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Valley Guide

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October- -N N ember 2008 No oovvember No October

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Treasure Passage at Organ Cave, Ronceverte, WV — Organ Cave promises a majestic organ, frozen waterfall, sponge beds and debris left behind by the Confederacy’s saltpeter mining operations. Thomas Jefferson visited the cave in 1778. During the Civil War, General Lee’s forces found refuge in the cave and, ever since the Civil Defense designated Organ Cave as a Fallout Shelter. Organ Cave stands ready to add pleasure to our lives or to offer us an ark of safety in this Atomic Age. Organ Cave is open daily, exclusive of some holidays.

Valley Guide SERVING SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA & WESTERN VIRGINIA Published bi-monthly yearly by Creations of Sorts P.O. Box 94 White Sulphur Springs West Virginia 24986 Your letters, stories, photographs, editorial contributions, comments and criticisms are welcome. All manuscripts and photographs should be accompanied by a self-addressed return envelope as

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

October-November 2008

Entertainment & The Arts Exhibits at Alleghany Highlands Arts & Crafts Center: Clifton Forge Girl Scout Night Out at GVT Poetry’s Flying Alphabet: Perceptions by M.Ray Allen

Huntersville Traditions Day Fall Fling in White Sulphur Springs STARS: Space Ship Earth by Dave Buhrman A Thought… by Lena G. Hoke For the Love of Liberty 2008 NAMI Awareness Walk John Henry’s Partner Speaks

Going Places

page 4 page 4 page page page page page page page

4 5 5 6 6 6 7

by David Salner, Reviewed by Hannah Langhoff page 7

page 8 Galleries Calendar page 9 Apple Day Writer’s Workshop Great Music coming up at the Pocahontas County Opera House page 9 page 10 Theatre & Music Calendar Virginia Junior Opry Stars: page 11 Corbin Hayslette page 11 GVT Presents A Comedy & A Drama Alleghany Highlands A&CC 2008 Fall page 11 Classes & Workshops Garden Talk: Plant Dreams — Anagrams page 12 & Skyscrapers by Barry Glick Entertainment Calendar pages 13-15, 19, 26, 29 page 26 Tilting at Windmills by Charles Garratt

Food

Tastefully Speaking: Squashes by Chef Ed McArdle

“There shall be no abridging the freedom of speech.”

page 27

Fall Color Excursions for Virginia and West Virginia photos and captions by Charles Garratt pages 16-17 Joan C. Browning for WV House of Delegates page 18 advertisement paid for by candidate Happy Anniversary Cooper Gallery page 19 Five New Stars Light Up GVT’s Sidewalk page 19

Commentary

Who DO WE Vote for? by Robbie Limbauer page John Hanson, American Patriot & President page of the United States in 1781 Politicians Seek to Exploit Unwarranted Fears of Foreign Oil page The Real Price of Oil page Letter to Editor by RIchard Walsh, Jackson page Photo Ticket Cameras to Track Drivers Nationwide page UK police ANPR will read 50 million license plates a day page

Clubs & Organizations

20 21 21 21 21 21

pages 22 - 25

Calendar, and Other Tid-Bits Carnegie Hall Fall 2008 Class & Workshop Schedule

Sports Calendar Book Review

20

page 25 pages 28 & 29 page 30

Roland Layton’s Review of Studs Terkel, with Sydney Lewis, Touch and Go, A Memoir

At left:

NY: The New Press, 2007

Statue at National D-Day Memorial, Bedford, Virginia To quote Sam Houston (March 2, 1793 – July 26, 1863), born at Timber Ridge near Lexington VA, on The Civil War... “To secede from the Union and set up another government would cause war. If you go to war with the United States, you will never conquer her, as she has the money and the men. If she does not whip you by guns, powder, and steel, she will starve you to death. It will take the flower of the country-the young men.”

At right & on the Cover: Ingredients for a Happy Fall

photo by Charles Garratt

I want you to see what real courage is ... It’s when you know you’re licked before you begin, but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what.

~ from To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee, a bold statement by Antticus Finch to his children concerning his case as a lawyer defending a black man wrongfully accused of a crime


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ENTER TAINMENT & THE AR TS ENTERT ARTS

VALLEY GUIDE October -No vember 2008 October-No -Nov

ATTENTION!

Exhibits at Alleghany Highlands Arts Center: Clifton Forge

Bonnie Venable comes out of traditional sewing tradition, has passed through some painting and now uses Japanese fabrics and papers. Her work with fibers has created her show — Fibrous Sources and Surprises — ranging from old silk kimonos to paper, and seed pods to twigs. Some of Bonnie’s work is very elegant and formal, some just whimsical. She exhibits some framed pieces, dwelling houses with treasures form unexpected sources, some "twig people" and even some pieces that deal with ancient languages. Fibrous Sources and Surprises remains on exhibit through October 11. “Everybody around here knows about Fall Festival”- or so it seems, until the work comes in and there’s a new artist to sharpen our ideas, or a familiar artist shifts gears completely. This show is an “open” show—no jurying required and Open to the Public - No Membership required just a few basic rules to observe, and the work just keeps getting better and better. That is what you! This year’s Monday-Friday 10 am-6 pm all other times by appointment only exhibit — the _title, presents _ works by _ artist. Some artists live here year round, some come back to share work with us, and there’s always plenty of lively discussion about the prizes awarded in each of the many categories — as Bulk Foods • Split Cases • Sodas • Paper Goods there should be with lots of ideas, opinions and interests to consider. That is why we offer a People’s Choice award, so Catering & Baking Supplies you can vote too! Enjoy the Fall Festival! beginning October 17 and the art exhibit continues through November 22. Concession Supplies: Sandi D’Alessandro is an abstract painter who uses recognizable objects as symbols. Sandi often works in series which explore significant themes in her life. Ideas lie in wait under layers of paint and marks, images and implications, cotton candy mix-snow cone syrups-funnel cake mix ... waiting to be deciphered like a coded message ... or just enjoy the color, form and composition. ”In the world of art, Convenience Store Programs • Gift Boxes the artistic journey is an intuitive process of concealing and revealing, adding and subtracting, until the desired result Don’t see it? ... We’ll do our best to find it for you! emerges from the layers,” says Sandi, ”I spend a great deal of time developing the idea, starting with thumbnail sketches, evolving the abstract through many small pencil studies. I work primarily with acrylics. This medium allows for versatility in creating textures, transparent and opaque effects which I scratch through and lift off to unveil images. This artistic process encourages play, risk taking and exploration as part of the art making. My goal is to achieve an overall painterly quality that allows the viewer to continue reaching beyond the obvious to find meaning each time the is viewed.” Fall Fling — Thursday, October 2, 3, 4, 5 painting Sandi holds Signature Membership status in the National and American, Baltimore and Virginia Watercolor SocietWildflower & Wildlife Art Show - wine & cheese reception, ies, regularly wins awards in theses and other national competitions, has taught workshops at San Diego and National, arts, crafts, 100th BDay promotion with save-the-date t-shirts been published in a national art magazine as well as receiving regional recognition. She teaches art at Hidden Valley & hoodies fund raiser, Ham & Bean Dinner & alumni Sock High school in Roanoke, VA. Sandi D’Alessandro’s work is on exhibit from November 25-December 30. Hop Friday night, live music, dinner, dance & cake for The Alleghany Highlands Arts and Crafts Center feels very fortunate to be able to present quality works by so many everyone Saturday night, Mod Bog Sunday major artists — in person versus only in text books, or at major museums! Do plan a visit to Alleghany Highlands Arts Thursday, October 16 and Crafts Center, 439 E. Ridgeway St, Clifton Forge VA, 540.862-4447. Shop Local & Vote on the lamp post Scare Crows, entry forms

Churches - Restaurants - Caterers - Family Reunions

Clifton Forge Wholesale Foods & Restaurant Supply 501 E. Ridgeway • 540-862-5951

White Sulphur Springs ... more than Third Thursdays

available at Kitten's Korner. Girl Scout, Haley Burns, for one of her badges, decorates the gazebo for fall and shows a free movie, The Great Pumpkin, in the park starting at dark, shops open 5-7pm - look for WV Flag

Thursday, November 20

Christmas Open Houses, strolling carolers, treats at each business, shops open 5-7pm - look for WV Flag

Saturday, December 6

Christmas Parade, line up 4 pm, parade 5 pm, to enter contact Garnett Haynes, WSS Main Street Promotions Chairman or a WSS Lions Club member Grand Marshals James & Kitten Burr

www.wssmainstreet.org - 304-536-5060

Girl Scout Night Out at Greenbrier Valley Theatre

In early August, area Girl Scouts got dressed up for Girl Scout Night Out at Greenbrier Valley Theatre to enjoy the PB&J Café Production of Hansel and Gretel. GVT is located at 113 East Washington St, Lewisburg, WV. Visit www.gvtheatre.org for more information! Interested in joining Girl Scouts and being a part of these great activities??? Contact Black Diamond Girl Scout Council Field Executive, Page Wilson at 304.647.5019.

Poetry’s Flying Alphabet : Perceptions by M. Ray Allen

THE

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Perceptions spawn poetry. Perceptions that have spawned some of my poems came from a crushed terrapin on asphalt, a bleeding deer leaping over the guard rail of a bridge to its death, a fawn in formaldehyde, and a wasp plucking a spider from its web. While driving across the desert at night in my convertible with the top down, I perceived a lunar moth that was wind-pressed around the arm of my windshield wiper blade. “The Windcarver,” a poem that wound up as part of the title of my second book of poems, features the struggling moth as its dominant image. Between the Thorns: Windcarver Songs of Appalachia features poems that explore my sense of loss and disillusionment based on perceptions garnered from traveling around the world in 1970 and returning home to find that my namesake died while I was in Japan. While on a ferry to Kowloon, I observed a beautiful moth slowly fanning its wings under a bench in front of me. Suddenly, an oriental man twisted around and smashed the moth with the heel of his shoe. The grist from that experience led me to write “On a Ferry to Kowloon.” In an airport terminal in Calcutta, India, I attempted to rescue a large moth that I believed was sure to meet the same fate as the one on the ferry; however, when I opened the window and tossed it gently out into the open, a large raven swooped down and devoured the moth. Such perceptions led me to write poems.

Beginning with a perception, a poet can weave words into a poem that is controlled by the form the poet chooses to implement or into a free verse poem that permits the poet freedom to write without the restrictions imposed by rules. While most of my poems are free verse, I have written several blank verse poems and a few poems that adhere to form. Perception of self, perception of others, perception of nature, and perception of events all offer the poet grist for poems. The point is that perceptions that move me to put my observations and feelings on paper are the ones that usually wind up in print. Anyone who wishes to write poetry will be well served to keep a notebook handy for writing perceptions that may spawn poems at the time or at a later date. To learn more about poetry, and to share your work with others, attend the free Alleghany Highlands Poetry Workshop that meets at 6:00 pm on the last Monday of every month — Monday, September 29, October 27, November 24 and December 29, at Clifton Forge Public Library, 535 Church Street, Clifton Forge VA, 540. 8624502, or make plans to attend Apple Day Poetry & Songwriting Workshop on Saturday, October 11 at Douthat Conference Center, Douthat State Park, Clifton Forge, VA. For details contact M. Ray Allen at 1-877-301-3817, (540)862-4502 or mrayallen@yahoo.com


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Huntersville Traditions Day

VALLEY GUIDE

Saturday, October 4, 2008 9:00 am to 6:00 pm

October -No vember 2008 October-No -Nov

Have you seen her? A little girl wearing a white dress and bon- strations of butter churning, quilting, wool spinning, shake making, net with the ribbons untied who likes to sit on a stair, or in a swing. horse shoeing, blacksmithing, apple cider making, ice cream makIs there a story behind this little girl? What happened to her? And, ing, weaving, and basket making. You can also try your hand at cow why does she continue to walk around Huntersville, West Virginia? milking, making apple butter, and muzzle loading. Then, ride a horse drawn wagon, listen and watch some living history interpreters Is she searching for someone, or something? and Civil War Soldiers, and hear One Huntersville, West Virsome old time music. ginia, woman reports that her Back in the days when it was son came running into the house a trading post, early hunters and one day shouting, “Mommy, trappers congregated at Mommy, there is a little girl sitHuntersville, others followed ting in my swing and she won’t when, from 1821-1891, get out and let me swing!” Huntersville served as the first The woman asked her son county seat of Pocahontas what the little girl looked like and County. So memories can her son said, she is ‘white’. abound as you visit historic sites “Well, what do you mean?,” such as the 1854 Presbyterian the woman asked. “Is she wearChurch which served as a Civil ing white?” “No!,” the little boy War hospital, the 1883 Jail answered. “She is white, House, the 1893 Carr Home, white!,” he continued, “I asked A little girl... standing in the middle of the road. 1886 United Methodist Church, her if she wanted me to push her in the swing and she didn’t answer. Right now she is just sitting on the 1880 Two-Story-Two-Room School House in use through 1970, the 1854 Carriage House Inn and Colonial Mary Engles Display, our swing.” The woman replied, “Let’s go and see.” So they went into the and attendance at the Civil War Cemetery Dedication. Tours are offered at the old Huntersville School including a backyard and, sure enough, there was a little girl sitting in the swing, wearing a white dress and a bonnet with the ribbons untied. There School Reunion for all those who were fortunate enough to be stuwas no color to her at all. All her features were white just like the dents at this facility down thru the years — yes, from 1880 to 1970 little boy had said — ‘white, white’. For a brief moment they stood when those school doors were officially closed. The restoration work on this old historic educational monument is really a must-see work and watched her sitting in the swing, and then she was gone. In the following years, this Huntersville woman has learned from in progress. It is fabulous! So, from ham biscuits and coffee around the camp fire to homeother folks that they have seen a little girl of about 4 or 5 years of age wearing a white dress and a bonnet with the ribbons untied. She made salt rising bread, baked goodies, jams and jellies, baked ‘taters’, has been seen in the road, in front of the home of Bob Francisco, candy apples to pork rinds and a beans and cornbread supper — enough to satisfy your palates and stuff your tummies! and even sitting on a stair in another lady’s house. So plan the trip! Huntersville Traditions Day promises to be an If you go to Huntersville Traditions Day, October 4, 2008, you too might see her — the little girl wearing a white dress and bonnet educational visit back into the past — perhaps a ‘ghostly’ past. with the ribbons untied, and she is ‘white, white’. Some Come, See for yourself! And if you’d like more information, call other interesting sites you can look forward to seeing are demon- 304.799.4747 or 1.800.336.7000

Fall Fling in White Sulphur Springs

The annual Fall Fling in White Sulphur Springs Springs, West Virginia, opens this year on Thursday, October 2nd with a 5:00 pm wine and cheese reception for the Wildflower & Wildlife Art Show, held at Old White Motors Showroom on Main Street. The celebration continues throughout the weekend with a little something for everyone. Friday, October 3rd, the Arts & Crafts Show, including a bake sale, is open from 12 noon to 8 pm at Emmanuel United Methodist Church located at 25 Tressel Street, a Ham & Bean Dinner is offered at WSS Civic Center from 4–7pm with an Alumni Welcome Reception beginning at 7 pm, and the Wildflower & Wildlife Art Show at Old White Motors Showroom is open once again from 4-8 pm. Both Friday, October 3rd and Saturday, October 4thth, stop in at Kittens Korner on Main Street to meet featured artist Kim Ayers. Kim was born and raised in Eastern Virginia. Her love of art began back in the days of coloring books and crayons. Over the years, trying every type of medium, she still falls back on her affinity for graphite finding black and white, as well as all the shades in between, most intriguing. Kim’s visit to Kitten’s Korner is a great opportunity to have your loved ones sketched, or even your favorite animal. Saturday, October 4th, White Sulphur Springs’ National Fish Hatchery’s Freshwater Folk Festival opens at 10 am and continues throughout the day until 6pm with music, food and festivities on the

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Beautiful Dresses for All Those Special Days

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108 E. Washington St. Lewisburg WV 24091 304-645-3633

grounds of the fish hatchery. Also on Saturday, October 4th, the Arts & Crafts Show continues at Emmanuel United Methodist Church Hope to see you soon! that includes a hot dog sale between 11 am and 6 pm, along with a wvciciora@suddenlink.net Spaghetti Dinner from 4 to 7 pm. The Wildflower & Wildlife Art Show at Old White Motors Showroom is open from 12 noon-4 pm. On Sunday, October 5th, the thrill and fun of a Mud Bog located on McCloud Road, a little over a mile out Big Draft Road, becomes a Fundraiser for the 2008 West Virginia Dandelion Festival held during Memorial Weekend in White Sulphur Springs. White Sulphur Springs has hosted distinguished guests from all over the world yet remains humble in their ways. White Sulphur Springs revels in their two hundred year history yet Fresh, Clean, Non-Toxic House Cleaning with antibacterial, antifungal, looks to the future with hope. White germicidal, antiseptic, healing, Sulphur Springs is where the wilds of West Virginia become a playground — from the mountain streams that run through the town, to deodorizing properties the lakes, and trails, and woods. Then, for determination, White of 100% essential oils Sulphur Springs celebrates the dandelion — a flower, like her people, as Nature intended! that brings out the child in us all, after all, White Sulphur Springs is For consultation call home to The Greenbrier, America’s Resort, home to the outdoors, Mike & Carlena Reynolds and a hometown where a Fall Fling is celebrated annually for 304.536.2200 • 304.667.4986 everyone’s enjoyment. This year, come, celebrate with us! License#55-0665369 • For more information call 304.536-9206 or 304.536-5060, ycs001@aol.com or online at www.wssmainstreet.org

We Clean The Green Way


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VALLEY GUIDE

October -No vember 2008 October-No -Nov

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STARS:

Space Ship Earth

Laurel M. Thomas

Licensed Massage Therapist BY APPOINTMENT 304-661-3479 14 North Street ❖Union, WV GIFT Certificates available for any amount

