645-7911, 5:15-8:15 pm Greenbrier Percussion Group • Greenbrier Community Center, Oak&Feamster St., Lewisburg WV, 304/497-3397, 6 pm NA • Emmanuel Episcopal, Covington VA, 6:30 pm AA • St. James Episcopal Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm Lewisburg Junior Woman’s Club • Lewisburg Library Annex, Lewisburg WV, Tracie Brackenrich 304/645-5107, 7pm Monroe County Landmark Commission • Monroe Co Court House, Union WV, 304/772-5539, 7pm Feb, Apr, June, Aug, Oct , Dec WSS Rifles • City Hall, WSS WV, 304/536-4373, 7:30 pm AL-A-NON • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Maple Street, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • OD, LW, SO, Emmanuel Episcopal Church Annex, Maple Street, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

CL UBS & OR GANIZA TIONS CLUBS ORG ANIZATIONS SATURD AY Dec 6, Jan 3 & Feb 7 TURDA

Summers County Public Library, 10:30 am, Hinton WV, 304/466-4490 4 Year Old Play ime • Green Bank Lib, Greenbank WV, 10-11:30 am Playground for 3-5 Year Olds • Hillsboro Lib, Hillsboro WV, 10-11:30 am Duplicate Bridge Club • Covington Senior Center, Rockbridge Ave., Covington VA, 10:30 am AA • St. James Episcopal Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon AA • OD, NS, Rivermont Community Center, 1011 Rock Bridge Street, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 12:15pm OA (Overeaters Anonymous) • St. James Episcopal Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, Patti 304/536-4130, 1 pm WSS CVB • City Hall, White Sulphur Springs WV, 5 pm Adult Basic Education Classes, GED's, & more • Monroe County Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038, 5:30-8:30 pm Hilldale-Talcott Ruritan Club • Community Building , Linda Huffman 304/466-2062, 6 pm Clintonville Ruritan Club • Community Building Rt. 60 W, Frank Hampton 304/645-6259, 6:30 pm NA • St. Andrew's Episcopal, Clifton Forge VA, 6:30 pm Clifton Forge City Council Work Session • Court House, Clifton Forge VA, 7pm Covington City Council Work Session • Council Chambers of Covington City Hall, 703/965-6300, 7pm Division of Genealogical Studies • Greenbrier Historical Society, Greenbrier County Library, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm Greenville Ruritan Club • Community Center, Rt 122, Tully Larew 304/832-6623, 7 pm November-May; 7:30 pm August-October Quinwood City Council Meeting • Quinwood City Hall, Quinwood WV, 304/438-6658, 7 pm WSS Fire Department • WSS Firehouse, 304/536-4715, 7 pm Epsilon Sigma Alpha International • Old Stone Presbyterian Church, Michelle Vance 304/536-4121, 7 pm NA • St. James Episcopal, Lewisburg WV 304/645-2588, 7:30 pm Alderson Women’s Club • Faye 304/445-2573, 7:30 pm Anthony Creek Volunteer Fire Department •Business meeting at Firehouse, David Young Chief 304/536-1636, 7:30 pm Anthony Creek Volunteer Rescue Squad • Anthony Creek Firehouse, Carl Wade Captain 304/536-1636, 7:30 pm Epsilon Sorority of Beta Sigma Phi • Nancy Collins 304/ 645-7000, 7:30 pm I.O.O.F.Greenbrier Lodge #146 •Ronceverte, 304/647-4527, 7:30 pm PEO Chapter V • Elizabeth 304/645-6462, 7:30 pm Ronceverte City Council Meets• City Hall, Ronceverte WV, 304/647-5455, 7:30 pm Covington VFW Post 1033 • VFW Hall, Dolly Ann Drive, Covington VA, 7:30 pm WSS Masons • WSS Masonic Lodge Hall, 304/536-4501, 8 pm AL-A-NON • St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Clifton Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • ST/O St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Clifton Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • OD, NS, St. Andrews Episcopal, Clifton Forge VA, 8 pm AA • Caldwell Presbyterian Church, Route 60, Caldwell WV, 7 pm

free computer class in Microsoft Word, Excel, typing, writing & math skills, GED prep, college level tutoring, services available 9am-7pm, Monroe County Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038 Children's Story Hour • ages 3-5, Greenbrier County Library, 301 Courtney Drive, Lewisburg WV, 304/645-2350, 10-11 am Playground for 3 Year Olds • Green Bank Library, Greenbank WV, 10-11:30 am Playground for 3-5 Year Olds • Hillsboro Library, Hillsboro WV, 10-11:30 am WSS Rotary Club • April's Pizzeria, White Sulphur Springs WV, 304/536-4309, 12 noon AA • St. James Epis Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon closed TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) • Rhema Christian Center, Fairlea WV, weight-in 4:45-5:45 pm, meeting 6pm, Leader Cindy Rhodes, 304/392-2261 Ronceverte Lions Club• The Lions Den, Lynn Holbrook, 6:30 pm

Alderson WV, 7 pm

AA • OD, St. Lukes, Hot Springs VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

Talents are common, everyone has them, but rare is the courage to follow our talents where they lead. - Anonymous

CBCBCBCBCBCBCBC

MOND AY Dec 8, Jan 112 2 & Feb 8 MONDA

Lewisburg Rotary Club • The Elk’s Club, Lewisburg WV, John MCCaffrey 304/392-2371, 12 noon Canvas Ruritan Club • AA • U. Methodist Church, Pocahontas & Walnut, Ronceverte WV, noon Canvas School, Butch Crump 304/872-0415, 6:30pm Alleghany Highlands Orchestra • rehearsal 6:30 - 8:30 pm, fellow- GFWC of Lewisburg • Greenbrier County Public Library, Lewisburg WV, ship hall, First Presbyterian Church, Locust & Maple, Covington VA, for membership and auditions 540/962-4847 Epsilon Delta Sorority of Beta Sigma Phi • Sandy Circosta 304/ 536-3403, 7 pm Greenbrier County Republican Club • Greenbrier County Courthouse, Bill Hawkins 304/536-2080, 7 pm Renick Ruritan Club • Call Karen McMillion 304/497-3779, 7pm WSS Junior Fire Department • White Sulphur Springs Firehouse, Bob White 304/536-1819, 7 pm Diabetes Support Group • Alleghany Regional Hospital, Lowmoor VA 1-800-451-7210, 7 pm Anata Shrine Club • 7:30 pm, Clifton Forge Shrine Club Alderson VFW Post #6723 • Alderson City Hall, Buel Cochran 304/445-7522, 7:30 pm Gamma Chi Sorority of Beta Sigma Phi • Sue Gurley 304/536-1044, 7:30 pm NA • St. James Episcopal, Lewisburg WV, 1-800-776-4442, 7:30 pm AA • First Presbyterian Church, White Sulphur Springs WV, 8pm AA • Alleghany Highlands Community Services, 305 Monroe Ave, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm4

304/645-3509, 12:30 pm

Adult Basic Education Classes, GED's & more • Peterstown Public Library, Peterstown WV, 304/772-3038, 5:30-8:30 pm

Civil Air Patrol (CAP) Composite Squadron WV 100 • aerospace

education, cadet programs, emergency services, CAP Squadron facility, Greenbrier Valley Airport, Maxwelton WV, cadets-youth 7th grade & up meet at 6 pm, adults 7 pm WSS City Council • White Sulphur Springs Town Hall, 6:30 pm Alderson Lions Club • The Big Wheel Restaurant, Alderson WV, 304/445-2674, 6:30 pm Carnifax Ferry Ruritan Club • Community Building, Bob Brown 304/872-2043, 6:30 pm Frankford Ruritan Club • Frankford Elementary School, Rt 219, Jody Garavaglia 304/497-2025, 6:30 pm Lewisburg Lioness Club • Dining Room, Greenbrier Valley Airport, RT.219 N, Lewisburg WV, 304/645-6762, 6:30 pm Organ Cave Ruritan Club • Organ Cave Community Center & Elizabeth Chapel Methodist Church, Organ Cave WV, Sue McCormick 304/6474269, 6:30 pm Spanishburg Ruritan Club • BV-VFD Community Room, Beckley Rd, Spanishburg WV, Richard Godfrey 304/425-1282, 6:30 pm AA • St. James Episc Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm closed I think one must finally Williamsburg Ruritan Club • take one’s life in one’s arms. Williamsburg Community Building, Jim Phares 304/392-6064, 7 pm - Arthur Miller AL-A-NON • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm Rainelle City Council meeting • FRID AY Dec 5, Jan 2 & Feb 6 FRIDA City Hall, Rainelle WV, 304/438-7191, 7 pm WSS Lions Club • WSS Community Center, Tuckahoe RD, White SulPEO Chapter O • Virginia 304/497-2557, 9:30 am phur Springs WV, Rodena Belcher 304/645-1831, 7 pm AA • OD, NS, Emmanuel Epis. Church, Covington VA, 12 noon Fort Hill Rebekah Lodge #17 • NA • Emmanuel Episcopal, Covington VA, 6:30 pm AL-A-NON • St. Andrews EpiscopalChurch, 516 McCormick Blvd, Clifton I.O.O.F. Lodge Hall, Madeline Moses 304/645-2041, 7:30 pm Lewisburg Masons • Greenbrier Lodge #42 A.F.& A.M-Masonic Temple, Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • St. James Episcopal Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm McElhenney Lane, Lbg WV, Jim Coleman 304/645-3768, 7:30 pm AA• Big Clear Creek Baptist Church, Anjean Rd, Rupert WV, Doc 304/ I.O.O.F. • I.O.O.F. Lodge, Main St, Hot Springs VA, 8 pm AA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church Annex, Maple Street, 392-5456, 7 pm Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • OD, NS, St. Andrews Episcopal, Clifton Forge VA, 8 pm


CL UBS & OR GANIZA TIONS CLUBS ORG ANIZATIONS TUESD AY Dec 9, Jan 113 3 & Feb 110 0 TUESDA Adult Basis Education & Literacy Programs •

free computer classes, typing, writing & math skills, GED prep, tutoring, Peterstown Public Library, Peterstown WV, 304/753-9568 Story Hour for 3, 4 & 5 year olds • Summers County Public Library, 10:30 am, Hinton WV, 304/466-4490

Playground for 4 Year Olds •

Green Bank Library, Greenbank WV, 10-11:30 am A.A.R.P. • Lewisburg United Methodist Church, Lewisburg WV, Rev. Carl Renick 304/645-6304, 11:30 am AA • St. James Epis Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon AA • OD, NS, Salvation Army Building, Covington VA, 12:15 pm Adult Basic Education Classes, GED's & more • Monroe Co Public Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038, 5:30-8:30 pm Lewisburg BPW Club • Dining Room, Greenbrier Valley Airport, Garnette Haynes 304/645-3961, 6 pm Lewisburg Lions Club • Lewisburg United Methodist Church, Lewisburg WV, Troy Holbrook 304/497-2966, 6:30 pm NA • St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 6:30 pm Gap Mills Ruritan Club • Carmel Presbyterian Church, Zenith Rd, Gap Mills, Duane Miller 304/772-3369, 7 pm Nemours Ruritan Club • Ruritan Community Building, Nemours Valley Rd, Sandra Hampton 304/979-8778, 7 pm Shenandoah Manor Family Council • meeting at Shenandoah Manor dining room, 304/645-7270, 7 pm Rockbridge Greens • regular meeting, Rockbridge Regional Library, 138 S. Main Street, Lexington VA, 540/261-4306, 7- 9 pm American Cancer Society • Greenbrier Valley Medical Center, Fairlea WV, Louise Machburn 304/647-4530, 7 pm WSS Rescue Squad • WSS Firehouse, 7 pm Clifton Forge City Council • main courtroom, 7:30 pm NA • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7:30 pm Greenbrier County Board of Education • County School Board office, Lewisburg WV, 7:30 pm. Xi Gamma Nu Sorority • 304/647-5051, 7:30 pm I.O.O.F. • Lodge Hall, Ronceverte WV, 7:30 pm Laureate Alpha Epsilon Sorority of Beta Sigma Phi • Barbara Livesay 304/647-3100, 7:30 pm Lodge Shryock 47 • Ronceverte Masonic Lodge, 7:30 pm AL-A-NON • St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Clifton Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • ST/O St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Clifton Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • OD, NS, St. Andrews Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 8 pm AA • Caldwell Presbyterian Church, Route 60, Caldwell WV, 7 pm

I always told God, I’m going to hold steady on to you, and you’ve got to see me through.

VALLEY GUIDE

THURSD AY Dec 111 1, Jan 8 & Feb 112 2 THURSDA

December 2008 - F ebr uary 2009 Fe bruary

23

MOND AY Dec 115, 5, Jan 119 9 & Feb 116 6 MONDA

Greater Greenbrier County Chamber of Commerce • Community Col- Lewisburg Rotary Club • lege, Alumni Rm 302, Lewisburg WV, 304/645-1000, 7:30 am

The Elk’s Club, Lewisburg WV ,John MCCaffrey 304/392-2371, 12 noon

Lashmeet Ruritan Club • Ruritan Community Building,

AA • United Methodist Church, Pocahontas & Walnut Sts,

Ruritan Lane, Lashmeet WV, Gale Shrewsbury 304/467-7442

Ronceverte WV, 12 noon

Adult Basis Education & Literacy Programs •

free computer classes, typing, writing & math skills, GED prep, tutoring, Family Refuge Center Board of Directors •

9 am-5 pm, Monroe County Public Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038 Family Refuge Center, Lewisburg WV, 304/645-6334, 4:30 pm Lewisburg Foundation • Old Stone Presbyterian Church, Green Bank Library, Greenbank WV, 10-11:30 am Lewisburg WV, Steve Hunter 304/647-5007, 4:30 pm AA • St. James Epis Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon closed Adult Basic Education Classes, GED's & more • Peterstown WSS Rotary Club • Public Library, Peterstown WV, 304/772-3038, 5:30-8:30 pm April’s Pizzeria, White Sulphur Springs WV, 304/536-4309, 12 noon Civil Air Patrol (CAP) Composite Squadron WV 100 • aerospace TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) • Rhema Christian Center, Fairlea WV, education, cadet programs, emergency services, CAP Squadron facilweight-in 4:45-5:45 pm, meeting 6pm, Leader Cindy Rhodes, 304/392-2261 ity, Greenbrier Valley Airport, Maxwelton WV, cadets - youth 7th grade & Muddelty-Glade Creek Ruritan Club • up meet at 6 pm, adults at 7 pm Community Building, Darlene Sopp 304/872-6712, 6 pm NAACP • 118 S. Lexington, Covington VA, 6 pm Family Resource Meeting • Shady Spring Ruritan Club • Perry Memorial United Methodist Old Stone Church Fellowship Hall, Lewisburg WV, 6 pm Church, 100 Shady Lane, Donald Collins 304/763-4336, 6 pm Greenbrier County Housing Coalition • Rock Camp-Wikle Ruritan Club • call for site & time, Randolph Community Building, Lewis Terrace, Lewisburg WV, 304/645-6331 Aglow • Old Stone Pres. Church, Lbg WV, 6pm social, speaker 7pm Miller 304/832-6820, Union/Lindside WV, 6:30 pm East River Ruritan Club • Ruritan Community Center, Oakvale WV, Gauneka Ruritan Club • Community Center, Owen ‘Junior’ Facemire Delbert Whitlow 304/898-2141, 6:30 pm 304/632-2070, Gauley Bridge WV, 6:30 pm Greenbrier Valley Board of Realtors • AL-A-NON • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm Greenbrier, Monroe, Pocahontas Co. Realtors & interested affiliates, Bereaved Parents • Lewisburg United Methodist Church, Martha Hilton 304/645-1900, 7 pm Lewisburg WV, Betty Ewart 304/645-3048, 7 pm Bozoo Ruritan Club • AA • St. James Episc Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm closed Ruritan Building, Oliver Porterfield 304/753-9111, 7 pm Muddy Creek Mountain Ruritan Club • Muddy Creek Mountain Com- Bluegrass Ruritan Club • call for area church meeting location, Joe Wiley 304/645-2573, Pickaway WV, 7 pm munity Building, Myron Goodell 304/445-2959, 7 pm Sun Valley Ruritan Club • Lewisburg Boy Scout Troop 70 • Ruritan Community Building, Echols Jeffries 304/384-7392, 7 pm Lewisburg United Methodist Church, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm Multiple Sclerosis Self-Help Group • All welcome! meet at Green- Ronceverte Friends of the Library • Ronceverte Public Library, brier Medical Center Cafeteria, 202 Maplewood Ave, Ronceverte WV, 7 Ronceverte WV, Carrie Curry, 304/645-7911, 7 pm pm, Joe Pellant 304/645-4779 WSS Public Library Board • WSS Library, 304/536-1171, 7 pm Ronceverte Merchants Assn • Ronceverte City Hall , 7 pm Greenbrier Commandery #15 K.T. • Rupert City Council • City Hall, Rupert WV, 304/392-5682, 7 pm Masonic Lodge, Lewisburg WV, Lee Bell 304/645-1525, 7:30pm Alderson City Council • Roanoke Valley Astronomical Society • City Hall, Alderson WV, 304/445-2916, 7:30 pm Science Museum of Western VA, Roanoke VA 540/ 342-5710, 7:30pm Eastern Star • Masonic Lodge Hall, 304/645-6733, 7:30 pm USABDA - Ballroom Dancers of Lewisburg • USABDA - Ballroom Dancers of Lewisburg • St. James Episcopal Church, 218 Church Street, Lewisburg WV, St. James Epis. Church, 218 Church St, Lewisburg WV, 7:30 - 9:30 pm, 7:30-9:30 pm, Shirley Griffith 304/536-1337 Shirley Griffith 304/536-1337 NA • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7:30 pm AA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church Annex, Maple Street, AA • First Presbyterian Church, White Sulphur Springs WV, 8 pm Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • Alleghany Highlands Community Services, 305 Monroe Ave, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm Lewisburg Elks Club • Lewisburg Elks CC, 8 pm, 304/645-3660 VFW Post 4482 • VFW Hall, White Sulphur Springs, 8 pm, Morgan Woodhouse 304/536-1230

Playground for 3 Year Olds •



With evil working overtime, virtue cannot be a hobby. ~ Pete. J. Gomas

AY Dec1 6, Jan 20 & Feb 117 7 UESDA Dec16, Holiness can solve any problem. TUESD ~ Anonymous

FRID AY Dec 112, 2, Jan 9 & Feb 113 3 FRIDA

AA • OD, NS, Emmanuel Epis. Church, Covington VA, 12 noon NA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Covington VA, 6:30 pm AA • St. James Epis Church, 218 Court Street, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm AA• Big Clear Creek Baptist Church, Anjean Rd, Rupert WV, Doc 304/ 392-5456, 7 pm

Playground for 3-5 Year Olds •

Public Library, Greenbank & Hillsboro WV, 10-11:30 am

Story Hour for 3, 4 & 5 year olds • Summers County Public Library, 10:30 am, Hinton WV, 304/466-4490

Duplicate Bridge Club • Covington Senior Center, Rockbridge Ave., Covington VA, 10:30 am

Busy Bees • Emmanuel United Methodist Church, White Sulphur Springs WV, 304/536-4016, 11:30 am

AL-A-NON • St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., AA • St. James Epis Church, 216 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon AA • OD, NS, Salvation Army Bldg, Covington VA, 12:15 pm Clifton Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm Harriet’s bounty in \late1860s Greater Greenbrier Valley Home Builders Association • for buildAA • OD, NS, St. Andrews Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 8 pm ers & businesses associated with builders in Greenbrier & Monroe was priced at $30,000 PEO Chapter F • Anna Warren 304/497-2557, 8 pm to exchange ideas, discuss regulations governing the building AA • OD, LS, SO, St. Andrews Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 8 pm Counties business, meeting at 6:30 pm, call 304/645-3230 for site WEDNESD AY Dec 110, 0, Jan 114 4 & Feb 111 1 WEDNESDA Quota Club • Ethel Dixon 304/536-1888, 6:30 pm SATURD AY Dec 113, 3, Jan 110 0 & Feb 114 4 TURDA Adul Basic Education & Literacy Programs •free computer classes in AA • Lewisburg United Methodist Church, 214 E. Washington St, use NA • St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 6:30 pm Microsoft Word, Excel, typing, writing and math skills, GED prep, college entrance off Lee St, Lewisburg WV (no smoking on church property) 10 am Athens Women's Club • Anderson Hall, Concord United Methodist

~ Harriet Tubman

level tutoring, services available 9am-7pm, Monroe County Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038 Buffalo Cabi Cabinn Quilters • newcomers & quilt pieces welcome! 10 am, call Becky Benett for meeting place 304/456-4082 Children's Story Hour • C.P.J. Memorial Library, Covington VA, 10:30am, 540/962-3321 AA • St. James Epis Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon Bingo • early bird 6 pm, Bingo 6:30 pm, The Douglas Center, 108 Douglas St, Princeton WV, sponsored by Concord College Athletics G.E.D. • Ronceverte Public Library, 304/645-7911, 5:15-8:15 pm Greenbrier Percussion Group • Greenbrier Community Center, Lewisburg WV, 304/497-3397, 6 pm NA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Covington VA, 6:30 pm AA • St. James Episcopal Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm NA • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm Richlands Ruritan Club • Calvary United Methodist Church, Rt. 60 W, Richlands WV, John W. Bell 304/645-3418, 7 pm Union City Council Meeting • City Hall, Union WV, 304/772-5522, 7 pm WSS Friends of the Library • 304/536-1171, 7 pm Eastern Greenbrier JAYCEES • Island Park Club House, Ronceverte WV, 8 pm, 304/536-2940 or 304/536-9111 AL-A-NON • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Maple Street, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • OD, LW, SO, Emmanuel Episcopal Church Annex, Maple Street, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

closed meeting: step study, Janeal Q 304/645-6070

Mountain Heritage Quilters Guild of Southern WV •

learn, promote & preserve quilting and patchwork, all welcome, lower level, Monroe County Public Library, Union WV, 10 am Honnahlee Saturday Playdays •for pre & elementary, Honnahlee, 117 E Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304/645-6123, 10:30 am Story Time & Crafts for ages 3 to 5 • White Sulphur Springs Public Library, 304/536-1171, 10-11 am AA • Monroe County Public Library, Rt 219, Union WV, Dwight 304/772-3487, 4 pm Bingo • Ronceverte Fire House, Ronceverte WV, 6 pm NA • St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 6:30 pm AA• Big Clear Creek Baptist Church, Anjean Rd, Rupert WV, Doc 304/ 392-5456, 7 pm AL-A-NON • St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Clifton Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • OD, NS, St. Andrews Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 8 pm

SUND AY Dec 114, 4, Jan 111 1 & Feb 8 SUNDA

Lewisburg Library Annex, Lewisburg, WV, 304/645-7936, 10 am Monroe County Historical Society • meetsMarch, June, Sept & Dec at Monroe County Library, Union, WV, 304/ 772-5208, 3pm NA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Covington VA, 6:30 pm AA • St. Thomas Epis Church, Rt. 60, White Sulphur Springs WV, 7 pm AA • OD, St. Lukes, Hot Springs VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

Church, Athens WV, 304/384-7146, September - June at 7 pm

GFWC Rupert Woman's Club •

Community Building, Rupert WV, 7pm

Cameras In Action • all welcome, St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Oak Hill WV, Nancy Wiseman 304/574-1718, 7 pm

Clifton Forge VFW Post 4299 • Clifton Forge National Guard Armory, Room 648C, Clifton Forge VA, 7 pm

Hinton City Council meeting •

City Hall, Hinton WV, 304/466-3255, 7:30 pm

Alderson Junior Woman’s Club •

City Hall, Alderson WV, Mary Danberry 304/445-2743, 7:30 pm

Covington VFW Post 1033 • VFW Hall, Dolly Ann Drive, Covington VA, 7:30 pm Clifton Forge Main Street, Inc. • Board meeting, Main Street office, W. Ridgeway St., Clifton Forge VA, 7:30 pm

I.O.O.F. • Greenbrier Lodge Hall #146, Ronceverte WV, 7:30 pm Lewisburg City Council meeting • City Hall, 7:30 pm NA • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7:30 pm Ronceverte Masonic Lodge Chapter • Masonic Lodge, Ronceverte WV, 304/645-7882, 7:30pm

AL-A-NON • St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Clifton Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

AA • ST/O St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Clifton Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

AA • OD, NS, St. Andrews Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 8 pm AA • Caldwell Presbyterian Church on Route 60, Caldwell WV, 7 pm


24

VALLEY GUIDE

December 2008 - F ebr uary 2009 Fe bruary

WEDNESD AY Dec 117, 7, Jan 221 1 & Feb 118 8 WEDNESDA

FRID AY Dec 119, 9, Jan 116 6 & Feb 20 FRIDA

Adult Basis Education & Literacy Programs • free computer AA • OD, NS, Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Covington VA 12 noon classes in Microsoft Word, Excel, typing, writing & math skills, GED NA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Covington VA, 6:30 pm prep, college level tutoring, services available 9 am-7 pm, Monroe AA • St. James Episcopal Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm County Public Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038 AA• Big Clear Creek Baptist Church, Anjean Rd, Rupert WV, Doc 304/ Greenbrier Gardeners • 304/645-7014, 10 am 392-5456, 7 pm NARVRE National Association of R an Railw Reetired and VVeeter eran Railwaay AL-A-NON • St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Clifton Emplo 14 Employyees, Inc., Rainelle, Unit #1 #11 Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm all railroaders working or retired are welcome to come join this group, AA • OD, NS, St. Andrews Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 8 pm Rainelle Public Library at 10am, for more info go to www.narvre.com or call 304.438-6350 or 304.438-8071 Children's Story Hour • C.P.J. Memorial Library, Covington VA, 10:30am, 540/962-3321 AA • St. James Epis Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon Grief Support • Alleghany Regional Hospital, Covington VA, 3 - 4 pm, call 540/862-6214 Fun & Games • Stories & Crafts • ages 7-12, Bath County Public Library, Warm Springs VA, 540/839-7286, 3:45-4:45 pm G.E.D. Classes • Ronceverte Public Library, Ronceverte WV, 304/645-7911, 5:15-8:15 pm Wednesday Bingo • early bird starts at 6pm, Bingo 6:30 pm, The Douglas Center, 108 Douglas St, Princeton WV, sponsored by Concord College Athletics Greenbrier Percussion Group • Greenbrier Community Center, Oak & Feamster St., Lewisburg WV, 304/497-3397, 6 pm NA • Emmanuel Episcopal, Covington VA, 6:30 pm Lewisburg Cub Scouts • Lewisburg United Methodist Church, 7 pm AA • St. James Episcopal Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm AL-A-NON • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Maple Street, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • OD, LW, SO, Emmanuel Episcopal Church Annex, Maple Street, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

Each of us is meant to have a character all our own, to be what no other can exactly be, and do what no other can exactly do.