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by Dave Buhrman www.wvskytours.com Would you like to live on a space ship? Well guess what? Planet Earth is a self contained vessel with a crew of 6.5 billion people plus plants and animals that is flying through space at 67,000 mph. Some complain that living on the Earth is expensive but every year we all get a free trip around the Sun. That’s an extra 587 million frequent flyer miles! But don’t try to fly a 747 to the Sun because even if jets could fly in the vacuum of outer space it would take seventeen years to reach the Sun at jet speed and of course you would be incinerated long before you got even close. Although our senses trick us into thinking the Sun travels around the Earth and it can be blocked out with just our thumb, in reality it is a huge giant fireball a million times bigger than our whole world and we are the ones spinning Night arrives over Europe and Nothern Africa around daily and orbiting the Sun every twelve months. Yes, it whips us around like a little toy. You’ve got to respect something that is so big and bright you can’t even peek at it from 93 million miles away. Every second of the day the Sun converts 4 million tons of itself into light and energy and generously gives it to the Universe. It baths us in its warm glow and holds us tight by the force of gravity without which spaceship earth would go sailing away into the icy cold darkness Jupiter P of space. Thank you Sun! Want to experience yourself on a whirling planet spinning ever eastward? The best times for that happen at dawn and dusk. You can watch either the Sun or Moon rise or set behind the mountain in just two minutes from start to finish because of Earth’s constant rotation. Want to appreciate your gravitational relationship with the Earth? Imagine you are standing at the South Pole the next time you spread a blanket, lay on the grass, and gaze at the stars. Picture yourself looking DOWN at the abyss of stars below you and you will quickly value the grip your planet has on you. The very same force of gravity that keeps the Earth circling the Sun also keeps the Sun and its sister stars circling the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. Yes, we’re all marching together in a grand parade around the center at about 180 miles perKsecond. As you lie there and count to twenty all the animals and forests, the entire Earth, Jupiter and the asteroids and even the great Sun are flung a distance equal to the width of the United States! To learn more about the night sky, register now for a class/workshop on astronomy with instructor Dave Buhrman: Intro to the Universe, a video presentation and class discussion of the images Dave has captured with his 15” telescope, followed by a session in Carnegie’s Starlab planetarium where Dave will show you how to find some of the major constellations and appreciate their significancewith optional outdoor stargazing after any evening class. Dates are Wednesday, October 22nd, 6:30-9pm, Thursday, November 20th, 6:309pm, Saturday, December 13th, 1:00-3:30pm. The 21/2 class is repeated each month. Tuition is $24 for age 8 ½ to adult. Class size is minimum 15 – 25 maximum. The same class is repeated each month. To register contact Carnegie Hall, 105 Church St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-7917. Stargazing can be done any clear dark night. It’s free and fun for the whole family and it’s twice as exciting when you learn what to look for and realize the vastness of space before you. To learn more contact David Buhrman, HC 67 Box 533, Renick, WV 24966; telephone: 304-497-2135, e-mail: dave@wvskytours.com, or visit him at www.wvskytours.com

A thought… by Lena G. Hoke

I heard a saying once, "Letters are expectations enveloped." Those few words say a lot! When you check the mail and you see a letter addressed to you, you wonder what it has to say; is it good news or bad news? Whatever it is, you won't know until you open the envelope. Did you know that there is a love letter written to each and every one of us and we should all have a copy of it in our homes? This letter was written with such love and with so many promises to us, and yet there are those who have never read this letter or may not even know that it even exists. It was written by God and is titled, "The Holy Bible." This letter is not ours exclusively but to be shared with others because the love He has for you and me, He also has for others. It is our job to share this letter and to tell others that the promises within are real and can be easily attained just by allowing Him into their lives. Share this love letter with others and enjoy the love you will receive in return.

For the Love of Liberty: The African American Soldier 1866-1945

An exhibit, For the Love of Liberty: The African American Sol1866-1945, is at The Clay Center in Charleston, WV, from dier 1866-1945 September 24 through November 2. A lecture on the exhibit is planned for Thursday, October 16. Organized by Anthony L. Powell, from his extensive collection of photographs and artifacts, this exhibition explores the history of African American soldiers from the post Civil War years to World War II. Colonel Walter Howard Loving is one of the soldiers featured in the exhibition. Loving was appointed conductor of the Philippine Constabulatory Band by William Taft in 1901, after Loving served as Chief Musician in the Spanish American War and later attended the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston. He was killed by Japanese soldiers during their occupation of the Philippines in World War II. The exhibition at One Clay Center is a collaboration between the Clay Center and the West Virginia Center for African-American Art and Culture, Inc. For more information call 304.561-3570.


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VALLEY GUIDE

2008 NAMI Mental Health Awareness Walk - November 1 The NAMI West Virginia affiliates and friends walk to increase awareness for mental health issues on Saturday, November 1, 2008 in Parkersburg, West Virginia at the WVUParkersburg campus. Registration begins at 9am. The NAMI Affiliate in Parkersburg has planned a bigger and more educational walk which features 38 mental health posters along the campus walking trail route with information on various illnesses and issues. This information is made available by an Abnormal Psychology class project from the campus of WVU-Parkersburg. After the Walk, folks gather at the campus amphitheater for entertainment and a light lunch. Afterwards, all West Virginia NAMI affiliate group members meet at the Caperton Center on Campus for a joint affiliate group training program provided by NAMI National in Washington, DC. The goal of the NAMI walk is to fight the stigma that surrounds mental illness, to build awareness of the fact that

the mental health system in this country needs to be improved, and to raise funds for the state office and 12 affiliates to continue the mission to educate families and advocate for better legislation. NAMI is a 501©3 charity. Donations to the walk are tax deductible. The NAMI Walk-day itself is a magical event. With T-shirts blazing team names of hope and enthusiasm, families join together, talking, laughing, learning, and sharing about the diseases that so affect their lives. But Walking for NAMI involves more than just the families and consumers who live with mental illness; part of their magic is that they draw all sorts of people from all over the state. Some teams consist of people with no real prior contact with NAMI or mental illness. For more information on starting a team, joining a team or making donations, call Carol Jones, NAMI Greenbrier President at 304.445-7866 or email: coatsrus@suddenlink.net.

John Henry’s Partner Speaks by David Salner, Reviewed by Hannah Langhoff On the cover of John Henry’s Partner Speaks, a wood carving depicts two steel drivers at work. One stands poised with his hammer over his head, preparing to strike. His partner, holding the spike in place for him, kneels with his face upturned as though praying. The danger, beseeching, and poised power in the image are perfectly captured by David Salner’s new collection of poetry. In these poems, Salner adopts the voice of characters whose lives have been marked by marginalization and hardship: former slaves, prison inmates, immigrants and, most notably, the working class. He gives expression to their private thoughts and reveals the injustices they suffer. In the process he reimagines the life of a folk hero who has become a symbol for manual laborers in America…. John Henry’s Partner Speaks blurs the boundaries between history, poetry, and legend. It is supposedly a transcription of taped interviews with Phil Henderson, a former railroad worker and the best friend of famed steeldriver John Henry. (Henderson is Salner’s invention, but various elements of the poems – the lives of workers on the C & O Railroad and the Monongah Mine disaster, for example – are factual.) Salner’s poetry has a simple conversational quality, with the line breaks serving to emphasize the rhythms and focus the reader’s attention on certain words or phrases. The style functions especially well here, in what is meant to be a transcribed interview. According to legend, John Henry agreed to race a steam drill to show railroad officials that human workers were more efficient. He won the competition but died shortly thereafter, supposedly having worked himself to death. Salner changes the manner of John Henry’s end and, in doing so, makes the story less about a conflict between a man and a machine and more about a worker standing up to the corrupt railroad officials. Like the old ballad in which the young John Henry proclaims “Hammer be the death of me,” the theme of mortality is constantly present in Phil Henderson’s memories. John and Phil witness a hanging and discover a cemetery for black workers killed in the tunnel. When an accident occurs, the surviving workers are given liquor to calm their nerves; on one such occasion John reflects, “Some day the whiskey’s gonna be on me.” This could be explained fancifully as John predicting his own death, but is more likely just a common attitude among the tunnel workers. They

have seen so many accidents that they take the nearness of death for granted…. “In the Dust of the Great Bend Tunnel” is partly a dialogue between John and Phil, calling back and forth in time with the blows of John’s hammer. Despite the difficult and dangerous working conditions, the music of their calls and the sense of friendship and trust between the two men makes the moment almost joyful. Years after John’s death, when Phil is working in a West Virginia coal mine, he witnesses this same camaraderie overcoming racial barriers: “I never saw white men cry over Black men / until I worked on that mine rescue team.” John Henry’s Partner Speaks is summed up by “The John Henry Song,” in which Phil Henderson explains the kind of work symbolized by his friend’s story: “I don’t mean glory work, not the kind of work / that makes you famous.” The miners, steel drivers, and factory workers in the poems know what it is to labor without fame or glory, but in the legend of John Henry and the poetry of David Salner, they have finally been given a voice. Hannah Langhoff is a recent graduate of Truman State University. Her fiction has appeared in Cicada Magazine. She lives in Indiana. David Salner’s poetry is influenced by the people he knew during the 25 years he worked at manual trades. An iron ore miner, furnace tender, power plant laborer, machinist, and garment worker, he lived in Minnesota, Arizona, Utah, and for many years in West Virginia. Before becoming an industrial worker, Salner completed an MFA degree at the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop. The author of three previous books, he received a Puffin Foundation grant to study the real history behind the John Henry myth. His work has appeared in Threepenny Review, Prairie Schooner, The Literary Review, North American Review, Southern Humanities Review, Free Lunch, Poetry Daily, and many other journals. In recent years, Salner has taught English as a second language; he currently works as a librarian, and lives in Frederick, MD with his wife, Barbara Greenway, a high school English teacher. John Henry's Partner Speaks, poems by David Salner, ISBN 978-1934999110, 108 pages, $17.00 can be ordered from Barnes and Noble, Powells, or Amazon. This review first appeared in The Green Hills Literary Lantern, an online journal of Truman State University, wordTech Editions, PO Box 541106, Cincinnati, OH 45254. 104pp.

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VALLEY GUIDE

October -No vember 2008 October-No -Nov

Galleries

Posters & Prints by Max Hayslette in Mini Art Gallery, art Alderson's, 203 S deco treasures, native American crafts, Alderson's Monroe St, Alderson WV, 304.445-2851 19th & 20th c. paintings paintings, Parian Ware Bronzes & original prints; private collection of military art & equipage from Napoleonic era through Boer War War, Wm. M. Grover Galleries ies, by appointment, Rt 687, Bacova VA, 540.839-6336 West Virginia artists exhibit, Tamarack Tamarack, Beckley WV, 304.256-6843 artist exhibits & receptions, Paine Gallery, Bluefield Area Arts Center Center, Bluefield WV, Mon-Fri 9-4, 304.325-8000 Fall Juried Artist’s Work gallery open 10 am-4 pm weekdays & 10 am-3 pm on Saturday, Gary Bowling’s House of Art at get s’mART CafeGo CafeGo, 701 Bland St, Bluefield WV, gallery 304.327-9300, cafe 304.323-2112 Fenton Glass & WV First Ladies exhibit, The Cultural Center Center, Charleston WV 304.558-0220 For the Love of Liberty: The African American Soldier 18661945, and African American Artists From the Permanent Collection: Paintings, prints, photographs and sculpture by Romare Bearden, Rosa Bradford, Sam Gilliam, Leon Hicks, Robert Hutton, Gary Kirksey, Jacob Lawrence, Edward McCluney, Martin Puryear, Faith Ringgold and Betye Saar September 24-November 2; Autobiographies: Six West Virginia Artists: Charleston & Huntington area artists – Peter Massing, Robin McClintock, Mark Tobin Moore, Eric Pardue, Emily Ritchey, Claire Sherwood – create works that reflect their concerns, artistic influences, affinities to certain materials or forms, and personal histories, September 27-November 16; Close to Home: 100+ paintings, drawings, prints & sculptures by WV artists, through January 4, 2009; giant format films; The Moon: Past, Present & Future; Space Oddities, Dinosaurs Alive! in ElectricSky Theater; Milton’s Marvels of Science; Kidspace, Avampato Discovery Museum, The Clay Center Center, One Clay Center, Charleston WV, 304.561-3570 Bonnie V enable: FFiberous iberous Sources & Surprises through Oct Venable: all FFestival estival NonJuried Art Show— W orks in all media 11; FFall Non-Juried Works welcome October 17-November 22; Sandi D’Alessandro — abstracts November 25-December 30; Alleghany Highlands Arts & Crafts Center Center, 439 E. Ridgeway St, Clifton Forge VA, 540.862-4447 (Mon-Sat 10am-4:30 pm; JanApril Tues-Sat 10 am-4:30 pm) Original oils & pottery by David Weaver, Midland Trail Gallery Gallery, Rt. 60/Rt. 41, Clifftop WV, 304.438-8649 Marcia Springsteen’s handthrown pottery — ornaments, pots with legs, lamps & classic favorites; Appalachian art & crafts, stained glass, cards, watercolors, Wakerobin Gallery lery, Rt 12, Forest Hill WV, 304.466-2227 Quilts and Quaker Heritage — never before seen quilts, samplers, clothing, related items, assembled & researched by quest curator Mary Robare on exhibit through Sept 22; Five Generations of Mennonite Quilts exhibit Sept 27 - Dec 29, Civil War Room, Children’s Room, Sewing Machines, Research Library, Virginia Quilt Museum Museum, Harrisonburg VA, 540.433.3818, www.vaquiltmuseum.org Nancy O’Farrell’s pottery & hand dyed shirts shirts, Creative Hands Gallery Gallery, 2nd Ave & James St, Hinton WV, Fri & Sat 10-6, 304.466-5559 John Henry Woodcarving Exhibit Exhibit: 100+ hand-carved figurines detailing railroad jobs in 1870, Hinton RR Museum Museum, 206 Temple St, Hinton WV, Mon-Sat 10-4, 304.466-5420 Cultural, artistic & educational exhibits, Sat 10-6, Sun noon-4pm, Campbell-Flannagan-Murrell Museum Museum, corner of 5th Ave & Summers St, historic Hinton WV, 304-466-1401 Wood Clock Museum Museum, 309 Temple St, Hinton WV, Fri & Sat 10-6, 304.466-3880 19th & 20th c. American & European paintings paintings, Parian Ware, Ceramic ware, Bronzes, original prints, oils, water-

colors, Wm. M. Grover Galleries Galleries, Mon-Thurs 11-4; Fri & Sat 10-5, 2809 Main St, Hot Springs VA, 540.839-6336 Auditorium Gallery: A Broad View: A Quarter Century Working with a Century Old Camera by Doug Chadwick Chadwick; Old Stone Room: 19th Annual Season of Color Juried Art Exhibition: Community; Museum Gallery: Images Portrayed: drawings by Donald Starr — all exhibits through October 2,, Hall, 105 Church Mon-Fri 9-4:30, Sat 12noon-4, Carnegie Hall St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-7917 Local History Exhibits Exhibits, City Hall Lobby Lobby, W. Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-4998 30; Evan New Works by Max Hayslette through Sept 30 3-31— artist reception 5-8pm on Boggess New Work Oct 3-31 Fri, Oct 3; Shir Wooton New 9x12 Pastel Studies Nov 730 30— artist reception 5-8pm on Fri, Nov 7; works by Dave Berry, Evan Boggess, Lynn Boggess, Dr. Zack Comeaux, G.P. Cooper, Barry Fields, Charles Flickenger, Max Hayslette, Jessica Roczniak & Barbara Nissman CD’s & books, Cooper Gallery Gallery, 122 E. Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-6439 Giclee Prints by local painters & photographers, Driftwood Sign & Frame Frame, 437 N. Jefferson St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-5854 Greenbrier Artists exhibits at Greenbrier County Public Library Library, Lewisburg WV, 304. 647-7568 Daywood Lobby features works by Brandon Fleshner Fleshner, Sharon Johnson Johnson, Shoshanna Schwimmer Schwimmer, Shirley Taggart Taggart, and photographer Gary Cooper Cooper; Pete Ballard’s Performing Artist Fashion Dolls, Greenbrier Valley Theatre Theatre, Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-3838 American Art & Craft Craft: distinctive jewelry, furniture, pottery & blown glass by our nation’s top artists, Harmony Ridge Gallery & Birdhouse Cafe Cafe, 209 W. Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-4333 Art & Antiques from Africa & China - Shona stone sculpture, Zulu pottery, North China baskets, chests & cabinets, American art jewelry & clothing, High Country Gallery Gallery, 122 W. Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-5222 Folk Art Works by Minnie Adkins, Black Joe Jackson, S.L. Jones, Addir Morgan, Cher Shaffer, Howard Finster, quilts, pottery, floor cloths, early country furniture; In Retrospect Antiques & Folk Art Art, www.inretrospecaniquesandfolkart.com Contemporary American craft art art, glass, pottery, jewelry, art to wear; art for living, New Horizon Gallery Gallery, 100 E Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-5600 Special exhibits, displays displays, North House Museum & Greenbrier Historical Society Society, 301 W. Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-3398 Photographs by Josh Lipton Lipton, Charles Garratt and other area photographers, Plants Etc., Jefferson St, Lewisburg WV, 304.647-3950 Original paintings, prints, notecards, Tuckwiller Gallery Gallery, 102 W. Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-2070; University Mall, Blacksburg VA, 540.552-2630 One of a kind works of art in contemporary painting and handmade print and ceramic genres of regional, national & international artists, call about featured artist show’s & reception, The Washington Street Gallery Gallery, 123 W. Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.647-4561 Staniar Gallery: J. J. Cromer: Our Stampedes are Compatible, meticulously detailed, mixed media works, through October 3; Kamen Gallery: Lloyd Goad: My Path, photographic exhibit predominately focuses on landscapes found in Rockbridge County through December 4; Cuban-American painter and videographer Alberto Rey: Life, Death and Beauty October 13-November 55; Dave Anderson Anderson: Rough Beauty, photographic documentation of the town of Vidor, Texas, November 10-December 12 12, Lenfest Center Center, Lexington VA, 540.458-8000 Fall Shows November 22 & 28 at Beckley Women’s Club on Park Avenue from 11-4, Jeff Diehl’s handthrown pottery, high-fired stoneware, porcelain tableware & decorative pieces at home and studio of Jeff & Donna Diehl, Lockbridge PPottery ottery Studio Studio, 1274 Lockbridge Rd, Meadow Bridge WV, 304.484-7150, www.lockbridgepottery.com