1

CD

- William Ellery Channing

THURSD AY Dec 118, 8, Jan 115 5 & Feb 119 9 THURSDA Adult Basis Education & Literacy Programs •

B

free computer classes, typing, writing & math skills, GED prep, tutoring, 9 am-5 pm, Monroe County Public Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038 Playground for 3 Year Olds • Green Bank Library, Greenbank WV, 10-11:30 am Playground for 3 to 5 Year Olds • Hillsboro Public Library, Hillsboro WV, 10-11:30 am WSS Rotary Club • April's Pizza, WSS, 304/536-4309, 12 Noon AA • St. James Epis Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon closed Greater Bluefield Chamber of Commerce Board Meeting • 12 noon, 304/327-7184 DAR • Linda Walls 304/645-2441, 1:30 pm TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) • Rhema Christian Center, Fairlea WV, weight-in 4:45-5:45 pm, meeting 6pm, Leader Cindy Rhodes, 304/392-2261 Coal Valley Ruritan Club • Welch Hospital, Walt Garrett 304/436-8682, Board meets at 5 pm; Club meets at 6 pm Covington BPW •meet at Best Western, 6pm, Covington VA, 540/965-6360 Ronceverte Lions Club • Lion's Den, Ronceverte, 6:30 pm Alleghany Highlands Orchestra • rehearsal 6:30 - 8:30 pm, fellowship hall, First Presbyterian Church, Locust & Maple, Covington VA, for membership and auditions 540/962-4847 Maxwelton Ruritan Club • Someplace Else Restaurant, Lewisburg WV, Patricia Tyree 304/645-7410, 6:30 pm Greenbrier Habitat for Humanity • all interested are invited to attend, 304/645-3886 for monthly meeting place, 7 pm Ronceverte River Festival Meeting • Ronceverte Public Library, Marty Smith, 7 pm Single Again • Lewisburg United Methodist Church, Lewisburg WV, Kyle Harper 304/645-2784, 7 pm Friends of the Greenbrier County Library • Lewisburg Library Annex, Lewisburg WV, 304/647-6231, 7 pm Throttle Throbs Car Club Meeting • rotating monthly dinner meetings in Greenbrier County every, for more information on club & activities call Ron Ness 304/497-3456, 7 pm Gamma Chi Sorority of Beta Sigma Phi • 7:30 pm Blue Bell Garden Club • 304/645-3403, 7:30 pm NA • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7:30 pm Eastern Star • Masonic Lodge Hall, WSS, 8 pm, 304/536-2151 AA • First Presbyterian Church, White Sulphur Springs WV, 8pm AA • Alleghany Highlands Community Services, 305 Monroe Ave,. Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

CL UBS & OR GANIZA TIONS CLUBS ORG ANIZATIONS TUESD AY Dec 23, Jan 227 7 & Feb 224 4 TUESDA

Pocahontas County Free Day at the Landfill • house hold/white goods(take appliances:refrigerators/stoves free any day landfill is open)

Adult Basis Education & Literacy Programs •

free computer class training in Microsoft Word for Windows, Excel, typing, enhancement of writing & math skills, GED preparation, college level tutoring, services available at Peterstown Public Library, Peterstown WV, 304/753-9568 Story Hour for 3, 4, 5 year olds • Summers County Public Library, 10:30 am, Hinton WV, 304/466-4490 Playground for 4 Year Olds • God sometimes Green Bank Library, Greenbank WV, 10-11:30 am Playground for 3-5 Year Olds • does his work Hillsboro Library, Hillsboro WV, 10-11:30 am with a gentle Duplicate Bridge Club • drizzle, not Covington Senior Center, Rockbridge Ave., Covington VA, 10:30 am AA • St. James Episc Church, 216 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon storms. AA • OD, NS, Salvation Army Building, Covington VA, 12:15 pm drip... drip... drip Downtown Lewisburg Merchants Association • call Donna Toney for meeting location, 304/645-4022, 5:30 pm ~ John Newton, Adult Basic Education Classes, GED's & more • author of hymn Monroe Cty Public Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038, 5:30-8:30 pm Indian Rocks Ruritan Club • Indian Rocks Lodge, Craigsville WV, Amazing Grace George Knight 304/742-8822, 6 pm Birch River Ruritan Club • SATURD A Y December 20 & Januar y 1 7 TURDA January 17 AA • Lewisburg United Methodist Church, 214 E. Washington St, use Birch River School, Dille WV, Drema Davis 304/649-2924, 6:30 pm entrance off Lee St, Lewisburg WV (no smoking on church property) 10 am NA • St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 6:30 pm NA • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7:30 pm closed meeting: step study, Janeal Q 304/645-6070 AL-A-NON • St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Story Time & Crafts for ages 3 to 5 • Clifton Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm White Sulphur Springs Public Library, 304/536-1171, 10 - 11 am AA • ST/O St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Honnahlee Saturday Playdays • pre-& elementary child activities, Clifton Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm Honnahlee, Lewisburg WV, 304/645-6123, 10:30 am AA • OD, NS, St. Andrews Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 8 pm AA • Monroe County Public Library, Rt 219, Union WV, AA • Caldwell Presbyterian Church, Route 60, Caldwell WV, 7 pm Dwight 304/772-3487, 4 pm

Bingo • Ronceverte Firehouse, Ronceverte WV, 6 pm NA • St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 6:30 pm AA• Big Clear Creek Baptist Church, Anjean Rd, Rupert WV, Doc 304/ 392-5456, 7 pm

AL-A-NON • St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Clifton Forge VA, 540/ 962-0137, 8 pm

AA • OD, NS, St. Andrews Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 8 pm

In time of war, opposition is called sedition. ~ William Pitt (1759-1806) Prime Minister of England at age 24

SUND AY Dec 221 1, Jan 118 8 & Feb 115 5 SUNDA

NA • Emmanuel Epis, Covington VA, 6:30 pm AA • St. Thomas Epis Church, Rt. 60, WSS WV, 7 pm AA • OD, St.Lukes, Hot Springs VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

Sometimes the best thing #you can do is to be quiet. ~ Pete. J. Gomas

MOND AY Dec 22, Jan 26 & Feb 23 MONDA Lewisburg Rotary Club •

The Elk’s Club, Lewisburg WV, John MCCaffrey 304/392-2371, 12 noon AA • U. Methodist Church, Pocahontas & Walnut, Ronceverte WV, noon Adult Basic Education Classes, GED's & more •Peterstown Public Library, Peterstown WV, 304/772-3038, 5:30-8:30 pm White Sulphur Springs Ruritan Club • White Sulphur Springs Civic Center, White Sulphur Springs WV, Gary Ray 304/536-1099, 6 pm Alderson Lions Club • 6:30 pm Fairlea Ruritan Club • Fairlea Firehouse, 1st Street, Fairlea WV, Kenny Shafer 304/645-7832, 6:30 pm Civil Air Patrol (CAP) Composite Squadron WV 100 • aerospace education, cadet programs, emergency services, CAP Squadron facility, Greenbrier Valley Airport, Maxwelton WV, cadets - youth 7th grade and up meet at 6 pm, adults meet at 7 pm Ronceverte Woman's Club • Ronceverte Public Library , 7 pm WSS Lions Club • WSS Community Center, Tuckahoe RD, White Sulphur Springs WV, Rodena Belcher 304/645-1831, 7 pm AA • St. James Episc Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm closed AL-A-NON • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm Lewisburg Masons • Greenbrier Lodge #42 A.F. & A.M-Masonic Temple, McElhenney Lane, Lewisburg WV, Jim Coleman 304/645-3768, 7:30 pm Fort Hill Rebekah Lodge #17 • 7:30 pm VFW Post 4482 Auxiliary • VFW Hall, A. Butts 304/645-6853, 7:30 pm I.O.O.F. • I.O.O.F. Lodge, Main St., Hot Springs VA, 8 pm AA • Emmanuel EpisAnnex, Maple St, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

Acts of Creation Acts of creation are ordinarily reserved for gods and poets, but humbler folk may circumvent this restriction if they know how. To plant a pine, for example, one need be neither god nor poet; one need only own a good shovel. By virtue of this curious loophole in the rules, any clodhopper may say: Let there be a tree— and there will be one. If his back be strong and his shovel sharp, there may eventually be ten thousand. And in the seventh year he may lean upon his shovel, and look upon his trees, and find them good. God passed on his handiwork as early as the seventh day, but I notice He has since been rather noncommittal about its merits. I gather either that He spoke too soon, or that trees stand more looking upon than do fig leaves and firmaments. Leopold, Aldo: A Sand County Almanac, and Sketches Here and There, 1948, Oxford University Press, New York, 1987, pg. 81.

WEDNESD AY Dec 224, 4, Jan 28 & Feb 25 WEDNESDA Adult Basis Education & Literacy Programs •

free computer classes, typing, writing & math, GED prep, tutoring, 9 am7 pm, Monroe County Public Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038 Children's Story Hour • C.P.J. Memorial Library, Covington VA, 10:30am, 540/962-3321 Savannah Garden Club • call Phyllis Tuckwiller, 304/645-6633, 11:30 am AA • St. James Epis Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon Lewisburg House & Garden Club • 304/647-5007, 1 pm Valley Trails Garden Club • 304/645-3163, 1:30 pm Grief Support • ARHospital, Lowmoor VA, 3-4 pm, 540/862-6214 G.E.D. •RoncevertePublic Lib, Ronceverte WV, 304/645-7911, 5:15-8:15 pm Greenbrier Percussion Group • Greenbrier Community Center, Oak&Feamster St, Lewisburg WV, 304/497-3397, 6 pm NA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Covington VA, 6:30 pm Greenbrier County Planning Commission • Greenbrier County Courthouse, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm Greenbrier County Democratic Women's Club • Greenbrier County Court House, Nadine Smith 304/645-1276, 7 pm AA • St. James Epis, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm Eastern Greenbrier JAYCEES • Island Park Club House, Ronceverte WV, 8 pm, 304/536-2940 or 304/ 536-9111 AL-A-NON • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Maple Street, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • OD, LW, SO, Emmanuel Episcopal Church Annex, Maple Street, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm


VALLEY GUIDE

25

CL UBS & OR GANIZA TIONS CLUBS ORG ANIZATIONS THURSD AY Dec 25, Jan 22 & Feb 26 THURSDA

MOND AY December 29 MONDA

WEDNESD AY December 331 1 WEDNESDA

Hinton WV, Ron Seaton 304/466-1365

MCCaffrey 304/392-2371, 12 noon

free computer classes, typing, writing & math, GED prep, tutoring, 9 am-

Apts, Clifton Forge VA, 540/863-9581, 7 pm

Ronceverte Public Library, Ronceverte WV, Sandy Walton, 7 pm

Greenbrier County Court House, Nadine Smith 304/645-1276, 7 pm

December 2008 - F ebr uary 2009 Fe bruary

Hinton Ruritan Club • First Presbyterian Church, 3rd & Ballengee, Lewisburg Rotary Club • The Elk’s Club, Lewisburg WV,John Adult Basis Education & Literacy Programs •

AA • United Methodist Church, Pocahontas & Walnut, Ronceverte WV, 7 pm, Monroe County Public Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038 Story Hour • WSS Public Library, WSS, WV, 10 am, 304/536-1171 free computer classes, typing, writing & math, GED prep, tutoring, 9 am- meet at 12 noon Adult Basic Education Classes, GED's & more •Peterstown Children's Story Hour • 5 pm, Monroe County Public Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038 C.P.J. Memorial Library, Covington VA, 10:30am, 540/962-3321 Public Library, Peterstown WV, 304/772-3038, 5:30-8:30 pm Playground for 3 Year Olds • White Sulphur Springs Ruritan Club • White Sulphur Springs Civic AA • St. James Epis Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon Green Bank Library, Greenbank WV, 10-11:30 am Center, White Sulphur Springs WV, Gary Ray 304/536-1099, 6 pm Grief Support • Alleghany Regional Hospital, Covington VA, 3-5 Year Old Playground • 3 - 4 pm, call 540/862-6214 Alderson Lions Club • 6:30 pm Hillsboro Library, Hillsboro WV, 10-11:30 am Fairlea Ruritan Club • Fairlea Firehouse, 1st Street, Fairlea WV, G.E.D. • 5:15-8:15 pm, Ronceverte Public Lib, Ronceverte WV, 304/645-7911 WSS Rotary Club • April’s Pizzeria, WSS, WV, 304/536-4309, 12 noon Greenbrier Percussion Group • 6 pm, Greenbrier Community Center, AA • St. James Epis Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon closed Kenny Shafer 304/645-7832, 6:30 pm Alleghany Highlands Orchestra • rehearsal 6:30 - 8:30 pm, fellow- Civil Air Patrol (CAP) Composite Squadron WV 100 • aerospace Oak&Feamster St, Lewisburg WV, 304/497-3397 ship hall, First Presbyterian Church, Locust & Maple, Covington VA, for education, cadet programs, emergency services, CAP Squadron facil- NA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Covington VA, 6:30 pm ity, Greenbrier Valley Airport, Maxwelton WV, cadets - youth 7th grade Greenbrier County Planning Commission • membership and auditions 540/962-4847 Greenbrier County Courthouse, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm We Stitch • learn to stitch & expand your knowledge of stitchery, A-H and up meet at 6 pm, adults meet at 7 pm Greenbrier County Democratic Women's Club • Embroiderer's Chapter, Embroiderer's Guild of America, Clifton Woods Ronceverte Woman's Club • Adult Basis Education & Literacy Programs •

WSS Lions Club • Valley View Country Club, White Sulphur Springs AA • St. James Epis, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm AL-A-NON • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Maple Street, WV, Connie Dorscheid 304/536-3572, 7 pm AA • St. James Episcopal Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm Ronceverte Public Library, Marty Smith, 7 pm AA • OD, LW, SO, Emmanuel Episcopal Church Annex, TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) • Rhema Christian Center, Fairlea WV, AL-A-NON • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm weight-in 4:45-5:45 pm, meeting 6pm, Leader Cindy Rhodes, 304/392-2261 Lewisburg Masons • Greenbrier Lodge #42 A.F. & A.M-Masonic Temple, Maple Street, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm Greenbrier Valley Shrine Club • McElhenney Lane, Lewisburg WV, McElhenney Lane, Lewisburg WV, Jim Coleman 304/645-3768, 7:30 pm Fort Hill Rebekah Lodge #17 • 7:30 pm Maynard B. Hinkle 304/645-3291, 7:30 pm VFW Post 4482 Auxiliary • VFW Hall, A. Butts 304/645-6853, 7:30 pm USABDA - Ballroom Dancers of Lewisburg • I.O.O.F. • I.O.O.F. Lodge, Main St., Hot Springs VA, 8 pm St. James Episcopal , 218 Church St, Lewisburg WV, 7:30 - 9:30 pm, AA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church Annex, Maple Street, Covington VA, Shirley Griffith 304/536-1337 ~ Lance Ferguson 540/962-0137, 8 pm NA • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7:30 pm AA • Alleghany Highlands Community Services, 305 Monroe Ave,

V V

Laureate Alpha Epsilon • Phyllis Boone 304/645-2534, 7 pm Ronceverte River Festival Meeting •

V

Patience brings Benefits!

THURSD AY Januar THURSDA Januaryy 29

Covington,VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

Lewisburg Elks Club • Elks Club, Lewisburg WV, 8 pm AA • First Presbyterian Church, White Sulphur Springs WV, 8pm

Adult Basis Education & Literacy Programs •

Intro to the Universe at Carnegie Hall

Intr se with Dave Buhrman features a Introo ttoo the Univer Universe class on Thursday, November 20, 6:30-9pm on the auditorium’s stage; or Saturday, December 13, 13:30 pm in Dance Studio/Annex, $24 for ages 8+, watch a video presentation & discuss the images captured with 15” telescope, then enter Carnegie’s Starlab planetarium to learn how to find some of the major constellations & appreciate their significance, optional outdoor stargazing after evening class.

FRID AY Dec 26, Jan 23 & Feb 227 7 FRIDA

AA • OD, NS, Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Covington VA 12 noon AL-A-NON • St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd.,

It is a sad fate for a man to die too well known to everybody else and still unknown to himself. ~ Francis Bacon

Clifton Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

AY December 30 TUESDA AA • St. James Episcopal Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm TUESD AA• Big Clear Creek Baptist Church, Anjean Rd, Rupert WV, Doc 304/ Pocahontas County Free Day at the Landfill •

for house hold goods - white goods (appliances like refrigerators and stoves may be taken free any day the landfill is open) Adult Basis Education & Literacy Programs • free computer classes, typing, writing & math skills, GED prep, tutoring, Peterstown Public Library, Peterstown WV, 304/753-9568 Monroe Co. Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038, 5:30-8:30 pm Story Hour for 3, 4, 5 year olds • Summers County Public Library, 10:30 am, Hinton WV, 304/466-4490 ~ George S. Patton, Jr. Playground for 4 Year Olds • Green Bank Library, 10-11:30 am Playground for 3-5 Year Olds • Hillsboro Library, 10-11:30 am Duplicate Bridge Club•Covington Senior Center, Covington VA, 10:30 am SATURD AY Dec 227, 7, Jan 224 4 & Feb 28 TURDA AA • St. James Episc Church, 216 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon AA • Lewisburg United Methodist Church, 214 E. Washington St, use AA • OD, NS, Salvation Army Building, Covington VA, 12:15 pm entrance off Lee St, Lewisburg WV (no smoking on church property) 10 am Greenbrier Valley Support Group for Alzheimer's closed meeting: step study, Janeal Q 304/645-6070 Disease and Related Orders • Old Stone Presbyterian Church Lib., AA • Monroe County Library, Union WV, Dwight 304/772-3487, 4 pm Lewisburg WV, Twyla Wallace 304/645-3414, 2 pm NA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Covington VA, 6:30 pm Greenbrier Valley Singles • singles dinner meeting to provide Pipestem Ruritan Club • Ruritan Community Building, wholesome fellowship, 6pm, call 304/645-3399 for dinner location Broadway Rd, Edward P. Lowe 304/466-0845, 6 pm Fairlea Ruritan Club • Fairlea Firehouse, Fairlea, WV, William Dixon AA• Big Clear Creek Baptist Church, Anjean Rd, Rupert WV, Doc 304/ 304/645-2053, 6:30 pm 392-5456, 7 pm Lewisburg Lions Club • United Methodist Church, AA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church Annex, Maple Street, Lewisburg WV, Troy Holbrook 304/497-2966, 6:30 pm Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm NA • St. Andrew's Episcopal, Clifton Forge VA, 6:30 pm AA • OD, St. Lukes Episcopal Church, Hot Springs VA, 8 pm NA • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7:30 pm 392-5456, 7 pm AA • OD, NS, St. Andrews Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge, VA, 8 pm

SS SS S

If everyone is thinking alike, then somebody is not thinking.

What luck for the rulers that men do not think. SUND AY Dec 28, Jan 25 & Feb 22 SUNDA

W

~ Adolf Hitler

AA •Lewisburg Library Annex, Lewisburg, WV, 304/645-7936, 10 am NA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Covington VA, 6:30 pm AA • St. Thomas Epis Church, Rt. 60, White Sulphur Springs WV, 7 pm AA • OD, St. Lukes, Hot Springs VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

free computer classes, typing, writing & math, GED prep, tutoring, 9 am5 pm, Monroe County Public Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038 Playground for 3 Year Olds • Green Bank Library, Greenbank WV, 10-11:30 am 3-5 Year Old Playground • Hillsboro Library, Hillsboro WV, 10-11:30 am WSS Rotary Club • April’s Pizzeria, WSS, WV, 304/536-4309, 12 noon AA • St. James Epis Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon closed TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) • Rhema Christian Center, Fairlea WV, weight-in 4:45-5:45 pm, meeting 6pm, Leader Cindy Rhodes, 304/392-2261 Alleghany Highlands Orchestra • rehearsal 6:30 - 8:30 pm, fellowship hall, First Presbyterian Church, Locust & Maple, Covington VA, for membership and auditions 540/962-4847 USABDA - Ballroom Dancers of Lewisburg • St. James Episcopal , 218 Church St, Lewisburg WV, 7:30 - 9:30 pm, Shirley Griffith 304/536-1337 NA • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7:30 pm AA • Alleghany Highlands Community Services, 305 Monroe Ave, Covington,VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • First Presbyterian Church, White Sulphur Springs WV, 8pm

Sacred Silence S S S Lights The Universe!

FRID AY Januar FRIDA Januaryy 30

AA • OD, NS, Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Covington VA, 12 noon AL-A-NON • St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Clifton Forge VA, 540/ 962-0137, 8 pm

AA • OD, NS, St. Andrews Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 8pm AA • St. James Episcopal Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, Steve 304/645-7294, 7 pm

AA• Big Clear Creek Baptist, Anjean Rd, Rupert WV, Doc 304/392-5456, 7 pm

 

Great changes are easier than small ones. ~ Francis Bacon

SATURD AY Januar 1 TURDA Januaryy 331

Flea & Farmer’s Market • WV State Fairgrounds, Rt. 219 S, Fairlea WV, 304-645-1090 or 304/647-5916

AA • Lewisburg United Methodist Church, 214 E. Washington St, use

entrance off Lee St, Lewisburg WV (no smoking on church property) 10 am closed meeting: step study, Janeal Q 304/645-6070 Story Time & Crafts for ages 3 to 5 • White Sulphur Springs Public Library, 304/ 536-1171, 10 -11 am I.O.O.F. Greenbrier Lodge #146 • Honnahlee Saturday Playdays • activities for preschool to I.O.O.F. Ronceverte WV, 304/647-4527, 7:30 pm elementary age children, Honnahlee, 117 East Washington Street, Laureate Alpha Epsilon Sorority of Lewisburg WV, 304/ 645-6123, 10:30 am Beta Sigma Phi • Barbara Livesay 304/647-3100, 7:30 pm AA • Monroe County Public Library, Rt 219, Union WV, Lodge Shryock 47 • Dwight 304/772-3487, 4 pm Ronceverte Masonic Lodge, Eugene Kelly 304/645-4657, 7:30 pm Bingo • Ronceverte Firehouse, Ronceverte WV, 6 pm AL-A-NON • St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., NA • St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 6:30 pm Clifton Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA• Big Clear Creek Baptist Church, Anjean Rd, Rupert WV, Doc 304/ AA • ST/O St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., 392-5456, 7 pm AL-A-NON • St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Clifton Clifton Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • OD, NS, St. Andrews Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 8 pm Forge VA, 540/ 962-0137, 8 pm AA • OD, NS, St. Andrews Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 8 pm AA • Caldwell Presbyterian Church, Route 60, Caldwell WV, 7 pm


26

VALLEY GUIDE

GOING PL ACES PLA

December 2008 - F ebr uary 2009 Fe bruary

Ent er om page 1188 Enter erttainment Calendar continued frfrom land Park Roller Rink, Ronceverte WV, 304.645-229

Monda Mondayy, December 29 Alleghany Highlands Poetry Workshop

meets last Monday of every month, 6 pm, all welcome, public welcome free of charge, Clifton Forge Public Library, 535 Church St, Clifton Forge VA, 540. 862-4502

Monda Mondayy-Tuesda uesdayy, December 29-30 Holiday Career & Lifestyles Fair

Roanoke Civic Center, Roanoke VA, 540.853-5483

Wednesda 1 ednesdayy, December 331 Goodnight Celebr ation Celebration

free family New Year’s Eve event, variety of performances by local musicians & entertainers at various venues, presented by Charleston Community Music Association, Charleston WV, 304.774-1400