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Pete Ballard’s 19th/20th Century Historic Fashion Doll Exhibit Exhibit, Gertrude Smith House House, 708 North Main Street, Mount Airy, North Carolina, 1-800-576-0231 Highland County Museum & Heritage Center Center, The Mansion House, Monterey VA, 540.396,4478 1829 Andrew Johnston House, Museum & Research Center Center, Giles County Historical Society, Pearisburg VA, 540.921-1050 Folk Art Art, 1918 Princeton display, coins , The Bronze Look Look, Mercer Street, Princeton WV, 304.920-2081 regional art, Dandelion Gallery Gallery, 506 Lazenby Avenue, Princeton WV, closed Mon & Weds, 304.877-3651 Paintings by Appalachian Artist Association Association, Jack’s Diner Diner, 801 Oakvale Road, Princeton WV, breakfast, lunch, dinner Monday-Saturday rinceton Shops by Steve Jesse, photographic display of Old PPrinceton replica depot houses, priceless artifacts of Virginian RR, Princeton Railroad Museum Museum, historic district of East Mercer Street, open Sundays 2-5pm, Princeton, WV 304.4875060 or 304.487-5045 area artists exhibits, The Gallery at the Jefferson Center Center, 541 Luck Ave, Roanoke VA, 540.343-2624, www.jeffcenter.org Louisiana Link through October 1, O.Winston Link Museum seum, Roanoke VA 540.982-5465 The Auto Gallery, History in Motion, Railcar Rescue, The Virginia Museum of Transportation Transportation, Mon-Sat 105, Sun noon-5, Roanoke VA, 540.342-5670 Theatre History Gallery, History Museum & Historical Society of Western Virginia Virginia, Roanoke VA 540.342-5770 Highlights from the American Collection, Process and Promise in a new Art Museum; Folk Art selections, sculpture court, Art Museum of Western Virginia Virginia, Roanoke VA 540.342-5760 Africa: The Serengeti through March 15, 2009; In The Glow: The Science Behind the Art of Neon; The Living River: coastal estuary touch zone; The Sky Above Mister Rodger’s Neighborhood: sing & dance about the day & night skies; Earth Treasures Mineral Gallery; Weather & Live Animals Galleries, The Science Museum of Western Virginia Virginia, Roanoke VA, 540.342-5726 A History of Salem through 200+ Years, Community and Courage, The Brown House Parlor, Lakeside!, Walter Biggs: Artist & Gentleman, Pete Ballard Fashion Dolls, Salem Museum Museum, 801 E. Main St, Salem VA, 540.389-6760 New Harmonies, Historic Crab Orchard Museum Museum, Rts 19 & 460, Crab Orchard Rd, Tazewell VA, 276.988-6755 artisan creations for the beauty of home, sculptural furniture, Gangchen Tibetan carpets, pottery, wood turnings, rustic elegance, antiques, jewelry, The Gallery at Seven Oaks Oaks, Court House Hill, Warm Springs VA, Fri -Sat 11-5pm, Sun 1-5pm, or special appointments 540.839-3054 original, hand crafted jewelry, tumbled stones, spheres, stone carvings, crystals, gem art, select Native American beaded pieces, McGraw Minerals Unique Jewelry & Gemstones Gemstones, Court House Hill, Warm Springs VA, ThursSat or by special appointment 540.839-2599 Kate Emlen oils, Angus Wilson oils, Diana Fayt ceramics through October 15; Phil Barter: oils & wood relief October 16-December 1 - artists’ reception Saturday, October 18 from 5-7:30pm; fine art, pottery, silver, shows and receptions May-Dec: Warm Springs Gallery Gallery, Courthouse Hill, Warm Springs VA, Weds-Sun 1 am-4 pm, or by appt 540.839-2985 Works by master potter Tracy Brent Howard and Terri Howard, The Pottery of The Greenbrier Greenbrier, The Greenbrier, White Sulphur Springs WV, 304.536-4723 P.Buckley Moss Originals & Prints Prints, Donna Farlow’s originals, prints & jewelry eannie jewelry, Jeff Davis wood carvings carvings, Jeannie Brenneman, Ron Resland Resland, Phyllis Crickenberger Crickenberger, Romney Brenneman Shelton Collins Collins, Ann Tamea & Sharon Johnson artist works, Kittens Korner Gift & Custom Frame Shoppe Shoppe, 80 West Main St, White Sulphur Springs WV, 304.536-9206


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VALLEY GUIDE

Apple Day Writers’ Workshop Saturday, October 11, 2008 beginning at 10:00 a.m., the annual Apple Day Writers’ Workshop opens with a Poetry Session in Douthat State Park's Conference Center. This two hour session, led by M. Ray Allen, focuses on the process of writing poetry from the conception of an idea to enhancing imagery, editing, and submitting the work for publication. Participants should bring some sample poems to read, and Ray will share some of his award winning poems to emphasis ideas. The workshop breaks for lunch at 12 noon and reconvenes at 1:00 p.m. with a Songwriting Session led by Bob Campbell. Bob’s two hour session includes writing effective song lyrics and enhancing them from the conception of the idea to a studio recording. A focus will be on the selection of suitable melodies and harmony accompaniment. For examples, recording artist Bob Campbell will perform some of his original songs.

Following these session, the poets and songwriters’ Open Mic is held between 3:15 and 4:00 p.m. Apple Day Writers’ Workshop is presented by AAA as part of Douthat State Park's Apple Day and sponsored by The Buckhorne country Store & Campground, Hershey’s Ice Cream, Hunt Brothers Pizza, and George E. Jones & Sons, Inc. - General Contractors. Workshop fee is $50.00 for both sessions, or $30.00 for one session. Scholarships are available for high school and college students. To register, make check payable to Appalfolks of America Association, and mail to: Appalfolks of America Association, 510 Main Street, P.O. Box 613, Clifton Forge, Virginia 24422. For more information, contact workshop director M. Ray Allen at The Buckhorne Country Store & Campground 1-877-301-3817 or (540) 862-4502, or by email at mrayallen@yahoo.com Douthat State Park is located on Rt. 629, just off I-64 at exit 27.

October -No vember 2008 October-No -Nov

9

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Great Music coming up at the PPocahont ocahont as County Oper ocahontas Operaa House

The Pochontas County Opera House in Marlinton, WV, continues to have a lineup of performances in store through November. Spencer Bohren, Blues/folk guitarist singer and songwriter, performs during the annual Harvest Festival 26 Brought up in a weekend on Friday, September 26. strict Baptist family, Bohren sang harmonies in church. His passion for gospel music led him to become an equally diligent student of blues and a master of the lapsteel guitar. The Autumn Harvest Festival concludes with a performance on Saturday, September 27 with Gandydancer Gandydancer, West Virginia’s premiere mountain string band. Five musicians from various West Virginia counties play driving fiddle tunes, banjo pieces and sing ballads, folksongs and old-time spirituals in four-part harmony. Speaking of strings, from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. on September 27, 27 the Opera House hosts the first ever Pocahontas County Youth Fiddle Contest Contest, the 4th fiddle contest in the nation exclusively open to young people. For details, visit www.pocahontasoperahouse.org or e-mail publicity@pocahontasoperahouse.org. Patrick O'Flaherty, Saturday, October 18, 7:30 p.m. Patrick, a talented multi-instrumentalist, began playing the harmonica as a young boy in Connemara. Raised in Galway's Gaeltacht on the Rugged West Coast of Ireland, he is part of a select group of people whose native language is Gaelic. Today he is acknowledged as one of the truly fine practitioners of Irish mandolin and harmonica, and is a highly respected player of the button accordion and banjo. Patrick is one of the few composers who writes original songs in Gaelic. His professional music career spans nearly three decades during which he has performed with The Celtic Folk and The Poor Clares, whose second album, Change of Habit, reached the national charts. Patrick and his wife Andrea are the proprietors of the popular Irish Pub on Washington Street in Lewisburg, WV. The Ahs, Friday, October 24, 7:30 p.m. The Ahs (rhymes with saws) formed in rural New Hampshire during the spring of 2005. The duo moved to

Portland, Oregon in December 2005. The duet consists of Tony Rogers, a classically trained cellist, and Amy McIntire a life-long singer/songwriter. Their unique sound combines the rich, open lows of the cello with the bright baby * kids * gifts precision of the banjo. Two voices: one male and one female, sing intricate harmonies against the instrumental lines. Their songs which gravitate towards the dark, mournful side of human life address love, fear, and uncertainty. Opry Night at the Opera House, Saturday, November 15, 7:30 p.m. The Opera House is transformed into the Opry Located in Beautiful House for a night of great Historic Lewisburg, WV home-style music and 112 W. Washington St. dancing. Featured perMon-Th 9.30-5.30 formers are Mud Hole, The Classic Country Ramblers and Fri + Sat 9.30-6 The Appalachian Country Cloggers. Sun 12-5 John Lilly and Rob 304.645.5270 McNurlin— A Tribute to Hank Williams Eclectic Clothing and Accessories STYLE Saturday, November Beautiful Jewelry 22, 7:30 p.m. INSPIRATION Bath & Beauty Products Wonderful This special tribute to COMFORT the legendary Hank Handbags Wallets Footwear Williams is performed by award-winning acoustic musician John Lilly and everyone's favorite cowboy, Rob McNurlin. John Lilly is a multi-talented acoustic music performer from Charleston, WV, specializing in Americana, roots country and traditional folk music. According to one reviewer, "If Hank Williams had a sunny disposition, he'd be John Lilly." Rob McNurlin was raised in Eastern Kentucky. The hymns in church, the Johnny Cash Show on TV, a harmonica from his grandmother, his parents' records and a guitar on his ninth Christmas set him on a musical path. He later began studying traditional music, learning hundreds of folk, hillbilly-blues and Gospel tunes. The will pay tribute to the great counProfessional Hair, Nails & Body Salon try music icon who in his short lifetime pioneered the honky tonk style and became one of the most influential musi304-536-5113 cians and songwriters of the 20th century. 108 West Main St., White Sulphur Springs, WV 24986 All Opera House tickets for adults are $7, children 12 and under are admitted free. The entrance Monday-Friday 9am-5:30pm • Saturday 8:30am-1pm and main seating area are handicapped accessible. Melanie Evans Cox, Owner Persons with disabilities are encouraged to attend; special accommodations can be arranged upon reCourtney Bennett, Stylist quest by calling 304.799-6645.

Be ready for Fall with ...

Barbering by Kenny Evans on Thursday & Friday Soleil Tanning Monday - Saturday Visit us at historic Cabell House

melanie’s Styles & Profiles


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VALLEY GUIDE

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October -No vember 2008 October-No -Nov

T heater &Music

Alleghany Highlands Center for the Performing Arts: The Masonic Theatre 877.301.3817 • 510 Main St • Clifton Forge VA

“STARS”: A Variety Show for Fall Saturday, October 11 at 7 pm

Barter Theatre

276.628-3991 • 133 W. Main St • Abingdon VA 10:30am, 2pm, 3pm, 7pm, 7:45pm, 8:15pm shows Comin’ Up a Storm through November 8, Bat Boy: The Tabloid Musical through November 9, The Desperate Hours October 3- November 14, Tuck Everlasting through November 15, Disney’s Beauty and the Beast through November 15, Miracle on 34th Street November 21-December 28, Another Night Before Christmas... November 26-December 28

Carnegie Hall

304.645-7917 • Church Street • Lewisburg WV Tuesdays with Fran Belin bring your lunch & enjoy the 12 noon free concert Tuesday, October 7 & November 4 Tristan Prettyman, singer/songwriter Saturday, October 11 at 7:30 pm Dinner & Show with George Winston, special membership performance, Wednesday, Nov 5 at 7:30 pm Ruthie Foster, blues, gospel, country, folk Wednesday, November 22 at 7:30 pm

The Charleston Ballet

304.342.6541 • Civic Center Theatre, Charleston, WV Ballroom, Barres & Ballet Blues Friday & Saturday, October 24 & 25 at 8 pm

Charleston Stage Company

concert followed by dinner, Saturday, October 11 Bach, Brahms & Faure, 3 pm Concert, Sun, Oct 12 Celebrate Schumann: All Schumann Program Three Romances for Viola & Piano, Op. 94, Six Studies in Canonic Form, Op. 56, Adagio and Allegro for Cello & Piano, Op. 70, 6 pm cocktails, 7 pm concert followed by dinner, Friday, October 17 Fünf Stücke im Volkston, Op. 102 & Piano Quartet in E Flat Major, Op. 47, 6 pm cocktails, 7 pm concert followed by dinner, Saturday, October 18 Andrés Díaz with the Garth Newel Chamber Players: Popper, Barrier, Shostakovich, 6 pm cocktails, 7 pm concert followed by dinner, Friday, October 24 Andrés Díaz with Garth Newel Chamber Players Schubert: Cello Quintet in C Major, 6 pm cocktails, 7 pm concert followed by dinner, Saturday, October 25 Andrés Díaz with Garth Newel Chamber Players: Schubert, Popper, Shostakovich 3 pm Concert, Sunday, October 26 Czech, Please! Martinu: Madrigals for Violin & Viola; Suk: Piano Quartet in A minor, 3 pm cocktails, 4 pm concert followed by Thanksgiving Dinner, Thursday, November 27 Janacek: Fairy Tale for Cello & Piano; Dvorak: Piano Trio in E minor Dumky, 6 pm concert followed by dinner, Friday, November 28 Table for Two! Dvorak: Romance in F minor for Violin & Piano; Dvorak: Rondo in G minor for Cello & Piano; Schulhoff: Duo for Violin & Cello, 11 am concert followed by lunch, Saturday, November 29 Greenbrier Valley Theatre 304.645-3838•113 E. Washington St•Lewisburg WV Weds & Thurs 7:30pm; Fri & Sat 8pm; Matinees 3pm Souvenir: A Fantasia on the Life of Florence Foster Jenkins a comedy by Stephen Temperly September 26, 27, October 2. 3. 4. 9, 10, 16 Manhattan Jazz Quartet, Sunday, Oct 19 at 7:30 pm To Kill a Mockingbird, a Christopher Sergel adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Harper Lee October 24, 25, 31, November 1, 7, 8, 14, 15 Manhattan Jazz Quartet, Sunday, Nov 16 at 7:30 pm

The Historic Fayette Theatre

304.574.4655 • 115 S. Court Street • Fayetteville WV 304.343.5272 • WV Capitol Theatre • Charleston, WV Measure for Measure by William Shakespeare, showtime: 8 pm • *matinee: 2 pm Thursday-Saturday, October 16-18, 23-25 at 8 PM Kitchen Witches insults are flung harder than food and rating smash tops both Martha Stewart and Jerry Springer when The Clay Center circumstances put “mature” cable-access cooking show 304.561-3596•One Clay Square•Charleston WV hostesses together, Oct 3, 4, 10, 11, 17, 18, 19* Chicago, Wednesday, September 24 at 7:30 pm Naturally Seven, Thursday, September 25 at 7:30 pm Readers Theatre: Dracula, a Readers Theatre adaptation of Bram Stoker’s novel, October 24, 25 LeAnn Rimes, youngest person to ever win a Grammy Yes, Virginia, There is a Santa Claus, the true story Saturday, October 11 at 8:00 pm of eight-year-old Virginia O’Hanlon, who wrote a letter Douglas Returns!, WV Symphony Orchestra to the editor of the New York Sun in 1897 asking if Santa Fri, Oct 17 at 8:00 pm & Sat, Oct 18 at 8:00 pm Claus exists, November 28, 29, 30*, Dec. 4, 5, 6, 7* Omar Sosa Afreecanos Quartet, wide range of world music and electronic elements with his native Cuban New River Youth Symphony & Chorus, Dec 11 roots, Thursday, October 23 at 7:30 pm The Jefferson Center Chelsea Handler, hilarious comedy, Sat, Nov 1 at 8 pm 540.345.2550 • Shaftman Hall • Roanoke VA Don McLean, classic songs & deeply personal lyrics Falstaff presented by Opera Roanoke Sunday, November 9 at 8:00 pm Friday, October 3 & Sunday, October 5 Mahler\’s Third with WV Symphony Orchestra Wynton Marsalis & The Jazz at Lincoln Center Friday, Nov 14 at 8 pm & Saturday, Nov 15 at 8:00 pm Orchestra, Tuesday, October 7 Michael Cooper’s Masked Marvels and Wondertales, Charleston Cultural Center 304.388-4250 • WV Capitol Complex • Charleston, WV Sunday, October 12 Kathy Mattea - Moving Mountains, Thurs, Oct 16 Gandydancer, Saturday, October 18 at 8:00 pm The Derek Trucks Band, Friday, October 24 Rosie Ledet and the Zydeco Playboys Sierra Hull and Highway III, Sunday, October 26 Saturday, November 15 at 8:00 pm Song of the Earth presented by Opera Roanoke Sunday, November 2 Garth Newel Music Center Lotus with special guest SeepeopleS, Monday, Nov 3 540.839-5018 • Route 220 • Warm Springs VA Spirit Over Oppression presented by Roanoke Symphony Garth Newel Jazz Club with saxophonist Justin Flynn Orchestra, Sunday& Monday, November 9 & 10 and his Quintet of cool New York sounds - concert

only, or enjoy dinner with an after-hours set of music, 6 pm cocktails, 7 pm concert, Saturday, October 4 Garth Newel Piano Quartet performs J. S. Bach & Faure, 6 pm cocktails, 7 pm concert followed by dinner, Friday, October 10 Brahms & Schnittke: String Trio, 6 pm cocktails, 7 pm

Faculty Recital: Catharine Gaylard, Timothy Gaylard, Lisa Zweben - eclectic evening of piano, violin, viola & voice of works by Handel, Mozart & Brahms, tickets free, but required. Tuesday, Sept 23 at 8 pm Chanticleer, one of world’s leading male choruses with repertoire from Renaissance to jazz, gospel to new music, tickets are required. Weds, October 8 at 8 pm Student Showcase 2008 presented by W&L Theater & Mindbending with scenes/ monologues from plays, arias/songs from operas/ musicals, & in choreographed dance pieces tickets required. Friday, October 17 at 7:30 pm St. Lawrence String Quartet program include works by Beethoven and Dvorák tickets required. Tuesday, October 21 at 8:00 pm Fall Choral Concert conducted by Dr. Jerry Myers, Augenmusik: Visualizing the Renaissance: University Chamber Singers perform music of Monteverdi, Gesulado & Morten Lauridsen’s Six ‘Fire Songs on Italian Renaissance Poems, & University Chorus preview their American & South African tour repertoire to prepare for April 2009 South African Choral Festival, guests include a cappella ensembles: Southern Comfort, JubiLee and General Admission, tickets are free, but required, Tuesday, October 14 at 8:00 pm Parents and Family Weekend Choral Concert includes Chamber Singers, University Chorus & Joyful Noise Gospel Choir, tickets are free, but required, Friday, October 24 at 8:00 pm University Jazz Ensemble Concert, contemporary big-band jazz in a variety of styles, tickets are not required, Friday, October 24 at 7:00 pm Applied Student Recital Tickets are not required. Sat, October 25 at 10 am University Wind Ensemble Concert, a family tribute program of familiar and unfamiliar, tickets are free, but required, Saturday, October 25 at 8:00 pm A Cappella Concert featuring Southern Comfort, JubiLee and General Admission, tickets are free, but required, Saturday, October 25 at 6:00 pm SonoKlect: The Columbia Trio 20th-century piano trios with works by Dimitri Shostakovich, Astor Piazolla, 2 trios by W&L’s Terry Vosbein. Violinist Fritz Gearhart & cellist Andrew Kolb join SonoKlect mainstay David Riley on piano tickets are free, but required. Sat, Nov 1 at 8 pm Four by Four: University-Shenandoah Symphony Orchestra perform Beethoven’s 4th Piano Concerto & Tchaikovsky’s 4th Symphony with guest piano soloist Thomas Pandolfi, tickets required, Saturday, November 8 at 8:00 pm Play it Again, Sam by Woody Allen, who embraces awkward moments when his wife leaves him & Dick and Linda try to help him find another woman. tickets required. November 13, 14, 15, 16 at 7:30 pm Applied Student Recital tickets are not required, Tuesday, Nov 18 at 8:00 pm