Fir Firsst Night Harrisonbur Harrisonburgg

downtown family-friendly New Year’s Eve celebration for all ages, Harrisonburg VA

New YYear’s ear’s Eve Concer Concertt

Garth Newel Music Center, Warm Springs VA, see page 10

New Year’s Eve Package

end the year with a dinner/dance package, includes 1 or 2 nights lodging, New Year’s Eve toast & refreshments, Twin Falls Resort State Park, Mullens WV 304.294-4000, 1-800.CALL WVA

New Year’s Eve

bring in the New Year with a gourmet dinner and live band at North Bend State Park, Cairo WV 304.643-2931, 1-800.CALL WVA

Wednesda 1, 2008-Januar ednesdayy, December 331 2008-Januaryy 11,, 2009 Celebrate the New Year!

dinner, music, dancing, Pipestem Resort State Park, Pipestem WV 304.466-1800, 1-800.CALL WVA

New Year’s Eve Blast ‘09

Roanoke Civic Center, Roanoke VA, 540.853-5483

Januar Januaryy 2009

Wat er color W or kshop begins in January with instructor Michael ater ercolor Wor orkshop

Farrar, call for details, Alleghany Highlands Arts & Crafts Center, 439 E. Ridgeway St, Clifton Forge VA, 540.862-4447 come watch ... call to participate ...1-800.833.2068

thr oughout Januar throughout Januaryy & Februar Februaryy G.P. Cooper exhibit at Chuck Mathena Center

photography exhibit by G.P. Cooper of Cooper Gallery, 2 Staffford Commons, Princeton WV, 304.645-6439, chuckmathenacenter.org

thr ough Januar through Januaryy 11,, 2009 Chris tmas in the PPar ar Christmas arkk

free winter wonderland light displays dusk-10pm, donations accepted, Chief Logan State Park, Logan WV, 304.792-7125

through January 4, 2009 Holiday of Lights

at dusk, Bluefield City Park, Bluefield WV, 304.327.2448

Thursday, January 1 The Shanghai PPar ar ade arade

12 noon, a New Year’s downtown tradition on Washington Street, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-1000

Fir ernational Fes tiv al: Ireland Firsst Da Dayy Int International Festiv tival:

free family entertainment, children’s events, Please Touch Museum, foods for sale, 1-5 pm, Greenbrier Campus of New River Community and Technical College, see story pg 11 & ad pg 32 Ar Artt bbyy Night, downtown Galleries, Roanoke VA, 540.342-2028

Thursdays, January 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 StarLab Thursdays

reservations suggested, 2pm, NRAO-National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Green Bank WV, 304-456-2150

Frida ridayy, Januar Januaryy 2 Friday Night Lights

downtown shops, restaurants, businesses, galleries 5-8 pm extended hours with special events, promotions, light refreshments, Lexington VA, 540-463-5375 Fir rida Firsst FFrida ridayys Af Aftter 5, shops & galleries open til 9pm, refreshments, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-4333

Artist Reception at Cooper Gallery

5-8pm at Cooper Gallery, 122 E. Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-6439 Film Fest Fridays, science related movie begins 7 pm, call ahead for title, NRAO, Green Bank WV, 304.456-2150

Saturday, January 3 Quadrantids Meteor Shower at peak ... can be seen Dec 28Jan 7, can be seen below handle of Big Dipper

Tuesday, January 6 Blue Ridge Story Tellers

Barnes & Noble, Roanoke VA, 540.776-2960

Ent er Enter erttainment Calendar continued on page 29

Garden Talk: Brightness, Patooonyas & Snowstorms by Barry Glick

Solidago caesia:

Solidago caesia happens to be one of my very favorite Autumn blooming perennials, and is one of the best to add some brightness to a Fall Garden. The bright, Primrose yellow brilliance of its unusual zig-zag, axillary, long lasting flower heads never fail to garner praise from garden visitors. One of the most commonly asked questions, after I answer the “WOW ... what is that?” question is “Doesn't it make you sneeze?” Poor, poor Goldenrod Goldenrod, taking the heat for Ambrosia artemisiifolia just because it coincidentally Solidago caesia, Goldenrod shares the same window of time in flowering. Ambrosia artemisiifolia is the dreaded Ragweed allergen, “Ragweed Ragweed!” Goldenrod pollen DOES NOT cause an allergic reaction. Solidago caesia is native to 32 states in the continental US http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=SOCA4 from Maine to Texas and 3 Canadian provinces. That said, I would think it to be hardy just about anywhere. Although its native habitat is shade, it can handle part sun. Moisture requirements are not high and I've grown it successfully in average to dryish soil. Plant height is 18”-36” if erect, but it so often assumes a graceful arching habit. The gargantuan populations of deer that roam these mountains and valleys have never even raised an eyebrow at this plant. Goldenrod YES, Solidago caesia is a “Goldenrod Goldenrod”, not one of the ‘weedy Goldenrods’, but an extremely desirable one and I highly recommend it for just about any garden — native, natural, wild or formal garden, there's a place for Solidago caesia .

Ruellia humilis:

Well ... kinda. “Wild Petunia” Wild Petunia is the common name for a genus of plants known as Ruellia in the family c a l l e d Ruellia humilis, Wild Petunia Acanthaceae family . The charming plant pictured above is Ruellia humilis, a very easy to grow, native, flowering perennial. It can be found growing wild in exactly half of the states in the US - http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=RUHU The specific epithet humilis refers to the low growing habit of the plant. In that respect, I've used this colorful, long flowering plant as a ground cover. The deer pay no mind to it, and it can take full sun to full shade quite well. I grow Ruellia in average soil but have trailed it in various conditions and the only habitat this plant seems to object to is wet soil. And as your eyes tell you from looking at the image, Wild Petunia the common name “Wild Petunia” is not a stretch of the imagination compared to some common names. These flowers really do resemble the annual Petunias that almost every gardener in the world grows for season long color. But unlike the Petunia Petunia, Ruellia humilis is a perennial and returns year after year only to be bigger and more robust.

I hear so many gardeners lamenting that there aren't enough really exceptional blue plants for their gardens. Well, lament no more! This is that highly desirable, sought after blue. Ruellia humilis seems to be in bloom almost all Spring, Summer and Autumn and has never been touched by insects or any other type of pests in my garden. The Kemper Center at the Missouri Botanic Garden http:// www.mobot.org/gardinghelp/plantfinder/ plant.asp?code=M220 lists it as hardy to zone 4. As I mentioned above, I've used this plant as a groundcover both in the garden and on a steep roadbank and have seen other gardeners use it in perennial beds and borders with stunning success. Better yet, check out the great technical article from the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center on Ruellia humilis at: http:// www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=ruhu

Aster divaricatus:

Your shade garden can look like a snowstorm in September when you plant a drift of the very easy to grow, reliable native woodland Aster Aster, Aster divaricatus. The glistening, pure white snowflake shaped flowers have bright yellow centers that fade to a deep rich burgundy as they slowly age over their long, long bloom period during Aster divaricatus, Aster late August through mid-October. Aster divaricatus is one of my very favorite plants for interest at a time of year when there isn't much happening in the garden. The height of this plant is just perfect also, 12”-24”, about the same as its width. They're not too tall, as in like the Asters that you'd have to tilt you head up to look at and not too diminutive like the ones that you'd find yourself down on your hands and knees to appreciate. Aster divaricatus is native to almost every state east of the Mississippi and to several provinces of Canada - http:/ /plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=EUDI16 but will grow well in just about any zone 3 -10 climate. Don't be alarmed if you see this plant referred to as Eurybia divaricata as this seems to be a taxonomic name change that everyone, myself included, appears to be ignoring. Butterflies enjoy the flowers just as well as we humans, but the deer don't bother with it. Although it grows naturally in average soil moisture conditions, it seems to tolerate drought and even excess soil moisture as well. Aster divaricatus even lends itself perfectly to being used as a long lasting cut flower. I could go on and on about Aster divaricatus, but the image of the plant speaks for itself — and, Aster divaricatus can be planted any time that your ground isn't frozen. Happy Gardening, Barry Editor’s Note: Recently, Governor Joe Manchin released the latest “Open for Business” report which documents WV’s economic progress. Among the select items, Sunshine Farm and Gardens earned a patent with a new groundbreaking plant, poinsettia Euphorbia Jessie Jessie. The United States Patent Office awarded Sunshine Farm and Gardens this plant patent for their hardy perennial poinsettia Euphorbia Jessie Jessie. This plant is the first known interspecific Euphorbia hybrid, a cross between E. griffithii and E. polychroma. Sunshine Farm and Gardens is a 36year-old arboretum, plant nursery and botanical garden in Renick, Greenbrier County. www.sunfarm.com

Barry Glick maintains a 60 acre Botanic Garden and Nursery at the headwaters of Spring Creek in Northern Greenbrier County. Barry Glick , Sunshine Farm & Gardens, HC 67 Box 539B, Renick, WV 24966 USA, 304-497-2208 FAX 304-497-2698 EMAIL barry@sunfarm.com Latitude 38.04N Longitude 80.26W USDA © 20 08 Bar eF ar m & Gar dens Zone 5 www.sunfarm.com 2008 Barrr y Gli Glicck and Sunshin Sunshine Far arm Gard


VALLEY GUIDE

FOOD

December 2008 - F ebr uary 2009 Fe bruary

Quic ks Quickk & Easy Snac Snacks

EDITH'S STORE

Avocado Tea Sandwiches low calorie, low carb, low sodium, low cholesterol — Smoked salmon plays off crispy cucumber and creamy avocado. Enough for 4 sandwiches Ingredients: 1 avocado, sliced 1 tablespoon mayonnaise 1/2 teaspoon lemon juice 1/8 teaspoon cracked black pepper 8 very thin slices wheat bread 2 ounces thinly sliced smoked salmon 12 thin slices cucumber Combine mayonnaise, lemon juice and pepper in a small bowl. Thinly spread on bread and top with salmon, avocado and cucumber.

114 East Washington Street downtown Lewisburg, WV

304.645.7998

Teas • Coffee • Herbs & Spices • Supplements Health & Fine Body Care Products

22

www.edithsstore.com • info@edithsstore.com

Feta & Herb Dip with Crudites low calorie, low carb, low sodium, low cholesterol, low sat fat, heart healthy, diabetes appropriate — lots of freshly chopped herbs add zing to white bean dip. Serve with assorted vegetables, such as baby carrots, bell pepper strips, radishes, snow peas, broccoli and cauliflower florets. Enough for 8 servings Ingredients: 1 15-ounce can white beans, rinsed 3/4 cup nonfat plain yogurt 1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 teaspoon garlic salt 1 teaspoon freshly ground pepper 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley 1/4 cup chopped fresh dill 1/4 cup chopped fresh mint 1/4 cup chopped fresh chives Place beans, yogurt, feta, lemon juice, garlic salt and pepper in a food processor; puree until smooth. Add herbs; puree until incorporated. Chill until ready to serve. Can make ahead and refrigerate for up to 2 days.

The Perfect Snack low calorie, low carb, low sodium, low cholesterol, low sat fat, high calcium, heart healthy — sweet and crunchy apple cubes pair nicely with smoky deli turkey and Swiss cheese. Makes 1 serving Ingredients: 1 slice Swiss cheese • 1 slice smoked turkey • 1/2 apple, sliced thin — turkey and cheese in apple slices and enjoy!

Roast Beef & Blue Cheese Spears low calorie, low carb, low sodium, low cholesterol, low sat fat, heart healthy — deli roast beef and a simple blue cheese topping makes a simple, pretty appetizer or snack. Enough for 16 servings Ingredients: 2 tablespoons sour cream 2 tablespoons crumbled blue cheese 2 heads of Treviso — a slender variety of radicchio, or Belgian endive, spears separated 4 ounces thinly sliced roast beef, cut into ribbons Combine sour cream and blue cheese in a small bowl. Top Treviso, or Belgian endive, with roast beef and a dollop of the blue cheese cream.

Sesame Carrots

low calorie, low carb, low sodium, low cholesterol, low sat fat, heart healthy, diabetes appropriate — toasted sesame seeds add taste and eye appeal to dish of baby carrots. Enough for 3 servings 2 cups baby carrots 1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds Pinch of dried thyme Pinch of kosher salt Toss carrots with sesame seeds, thyme and kosher salt in a small bowl.

27

Cathering & Banquet Facilites

Low Moor, Virginia

540-862-0098

wireless internet

Monday-Saturday 7:30 am - 2:30 pm Dinner Thursday-Saturday 6:00 - 9:30 pm Sunday Brunch 11:30 am - 3:00 pm Brunch & Dinner Reservations appreciated Call us to learn about our Wine Tastings and Themed Dinners

ORIGINAL

TRADITIONAL & CONTEMPORARY

ART

Shir Wooton: Explorations through November 30 Jessica Roczniak New Work December 5-31 artist reception 5-8pm, Friday, December 5 custom framing/sculpture/photography paintings/fine crafts/free consultation www.coopergallery.com 304-645-6439 / 888-868-5129 122 E. Washington Street, Lewisburg, WV 24901 Open Mon-Thurs 10-5 Fri-Sat 10-6

French & American Cuisine Wine, beer and liquor featured in September 2007 Southern Living magazine

640 N. Lee Highway Lexington,VA 24450 www.michelcafe.co 540-464-4119

Fine dining in a casual atmosphere featuring seafood, prime rib, steaks and pasta Dinner at 5 pm • Reservations Suggested closed Sunday Visa • MasterCard • American Express Discover • Diner’s Club


28 VALLEY GUIDE

SPORTS

SPOR TS SPORTS

December 2008 - F ebr uary 2009 Fe bruary

December 2008February 2009

although presumed correct at the time of publication, do call ahead to verify information as times and events may change Bird Hotline: 804.367-1000 Bowling Leagues Leagues: Greenbrier Bowling & Recreation Center at Spare Time Bowing Sports Bar & Grille, Rt. 219N, Lewisburg, WV, 304.645.0065 - call now about youth & senior programs! Cass Scenic Railroad State PPark ark ark: old logging town with history, walking tour, Cass Scenic Railroad SP, 1-800-CALL-WVA Catch & Release Fishing: Milligan, Second Creek, Dogway Fork of the Cranberry River, Shavers Fork of Cheat River, North and South Branch of the Potomac River Daily Walks, Hikes & Programs: Bluestone State Park, Canaan Valley Resort State Park, Greenbrier State Forest, Pipestem Resort State Park, Seneca State Forest, Twin Falls State Park, Watoga State Park, 1.800.CALL WVA Douthat State Park: cabin rentals, interpretive programs, jon & canoe rentals, paddle boat tours, canoe trips, nature strolls, Douthat State Park, Clifton Forge, VA, 540.862.8100

White Sulphur Springs Civic Center :

exercise/gym/rooms, certified kitchen, 304.536.2010 White Sulphur Springs Fish Hatchery Tours: learn how eggs are harvested from rainbow trout & how freshwater mussels are protected, visitor’s center self-guided tours with 4 aquariums, 400 E Main St, White Sulphur Springs WV, 304.536.1361 Year-Round Fishing: Back Fork of/and Elk River, North Fork of/and Cranberry River, Blackwater River, North Branch of the Potomac River, North Fork of the South Branch, Williams River Daily/Weekly Exercise Classes: On the Ball Ball, Fitness for Weight Loss Loss, Tai Chi Chi, Yoga Yoga, Relax Class Class, WVPTs Wellness Classes, Rt 219N, Lewisburg WV, 304.645.2525 Every Tuesday: Birds & More Walks: meet at Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge, 7:30-9:30am, 304.866.3858 Jazzercise: 5:45 pm, White Sulphur Springs Civic Center, White Sulphur Springs, WV, 800.284.9440; Street Hockey: 7-11 pm, Lewisburg Tennis Courts by Elementary School, skaters or not, all welcome!, 304.647.9613 Every Friday & Saturday: Catfish Derby, 12-acre lake, $500 tag fish, 7pm-1am, Mountain Meadow Hunting Preserve, Ellison Ridge Rd, Greenville WV, 304.832.6635 Every Saturday: Shooting Match: shotguns & 22's, 1.5 miles up Rt. 92, White Sulphur Springs, WV, 304/ 536-1213, 7 pm through April 30 - Winter Escape for all winter enthusiasts, $99 double occupancy packages, North Bend State Park, Cairo WV, 304.558.3370

Driving Course Classes Classes: AA (Accident Avoidance), MDC (Masters Driving Course) review & advanced course for AA graduates, EDC (Evasive Driving Course), Executive Security Training, FATT (Fridays at the Track), through November Summit Point Race Track, Summit Point, WV, 304.725.8444 Gauley River Whitewater Season Elk River Touring Center: mountain biking, snow touring & Getaway Packages, Pipestem Resort State Park, Pipestem more, Slatyfork, WV, 304.572.3771, www.ertc.com airy Stone State Park: Little Mountain Trail System open all Fairy year - hiking, bicycling, horseback riding, 276.930.2427 Great Train Excursions: 1.5hr, 10 mi roundtrip on Durbin Rocket powered by Climax #3 steam locomotive, departs Durbin Depot, scenic vistas & wildlife viewing; 2-hr-36 mi. roundtrip on Cheat Mountain Salamander goes over the river and the mountain, train departs from Cheat Bridge, Durbin & Greenbrier Valley Railroad, Durbin, WV, 877.686.7245, www.mountainrail.com Hawk’s Nest State PPark ark Nature Center, Aerial Tram, Scenic Overlook, 1-800-Call WVA The Homestead golf & shooter’s choice packages, Hot Springs VA, 540.839.7721, www.thehomestead.com Hunt by Reservation Only: 1.800.933.PARK Huntington Blizzard Ice Hock ey Club weekly games Hockey through March, 763 3rd Avenue, Huntington, WV, for schedule ey Club weekly 304.697.PUCK & Roanok Roanokee Express Ice Hock Hockey games through March Living History Golf Course: play with hickory clubs the oldfashioned way, clubs & gutta purcha balls provided, scheduled tee times 8am-4:30pm May-October, Oakhurst Links, Montague Drive, White Sulphur Springs WV, 304.536-1884 Longdale Trout Pond: Rainbow Trout 10” & up, I-64 exit 35, 6400 Longdale Furnace Rd, Clifton Forge VA, 540.862.4295 Migration of the Raptors: a top Peters Mountain, near Gap Mills WV, at Hanging Rock Raptor Observatory

Motorcycle Rentals & Tours in West Virginia

Mountain Thunder, 1-888-WV-BIKER, www.wvbiker.com New River Smallmouth Bass: guided fishing trips & floats, Spencer, WV 540.726-3452

WV, 304.466-1800 for reservations

Saturday-Sunday Saturday-Sunday,, December 6-7 Annual Jack Frost Celebration

season opens, trail work, celebration & Sunday brunch, bring a dish to share Sat. night, music jams, and the shot ski, White Grass, Davis WV, 304.284.9548

Sunday, December 7, 14, 21 Blessed Blades Public Ice Skating with Spirit FM

admission $5 plus $2 for skate rental, 2-5:00 pm, roup discounts, Roanoke Civic Center, Roanoke VA, 540.853-5483

Wednesday, December 10 High TTech ech W ednesday, guided tours through parts of NRAO Wednesday normally off-limits, 3:30 pm, NRAO - National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Green Bank WV, 304.456-2150

Friday, December 12, 19, 31 Rock the Ice Skating with 96.3 WROV

bring your friends, skate to music, group discounts, admission $5 plus $2 for skate rental, 6-9:00 pm, Roanoke Civic Center, Roanoke VA, 540.853-5483

December 12, January 10, FFebruary ebruary 7, March 10 Full Moon Skiing Trips

head out around 7:30pm for special magic, White Grass, Davis WV, 304.284.9548

Saturday, December 13, 20, 27 Public Ice Skating

bring your friends, group discounts, admission $5 plus $2 for skate rental, 12-3:00 pm, Roanoke Civic Center, Roanoke VA, 540.853-5483

Saturday Saturday,, December 20 Star Party - all welcome to look through optical telescopes, begin at dusk, NRAO, Green Bank WV, 304.456-2150

Getaway Packages, Nature Center Open, Aerial Tram, Scenic Audubon Christmas Bird Count

Overlook, golf course open weekends, Hawk’s Nest State Park, 37th annual all-day winter bird count survey with Pipestem Ansted WV, 304.658.5212, 1.800.CALL WVA for reservations staff & Bibbee Nature Club, $5 fee goes to National Audubon Society, for more information contact Jim Phillips, Pipestem Thursday Thursday,, November 20 StarLab Thursdays - unique look at the sky, NRAO, Green Resort State Park, Pipestem WV, at 304 466-1800 ext. 344,, 1.800.CALL WV Bank WV, 2:00 pm, reservations suggested 304.456-2150

Friday-Sunday riday-Sunday,, November 21-23 Virirginia ginia Rodeo East Coast Invitational

The Amos Alonzo Stagg Bowl NCAA Division III FFootball ootball Championship

championship high school rodeo with contestants from 6 states, advance $12.50, $15 day of game, college students & children $7, Salem Civic Center, Salem VA, 540.375.3004 Virginia Horse Center, Lexington, VA, 540.464.2950

Saturday-Sunday,, December 20-21 Saturday-Sunday Saturday Saturday,, November 22 Star Party - all welcome to look through optical telescopes, Salem Gun & Knife Trading Show

over 300 tables displaying guns, knives & Military memorabilia, 9-5, Sun 10-5, $7 admission, 12/under free with adult, , Sat SaturdayThursday January 1, 2009 Saturday-Thursday Thursday,, November 2929-January Salem Civic Center, Salem VA, 540.375.3004 Christmas in the PPark ark, Chief Logan State Park, Logan WV, Tuesday-F riday uesday-Friday riday,, December 23-26 304.792.7125 begin at dusk, NRAO, Green Bank WV, 304.456-2150

Sunday Sunday,, November 23 Sunday FFall all PPoints oints Race

Natural Bridge Drag Strip, gates open at 12 noon, Natural Bridge VA, 540.291-3724

Thursday-Sunday Thursday-Sunday,, November 27-30 Pony Club of America Annual TTurk urk ey Club Circuit urkey Virginia Horse Center, Lexington, VA, 540.464.295

Friday-Sunday riday-Sunday,, November 28-29-30 Gem & Mineral Show

8:30-1 pm, Salem Civic Center, Salem VA, 540.375.3004

Saturday, November 29 Public Ice Skating

Canaan Holiday Celebration

2-3 day packages includes lift tickets, other amenities, Canaan Valley Resort, Davis WV 304.866-3858, 1.800.622-4121

Thurs day-Saturday Thursday-Saturday day-Saturday,, December 26, 27 & 29 Holiday Hoopla Basketball Tournament Salem Civic Center, Salem VA, 540.375.3004

Saturday-Monday Saturday-Monday,, December 27-29 BMX National Bicycle League Christmas Classic & PPresident’s resident’s Cup

watch 3-days of BMX racing as 2,500+ speed racers speed around the indoor dirt track, Virginia Horse Center, Lexington, VA, 540.464.2950

Sunday,, December 28 bring your friends, group discounts, admission $5 plus $2 for Sunday Gateway to the Refuge skate rental, 12-3:00 pm, Roanoke Civic Center, Roanoke VA, guided & group tours, solar viewing, high tech tours, star lab, star 540.265.8111 or email roanokeskates@yahoo.com 1pm natural history snowshoe walk in the National Wildlife parties, Green Bank WV, 304.456-2150 Refuge, White Grass, Davis WV, 304.284.9548 Sunday, November 30 Organ Cave Guided and Wild Cave Tours: it’s always the Evergreen Wreath Making Workshop MondayThursday January 1 Monday-Thursday Thursday,, December 2929-January same 52 degrees inside the cave, Organ Cave WV, 304.645.7600 bring hand pruner, & any decorations or ornaments to add on to Canaan Holiday Celebration Pocahontas Co. Info: 1.800.336.7009 finished evergreen wreath, all rest of materials supplied, begin 2-3 day packages includes lift tickets, other amenities, Canaan Seneca Rocks Discovery Center: 304.636.1800 Valley Resort, Davis WV, 304.866-3858, 1.800.622-4121 1pm, White Grass, Davis WV, 304.284.9548 Snowshoe Mountain Resort Events Events, WV, 877.441-4Fun Wednesday ednesday,, December 31 Blessed Blades Public Ice Skating with Spirit FM Swiss Mountain Retreat’s Hunter ’s Haven, Grandpa admission $5 plus $2 for skate rental, 2-5:00 pm, roup discounts, New Years Eve Carefree Snowshoe Tour Hunter’s John’s Hilltop Heritage Farm, Helvetia WV 304.924-5503 1pm natural history snowshoe walk in the National Wildlife Roanoke Civic Center, Roanoke VA, 540.853-5483 Skiing&more ... Canaan Valley Resort, Davis WV, Refuge, White Grass, Davis WV, 304.284.9548 1.800.622.4121, www.canaanresort.com Snowshoe Mountain Resort, Snowshoe WV, 877.441-4Fun Opening of Ski Area Thursday Thursday,, January 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 he Homestead, Hot Springs VA, 540.839.7721, or for moun- Canaan Valley Resort, Davis WV, 800.622.4121 StarLab Thursdays - unique look at the sky, NRAO, Green tain conditions call 540.839.7800, www.thehomestead,com Thursday Thursday,, December 4 Bank WV, 2:00 pm, reservations suggested 304.456-2150 White Grass Touring, Davis WV, whitegrass.com, 304.284.9548 Annual Horses Christmas Thistle Cove Farm Tours, Tazewell Co, VA, www.thistlecovefarm.com 1pm Glen Maury Park, Buena Vista VA, 1-800.555.8845 Friday, January 2, 9, 16 Rock the Ice Skating with 96.3 WROV WV State Parks & Sportsmen Specials: 1.800.CALL WVA Thursday Thursday,, December 4, 11, 18 WinterPlace Ski Resort, Flat Top, WV, 1.800.607.SNOW, StarLab Thursdays - unique look at the sky, NRAO, Green bring your friends, skate to music, group discounts, admission $5 plus $2 for skate rental, 6-9:00 pm, Roanoke Civic Center, 304.787.3221, for snow report 800.258.3127 Bank WV, 2:00 pm, reservations suggested 304.456-2150 Roanoke VA, 540.853-5483 VA Hunting, Fishing, Trapping Hotline: 304.558.3399 Friday-Sunday riday-Sunday,, December 5-6 Friday-Sunday, January 2-4 WV State Parks & Sportsmen Specials: 1.800.CALL WVA Virirginia ginia PProfessional rofessional Bull Riders Challenge Roanoke Valley Gun Show WV Hunting, Fishing, Trapping Hotline: 304.558.3399 Virginia Horse Center, Lexington VA, 540.464.2953 NRAO - National Radio Astronomy Observatory