Mill Mountain Theatre

540.342-5740 • 800.317-6455 • Roanoke VA Tue-Thurs,Sun7:30pm;Fri-Sat8pm;MatineesSat-Sun2pm Cyrano, a retelling of a story with a way with words, a loving heart & a nose that asks what makes a man — is it his face or what lies within his heart, imaginative, fast-paced 1-act play with three actors Waldron Stage October 1 - 5, 2008 SPITFIRE GRILL fa heartfelt musical of warmth, spirit and goodwill, Trinkle Main Stage, October 15-November 2

Pocahontas County Opera House

Third Avenue • Marlinton WV 304.799.6645 • 800.336.7009 - see story page 11 Spencer Bohren, Friday, September 26 at 7:30 pm Pocahontas County Youth Fiddle Contest Saturday, September 27 at 10 am-4 pm Allen Toussaint, Friday, November 14 Gandydancer, Saturday, September 27 at 7:30 pm Robert Jospe & Inner Rhythm w/ Royce Campbell, Patrick O’Flaherty, Saturday, October 18 at 7:30 pm Sunday, November 16 The Ahs, Friday, October 24 at 7:30 pm Night at the Opera House, Sat, Nov 15 at 7:30 pm Lenfest Center for the Performing Arts Opry John Lilly and Rob McNurlin: A Tribute to 540.458-8000 • Lexington VA Hank Williams, Saturday, November 22 at 7:30 pm

Roanoke Civic Center

540.853.5483•Williamson Rd & Orange Ave•Roanoke VA Chicago, Wednesday-Friday, September 24, 25, 26 at 7:30 pm with Broadway Buffet nightly Ron White, comedian Saturday, October 4 Michael W. Smith & Steven Curtis Chapman Saturday, October 11 Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, Tuesday, November 25 at 7:30 pm with Broadway Buffet on Wednesday

Salem Civic Center

540.375-3004 • 1001 Boulevard, Salem VA The Halloween Blast featuring Burning Bridges Saturday, October 25 Jason Aldean with special guest Lady Antebellum Friday, November 14 at 8:00 pm Roanoke Symphony Pops concert with Vince Gill Friday, November 21

Shenandoah Shakespeare BLACKFRIARS Playhouse

540.851-1733 • shenandoahshakespeare.com 10 S. Market St • Staunton, VA 24401 King Lear & Measure for Measure through December 6; Twelfth Night & Richard II through December 7 Play Reading: Cardenio, Sunday, October 5 at 7:30 pm

Showtimers Community Theatre

540.774.2660 • Roanoke VA • performances Wednesday-Saturday at 8:00 pm; Sunday at 2:00 pm Biloxi Blues, a comedy, through September 28 Come Back Little Sheba, a drama, November 12-23

Summit Theater

304.325.8000 • 500 Bland S • Bluefield WV Animal Farm, adapted by Ed Trotta make dinner theatre reservations Fri & Sat, October 3, 4, 10, 11; no reservations needed for Sun, Oct 5 matinee

Tamarack Sunday’s @ 2 & More

304.256-6843 • 1-88-TAMRACK • Beckley WV Live Performances Sundays @ 2 pm Sept 28, October 5, 12, 19, 26, November 2, 9, 16, 23, 30

Theatre at Lime Kiln

540-463-7088 • Lexington VA The Millers — Clayton on guitar & vocals, age 25; Cole on drums & vocals, age 21, and L.D. age 14, on harmonica & vocals, & their dad Larry on bass, Sun, Sept 28 Folktales by Firelight in The Enchanted Kiln: Lost in the Woods features Hansel & Gretel and Little Red Riding Hood performed by Golden Duck Productions, October 16-18, 23-25

Unkl Ray’s where music makes the difference 304.466-3550 • on the river • Hinton WV call for Oct-Nov live entertainment schedule

The Wild Bean

304.645-3738 • 1-81/I-77 Exit 73 119 E. Washington St • Lewisburg WV 24901 Barrel House Mamas, Friday, Sept 26 at 8 pm Spring Creek, Friday, October 10 at 8 pm

Wohlfahrt Haus Dinner Theatre

888.950.3382 • 1-81/I-77 Exit 73 170 Malin Dr • Wytheville VA 24382 Gospel Side of Elvis staring Stephen Freeman matinee lunch 12 noon show at 2pm, dinner 6pm show at 8pm, September 23, 24 & 30 Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, to ensure her marriage success, Millie, a young bride of the 1850's Oregon wilderness, plans to civilize & marry off her 6 rowdy brothers-in-law; songs include Bless Your Beautiful Hide Sobbin' Women, Wonderful Day, & more! through November 2 A Wohlfhart Haus Christmas, unforgettable, original revue conceived by our Artistic Director, Michael Stanek features traditional to contemporary holiday favorites from around the world. November 6 - December 31


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VALLEY GUIDE

Virginia Junior Opry Star’s: Corbin Hayslett

October -No vember 2008 October-No -Nov

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Something Sweet, Something Special Clifton Forge, Virginia — Corbin Hayslette, age 14 and winner of the

2008 Appalachian String Band Music Festival’s Junior Banjo Contest, performed once again with the Virginia Junior Opry on stage at the historic Masonic Theatre on Saturday, September 20. As he says, “Performing with the Virginia Junior Opry is a lot of fun, and it is a great community outreach. A lot of my relatives live in Clifton Forge, and I enjoy playing on stage at the historic theatre where the freight Hoppers and Mike Seeger have played.” M. Ray Allen, president and founder of Appalfolks of America Association (AAA), said, “Corbin has been performing with the Virginia Junior Opry for three years. To see him achieve success as a musician is most gratifying.” Corbin Hayslett is a native of Lynchburg, Virginia, and resides with his mother Nicole Stevens in Brookneal. He is a freshman at William Campbell High School where he is also a member of the golf team. Cory Hayslett of Clifton Forge is Corbin’s great uncle and a guitarist with The Expressions. Both Cory and Corbin performed at Douthat State Park’s Amphitheater on the evening of August 16. Corbin’s father, Michael Hayslett, is an employee of Sweetbriar College in Amherst. Corbin received $100 and a first place ribbon for his performance of “Redwing” at the Appalachian String Band Music Festival at Clifftop, Corbin Hayslett in his vintage Stetson hat, a West Virginia — a competition that permitted Dr. Woody McKenzie gift from friend Jim Costa of West Virginia. of Lynchburg College to accompany him on guitar. Having won $50 for a second place finish at the 2007 festival, Corbin is pleased at the progress he is making on the banjo. His great grandmother, Mrs. Laura E. Hayslett of Clifton Forge, noted that Corbin considers Clifton Forge his home away from home. She also said that in addition to his love of music and playing golf, he likes to hunt and fish. He spent his summer of 2008 hiking and playing his banjo along 500 plus miles of Virginia’s sections of the Appalachian Trail. AAA’s Virginia Junior Opry has performed at the Rockingham County Fair, Turner Ashby High School, and in Buena Vista and Danville. Bob Campbell, director of the Virginia Junior Opry, and M. Ray Allen organized a benefit at Robert E. Lee High School, and more than $1,200 was raised and donated to the 9/11 Fund.

GVT Presents Comedy Souvenir: A Fantasia on the Life of Florence Foster Jenkins

American Idol” was not the first venue to create a cult figure out of someone singing badly. In the 1930’s a wealthy New York socialite, Florence Foster Jenkins, became famous for her off-key singing by financing her own private opera concerts in New York, Boston and Washington. Greenbrier Valley Theatre presents this true story with its production of Souvenir: A Fantasia on the Life of Florence Foster Jenkins by Stephen Temperley. Shows begin with GVT’s “Pay What You Can” Performance on Thursday, September 25th at 7:30pm 7:30pm. Opening Night with post-show reception is Friday, September 26th at 8pm 8pm. This is also Director’s Night. Come one-hour prior to the show to learn about the play with in-depth analysis and “behind the scenes” perspectives by the director. Remaining performance dates include September 27, October 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, & 16 16. According to the New York Daily News, Souvenir: A Fantasia on the Life of Florence Foster Jenkins traces the relationship between Jenkins, played by Beth McVey, and her accompanist, the composer and pianist Cosme McMoon, played by Jeremy Fenn-Smith. McMoon begins as Jenkins’ embarrassed accompanist, but he grows into a reluctant admirer and eventually a friend. Directed by Cathey Sawyer, this hilarious and poignant story of a true musical novelty “makes hilarious and deeply touching theater out of something inherently ridiculous. A loony triumph.” Opening at the end of October is Harper Jeremy Fenn-Smith and Beth McVey rehearsing for Souvenir Lee’s Pulitzer Prize winning masterpiece To Kill a Mockingbird with performances October 24, 25, 31, November 1, 7, 8, 14 and 15. 15 Skillfully adapted to the stage by Christopher Sergel, this is a timely classic about bigotry, injustice and standing up for what’s right. Set in Alabama during the Great Depression, Scout is about to experience dramatic events that will alter the rest of her life. She and her brother, Jem, are raised by their father, Atticus Finch — a lawyer defending a black man wrongfully accused of a grave crime. Atticus boldly states to his children, “I want you to see what real courage is ... It’s when you know you’re licked before you begin, but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what.” Call GVT Box Office for reservations and for more info at (304) 645-3838 or toll free (866) 888-1411. GVT is located at 113 E. Washington St., Lewisburg, WV, or on line at www.gvtheatre.org. GVT is handicap accessible and smoke free. Box Office hours are Mon - Fri, 1 – 6pm. GVT is West Virginia’s Official Year-Round Professional Theatre.

 PAULETTE’S PASTRIES LLC

216 W. Edgar Avenue

 Ronceverte, WV 24970

304.645-CHOC(2462)

Boxed Lunches  Custom Cakes

Sat 8-4pm

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Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri 7:30am-5pm

Alleghany Highlands Arts & Crafts Center 2008 Fall Classes & Workshops Mak ear a Witc Makee a Witc Witchh — W Wear Witchh with Karen Shapcott meets Saturday, September 27 from 10am-1pm for ages 16+ to learn basic needle felting techniques to make a witch pin at workshop on dry felting which compresses wool fibers together by use of barbed wire, $35 includes all materials — Needlef elting Snow PPeople eople meets Saturday, November 15 from 10ameedlefelting 1pm for ages 16+, $35 includes all materials Mail Bask Baskeet with Karen Brown meets Saturday, October 25 from 10am3pm, to make a useful rectangular bottom basket 7.5”x4”x10” with handle, $40 includes all materials Great Gour ds with Sharon Ginsburg meets Saturday, October 25 from Gourds 12:30am-4:30pm, for ages 12 + to make a wearable Halloween mask, gourd basket, dipper, bowl, bird house, or unique animal, $35 includes all materials, do bring anything personal you might want to use Call ffor or inf ormation on future w er color awing and oil painting information wat ater ercolor color,, dr drawing at sessions, a Satur da ving session with J. Gail Geer Saturda dayy 1-da 1-dayy car carving Geer,, and some Wint er Holida oject W or kshops & Classes Winter Holidayy Pr Project Wor orkshops To register contact: Alleghany Highlands Arts & Crafts Center, P.O. Box 274, 439 E. Ridgeway St, Clifton Forge VA 2422, 540-862-4447


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VALLEY GUIDE

October -No vember 2008 October-No -Nov

Be Grat eful Grateful to those who remind us tto o Be Grat eful!. Grateful!.

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Garden Talk: Plant Dreams — Anagrams & Skyscrapers by Barry Glick

A plant anagram anagram: Seems like the taxonomists that were as- NO insect, pest or disease problems and is 100% deerproof! Come for a visit to my gardens and you can see how it grows. signed to name a rare plant discovery from China were either bored, suffered a lack of imagination, were just plain lazy or had a brilliant You may even want to take some home. Skyscraping Daylily: Imagine a daylily 84” tall. sense of humor. Whatever the That’s 7 feet! And imagine one that has sturdy case may be and “A rose by - in appreciation and for thanks flower stems with brilliant yellow flowers and an any other ... yada yada yada”. intense sweet fragrance. Well, imagine no more, Actually, what we have here is because it really does exist. I’m describing a superb garden plant. In fact, Hemerocallis thunbergii, a native of Japan, and I’ve enjoyed Saruma henryi in my garden for about 12 years an essential, worthwhile addition to any perennow and, season after season, nial garden. As with most Hemerocallis, this is it never fails to impress all who quite the easy plant to grow. I grow it in full behold this beauty. sun and it makes a 24” to 36” wide clump in I first saw Saruma henryi just a couple of years. Blooming over a long period of time, from growing in Cole Burrell’s ice June through August, the flowers open around cold Minnesota zone 4 garden mid-afternoon and stay open through the folin 1995. I knew if a plant could Saruma henryi A 32-page per issue tabloid format lowing morning. In their native habitat, they are most likely pollisurvive up there, it could survive just about anywhere. Cole, genpersonal guide to entertainment, nated by night flying moths. Since I have no Japanese night flying erous chap that he is, was kind enough to send me some seeds and shopping, recreation and more, moths here at Sunshine Farm in West Virignia, I hand pollinate the I’ve been growing the plant ever since — sharing it with many friends with calendars of events and feature stories flowers to insure a good seed set by taking the and customers. serving southern West Virginia and Saruma henryi was diswestern Virginia since 1991. pollen rich anthers of one flower and delicately dab them onto the stigma of another. I try to covered on a Chinese plant Published bi-monthly year round by cross pollinate one plant with another to assure collection expedition in the Creations of Sorts genetic diversity. early part of the 1900’s by P.O. Box 94 The seeds are sown outside so as to let plant explorer Augustine White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia Mother Nature do her thing. They’ll germinate Henry and named in his 24986 the following Spring and we even get a flower or honor— Who knows why it Phone/Fax: 304-536-2500 two that first year. They’ll all flower the followtook so long to really get this valleyguide@gmail.com ing year. Clumps can be divided very easily in the plant into cultivation? early Spring before growth commences. Now ... back to the taxPrint dates for 2008-2009 Hemerocallis thunbergii has graced my gardens onomists. ‘Saruma’ is an anaMonday, November 17, 2008 gram of the word ‘Asarum’ reliably since 1993 when my friend Nagao for December 2008- January 2009 issue Saruma henryi’s large, velvety, cordate foliage and is a monotypic genus in Matsubayashi sent me seeds that he collected on Monday, January 19, 2009 Aristolochiaceae the Mt Ryoko in Japan. family. The Aristolochiaceae family is home for February - March 2009 issue I asked my to the genus Asarum, the deciduous “Wild Gingers” and Hexastylis, Monday, March 23, 2009 Aristolochia daughter, Abbey the evergreen “Wild Gingers”. Also, the genus , betfor April-May 2009 issue Jo, who is just shy ter known as the vine “Dutchman’s Pipe”. Our East Coast native, Monday, May 18, 2009 Aristolochia durior of 5 1/2 feet tall, , can climb a hundred feet into the top of a tree for June-July 2009 issue and makes a really neat spiral around the branches. The flowers to stand next to a Monday, July 20, 2009 resemble little pipes. Check out a picture at — http:// plant of Hemerofor August-September 2009 issue farm1.static.flickr.com/193/502038078_48d4084174.jpg?v=0 callis thunbergii Submissions and ad copy should be If you’d like to know more about the fascinating Aristolochiaceae that was planted received a week prior to each print date. family, go to the following link — http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/ from a 2” pot a year ago. This 2008-2009 Basic Rates per Issue anthophyta/paleoherbs/aristolochiales.html Hemerocallis Now that you Actual price per column inch (CI) thunbergii plant is know got its display ad is $5.50 per column inch. name, the best already over 6’ tall Business Card 2CI(3.5”) x 2” = $22 way that I can and will reach its 1/8 page, 3CI x 3.3” = $55.00 think to describe full height potenSaruma henryi tial next year. is 1/4 page, 3CI x 6.5” = $105.00 As you most as a “Wild Ginger 1/3 page, 2CI x 12.5” = $135.00 likely already on steroids”. 1/2 page, 6CI x 6.5” = $ 200.00 know, HemerocalThe large, velFull page 6CI x 13” = $400.00 lis — Daylilies, vety, cordate foSpecial custom size ads are available. liage holds up appreciate full sun Examples of pricing for custom ads are: well all the growand are hardy viring season long. tually everywhere. 3CIx3”=$50; 3CIx4”=$66; For several weeks This species is no 3CI x5”=$82.50 in mid-Summer, exception. Valley Guide can be found in over 500 it is topped with Now is a good locations in Fayette, Greenbrier, Mercer, one inch brilliant time to plant any Monroe, Pocahontas and Summers Counties in primrose yellow variety of HemeroWest Virginia and Alleghany, Bath, Giles, callis flowers. I grow it — Daylilies, Highland, Rockbridge, Tazewell Counties in in partial shade as this season now Virginia; plus subscriptions mailed first class to and find it attains gives them plenty Abby Jo with Hemerocallis thunbergii readers in Alabama, Arizona, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, a height of about of time to establish Maryland, Nevada, New York, North Carolina, 12’ to 20’. It themselves before Winter. Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, seems to have Hemerocallis thunbergii Happy Gardening, Barry Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia. Total issues printed: 15,000; Industry Standard Estimated Readership Minimum: 45,000; VG Estimated Survey Readership: over 50,000

Barry Glick maintains a 60 acre Botanic Garden and Nursery at the headwaters of Spring Creek in Northern Greenbrier County. Barry Glick , Sunshine Farm & Gardens, HC 67 Box 539B, Renick, WV 24966 USA, 304-497-2208 FAX 304-497-2698 EMAIL barry@sunfarm.com Latitude 38.04N Longitude 80.26W USDA © 20 08 Bar eF ar m & Gar dens Zone 5 www.sunfarm.com 2008 Barrr y Gli Glicck and Sunshin Sunshine Far arm Gard


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Oct ober -No er tainment October ober-No -Novvember‘08 Ent Enter ertainment

although presumed correct at the time of publication, do call ahead to verify information as times and events may change Artists Studio Tours, view area artists’ works in progress, discuss techniques, watch demonstrations, purchase direct, 304.645.1000 Bath County Historical Society , Fri-Sat 10am-4pm, free admission, Courthouse Hill, Warm Springs, VA, 540.838.2543

Boxerwood Gardens Arboretum

7000 native & ornamental trees/shrubs, 6 distinct habitats in Shenandoah Valley, 1 mile from Lexington VA, 540.463.2697 Daily Movie Showings shows 10am-4:30pm Tamarack, Beckley WV, 1.888.262-7225, www.tamarackwv.com

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Lickety Splits Restaurant, Hwy 42 & Rt. 39, Millboro Springs VA, 540-997-0239; Edray Flea Market free setup, Edray Kwik Stop; ; Flea Market VFW Post 1033, Dolly Ann Drive, Covington VA, 540. 965-4841, 540.962-3137, 540.962-2371; Marlinton Farmer’s Market locally produced fruits, vegetables, flowers, nursery stock, honey, eggs, baked goods, First Ave next to Mini Park on banks of Greenbrier River, Marlinton WV, 304.799.6083 or 304.799.6416; Mercer County Farmers Tailgate Market at MCTEC; Tiptoe through the Tombstones, Warm Springs Cemetery, 11am, Bath County Historical Society, 540.839-2543

Thistle Cove Farm, Tazewell Co, VA, www.thistlecovefarm.com

Every Saturday through November Bartow Drive-In Flea Market Bartow WV, 304.456-4793; Bluefield Flea Mar ket, Bluefield, WV, 5am-3pm through Nov 24; Marlinton Market Farmer’s Market locally produced fruits, vegetables, flowers,

211 Ballengee, Hinton WV, 304.466-5811

Springs Golf Course, call Krysten Wall 304.772-4360

Farm Tours at Thistle Cove Farms

October -No vember 2008 October-No -Nov

Graham House Tours & Dinner Lowell WV, 304.466-3321 nursery stock, honey, eggs, baked goods, First Ave next to Mini Park Gr al Phot ogr aph Graay Owl Digit Digital Photogr ograph aphyy Seminar Seminarss and nature photo on banks of Greenbrier River, Marlinton WV, 304.799.6083 or workshops with Charles Garratt, PO Box 301, Warm Springs VA 304.799.6416; Pence Springs Flea Market, Pence Springs, 24484, 540.839-2016, charles@grayowl.com WV, 6 am; Renick Flea Market 12 noon-4 pm, inside old Greenbrier Bunker Tours - public tours ($30) at 9:30, 11:30, school, Renick WV, 304.497-2992; WV State Fairgrounds 1:30, 3:30 daily, meet at North Entrance of The Greenbrier, White Flea Market 8am-early afternoon, WV State Fairgrounds, Rt. Sulphur Springs, WV, 304.536-7810 219 S, Fairlea WV, 304.645-1090;Tazewell Farmer’s MarGVTs After School Drama Program for ages 5-17, GVT, ket , at Pisgah, 8am-noon, Tazewell VA, 540.988-9090 Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-3838 Every Saturday & Sunday Meditation for Everyone His 929 Ritz Theatre great films & shows year round, 2-3pm, Enhansse Spa and Fitness Center, Rt 219 near Fountain Histtoric 11929 Hull’s Drive-In Theat er Theater

Every Sunday through October Bartow Drive-In Flea two 1st-run movies every Fri, Sat & Sun April-Oct, Rt. 11 N from Market , Bartow, WV, 304/456-4793; Edray Flea Market I-64 exit 55, Lexington VA, 540.463-2621 Edray Kwik Stop; Flea Market VFW Post 1033, Dolly Ann Drive, Meadow Bridge Drive-In Theat er Theater Covington, VA, 540/ 965-4841, 540/ 962-3137; Renick Flea two 1st-run movies every Fri, Sat & Sun April-Oct, Market 12 noon-4 pm, at old school, Renick, WV, 304/ 497-2992 Rt. 11 N from I-64 exit 55, Lexington VA, 540.463-2621 Every First Monday April-December Mill Mountain Zoo Roanoke VA, 540.343-3241 Home School Days National D-Day Memorial dedicated to the memory of valor, special programs for homeschoolers in groups or family units,

fidelity and sacrifices of the Allied Armed Forces of Europe, June 6, 1944, Bedford VA, 1.800.351.D-Day Pearl S. Buck Birthplace Museum Mon-Sat 9am-5pm, Sun 1pm-5pm, Hillsboro WV, 304.653-4430 WV Centr al Railr oad ride Cheat Mt Salamander Railbus along Central Railroad Shavers Fork River Thurs-Mon, 1.800.MTN RAIL Every Monday The Story Wizards for ages 3-5, 10:30-11:30 am, Princeton Pub Lib, 205 Center St, 304.487-5045; Open Stage Night at RiffRaff Arts Collective, Mercer St, Princeton, show 7 pm, all ages welcome — poetry, dance, all genres of music encouraged, $3 donation for non-performers, $2 for performers to help defray costs, complimentary snacks served at this family event. Every Tuesday Ronceverte Farmer’s Market 10 am- 2 pm, Edgar Ave. next to the Post Office. All local farmers welcome. 304-647-3140: Story Hour for ages 3-5, 11- noon, White Sulphur Springs Public Library, 304.536.1171; The Story Wizards storytime for ages 3-5 from 1-2 pm, Princeton Public Library, 205 Center St, Princeton WV, 304.487-5045; American Heritage Music Hall, open jam sessions, 7-? pm, former Island Park Roller Rink, Ronceverte WV 304.645-2298 Every Tuesday through October Flea Market 8amearly afternoon, WV State Fairgrounds, Rt. 219 S, Fairlea WV, 304.645-1090; Greenbrier Valley Farmers Market State Fairgrounds of WV, Rt. 219 south, Fairlea WV, 304.645-1090

Frontier Culture Museum, Staunton VA, 540.332-7850

Wednesday, September 24-October 29 Music Appreciation Cour se: Course: From Medie omantic & Modern Medievval &Classical ttoo R Romantic

what is music & role music plays in society, learn to recognize different styles & time periods, 6-8:30 pm taught by Jamie Letourneau at Garth Newel Music Center 540.839-5018, Warm Springs VA, $150 advance registration required, 540-8632863 or email jclark@dslcc.edu, for non-credit course sponsored by Dabney S. Lancaster Community College

Thursday-Saturday, September 25-27 8th Annual N othin’ FFancy ancy Bluegr ass Fes tiv al Nothin’ Bluegrass Festiv tival

with Rhonda Vincent, The Bluegrass Bros., Michelle Nixon, Nothin’ Fancy & more, Glen Maury Park, Buena Vista VA, 540.464-2950

Frida ember 26, 227, 7, 28 ridayy-Sunda -Sundayy, Sept September Fortune / Williams Music Festival

Floral & Gifts for over 50 years “Flowers Make Scents”

Gift & Fruit Baskets • Singing Balloons • Leanin’ Tree Cards & Posters• Limited Selection of First Edition Books Live & Silk Arrangements for all Occasions WV Logo WINDCHIMES 303 Frankford Rd Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri 9:30-3:30 Ronceverte WV Weds & Sat 9:00-12noon

304.647-4300

Villas at the Meadows a restful retreat ... with you in mind

Frontier Culture Museum, Staunton, 540.332-7850

Mount ain Herit age Ar ts & Cr af ts Fes tiv al Mountain Heritage Arts Craf afts Festiv tival

quality crafts Fri&Sat 10am-6pm, Sun 10am-5pm, entertainment, free parking, Harpers Ferry WV, 1. 800.624.0577

Wildlif eek end Wildlifee W Week eekend

chainsaw demonstration of wildlife carvings, carved wooden birds, unique ornaments, beginning at 10am, Tamarack, Beckley WV, 1.800.tamarack

Satur da ember 227 7 Saturda dayy, Sept September Every Wednesday Mercer County Farmers Tailgate Prince Princetton AutumnFes AutumnFestt Market at MCTEC, Music in the Park 12 noon, Princeton WV, music, food, vendors, Mercer St, Princeton WV, 304.487-1502 Appalfolks Workshop for Vocalists Vocalists, FREE group voice les- Sundance SStudio tudio Clogging Compe tition Competition

sons for children in grades 1-college with Peggy Kimmel, 4-5 pm, Clifton Forge Library Conference Room, 535 Church St, Clifton Forge VA, 540.862-4502 Every Thursday Come Paint! with Greenbrier Artists: 9am3pm, Carnegie Hall Art Studio, Carnegie Hall, Lewisburg WV, 304.392-5525; International Buffet & Live Music Elk River Touring Center, Slatyfork WV, 6-9 pm, 304.572-3771 Every Thursday-Saturday - The Yard Sale 9am-5pm, Clifton Forge near Cliftondale Park, 540.968-2515; Pottery/Sculpture lessons, 4-6pm, get s’mART, Bluefield WV, 304.3-2112 Every Friday Monroe Farm Market seasonally fresh, local products: vegetables, fruits, berries, eggs, plants, jams, baked goods, meat to order, honey, flowers & more, 2-6 pm MayOctober, Pump St on Hwy 3, Union WV; Farmers’ Market 3:30-6pm, The Highland Center, Spruce St, Monterey VA, 540468-1922; Blue Ridge Backroads live at the Rex Historic Rex Theatre, Galax VA, 276-238-8130; Friday Night Jamborees, Floyd General Store, Floyd VA, 540-745-4563

American Clogging Hall of Fame sanctioned, 9 am, Highland High School Gym, Monterey VA, 540-468-3499

Har ves Harves vestt Da Dayy

games, live entertainment, apple butter making, crafts & wares, hand-powered rail car rides, bicycle & kennel service, special evening train to Whittaker Station with turkey dinner & all fixings on the train at 5 pm, also Whittaker trains at 9:30 am, noon & 2:30 pm, Bald Knob train at 11 am, Cass Scenic Railroad State Park, Cass WV, 1-800 CALL WVA, 304.456-4300

Autumn Har ves tiv al, WV R oad Kill Cook -Of Harves vestt Fes Festiv tival, Road Cook-Of -Offf Marlinton WV, , 1-800.336.7009

Frankford Autumn Festival

games, food fun for all, Frankford WV

Canaan Culinar sity errean Cuisine Culinaryy Univer University sity:: Medit Mediterrean

create Mediterrean specialities with Executive Chef Nemat Odeh, participants receive chef hat & apron, recipes & dine on their creation, $50 per person, Canaan Valley Resort, Davis WV 304.866-3858, 1.800.622-4121

American Herit age Music Hall Heritage

Every Saturday through October Bath County 4th Saturday music, dance, featured band 7-11 pm, welcome all Farmer’s Market awesome market sells baked goods, ages, family atmosphere, kids play area, donations appreciated,

eggs, cheese, produce, herbal body products, herbs, goat former Island Park Roller Rink, Ronceverte WV, 304.645-2298 soap, honey & more, 8 am-12 noon, under the porch at All Night Open Mic, rain or shine, gates open 5pm, music at

an exquisite selection of private villas for your personal vacation, corporate retreat or small group get-away comfortably appointed 1,2 & 3 bedroom suites nestled in the heart of the George Washington National Forest near the Jefferson Pools at Warm Springs, Virginia www.villameadowsva.com • 540-839-2124 • P.O. Box 153, Meadows Drive Warm Springs, Virginia 24484


14

VALLEY GUIDE

October -No vember 2008 October-No -Nov

ENTER TAINMENT & THE AR TS ENTERT ARTS

8pm, free admission, camping $5, The Appalachian South 10-5; Sat 10-1, 535 Church St, Clifton Forge VA, 540.826-2519 Southern WV It alian Fes tiv al Italian Festiv tival Folklife Center, Pipestem WV, www.allnightopenmic.com Naturally 7 creates a full band sound simply by using their Fri. dinner dance, entertainment, Italian grocery & crafts, Bluefield City Auditorium/Youth Center, Stadium Drive, voices, 8pm, The Chuck Mathena Center, Princeton WV Bluefield WV, 304.589-3069 Sunday, September 28 Friday-Sunday, October 3, 4, 5 Cr anberr Cranberr anberryy Shindig, Open House at Cranberry Mountain NaAr tis tr ations Artis tistt Demons Demonstr trations ture Center, Pocahontas Co. WV, 1-800.336.7009 beginning at 10am, Tamarack, Beckley WV, 1.800.tamarack Uncor Uncorkked & Unplugged da ober 4 Saturda dayy, Oct October sip wine, listen to music, 2-5 pm, Raphine VA, 1-888-511-WINE Satur

117 E. WASHINGTON ST., LEWISBURG, WV • 304-645-0000

KAREN LEE & MIKE MCCLUNG, OWNERS

Hope to see ya at Fall Festival October 4!

A Small Department Store

ALDERSON' S Art Re’Marques

Beautiful New Fall Clothes for Gals & Guys! A New Selection of Unigue WVU items Unusual Gifts WV Books Jewelry & Accessories Home Accents Collectibles & Art Handcrafted Peace Tie Dyes

203 S. Monroe St. Alderson, WV

Mon-Sat 9 - 5 (304) 445-2851 Personalized Service • Complimentary Gift Wrap

Monda ember 29 Mondayy, Sept September Alleghany Highlands Poetry Workshop

arts, crafts, historical displays, free entertainment, 9am-3pm, meets last Monday of every month, 6 pm, all welcome, public historic business district, Alderson WV, 304.445-7365 welcome free of charge, Clifton Forge Public Library, 535 Church Wide Yard Sale Church St, Clifton Forge VA, 540. 862-4502 beginning at 9am in the parking lot of Johnson Memorial United Methodist Church, Alderson WV, 304.445-7814

Oct ober 2008 October

28th Annual Countr af Countryy Cr Craf aftt Guild Show

Pipestem Resort State Park, Pipestem WV, 304.466.1800

Oct ober Sky Fes tiv al October Festiv tival

thr oughout Oct ober & N throughout October Noovember Ge ac Gettaw awaay PPac ackkages Weekends through November 1 Corn Maze & Pumpkin PPatc atc atchh

corn, hay & twilight mazes, hay rides, campfires, Fri 4-10pm, Sat 9am-10pm, Sun 1-10pm, Byrnside Branch Farm, 1mi down Willow Bend Rd on left, Union WV 304.772-3131, www.byrnsidebranchfarm.com

PubPub Quiz Every Tuesday at 8 Irish Session Every Sunday at 6 pm irishpub24901@gmail.com www.irishpubonwashingtonstreet.com good days to advance goals October 26-31 Stay clear & get grounded October 23 & 24 Kiss Days November 9-10; 15-17 confusion, instability November 1-3; calmer and more to the point by Tuesday November 4

Skywatch

Monthly Astrological Predictions for 2008 an astrological timing guide for all signs which brings a daily grind of astrological awareness every morning! Learn more ... send $1 and a long S.A.S.E. to Skywatch PO Box 61045, Corpus Christi, Texas 78466 or read the latest at

www.skywatchastrology.com

unique gifts, fall & holiday decorations, 9:00- 3:00 pm, Bluefield Area Arts Center, Bluefield, WV, 304.425-3521 Coalwood WV, 304.297-2202

Huntersville Traditions Day

wagon rides, horse plowin’, livin’ history, frontier cookin’, back porch pickin’, apple butter makin’, demonstrations of lost arts, see ad pg 32 & story pg 5, Huntersville WV, 304.799-4747, 800-336-7009

Ghos our Ghostt TTour ourss of Lewisbur Lewisburgg

4th Annual Freshwater Folk Festival

Dr awing fr om His Drawing from Histtor oryy Class

Annual Har ves tiv al Harves vestt Fes Festiv tival

7:30 & 9 pm, meet at General Lewis Inn, Lewisburg WV music by Everett Lilly & the Lilly Mountaineers with special guest Chance McCoy, The Rust Kings, & Alliens, presentations 304.256-8687 & exhibits by expert biologists & conservationists, hands-on Miller’s Mazing Corn Maze educational activities, arts & crafts, food vendors, 10-5pm, CreighBerHili Farm, Lewisburg WV 304.497-3184, ribbon cutting ceremony for Outdoor Classroom at 1pm, FREE www.creighberhilifarm.com admission, WSS Fish Hatchery, East Main Street, White Sulphur Wednesda ober 11,, 8, 115 5 ednesdayys, Oct October Springs WV, 304.536-1361 learn or re-learn basics of drawing in an historical setting with resident interpreter Christy Mackie, explore line, texture, composition, negative & positive space, shading, use of artifacts, architecture & Fall garden inspiration, $20/1 week, $30/2 weeks, $40/3 weeks, 2-4:30 pm, Historic Smithfield Plantation, 1000 Plantation Road, Blacksburg VA, 540-231-3947

Thursday, October 2 Ar Artt bbyy Night, downtown Galleries, Roanoke VA, 540.342-2028 Thursdays, October 2, 9, 16, 23 GVT Literary Tea Series, listen to great works of literature

M & Tu 3pm-1am F-S-Sun 1pm-1am closed Weds & Thurs

Alderson’s 3rd Fall Heritage Festival

relax to live music, sample winning Rockbridge wine, grape stomping, hay rides, food available, $5 includes tasting & souvenir glass, 11am-5pm, Raphine VA, 1-888-511-WINE Oktoberfest with special hymn singing between 2 and 4 pm, Frontier Culture Museum, Staunton, 540.332-7850

Helve tia’s Fir da Helvetia’s Firsst Satur Saturda dayy Square Dance

begins at 8 pm, adults $5, 12 & under $1, Community Hall, Helvetia WV, 304.924-6435