December 2008

January 2009


VALLEY GUIDE

SPOR TS SPORTS Roanoke Civic Center, Roanoke VA, 540.853-5483

Saturday Saturday,, January 3 Eagle Survey

survey wintering eagles in southern WV, Pipestem Resort State Park WV, contact Jim Phillips 304.466-1800, ext 344

Saturday, January 3, 10, 17, 24 Public Ice Skating

bring your friends, group discounts, admission $5 plus $2 for skate rental, 12-3:00 pm, Roanoke Civic Center, Roanoke VA, 540.853-5483

Sunday, January 4, 11, 16

Guns & Hoses VI Benefit Hockey Game

Roanoke Civic Center, Roanoke VA, 540.853.5483

Wednesday ednesday,, January 14 High TTech ech W ednesday, guided tours through parts of NRAO Wednesday normally off-limits, 3:30 pm, NRAO - National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Green Bank WV, 304.456-2150

Friday-Monday riday-Monday,, January 16-19 eek end Week eekend MLK W

2-3 day packages includes lift tickets, other amenities, Canaan Valley Resort, Davis WV, 304.866-3858, 1.800.622-4121

Sunday ebruary 16 Sunday,, January 18 & FFebruary Carefree Snowshoe Tour

chance to appreciate beauty of snowshoeing, natural history & local lore featured, 1pm, White Grass, Davis WV, 304.284.9548

Saturday-Sunday ebruary 7-8 Saturday-Sunday,, January 24-25 & FFebruary NATO Telemark Workshop

Vermont’s Dick Hall & staff give bright new direction to XC skiing, 8am, White Grass, Davis WV, 304.284.9548

Sunday, January 25 5 Km Snowshow Walk/Run

well organized by Helvetia WV long distance runner Dan Lehmann, 1pm on rolling course full of prizes & fun, rentals available for $8, White Grass, Davis WV, 304.284.9548

Wednesday-F riday ednesday-Friday riday,, January 28-30 West Virginia Special Olympics Winter Games

racers, parents, coaches, volunteers, helpers from 3 states gather at White Grass, Davis WV, 304.284.9548

February 2009 Tuesday ebruary 3 uesday,, FFebruary Ground Hog’s Day Ski

full day backcountry trek, 9am, White Grass, Davis WV, 304.284.9548

Sunday ebruary 8 Sunday,, FFebruary 25K Mountain State Marathon

kid’s classes, great prizes, 1pm, White Grass, Davis WV, 304.284.9548

Friday & Saturday ebruary 13 & 14 Saturday,, FFebruary Advance Auto Parts Monster Jam

Roanoke Civic Center, Roanoke VA, 540.853.5483

Sunday ebruary 15 Sunday,, FFebruary Starter Dream XC Clinic

better secrets to grib, glide & fun to XC skiing, 9am-4pm, White Grass, Davis WV, 304.284.9548

Monday ebruary 16 Monday,, FFebruary Advanced Dream XC Clinic

more secrets to grib, glide & fun to XC skiing, 9am-4pm, White Grass, Davis WV, 304.284.9548

Friday ,-Saturday ebruary 20-21 riday,-Saturday ,-Saturday,, FFebruary Professional Bull Riders Roanok our Roanokee Invitational Enterprise TTour

Roanoke Civic Center, Roanoke VA, 540.853.5483

Saturday-Sunday ebruary 21-22 Saturday-Sunday,, FFebruary Roanok alley Gun Show Roanokee V Valley

Roanoke Civic Center, Roanoke VA, 540.853.5483

WSS Main Street Committee meets

open to public, 6 pm, WSS City Hall, 304.536-4787

Thursday, January 8 Winter Jam 2009 Tour Spectacular

Roanoke Civic Center, Roanoke VA, 540.853-5483

Monday, January 12 Carnegie Hall Film Series

7pm, Lewis Theater, Lewisburg WV, 304.645.7917

Satur da 4 Saturda dayy, Januar Januaryy 224 American Herit age Music Hall Heritage

4th Saturday music, dance, featured band 7-11 pm, welcome all ages, family atmosphere, kids play area, donations appreciated, former Island Park Roller Rink, Ronceverte WV, 304.645-2298

Monte Carlo Evening

an evening of glitz & glamor to benefit Theater at Lime Kiln, Moody Hall, VMI, Lexington VA, 540.463-7088

Monda Mondayy, Januar Januaryy 26 Alleghany Highlands Poetry Workshop

Februar Februaryy 2009

Wednesday-Thursday, January 14-15 Overview of Biodiesel/Renewable Energy

Monday, February 2 VMI Cadet Full Dress Parade

Downt own Charles tW alk Downtown Charlestton Ar ArtW tWalk

Artist Reception

Women’s Expo

Sunday, February 8 Disney Playhouse Live!

Saturday, January 17 Lee-Jackson Day

Tuesday, February 10 Old Time Music Jam Live from Work Horse Cafe

overview of biodiesel production, technology, process, ASTM VMI parade grounds, 4:30pm, Lexington VA, 540.464-7313 specifications, taxes, incentives & hands-on learning using Pied- Frida ridayy, Februar Februaryy 6 mont Biofuels mobile lab, Women’s Business & Training Center, Friday Night Lights Beckley WV, 304.253-3145, 1.800.-766-4556 downtown shops, restaurants, businesses, galleries 5-8 pm extended Thur sda 5 Thursda sdayy, Januar Januaryy 115 hours with special events, promotions, light refreshments, LexingThird Thursdays in White Sulphur Springs ton VA, 540-463-5375 shops open late, refreshments, entertainment & special offers by Fir rida Firsst FFrida ridayys Af Aftter 5, shops & galleries open til 9pm, merchants, White Sulphur Springs WV, 304.536-9206 refreshments, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-4333 showcases Charleston’s art scene with best of local, regional & 5-8pm at Cooper Gallery, 122 E. Washington St, nationally recognized artists, free reception 5-9pm, The Clay Cen- Lewisburg WV, 304.645-6439 ter, Charleston WV, 304.561-3570 Film Fest Fridays, science related movie begins 7 pm, call Frida da 6-1 7 ridayy -Satur -Saturda dayy, Januar Januaryy 116-1 6-17 ahead for title, NRAO, Green Bank WV, 304.456-2150 Roanoke Civic Center, Williamson Rd & Orange Ave, Roanoke VA, 540.853-5483

Roanoke Civic Center, Roanoke VA, 540.853-5483

The Stonewall Brigade Sons honor Generals Robert E. Lee & FREE mountain music jam session, 6:00 pm, musicians welcome, audience encouraged to dance and sing, concessions available, Stonewall Jackson, memorial service re-enactments, honor guard, Virginia Horse Center, Lexington VA, 540.464-2950 parades, special guest speaker Michael R. Bradley 10am-2:30pm, Saturday, February 14 Valentine’s Day Lexington VA, 540.464-7313

Monday, February 16 President’s Day Wednesday, February 18 gather in front of Lewisburg’s Greenbrier County Courthouse prior to Live Music & Dinner 11:00 am, march begins at 11:00 am from Court St, down Washing-

Monday, January 19 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day Celebration

live music every 3rd Wednesday monthly, 7-9pm, no cover, Origiton St to Lewisburg United Methodist Church for program & lunch from 11:30-2:30pm, all welcome, van provided for those in need of nal Italian Restaurant, Lexington VA, 540.261-3136 Wednesday-Monday, February 18=23 assistance, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-4966

Roanoke Symphony Masterworks III: Sea to Shining Sea

Roanoke Civic Center, Roanoke VA, 540.853-5483

Wednesday & Thursday, January 21-March 12 Start Your Own Business Today!

The Log Homes Shows

Roanoke Civic Center, Roanoke VA, 540.853-5483

Friday, February 20 Cabin Fever Series presented by Event Zone & Broadway in Roanoke: The Rat Pack is Back!

Opening Soon, Inc Training step by step program to develop includes Broadway Buffet, Roanoke Civic Center, Roanoke VA, home-bases direct selling, or you own business idea at your pace 540.853-5483 & schedule, 9am-3 pm, Women’s Business & Training Center, Beckley WV, 304.253-3145, 1.800.-766-4556

COMING-UP

Wednesday, January 21 Live Music & Dinner

live music every 3rd Wednesday monthly, 7-9pm, no cover, Original Italian Restaurant, Lexington VA, 540.261-3136

Monday, January 23 Cabin Fever Series: Sea to Shining Sea

Friday-Sunday ebruary 27-March 8 riday-Sunday,, FFebruary Roanok alley Charity Car Show Roanokee V Valley

Friday-Sunday, January 23-25 Country Western Weekend

Roanoke Civic Center, Roanoke VA, 540.853.5483

instructors teach couples dance lessons, Pipestem Resort SP, Pipestem WV 304.466-1800, 1-800.CALL WVA

meets last Monday of every month, 6 pm, all welcome, public Certification with emphasis on tourism related enterprises & welcome free of charge, Clifton Forge Public Library, 535 Church buildings for commercial & manufacturing use, Women’s Busi- St, Clifton Forge VA, 540. 862-4502 ness & Training Center, Beckley WV, 304.253-3145, 1.800.- Tuesda 7 uesdayy, Januar Januaryy 227 766-4556 Essential Skills for the Managers or Supervisors Old Time Music Jam Live from Work Horse Cafe effectively communicate, delegate, manage priorities to achieve FREE mountain music jam session, 6:00 pm, musicians welcome, management success, Beckley WV, 1-800.556-3009 audience encouraged to dance and sing, concessions available, Satur da 1 Saturda dayy, Januar Januaryy 331 Virginia Horse Center, Lexington VA, 540.464-2950 10th Annual Fur Ball Wednesday, January 14 music, cash bar, hors d'oeuvres, silent auction features items of art, Homestead Postcard Club dining, golfing & more, 8pm-midnight, tickets $50 pp advance, $60 Reynolds Homestead, 7pm, Critz, VA, 276.694-7181 at door available from GHS board members or GHS office at the High Tech Wednesday, guided tours through normally off- animal shelter on RT. 60, Lewisburg, greenbrierhumane.com/ limit spaces, 3:30pm reservations suggested, limited to 15, NRAO, pg.cfm, 304-645-4775, Greenbrier Humane Society fundraising Green Bank WV, 304.456-2150 gala, Brier Inn & Conference Center, 540 N. Jefferson Street, Old Time Music Jam Live from Work Horse Cafe Lewisburg WV, 304-645-7722 FREE mountain music jam session, 6:00 pm, musicians welcome, audience encouraged to dance and sing, concessions available, Virginia Horse Center, Lexington VA, 540.464-2950

Friday-Sunday ebruary 27-March 1 riday-Sunday,, FFebruary Southwest V irirginia ginia Boat Dealers Association Vir Roanoke Civic Center, Roanoke VA, 540.853.5483