Tuesday, October 7 Blue Ridge Story Tellers while enjoying a cup of tea, 5:30pm, Greenbrier Valley The- Barnes & Noble, Roanoke VA, 540.776-2960 atre, 113 E. Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-3838 WSS Main Street Committee meets Reading Ar Artt Book Club The Lady and the Unicorn by Tracy Chevalier is story of Nicho- open to public, 6 pm, WSS City Hall, 304.536-4787 las des Innocents, commissioned to design a cycle of tapes- Wednesday, October 8 tries in 15th century France, the women he meets during cre- Homestead Postcard Club

ative process, especially Claude-his patron’s daughter, results Reynolds Homestead, 7pm, Critz, VA, 276.694-7181 in this famous work, 1:30-3 pm, The Clay Center, Charleston High Tech Wednesday, guided tours through normally off-limit spaces, 3:30pm reservations suggested, limited to 15, NRAO, WV, 304.561-3570 Green Bank WV, 304.456-2150 Thursdays, October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 Wake up and see stars, reservations suggested, 2pm, Old Time Music Jam Live from Work Horse Cafe FREE mountain music jam session, 6:00 pm, musicians welNRAO, Green Bank WV, 304-456-2150 come, audience encouraged to dance and sing, concessions Thur sda da ober 2-4 Thursda sdayy-Satur -Saturda dayy, Oct October available, Virginia Horse Center, Lexington VA, 540.464-2950 Fall Cooking Sc hool with Chef Randy School fine tune your cooking skills & enjoy some delicious meals, 2 Draconids Meteor Showers - 25 per hour for 2 days sda ober 9, 116, 6, 23, 30 Thursda sdayy, Oct October pm Thurs-Saturday Brunch, learn healthy alternatives from Thur just basic recipes, also fusion cuisine & become a localvore, After School Classes $250/pp, Garth Newel Music Center, Rt 220, Warm Springs Frontier Culture Museum, Staunton, 540.332-7850 VA, 540.839-5018 After School Classes Thur sda ober 2-5 Thursda sdayy-Sunda -Sundayy, Oct October Crab Orchard Museum, Rts. 19 & 460, Crab Orchard Road, Tazewell Fall Fling in Whit Whitee Sulphur Springs VA, 276.988-6755 Thurs at 5pm Wildflower & Wildlife Art Show with wine & Frida ober 110 0 ridayy, Oct October cheese reception at Old White Motors Showroom, Fri Arts & Little Switzerland Cloggers’ Crafts Show opens 12 noon-8pm at Emmanuel United Meth- Annual Dance & Family Fun odist Church, ham & bean dinner 4–7pm at WSS Civic Center food served from 5 pm, dance & family fun begins 6 pm, & Alumni Welcome Reception 7pm & featured artist Kim Ayers Monterey Firehouse, Monterey VA, 540.468-3499 at Kittens Korner, Sat. Freshwater Folk Festival 10am–6pm Frida da ober 110-1 0-1 1 ridayy-Satur -Saturda dayy, Oct October 0-11 at National Fish Hatchery, spaghetti dinner 4–7pm at Southernmost Maple Products Emmanuel United Methodist Church, Sunday, Mud Bog 12 noon–6pm on McCloud Road, 304.536-9206 or 304.536- maple pork BBQ, chicken dinners, bluegrass music, hay rides, maple donuts, beginning at 9 am, Monterey VA, 5060, or online at www.wssmainstreet.org, see story pg 5 540.468-2682 ridayy, Oct October Frida ober 3 Friday-Sunday, October 10-12: Fir rida Firsst FFrida ridayys Af Aftter 5, shops & galleries open til 9pm, Lewisburg BPW 28th Annual Arts & Crafts Fair refreshments, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-4333 prize/cash drawings, food, free admission & parking, Fri & Sat Artist Reception for Evan Boggess 9am-7pm, Sun 11am-5pm, West Virginia State Fair Event Cen5-8pm at Cooper Gallery, 122 E. Washington St, Lewisburg ter, Rt 219S of Lewisburg, Fairlea WV State Fair of WV fairWV, 304.645-6439 grounds, Fairlea WV, 304.645-1321 Film Fest Fridays, begins 6:30 pm, call ahead for movie Used Book Sale titles, NRAO, Green Bank WV, 304.456-2150 Highland County Public Library, Monterey Firehouse, Friday-Saturday, October 3-4 Monterey VA, 540.468-2550

Clif ge Public Libr ar Cliftton For Forge Librar aryy BookSale

hardbacks, paperbacks, CD’s, DVD’s, tapes & other items, Fri

SPCA Annual Sweater Sale

Highland County Craft Shop, Monterey Firehouse, Monterey


VALLEY GUIDE

ENTER TAINMENT & THE AR TS ENTERT ARTS VA, 540.468-2550

Craftsmen’s Fall Classic Arts & Crafts Festival Roanoke Civic Center, Roanoke VA, 540.853-5483

Farmers’ Market

15

baked goods, apple pies, 9am-4pm, Eden United Methodist Church, Bath County VA, 540.839-5409, 1.800.628-8092

15th Annual FFall all Show

jewelry, ceramics, baked goods, seasonal decorations, woodproduce, flowers, baked goods, crafts, 11-5 pm, The High- working items, crafts, AVON, Pampered Chef, 9-4 pm, Mounland Center, Spruce St, Monterey VA, 540.468-1923 tain View Elementary School Gym/Cafeteria & Clifton Middle Gold Wings Road Riders Association State Rally School Cafeteria, Low Moor VA, 540.962-0557 Salem Civic Center, Salem VA 540.375-3004 Pumpkin Promenade 26th Annual LLumberjac umberjac kin’ Bluegr assin’ Jamboree, free pumpkins & games for all children, 10am-1pm, Bath umberjackin’ Bluegrassin’ bluegrass music, food, arts & crafts, woodsman competition, County Parks & Recreation Shelter in Ashwood, Bath County Twin Falls State Park, Mullens WV 304.294-4000 VA, 540.839-5409, 1.800.628-8092 Ar tis tr ations Artis tistt Demons Demonstr trations New River Gor ge Bridge Da Gorge Dayy, only day pedestrians can beginning at 10am, Tamarack, Beckley WV, 1.800.tamarack walk across world’s 2nd longest single arch steel bridge, base Saturday, October 11: jumpers parachute off bridge, craft & food vendors, New River Apple Day Poetry & Songwriter’s Workshop Gorge, Fayetteville, WV, 1.800.CALL WVA, 800.927-0263 Douthat State Park, Clifton Forge VA, 540.862-8100 Helve tia Da Helvetia Dayy Apple Da Dayy dancing, historic walk, Helvetia WV, 304.924-6435 heritage arts, crafts, apple butter making, demonstrations, Barn Dance canoe tours, campfire cooking, music, great food, Douthat Frontier Culture Museum, Staunton, 540.332-7850 State Park, Clifton Forge VA, 540.862.8114 540.862-8100 Barn Dance to register as a demonstrator call Beth 540.862.8117 Crab Orchard Museum, Rts. 19 & 460, Crab Orchard Road, Tazewell Annual Mount ain Da ation & Duc Mountain Dayy Celebr Celebration Duckk Race VA, 276.988-6755 10 am-4 pm, Glen Maury Park, Buena Vista VA, 540.261-7321, Saturday-Sunday, October 18-19 800.555-8845 Har ves ield Harves vestt Fes Festt at Smithf Smithfield T.O.O.T T.O.O.T.., wide variety of foods & more, benefit Carnegie Hall, family activities, reenactments, crafts, Sat. 10-4 pm, Sun. 12 11am-3pm, on the streets of Lewisburg WV, 304.645-7197 noon-4 pm, Historic Smithfield Plantation, 1000 Plantation Br amwell Okt ober Bramwell Oktober oberffes estt Road, Blacksburg VA, 540-231-3947 live music, street performers, food vendors, artists, beer com- 20th Annual TTown own PPoint oint Vir ginia Wine Fes tiv al Virginia Festiv tival petition, fine brews, 2-8 pm, $12 adv, $15/gate, tickets at 800- town Point Park, downtown Norfolk VA, 757.441-2345, www.virginiawinefest.org 221-3206 or 304.248-87414, Bramwell WV

Satur da ober 111-1 1-1 2 Saturda dayy-Sunda -Sundayy, Oct October 1-12 Hands & Harvest Festival

October -No vember 2008 October-No -Nov

Thur sda da ober 119 9 Thursda sdayy-Satur -Saturda dayy, Oct October In Sweet Accord Shape

arts, crafts, bluegrass music, hay rides, seasonal foods, with hymn singing from 2-4, Frontier Culture Museum, Staunton, Little Switzerland Cloggers Sat. at 1 pm, pumpkin carving 540.332-7850 da ober 22-25 ednesdayy-Satur -Saturda dayy, Oct October contest with prizes 5 pm at Mill Alley Courtyard, Sundance Wednesda Fall Quilt er’s W or kshop, Canaan Valley Resort, Davis WV Express Sun. at 1:30 pm, Monterey VA, 540.468-2550 Quilter’s Wor orkshop 304.866-3858, 1.800.622-4121 Shawnee TTrrail sda da ober 23, 224, 4, 25 Sat. 10-4pm, Sun. 12 noon-4 pm, $2/pp, Chief Logan State Thur Thursda sdayy-Satur -Saturda dayy, Oct October Park, Logan WV, 304.752.7044 Creepy Tales Sunda ober 112 2 Sundayy, Oct October Frontier Culture Museum, Staunton, 540.332-7850

Antiques Appr aisal FFair air Appraisal

Friday-Saturday , October 24-25

Carnegie Hall Film Series

Friday-Sunday, October 24-26 Roanok alley Gun Show oanokee VValley

Furniture • Accessories • Interior Design

Lesia Campbell Interiors

104 West Main Street, White Sulphur Springs, WV 24986 • 304-536-5101

appraisal of items brought in by the public, $6 per item 3 for PMCCC 6th ANNU AL W OMEN'S EXPO ANNUAL WOMEN'S $15 - limit 3 items pp, 1-5 pm, Valley Auction Company, crafts, vendors, fashion show, health & fitness demonstraNarrows Community Center, Giles County WV, 540.921.1050 tions, women's health issues, Brushfork Armory, Bluefield WV, Monday, October 13 304.487-1502, www.pmccc.com 7pm, Lewis Theater, Lewisburg WV, 304.645.7917

Monda ober 113-1 3-1 4 Mondayy-Tuesda uesdayy, Oct October 3-14 West Virginia Book Festival

Roanoke Civic Center, Roanoke VA 540.853-5483

Friday-Sunday, October 24, 25, 26 & 31 booksignings, workshops, children’s activities, used book Ar tis tr ations Artis tistt Demons Demonstr trations

sale, emphasis on WV & Appalachian authors, Charleston beginning at 10am, Tamarack, Beckley WV, 1.800.tamarack Civic Center, Charleston WV, www.wvhumanities.org/ Satur da ober 25 Saturda dayy, Oct October bookfest/bookfest2.htm Canaan Culinary University: Soups & Stocks

Wednesday, October 15 Unmasking Ment al Illness Mental

Culinaryy Univer University sity:: Soups & SSttoc ocks Canaan Culinar sity ks

create “mother of sauces”, basic stock & others with Executive Chef Nemat Odeh, learn about thickening agents & more, NAMI’s 4th annual celebration, special guests include Terry participants receive chef hat & apron, recipes & dine on their Bradshaw & Joyce Cooling, proceeds benefit programs of NAMI creation, $50 per person, Pazzo’s Pizza & Diner, Canaan Val& their dedication to eradicate mental illnesses & to improve ley Resort, Davis WV 304.866-3858, 1.800.622-4121 quality of life to all whose lives are affected by these diseases, American Heritage Music Hall Heritage 7:30 pm, Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium, Washington D.C., con4th Saturday music, dance, featured band 7-11 pm, welcome all tact Darcy Taylor: 703-524-7600 ages, family atmosphere, kids play area, donations appreciated, Thur sda ober 116 6 Thursda sdayy, Oct October former Island Park Roller Rink, Ronceverte WV, 304.645-2298

Third Thursdays in White Sulphur Springs

A Ghos alk in His amwell Ghostt W Walk Histtoric Br Bramwell

shops open late, refreshments, entertainment & special offers by tours begin at 7 pm, $10 adv, $15/door, tickets at merchants, White Sulphur Springs WV, 304.536-9206 304.425.8738 ext 2156 or 2157, Bramwell WV NAMI New River/Greenbrier Valley , all welcome, Satur da ober 25-26 Saturda dayy-Sunda -Sundayy, Oct October meet at 7 pm, Old Stone Church, Lewisburg WV, 304.445.7866 Home Impr erial Auction Improovement & Building Mat Material

Downt own Charles tW alk Downtown Charlestton Ar ArtW tWalk

huge 2-day sale begins Sat. at 9am & Sun. at 10 am, WV State showcases Charleston’s art scene with best of local, regional Fairgrounds, Fairlea WV & nationally recognized artists, free reception 5-9pm, The Clay Sunda y , Oct ober 26 Sunday October Center, Charleston WV, 304.561-3570 Halloween P ar ty, make scary crafts, fun games, prizes, North Par arty Shriner Shrinerss Oy Oysster Dinner Brushfork National Guard Armory, Bluefield WV, 304.248-7347 Bend State Park, Cairo WV, 304.643-2931

Friday-Sunday , October 17, 18, 19 Clif ge FFall all Fes tiv al Da Cliftton For Forge Festiv tival Dayys

Monda ober 227 7 Mondayy, Oct October Alleghany Highlands Poetry Workshop

Yoga R Reetreat

Thursday-Saturday, October 30-31, Nov 1 Lif Lifeetime Success Planning Expo

vendors of all kinds line the streets of Clifton Forge with food, meets last Monday of every month, 6 pm, all welcome, public welcome free of charge, Clifton Forge Public Library, 535 arts, crafts, antiques, collectibles & more, Clifton Forge VA Church St, Clifton Forge VA, 540. 862-4502 Canaan Valley Resort, Davis WV, 1.800.622-4121

Ar tis tr ations Artis tistt Demons Demonstr trations

beginning at 10am, Tamarack, Beckley WV, 1.800.tamarack

Roanoke Civic Center, Roanoke VA 540.853-5483

Frida ober 331 1 ridayy, Oct October Satur da ober 118 8 Saturda dayy, Oct October Bear P aw Halloween PPar ar ty, Canaan Valley Resort, Davis Paw arty Eden Apple Butter Festival , stir a kettle, live music, WV 304.866-3858, 1.800.622-4121 gospel groups, craft fair, flea market, silent auction, abundant Christmas crafts, lunch prepared by ladies of Eden Church,

Entertainment Calendar continued on page 19

Greenbrier River Campground “on the banks of the Greenbrier”

CANOE • TUBE KAYAK & RAFT RENTALS SHUTTLE SERVICE Located between Ronceverte & Alderson on Rt 63 For reservations & Information call:

800 - 775 - 2203

UUUUU RATED FIVE STAR


16

VALLEY GUIDE

October -No vember 2008 October-No -Nov

GOING PL ACES PLA

Fall Color Excursions for

Plan a drive or a train ride, take a walk, enjoy the sky, Fall is a fantastic time in the mountains of Virginia and West Virginia as the daily earth changes create a full spectrum of colors. The

In addition to the colorful leaves, trees and shrubs like this Mountain Ash with its impressive clusters of bright red berries eaten by many birds and its twigs eaten by white-tailed deer, contribute to the fall color season with brilliant displays of fruits and berries.

West Virginia Fall Color Guide

In most years, peak color along the Scenic Highway in Pocahontas County has been around the last weekend in September and spreads across the rest of West Virginia during October. There is always great color for the fall festival and Road Kill Cook Off in Marlinton the last weekend of September, but the colors in the higher parts of the state often hold through the first week of October and plenty of color is to be found in the southern parts of the state through early November. Map courtesy West Virginia Division of Tourism

Fall Color Information

The Internet makes finding up-to-the-minute information on fall color easy. For those with access to a computer, search on "fall color Virginia" or "fall color West Virginia" for sites with information or start with the links below. These sites have suggested driving tours, links to foliage reports and other information for the fall color enthusiast. http://www.wvtourism.com/spec.aspx?pgid=69 http://www.dof.virginia.gov/fall/index.shtml http://www.fs.fed.us/news/fallcolors By phone, The U.S. Forest Service and tourism agencies maintain seasonal fall color hot lines: Forest Service: 800 354 4595 Shenandoah Valley: 800 434 LEAF (5323) In West Virginia, the copper-orange shades of the birch trees contrast the brilliant magenta reds of the native dogwood.

Like a quilt, the Fall vistas in West Virginia parade across the mountain tops in shades of orange, yellow, reds, greens and browns.

Blue Ridge Parkway 828 298 0398 (press 7) WV Tourism 800 Call WVA (800 225 5982)


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Virginia and West Virginia

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many assorted varieties of hard and soft wood trees, even the evergreens with their surprise addition of pine cones or golden needles add to this seasonal glory.

Virginia Fall Color Guide

Individual maple trees have already turned by mid-September in Highland County, Virginia, but the real color doesn't start spreading across the rest of Virginia until early October. Use the dates on the maps as guides and call ahead before planning a Fall color tour. Late summer drought, early Fall frost, a warm September or October can all impact the time of the fall colors. Map courtesy Virginia Division of Forestry

Scenic Colors Viewed from a train ride at Cass

A great way to see the fall colors is on one of West Virginia's scenic trains. Some travel writers have called these West Virginia rides, such as the train at Cass pictured here, the most scenic train rides in America. Call ahead or check the web for schedules and fall color specials.

Tips for photographing fall color: * Shoot early, shoot late. For the best color in photographs, avoid high midday sun. The sunlight in early morning or late afternoon will give better colors and the lower angle of the light will add depth to the photos. * Brace yourself. Use a tripod, rock wall, tree or other object to brace the camera. Modern digital cameras are often used a arms length with the big LCD screens on the back as view-finders. Big landscapes taken in morning or afternoon light will be sharper and more vivid if the camera doesn't move during the exposure. * Fore... Don't forget the foreground. Include a colorful tree, building, people in the frame with the sweeping mountains.

While changing leaves draw most of the attention, little gems continue to bloom through the fall. Ladies' tresses orchids, spiranthes, can still be found blooming throughout October. Some species prefer wet areas and bogs, others are found on dryer sandstone soils of mountain woodlands and road sides.

* Filter if you can. If your camera allows the use of filters on the lens, try a circular polarizer or one of the specialty combination polarizing/warming filters. These can be especially handy if you include part of the sky in the photo.

The reds of old barn with its metal roof magnify the yellow, orange and reds of the adjacent maple tree and emerging colors of distant trees.

* Think big. 8X10 and larger prints are just a few dollars from on-line services and many one hour photo centers. Even images from two and three megapixel digital point-and-shoot cameras can make impressive enlargements.

All photos and captions by Charles Garratt


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VOTE for Joan C. Browning West Virginia House of Delegates - Greenbrier County

Joan Gets Results!

What do you want the West Virginia Legislature to do for Greenbrier County?

If you want Joan to respond, tell her how to contact you:

Name:_________________________________ Address:_______________________________ City:________________ State____ Zip:______ Email:_________________________________ Telephone: _____________________________ Will you help elect Joan to the House? Mail this form to:

www.joanbrowning.com PAID FOR BY CANDIDATE

CHECK HERE

Learn More Joan C. Browning www.joanbrowning.com PO Box 1147 Lewisburg, WV 24901 Email: joan@joanbrowning.com


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Happy Anniversary Cooper Gallery

!!

Excited about the coming anniversary, Harvey and Naomi Cohen, standing from left to right around the featured work of Max Hayslette, Marilyn Cooper, Lynn Aaron, Audrey Cooper Dudais, G.P. Cooper, Andrew Must and Sara McDonald laugh and chat about past exhibits during one of Cooper Gallery’s Friday Evenings Art chat time.

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Marilyn and G.P. “Gary” Cooper opened their gallery on Washington Street ion Lewisburg, West Virginia, soon after the success of the first GVT, Greenbrier Valley Theatre, Art Auction in 1995. At that time when Marilyn Cooper was serving on the board for GVT, the theatre was sorely in need of funds to continue to

complete new renovation plans for the downtown theatre. Aware of the outstanding amount of artistic talent in various creative mediums throughout the state of West Virginia, Marilyn presented the idea of an art auction to the board. After the mag- Pictured above is a selection of an exhibit of photographs by Barry nanimous acceptance of the idea, and not Fields and, displayed on the pedastals, are nature wood carvings by wanting to overlook anyone, Marilyn ac- Dr. Zack Comeaux in one of the gallery sections of Cooper Gallery quired a list of artists from the West Vir- located on the corner of East Washington Street in Lewisburg, West ginia state registry and began sending out Virginia, 304.645-6439. invitations. This past year Greenbrier Valley Theatre celebrated its 14th Annual GVT Art Auction. By fall of that year, the Cooper’s celebrated the opening of their first gallery with a reception during Lewisburg merchant’s Christmas Open House. This year during Lewisburg Holiday Open House, Sunday, November 23, be sure to stop in Cooper Gallery and wish Marilyn and Gary a very Happy Anniversary, with many more to come.

Five New Stars Light Up GVT’s Sidewalk

Greenbrier Valley Theatre in Lewisburg became brighter on Friday, September 5, when five new stars were revealed on the sidewalk in front of the theatre. These permanent markers honor the contributions of supporters whose magnitude of giving merits this level of recognition. Cast in bronze and inscribed with the donors’ names, these stars can now be seen by generations to come. Receiving a Sidewalk Star are, from left to right, Allen and Paula Carson, Mrs. James H. Davis, III, Suzanne Snyder, Alice and Bud LaFollette, Ron Snyder, and Joe and Susan McGraw. Greenbrier Valley Theatre is located at 113 E. Washington Street in historic downtown Lewisburg, West Virginia and has been designated as West Virginia’s Official Year-Round Professional Theatre. If you would like more information on the theatrical performances, programs or to make reservations for show, please call (304) 645-3838, Tuesday – Saturday, 1 to 5pm, or visit the GVT website at www.gvtheatre.org to stay informed of all GVT events. GVT is handicap accessible, smoke-free, and provides a cash bar. Greenbrier Valley Theatre 2007-2008 Annual Sponsors include The Greenbrier Sporting Club, Ballard Family Foundation, Roger and LewAnne Cerasoli, The Greenbrier, Greenbrier Technical Services, Greenbrier Valley Medical Center, Paul and Ann Moran, Ream Associated Companies, and Sweet Grass Village.

October -No vember 2008 October-No -Nov

Friday-Sunday, October 31-November 2 Line Dance Weekend

latest lessons for all levels, Sat night dance & dinner, Pipestem Resort State Park, Pipestem WV, 304.466-1800, ext 379

November 2008 Saturday, November 1 Chris tmas Open House Christmas

unique gifts, fall & holiday decorations, 10-5 pm, Craft Shops of Covington, Covington VA, 540.982-0557, see ad pg 32

Helve tia’s Fir da Helvetia’s Firsst Satur Saturda dayy Square Dance

begins at 8 pm, adults $5, 12 & under $1, Community Hall, Helvetia WV, 304.924-6435

Saturday-Sunday, November 1, 2 Ar tis tr ations Artis tistt Demons Demonstr trations beginning at 10am, Tamarack, Beckley

Sunday, November 2 Daylight Savings Time Ends - fall back an hour Helve tia TTown own Mee ting Helvetia Meeting Helvetia WV, 304.924-6435

Sunda 0 Sundayy-Monda -Mondayy, N Noovember 2-1 2-10 West Virginia International Film Festival , domestic & international cinema, Charleston WV, www.wviff.org

Tuesday, November 4 Blue Ridge Story Tellers

Barnes & Noble, Roanoke VA, 540.776-2960

WSS Main Street Committee meets

open to public, 6 pm, WSS City Hall, 304.536-4787

Elections Outlook

keep up to the minute on election updates on the big screen in Laurel Lounge, drink special, Canaan Valley Resort, Davis WV 304.8663858, 1.800.622-4121

Wednesda ednesdayy, N Noovember 5 Sc herensc hnitt aper Cutting Scherensc herenschnitt hnittee PPaper

in Germany & Pennsylvania, Scherenschnitte — chair-en-shnitt-te — scissors cutting— is a popular 1800s folk art, Carol McAlister instructs on cut designs to make unique frameable gifts, Christmas cards, ornaments, and other projects, $12/per person, 1-3 pm, Historic Smithfield Plantation, 1000 Plantation Road, Blacksburg VA, 540-231-3947

Thursday, November 6 Ar Artt bbyy Night, downtown Galleries, Roanoke VA, 540.342-2028 Shriner’s Circus, Bluefield WV, 304.248-7247 Thursdays, November 6, 13, 20 Wake up and see stars

reservations suggested, 2pm, NRAO-National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Green Bank WV, 304-456-2150

Friday, November 7 Fir rida Firsst FFrida ridayys Af Aftter 5 - shops & galleries open til 9pm, refreshments, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-4333

Ar tis eception ffor or Shir W oot on Artis tistt R Reception Woot ooton

5-8 pm at Cooper Gallery 122 East Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-6439 Film Fest Fridays, begins 6:30 pm, call ahead for movie titles, NRAO, Green Bank WV, 304.456-2150

Satur da Saturda dayy-Sunda -Sundayy, N Noovember 7-9 Frontier Da Dayys

Chief Logan State Park, Logan WV, 304.792.7125

Saturday-Sunday, November 7, 8, 9 Ar tis tr ations Artis tistt Demons Demonstr trations

beginning at 10am, Tamarack, Beckley WV, 1.800.tamarack

Satur da Saturda dayy, N Noovember 8 Gift Shop Savory Sale

customers sample sumptuous delectables prepared from recipes found in gift shop cookbooks, special discounts, 10 am-3 pm, Frontier Culture Museum, Staunton, 540.332-7850

Gift Shop Savory Sale

customers sample sumptuous delectables prepared from recipes found in gift shop cookbooks, special discounts, Crab Orchard Museum, Rts. 19 & 460, Crab Orchard Road, Tazewell VA, 276.988-6755

Saturday-Sunday, November 8-9 Pocahont as NRHS TTrrain Show ocahontas

complete show for all RR enthusiasts, Bluefield Youth Center/Auditorium, Stadium Drive, Bluefield WV, 304.431-2593

Sunda Sundayy, N Noovember 9 Hunter’s Buckwheat & Pancake Feast begins 8 am, Blue Grass Ruritan Club, Blue Grass VA, 540.468-2550

Monday, November 10 Carnegie Hall Film Series

7pm, Lewis Theater, Lewisburg WV, 304.645.7917

Ent er Enter erttainment Calendar continued on page 26


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Who DO WE Vote for?

by Robbie Lindauer With Obama’s recent FISA vote exposing his real self - just another neo-con - and McCain being an obvious facsist, and the Libertarian Party being co-opted by neo-con Bozo Bob Barr, and Nader being a control freak, I asked a fellow Libertarian who we vote for this time. Below is his thoughtful response:

What we need is not a new government governing this same people - just a new government anyway. If our PEOPLE were willing to take moral responsibility for our own actions then it would not matter who our governors were. For instance three simple (and thankfully legal) things would end the current (as I see it) economic insanity: A) Take your money out of a bank and put it in a credit union. Get your home loan from a Credit Union. Statistic: If 30% of the people who have their money in banks were to take it out of these banks and put the money in credit unions that are member-governed then the monetary grip and policy of the federally-subsidized lending institutions which is -mostly- responsible for the ongoing housing boom-bust cycles would end. Ideology: Credit unions are, essentially, nonprofit institutions for our public benefit and are the closest to the libertarian ideal of selfgoverning free-commerce. BANKS are supported by the federal government’s laws and subsidies and are 100% anathemic to the libertarian ideal of free market economy. Credit unions can be made better. They’re democratic institutions run by their members. Banks can not be improved and are intimately intertwined with the Federal Reserve System making them, from a libertarian point of view, untenable. Methodology: Tell a Friend, credit unions are great... that makes then greater. B) Stop using “optional” gasoline and petroleum products Statistic: The US uses much, much more oil per person than every other country: http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/ ene_oil_con-energy-oil-consumption including countries with much, much larger populations. If we simply put a stop to our OPTIONAL oil consumption, this Iraq/Iran middle-east crisis in general would simply end. The middle east would be irrelevant for us just a gigantic strip of somebody else’s desert. Ideology: MUCH of this is optional in this sense: you don’t have to drive to work, there are busses and trains in major cities ... in major cities without busses and trains, they should have them and they would be cheaper than the gas cost of not having them ... recreational driving/flying/boating remains out of control in light of our current moral obligation not to be killing people over oil. Methodology: Before jumping into the car think: a) could I do this on an electric scooter, bicycle, feet? (electric scooter’s can be less relevant in some places because of insane method of electricity production or terrain) b) could I do this using public transportation? c) do I really need to do this or is this just for fun? ... I’m not claiming “everyone should never do anything fun” just that if the options are do the fun thing OR continue this insane war in Iraq, stop doing the insane thing which is to use oil like it doesn’t have a cost which, in 2007, was 493 Billion Dollars in war-costs and 730,000,000,000 (roughly)

in cold-hard-cash at the WHOLESALE LEVEL and some incalculable amount at retail. WITHOUT making the claim of knowing for sure, I’m gonna guess that approximately 20% of that consumption is “optional” in the sense that it could simply be done better (stop driving the hummers and tundras, shipping by truck versus train, etc.!) and another 30% is optional in the sense that we’re doing what in itself is optional (like ordering pizza delivered when there’s food in the fridge...) C) Buy local, do a job that “actually produces something” locally. Statistic: Services economies are incapable of doing basic things which is feed, clothe, shelter people. Instead, we use our banking system and military system to subsidize unfair trading practices and shipping costs (e.g. oil again) from other countries and locales (eating kiwi’s produced in New Zealand? Why not local ones? Why not stick to area produce?) Why buy ‘trucked-in meat when some of the world’s largest farms are actually right down the road? Ideology: If you can produce enough goods to provide for your children and provide a method for them to be able to provide for their children, you have what is called a “sustainable economy” -- if not, you don’t. Sustainable economies have the benefit that the people who live in them are basically able to provide for themselves. Unsustainable economies (e.g. Imperialisms) are wholly dependent on their ability to make war. (sidenote) We will not win a war against the Chinese or Indians. Yes, it can cost more to buy locally, but recognizing that the real cost is the long-term inability to sustain a local economy should be enough impetus to make it worthwhile. Think of your children fighting this war for oil in 50 years when there’s even less of it around and oil is $1,750/barrel. Methodology: Buy Local: simply and only buy things that are produced “within 300 miles of you”. Produce something of “real value” in your work and if you can’t do that (say you’re a banker, lawyer, doctor, judge or programmer ...) support those people who do as much as possible (if you make enough money, buy a farm, employ farmers and feel good about the programming and banking and lawyering and public-relations! ... and I mean here things like shoes, corn, fish, bread, wheat, cotton, houses, walls, actually very useful things for all, etc. ... and, VALUE THOSE WHO PRODUCE THESE THINGS! Life is not made entirely of shoes, corn, fish and ... but without them, we have nothing. Those are my thoughts. I invite a general discussion about how to improve our country morally, economically and in pursuit of freedom. Perhaps I will clarify these thoughts into t-shirts soon. What are your ideas and thoughts! Write them down! If our government ever made it illegal to act morally, then we’d have a real problem. As it stands, it is still our choice to do the right things, Thank God.

COMMENT AR Y COMMENTAR ARY

John Hanson, American Patriot & President of the United States in 1781

Ah! You thought George Washington the first President of the United States. Unfortunately, this is not really true. Actually, John ‘Swede” Hanson was the first President of the United States. Funny, isn’t it, that the man we were taught could not tell a lie is himself the subject of one of many lies that make up what we thought to be the history of our country. John Hanson was born on April 14, 1721 on the family plantation near Mulberry Grove, Maryland. He became heir to one of the greatest family traditions in the colonies and also the patriarch of a long line of American patriots — his great-grandfather died at Lutzen beside the great King Gustavus Aldophus of Sweden; his grandfather was one of the founders of New Sweden along the Delaware River in Maryland; one of his nephews was the military secretary to George Washington; another nephew was a signer of the Declaration of Independence; still another was a signer of the Constitution; yet another was Governor of Maryland during the Revolution; and still another was a member of the first Congress; two sons were killed in action with the Continental Army; a grandson served as a member of Congress under the new Constitution; and another grandson was a Maryland Senator. Thus, even if John Hanson had not served as President himself, he would have greatly contributed to the life of the nation through his ancestry and progeny. As a young man, John Hanson began a self-guided reading of classics and like most of America’s wealthy landowners’ offspring, he was sent off to England to get a gentleman’s education. Upon returning from England he ran the family business — Mulberry Grove, a 1000-acre plantation. In 1757 he was elected to the Maryland House of Delegates, an office he held undefeated for 24 years. In 1775 he was elected to the Provincial Legislature of Maryland and he became a member of Congress in 1777 where he distinguished himself as a brilliant administrator. Then, in 1781, November of that year he became the first President of the United States. As stated in The People’s Almanac: In 1781, while Washington was still fighting the last battles of the Revolution, the 13 Colonies joined together in a loose union under the Articles of Confederation. After the British surrender in Yorkstown, this new confederation needed a leader ... In November 1781, the Continental Congress elected John Hanson “President of The United States in Congress Assembled”. (p261) Was John Hanson the first President of the United States? The new country was actually formed on March 1, 1781 with the adoption of The Articles of Confederation, a document proposed on June 11, 1776, but not agreed upon by Congress until November 15, 1777. Maryland refused to sign The Articles of Confederation until Virginia and New York ceded their western lands because Maryland was afraid Virginia and New York would gain too much power in the new government from such large amounts of land. After the signing took place in 1781, a President was needed to run the country. John Hanson was chosen by the Congress, a congress which included George Washington. In fact, other potential candidates refused to run against him, as he was a major player in the Revolution and an extremely influential member of Congress. Hanson took office just as the Revolutionary War ended. Almost immediately, the troops demanded to be paid and there were no funds to meet the salaries. As a result, the soldiers threatened to overthrow the new government and put Washington on the throne as a monarch. All the members of Congress ran for their lives, leaving Hanson running the government. He somehow managed to calm the troops and hold the country together. If he had failed, the government would have fallen almost immediately and everyone would have been bowing to King Washington. As President, Hanson ordered all foreign troops and their flags off of American soil. This was something considering that many European countries had a stake in the United States. He also established the Great Seal of the United States, the first Treasury Department, the first Secretary of War, the first Foreign Affairs Department and, he declared that the fourth Thursday of every November was to be Thanksgiving Day. The Articles of Confederation allowed a President to serve a one-year term during any three-year period, in looking back, Hanson accomplished quite a bit in a little time as the first President to serve a full term — November 5, 1781 - November 3, 1782, after the full ratification of the Articles of Confederation. The following is a list of the first presidents: John Hanson (1781-1782), Elias Boudinot (1782-1783), Thomas Mifflin (1783-1784), Richard Henry Lee (1784-1785), John Hancock (1785-1786), Nathan Gorman (17861787), Arthur St. Clair (1787-1788), and Cyrus Griffin (1788-1789) — all prior to Washington taking office. George Washington was the first President of the United States under the Constitution we follow today. Some sources: The People’s Almanac. David Wallechinsky and Irving Wallace. Doubleday & Co. Garden City, NY. (1975); The Illuminoids, by Neal Wilgus, published by Pocket Books, New York 1978; http://www.standingstones.com/8pres.html; America’s first President - John Hanson, by Harry V. Martin; John Hanson (1721-1783); History in Perspective


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October -No vember 2008 October-No -Nov

Politicians Seek to Exploit Unwarranted Photo Ticket Cameras to Track Drivers Nationwide Vendors plan to add spy technology to existing red light camera Fears of Foreign Oil and speed camera installations.

from THE LIGHTHOUSE, edited by Carl P. Close The United States gets about two-thirds of the oil it consumes from foreign producers. This worries many Americans, and politicians know an opportunity when they see one. Consistent with the political tradition of turning fear into votes, both Barack Obama and John McCain propose breaking the U.S. “addiction” to foreign oil. In his latest op-ed, Ivan Eland Eland, director of the Independent Institute’s Center on Peace & Liberty, argues that dependence on foreign oil is nothing to fear. Eland argues that although oil is a “strategic” commodity in the narrow sense that military vehicles run on oil derivatives, the United States could ably fight a regional war by relying on domestic supplies alone: the U.S. produces about 1.8 billion barrels of oil barrels annually, almost 13 times the amount used by the U.S. military for the Iraq and Afghanistan wars at their height. A war that shut down oil distribution from the Middle East (the source of one-fifth of U.S. oil imports) would raise oil prices, but the U.S. economy is resilient enough to withstand such a supply shock. (Consider Germany: oil prices there rose 211% from late 1998 to late 2000, but economic growth continued at a respectable rate.) ”Of course, a war anywhere in the world will cause the price of oil to go up,” writes Eland. “But about 80% of U.S. semiconductor imports come from East Asia, yet the media doesn’t constantly run hysterical stories on price spikes in semiconductors or on the horrible U.S. dependence on East Asian semiconductors. And the politicians don’t talk about using the U.S. military to safeguard such supplies from East Asia.” Sources: U.S. Dependence on Foreign Oil: Why We Shouldn’t Be Alarmed, by Ivan Eland (9/ 1/08); Do We Need to Go to War for Oil?, by David R. Henderson (9/1/07); The Empire Has No Clothes: U.S. Foreign Policy Exposed (Updated Edition), by Ivan Eland, Center on Peace & Liberty (Ivan Eland, Director), THE LIGHTHOUSE, 100 Swan Way, Oakland, CA 946211428, (510) 632-1366 phone, 510) 568-6040 fax