29

Ent ererttainment & Ar om pg26 Enter Artsts Calendar cont’d frfrom

Tuesday, January 13 admission $5 plus $2 for skate rental, 2-5:00 pm, roup dis- Introduction to Green Building counts, Roanoke Civic Center, Roanoke VA, 540.853-5483 & Energy Efficient Concepts Saturday overview of green building & sustainable design includes US Saturday,, January 10 Green Building Council’s LEED rating system & Green Advantage Winter Trails Day chance to appreciate beauty of snowshoeing, natural history & free lessons, clinics & half price rentals to all first time interested skiers or snowshoers, XC lessons every hour, 10am & 2pm clinics followed by natural history tour, White Grass, Davis WV, 304.284.9548

December 2008 - F ebr uary 2009 Fe bruary

Roanoke Civic Center, Roanoke VA, 540.853-5483

Friday-Sunday , March 6-8 own Music Fes tiv al Homegrown Festiv tival Homegr

Snowshoe Mountain Resort, Snowshoe WV

Friday-Saturday , March 14-15 & 21-22 Highland County Maple Fes tiv al Festiv tival

celebrate the beginning of Spring with maple treats, tours, educational exhibits, fun & food, Monterey, Virginia

Friday-Sunday , March 20-22 Shades of Cream Champagne & Chocolat eek end Chocolatee W Week eekend Snowshoe Mountain Resort, Snowshoe WV


30

VALLEY GUIDE

December 2008 - F ebr uary 2009 Fe bruary

Roland Layton’s Review of

Witness

by Whittaker Chambers NY: Random House, 1952 One would have to be my age (right next door to 80) to recall the “Hiss Case,” which loomed so large in American affairs in the late 1940s. For the benefit of our younger readers, to summarize briefly, Whittaker Chambers, then a senior editor of Time magazine, and the author of the book being reviewed here, admitted to the House Committee on UnAmerican Affairs in 1948 that he had been a member of the Communist Party in the 1920s and 30s, and moreover, that he had led an underground Communist cell in Washington that had carried out espionage for the Soviet Union. He named Alger Hiss as a fellow ComWhittaker Chambers munist and spy for the Soviet Union. Hiss was no ordinary American: a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Johns Hopkins and of Harvard Law School, Hiss had served in various capacities in the 1930s and 40s in several departments of the United States government, including the Department of State, service that culminated in his presiding over the San Francisco Conference that founded the United Nations and in his advising President Roosevelt at the Yalta Conference. Hiss vehemently denied Chambers’ charges and challenged him to repeat them in public where he would be open to prosecution for libel (testimony before a congressional committee is not subject to legal action). Chambers responded by repeating the charges in a radio broadcast and in a newspaper interview, whereupon Hiss sued him for slander. The first trial resulted in a hung jury, the second in Hiss being found guilty — of perjury, i.e., of lying about his past under oath (he could not be tried for espionage itself because of the Statute of Limitations). The Court sentenced Hiss to five years in prison. The evidence for and against Hiss is too complicated to go into in depth here. Hiss’s lawyers brought in leading figures in American affairs as character witnesses: two Supreme Court justices (Reed and Frankfurter), a former Democratic candidate for president (John Davis in 1924), a future candidate for president (Adlai Stevenson), and the Secretary of State, Dean Acheson, who stated that he would not “turn my back on Alger Hiss.” President Truman called the trial a “Red Herring.” Hiss first denied ever knowing Chambers — but when evidence piled up that the two had been friends, Hiss reluctantly admitted that he had perhaps known Chambers “under another name.” Various bits of circumstantial evidence seemed to authenticate Chambers’ testimony — at any rate, the jury in the second trial was persuaded of Hiss’s guilt. The trial took on larger dimensions than one man’s fate, as conservatives pointed to the trial’s outcome as proof that the Democrats had been lax in guarding the country’s security against Communist infiltration. Democrats of course bridled under this criticism and pointed to President Truman’s vigorous anti-Soviet foreign policy as proof of their patriotism. Hiss denied his guilt to the end of his life (he died at age 92 in 1996). He still has some defenders, but it seems safe to say that the preponderance of opinion today is that Hiss had indeed been a Communist and a spy for the Soviet Union

— although it must be said that final, incontrovertible proof will probably never be available. The most careful account of the whole complicated affair is by a professor at Smith College, Allen Weinstein, who examined 80,000 documents in FBI custody, and conducted countless interviews, including some with Hiss himself. Publishing his results in 1997 in Perjury, The Hiss-Chambers Case, Weinstein concludes that Chambers’ account “seemed to be a better fit to the documented facts than Hiss’ account,” in other words, Hiss had been a Communist and a spy. Chambers wrote his book, Witness, to give his side of the story. But the book is much more than a statement of self-defense. The essence of the book is a portrayal of the titanic struggle between Communism, with its totalitarianism, forced labor camps, and purges, and the West, with its traditions of freedom and tolerance, the ideals of the Enlightenment as expressed in the English, French, and American revolutions. It is hard now for us in 2008 to realize how intense this struggle was in by-gone times. But remember that Chambers wrote his book at the height of the Cold War, at a time when the Soviet Union and Communism were marching from one triumph to the next, and it was by no means clear which side would win. Chambers saw the struggle as going on for centuries, he surely had no idea that the citadel of Marxism, the Soviet Union, would suddenly fall apart within a generation of the publication of his book. Now, even China, nominally Communist, boasts of its free market system (certainly, not what Karl Marx had in mind!). Communist Cuba probably won’t last long. Communist parties all over the world are shells of their former selves, populated exclusively by very old men. In any event, Arthur Schlesinger Jr. (a leading liberal historian) described the book as “one of the greatest of American autobiographies.” Ronald Reagan credited it for inspiring him to change from New Deal Democrat to conservative Republican. More than once in the past I read statements to the effect that one cannot understand the twentieth century unless one has read Chambers’ Witness. I am embarrassed to say that finally in my old age, I sat down and read the book (there is not enough time in life to read all the books that one wants to read!). I certainly agree that Witness is a great book. It is wellwritten — Chambers in his later years, after his Communist youth, was a senior editor of Time and so one would expect him to be a fine stylist. It is full of passion, so that one can understand the appeal of Communism in the years after the First World War and in the Depression — and also one can understand the disgust that gradually consumes a sensitive man who finally perceives the evils that Communism inflicts on mankind — the forced labor camps, the contrived famines, the purges and executions — all brought about by the basic fact that Marxism is so wrong about the basic nature of human beings. Marxism seeks to create a utopia, where the ruling principle will be “from each according to his ability, to each according to his need” — everyone will work selflessly for the good of society, without regard to compensation. And when humans prove to be unwilling instruments for the creation of utopia, the rulers turn to violence to force compliance: hence all the hideous crimes committed by Communism in the twentieth century. Chambers begins his book with a lengthy account of his youth. He was born in 1901 into a highly dysfunctional family, with the father absent for years at a time, the mother struggling to keep her two sons housed and fed. Their situation was complicated by the presence of a mentally ill grandmother who for years was a danger to herself and the family. Chambers’ younger brother committed suicide as a teenager. When Chambers graduated from high school he left home with almost no cash and ended in Washington, D. C. where he worked as a common laborer, laying streetcar tracks. From here he moved to New Orleans where he was little more than a bum. But then he returned home and entered Columbia University where his brilliance was recognized by professors and fellow students alike. As a young man he felt the lure of Marxism and joined the American Communist Party in 1925. And here he ex-

BOOK REVIEW plains what seems so inexplicable to us in 2008, that is, why anybody would want to be a Communist?! First of all, the atrocities that we associate with Communism were still in the future. And we must realize that however mistaken Marxism turned out to be, it was a profoundly serious effort to explain history and society, an effort that had a huge appeal for a person of studious and intellectual bent. The capitalist world was in full crisis — with World War I in the recent past, and economic breakdown with all the attendant human misery ever present. Marxism would take mankind to a better future, indeed a utopia with no war and no poverty. So, a full-fledged member of the Party, Chambers became editor of the Daily Worker, the Party newspaper. About this time he married — a happy marriage with the two devoted to each other for a lifetime, a union blessed with two children (Chambers has a vivid section on how looking at his baby daughter, with her perfect ears and other features, made him realize that there was something more to this world than Dialectical Materialism!). In 1932 the Party moved him from the public party to the underground, and we have many pages describing his work as a spy. He takes up the question of how the men he recruited, highly educated men, could so blithely betray their country. The answer is that their loyalty was not to their country — their loyalty was to the Communist dream of creating utopia on earth. Chambers goes into great detail telling of the friendship Hiss and Chambers, and their families, had for each other. He describes at length their espionage work — how Hiss and the others would provide him with documents which he would photograph and pass on to his Soviet “handler,” while the originals went back to the offices. He remarks that the documents usually weren’t really all that valuable — but possessing them enabled Soviet Intelligence to break the State Department’s codes. What was more significant than getting the documents was having secret Communists high up in government where they could begin to help mold American policy along lines favorable to the Soviet Union. But then, as related above, Chambers became disenchanted with Communism. He left the Party and went into hiding because the Party had on occasion assassinated renegades. Then he got a job with Time magazine, where his outstanding abilities enabled him to become a senior editor. And of course he devotes many pages to giving his side of the Hiss case. He bought a farm near Westminster, Maryland, and he and his family loved the rural life. They began participating in a Friends (Quaker) Meeting, thereby satisfying a spiritual hunger that Communism had never fully satisfied. But at one point his despair over how his testimony was being received led him to attempt suicide — which failed because he misread the directions on the box of chemicals. Finally, his life ended with some years of happiness, as his book was a huge success — restoring him to prosperity (he had had to resign his post as a senior editor of Time), and he was gradually being recognized as a hero in the West’s struggle against Communism. A personal note: I went to college (Western Maryland College, recently renamed McDaniel College) just a short distance from Chambers’ farm. An article in a recent alumni magazine described how Chambers spent his last years — this is well after my time at the college — taking classes at Western Maryland College, completing the formal education that he had broken off when he left Columbia University. The author of the article interviewed a number of students who recalled Chambers as participating actively in student life, making friends with the students and professors and excelling in his class work. This book is in some sense a “period piece” in that the battle between the West and Communism, which Chambers foresaw as lasting for centuries, with Communism quite likely to be the victor, is already over. But as a historical document, the book will always be of interest. I can attest that it is very interesting reading, and I wish I had not waited so long to read it! (Note: I used Wikopedia and several websites to refresh my memory on some points.)


WVA for reservations

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17 Lovely Guestrooms nestled in the beautiful Alleghany Mountains Evening Dining and Sunday Brunch in the Old Mill reservations appreciated

The Inn at Gristmill Square & The Waterwheel Restaurant

P.O. Box 359, Warm Springs, VA • 540.839-2231

and

The Quilter’s Nook

Wonderful Yardage Assortment for All Your Quilting Needs Perfect Gifts for Any Occasion All in One!

Willow Tree Angels • Primitives Jewelry • Blenko Glass Home & Garden Accents & Accessories Between now and Christmas, enjoy a cup of cider while you browse the shop for all the gifts on your list ... Route 12, near intersection of Routes 12 & 63

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Over10,000 different rare and unusual flowering plants, trees, shrubs and bulbs collected from all over the world by Barry Glick,

Now available WHOLESALE to the gardening public! We ship UPS. Call, write, fax or e-mail for directions: Sunshine Farm & Gardens, HC 67, Box 539B, Renick, WV 24966 304.497-2208 Fax: 304.497-2698 E-Mail: barry@sunfarm.com www.sunfarm.com


6th Annual

Alderson’s Christmas Homes Tour Sunday, December 7 1:00-5:00 pm Alderson est Virginia Alderson,, W West

5 Homes on Tour • Praise and Worship Team Performances • Model Train Exhibit Tickets: $10 available at Alderson’s Depot Museum day of tour

$5 Soup & Sandwich LLunch unch at the Methodist Church see story page 16-17

A Historic Holiday: Christmas at The Barracks 301 W. Washington St, Lewisburg WV

BIG HOLIDAY SALE North House Gift Shop Most items 30-50% off

Annual Stellar Evening Gala

Greenbrier Historical Society Historic Holiday Wonderland at The Barracks, one of Lewisburg’s oldest buildings, 200 North Jefferson Street, Lewisburg, WV

Holiday Exhibit Grand Opening Friday, December 5 5-9 p.m. Admission $5

light refreshments served and

Saturday December 6, 12, 13, 19 & 20 December 6 from 10 - 4 p.m. see story page 9 7:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.

Roland P. Sharp Alumni Center on the campus of the West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine features soulful tunes of The Esquires from Charleston, WV wonderful cuisine & great auction items WVU football game on the Big Screen

Tickets: $50 advance — $60 at the door Call North House at 304.645.3398 Sponsorships are available

www .greenbrier wv .com www.greenbrier .greenbrierwv wv.com


Valley Guide