The Real Price of Oil

The price of oil is up, and everyone is worried about the potential economic consequences. But what if the price of oil wasn’t really up? What if it were just an illusion? The American Geological Institute (AGI) recently released a report looking at the price of crude oil in relation to the U.S. dollar and the price per ounce of gold. They found that the price of oil has been going up in relation to currency only. This means that the value of oil has not been increasing in real terms; instead, currency has just been decreasing in value. In other words, if U.S. currency were still based on gold, as it was until 1971, then the price of oil would be stable. So if you are an American, the price of gas hasn’t really gone up, it is just that the value of the dollar has significantly plummeted. Sources: RideLust August 16, 2008; The American Geological Institute Report

Letter to Editor:

letter in The Manchester Times, Manchester, N.J., August 13, 2008 sent to Valley Guide

Please don't kill me, put your hands in my pockets or search my private property. 1. I am wearing a chrome plated seat belt. 2. I may be reaching for my wallet or pocketbook. 3. I may have a cell phone in my hand (calling my mom to let her know the police have pulled me over). 4. I may have my wallet/ hairbrush in my hand. 5. When I put my car in park, the reverse lights will flash. 6. I may be reaching for the radio, to lower the volume. 7. I may be reaching into the glove compartment for registration and insurance papers. 8. I may need to find a safe place to pull over. I have seen all the dashboard cam videos of devastating accidents on shoulders of major highways. 9. When a police officer asks if I have any guns, drugs or contraband on me, or in my car and I say no, and he says well then you wouldn't mind if we search you and your car. My answer is no way, I am an American. Go search someone you have probable cause to search. Then the officer says if you do not submit to the searches, I will be held there against my will until a police drug dog can declare my car and me drug, gun and contraband free. 10. I do not want to answer questions about where I am coming from, or going to. I am an American driving down the road, that's all. I especially do not want you questioning our young daughters about where they go to. Our local traffic enforcement police officers have changed themselves into a combination of detectives, DEA agents, ATF agents, U.S. Customs agents, INS agents, homeland security agents and judges that can circumvent the Bill of Rights and declare that they have probable cause to search you and your property. Very worried about our freedom. Richard Walsh, Jackson

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Private companies in the US are hoping to use red light cameras and speed cameras as the basis for a nationwide surveillance network similar to one that will be active next year in the UK. Redflex and American Traffic Solutions (ATS), the top two photo enforcement providers in the US, are quietly shopping new motorist tracking options to prospective state and local government clients. Redflex explained the company’s latest developments in an August meeting with Homestead, Florida officials. ”We are moving into areas such as homeland security on a national level and on a local level,” Redflex regional director Cherif Elsadek said. ”Optical character recognition is our next roll out which will be coming out in a few months — probably about five months or so.” The technology would be integrated with the Australian company’s existing red light camera and speed camera systems. It allows officials could keep full video records of passing motorists and their passengers, limited only by available hard drive space and the types of cameras installed. To gain public acceptance, the surveillance program is being initially sold as an aid for police looking to solve Amber Alert cases and locate stolen cars. ”Imagine if you had 1500 or 2000 cameras out there that could look out for the partial plate or full plate number across the 21 states where we do business today,” Elsadek said. “This is the next step for our technology.” ATS likewise is promoting motorist tracking technologies. In a recent proposal to operate 200 speed cameras for the Arizona state police, the company explained that its ticketing cameras could be integrated into a national vehicle tracking database. This would allow a police officer to simply enter a license plate number into a laptop computer and receive an email as soon as a speed camera anywhere in the state recognized that plate. Such programs would be fully consistent with existing law on searches and seizures. In the 2003 case Washington v. William Bradley Jackson, the Washington State Supreme Court ruled that police could not use a physical GPS tracking device to monitor a suspect’s movements without first obtaining a warrant. No warrant would be needed or restrictions applied to license plate tracking systems which do not require any physical contact. Instead, individual police officers could monitor the movements of suspected criminals or even their wives and neighbors at any time. In the past, police databases have been used to intimidate innocent motorists. An Edmonton, Canada police sergeant, for example, found himself outraged after he read columnist Kerry Diotte criticize his city’s photo radar operation in the Edmonton Sun newspaper. The sergeant looked up Diotte’s personal information, and, without the assistance of electronic scanners, ordered his subordinates to “be on the lookout” for Diotte’s BMW. Eventually a team of officers followed Diotte to a local bar where they hoped to trap the journalist and accuse him of driving under the influence of alcohol. Diotte took a cab home and the officers’ plan was exposed after tapes of radio traffic were leaked to the press. Police later cleared themselves of any serious wrong-doing following an extensive investigation. In the UK, officials are planning to dramatically expand the use of average speed cameras that track cars over distances as great as six miles. Records on all vehicle movements taken from a nationwide network of cameras will be stored for five years in a central government Automated Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) server, allowing police to keep tabs on criminals and political opponents. Work on the data center in north London began in 2005 and officials expect real-time, nationwide tracking capability to be available by January. www.thenewspaper.com/news/25/2537.asp

UK police ANPR will read 50 million license plates a day The UK is in the final stages of expanding vehicle surveillance that will allow police to record and store details of 50 million licence plates a day, enabling officers to reconstruct the journeys of motorists. Not only that, the data will be stored for up to five years and will be used during investigations ranging from counter-terrorism to low-level crime. In 2005 the UK government invested some US$57 million to develop an ANPR data sharing program after police concluded that road traffic cameras could be integrated into mainstream policing, even for everyday criminal investigations. Local authorities have adapted their CCTV systems to capture licence plates on behalf of police, massively expanding the network of available cameras, while mobile cameras have been installed in patrol cars and unmarked vehicles parked by the side of roads. So far, half of all police forces in England and Wales have now been connected to the network and using the system to read and record up to 10 million licence plates a day. However, by the end of the year, when the nationwide network of cameras is fully operational, the National ANPR Data Centre in North London will be able to record up to 50 million licence plates a day. The database will have the capacity to store as many as 18 billion licence plate sightings in 2009. Although senior police officers claimed the number plates would only be stored for two years, following enquiries under the Freedom of Information Act, the UK Home Office has now admitted the data will be kept for five years. Privacy International, the human rights group, described the five-year record of people’s car journeys ‘unnecessary and disproportionate’. It has lodged an official complaint with the Information Commissioner’s Office, the data watchdog. According to a statement, the ICO said it would take up the matter and would be contacting police to discuss the five year data retention period. www.itsinternational.com/news/article.cfm?recordID=13845


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WEDNESD AY Oct ober 1 & N WEDNESDA October Noovember 5

SATURD AY Oct ober 4 & N TURDA October Noovember 1

free computer class in Microsoft Word, Excel, typing, writing & math skills, GED prep, college level tutoring, services available 9 am-7 pm, Monroe County Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038 Children's Story Hour • C.P.J. Memorial Library, Covington VA, 540/962-3321, 10:30 am AA • St. James Episcopal Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon Grief Support • Alleghany Regional Hospital, Covington VA, 3-4 pm, call 540/862-6214 Bingo • early bird 6pm, Bingo 6:30pm, door prizes, Douglas Center, 108 Douglas St, Princeton WV, sponsored by Concord College Athletics G.E.D. • Ronceverte Public Library, 304/645-7911, 5:15-8:15 pm Greenbrier Percussion Group • Greenbrier Community Center, Oak&Feamster St., Lewisburg WV, 304/497-3397, 6 pm NA • Emmanuel Episcopal, Covington VA, 6:30 pm AA • St. James Episcopal Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm Lewisburg Junior Woman’s Club • Lewisburg Library Annex, Lewisburg WV, Tracie Brackenrich 304/645-5107, 7pm Monroe County Landmark Commission • Monroe Co Court House, Union WV, 304/772-5539, 7pm Feb, Apr, June, Aug, Oct , Dec WSS Rifles • City Hall, WSS WV, 304/536-4373, 7:30 pm AL-A-NON • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Maple Street, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • OD, LW, SO, Emmanuel Episcopal Church Annex, Maple Street, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

entrance off Lee St, Lewisburg WV (no smoking on church property) 10 am closed meeting: step study, Janeal Q 304/645-6070 Delta Kappa Gamma • Emmanuel United Methodist Church, WSS WV, Beatrice Harvey 304/645-2138, 10am Honnahlee Saturday Playdays • activities for preschool and elementary age children, Honnahlee, 117 East Washington Street, Lewisburg WV, 304/645-6123, 10:30 am Story Time & Crafts for ages 3 to 5 • WSS Public Library, 304/536-1171, 10 - 11 am Spa City Energizers 4-H Club • WSS Public Library, Mendy Jones 304/536-1400, 1 pm AA• Monroe Co. Lib, Rt 219, Union WV, Dwight 304/772-3487, 4 pm Bingo • Ronceverte Firehouse, Ronceverte WV, 6 pm NA • St. Andrew's Episcopal, Clifton Forge VA, 6:30 pm AA• Big Clear Creek Baptist Church, Anjean Rd, Rupert WV, Doc 304/ 392-5456, 7 pm AL-A-NON • St. Andrews Episcopal, 516 McCormick Blvd., Clifton Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • OD, LS, SO, St. Andrews Episcopal, Clifton Forge VA, 8 pm

Inter Agency Council • Carma 304/445-7309, 9 am Adult Basis Education & Literacy Programs •

CL UBS & OR GANIZA TIONS CLUBS ORG ANIZATIONS TUESD AY Oct ober 7 & N TUESDA October Noovember 4

All Saints Day • November 1 Election Day • November 4 AA • Lewisburg United Methodist Church, 214 E. Washington St, use Story Hour for 3, 4, 5 year olds •

Summers County Public Library, 10:30 am, Hinton WV, 304/466-4490 4 Year Old Play ime • Green Bank Lib, Greenbank WV, 10-11:30 am Playground for 3-5 Year Olds • Hillsboro Lib, Hillsboro WV, 10-11:30 am Duplicate Bridge Club • Covington Senior Center, Rockbridge Ave., Covington VA, 10:30 am AA • St. James Episcopal Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon AA • OD, NS, Rivermont Community Center, 1011 Rock Bridge Street, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 12:15pm OA (Overeaters Anonymous) • St. James Episcopal Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, Patti 304/536-4130, 1 pm WSS CVB • City Hall, White Sulphur Springs WV, 5 pm Adult Basic Education Classes, GED's, & more • Monroe County Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038, 5:30-8:30 pm Hilldale-Talcott Ruritan Club • Community Building , Linda Huffman 304/466-2062, 6 pm Clintonville Ruritan Club • Community Building Rt. 60 W, Frank Hampton 304/645-6259, 6:30 pm NA • St. Andrew's Episcopal, Clifton Forge VA, 6:30 pm Clifton Forge City Council Work Session • Court House, Clifton Forge VA, 7pm Covington City Council Work Session • Council Chambers of Covington City Hall, 703/965-6300, 7pm Steven J. Schwartz, Ph.D., Division of Genealogical Studies • Greenbrier Historical professor of food science at Ohio State Society, Greenbrier County Library, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm University in Columbus, Ohio, says, Greenville Ruritan Club • Community Center, Rt 122, Tully Larew 304/832-6623, 7 pm November-May; 7:30 pm August-October Eating a steak or any fatty food with Quinwood City Council Meeting • Figs, when growing on any vegetable can release its antioxi- Quinwood City Hall, Quinwood WV, 304/438-6658, 7 pm their fig tree, hang in WSS Fire Department • WSS Firehouse, 304/536-4715, 7 pm dants, but small amounts of healthy twos and are full of Epsilon Sigma Alpha International • unsaturated fats are a better choice. Old Stone Presbyterian Church, Michelle Vance 304/536-4121, 7 pm seeds. Figs increase NA • St. James Episcopal, Lewisburg WV 304/645-2588, 7:30 pm the motility of male Alderson Women’s Club • Faye 304/445-2573, 7:30 pm AY Oct ober 5 & N SUNDA October Noovember 2 sperm and increase the sperm numbers SUND Anthony Creek Volunteer Fire Department •Business meeting Daylight Savings Time • November 2 so well as to overcome male sterility. at Firehouse, David Young Chief 304/536-1636, 7:30 pm NA • Emmanuel Episcopal, Covington VA, 6:30 pm Anthony Creek Volunteer Rescue Squad • AA • St. Thomas Epis Church, Rt. 60, White Sulphur Springs WV, 7 pm Anthony Creek Firehouse, Carl Wade Captain 304/536-1636, 7:30 pm THURSD AY Oct ober 2 & N THURSDA October Noovember 6 • Alderson Presbyterian Church, basement on Monroe County side, Epsilon Sorority of Beta Sigma Phi • Bath County Chamber of Commerce Board Meeting • open to all AA Alderson WV, 7 pm Nancy Collins 304/ 645-7000, 7:30 pm members, Chamber office, Hot Springs VA, 8 am, 1-800-628-8092 AA • OD, St. Lukes, Hot Springs VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm I.O.O.F.Greenbrier Lodge #146 •Ronceverte, 304/647-4527, 7:30 pm Adult Basis Education & Literacy Programs • PEO Chapter V • Elizabeth 304/645-6462, 7:30 pm free computer class in Microsoft Word, Excel, typing, writing & math Ronceverte City Council Meets• skills, GED prep, college level tutoring, services available 9am-7pm, Avocado and Tomato City Hall, Ronceverte WV, 304/647-5455, 7:30 pm Monroe County Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038 Covington VFW Post 1033 • Children's Story Hour • ages 3-5, Greenbrier County Library, 301 are a Good Mix VFW Hall, Dolly Ann Drive, Covington VA, 7:30 pm Courtney Drive, Lewisburg WV, 304/645-2350, 10-11 am WSS Masons • WSS Masonic Lodge Hall, 304/536-4501, 8 pm Tomatoes are a super food. AL-A-NON • St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Playground for 3 Year Olds • Green Bank Library, Greenbank WV, 10-11:30 am They contain the antioxidant Clifton Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm Playground for 3-5 Year Olds • lycopene. Eat some avocado AA • ST/O St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Clifton Hillsboro Library, Hillsboro WV, 10-11:30 am Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm at the same time and you've WSS Rotary Club • AA • OD, NS, St. Andrews Episcopal, Clifton Forge VA, 8 pm April's Pizzeria, White Sulphur Springs WV, 304/536-4309, 12 noon AA • Caldwell Presbyterian Church, Route 60, Caldwell WV, 7 pm got a super, super food beAA • St. James Epis Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon closed cause the fat in the avocado TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) • Rhema Christian Center, Fairlea WV, Grapes hang in a cluster helps the body absorb seven weight-in 4:45-5:45 pm, meeting 6pm, Leader Cindy Rhodes, 304/392-2261 that has the shape of the times more lycopene. Ronceverte Lions Club• The Lions Den, Lynn Holbrook, 6:30 pm

heart. Each grape looks Canvas Ruritan Club • like a blood cell and today’s Canvas School, Butch Crump 304/872-0415, 6:30pm AY Oct ober 6 & N MONDA October Noovember 3 Alleghany Highlands Orchestra • rehearsal 6:30 - 8:30 pm, fellow- MOND research shows that grapes ship hall, First Presbyterian Church, Locust & Maple, Covington VA, for Marie Ruritan Club•Community Building, Michael Allen 304/466-4149 are also profound heart and AA•U. Methodist Church, Pocahontas & Walnut, Ronceverte WV, noon membership and auditions 540/962-4847 blood vitalizing food. Lewisburg Rotary Club • The Elk’s Club, Lewisburg WV, Epsilon Delta Sorority of Beta Sigma Phi • John MCCaffrey 304/392-2371, 12 noon Sandy Circosta 304/ 536-3403, 7 pm PATCH • WV School of Osteopathic Medicine, Lewisburg WV, WEDNESD AY Oct ober 8 & N 2 WEDNESDA October Noovember 112 Greenbrier County Republican Club • April L. Vestal 304/438-6188 ext. 131, 3 pm Basic Education & Literacy Programs •free computer classes Adul Greenbrier County Courthouse, Bill Hawkins 304/536-2080, 7 pm Adult Basic Education Classes, GED's & more • in Microsoft Word, Excel, typing, writing and math skills, GED prep, Renick Ruritan Club • Call Karen McMillion 304/497-3779, 7pm Peterstown Library,Peterstown WV, 304/772-3038, 5:30-8:30 pm WSS Junior Fire Department • Civil Air Patrol (CAP) Composite Squadron WV 100 • aerospace college level tutoring, services available 9am-7pm, Monroe County White Sulphur Springs Firehouse, Bob White 304/536-1819, 7 pm

education, cadet programs, emergency services, CAP Squadron facility, Greenbrier Valley Airport, Maxwelton WV, cadets - youth 7th grade and up, Alleghany Regional Hospital, Lowmoor VA 1-800-451-7210, 7 pm 6 pm; adults 7 pm Anata Shrine Club • 7:30 pm, Clifton Forge Shrine Club ARES (Mountaineer Amateur Radio Emergency Service) • Rm 203, old Rivermont School, Covington VA, 6 pm Alderson VFW Post #6723 • AL-A-NON • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm Alderson City Hall, Buel Cochran 304/445-7522, 7:30 pm Alvon Arrows 4-H Club • Old Anthony Creek School Building, Gamma Chi Sorority of Beta Sigma Phi • Joy Bland 304/536-2444, 7 pm Sue Gurley 304/536-1044, 7:30 pm NA • St. James Episcopal, Lewisburg WV, 1-800-776-4442, 7:30 pm Greenbrier County Cattlemen's Association • Jim McCutcheon 304/645-1525, 7 pm AA • First Presbyterian Church, White Sulphur Springs WV, 8pm GFWC of White Sulphur Springs • Emmanuel United Methodist Church, AA • Alleghany Highlands Community Services, 305 Monroe Ave, Shirley Hicks 304/ 536-3794, 7 pm Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm4 Lewisburg Boy Scout Troop 70 • Lewisburg United Methodist Church, Cliff Baker, 304/645-6131, 7 pm FRID AY Oct ober 3 & N FRIDA October Noovember 7 Smoot Ruritan Club • Smoot Elementary School Cafeteria, Gene PEO Chapter O • Virginia 304/497-2557, 9:30 am Campbell 304/392-6717, 7 pm (if holiday 2nd Mon) AA • OD, NS, Emmanuel Epis. Church, Covington VA, 12 noon Peterstown Ruritan Club • Call Trent Chinault 304/753-4452, 7 pm NA • Emmanuel Episcopal, Covington VA, 6:30 pm City Council•City Hall, Marlinton WV, 304/799-4315, 7:30 pm AL-A-NON • St. Andrews EpiscopalChurch, 516 McCormick Blvd, Clifton Marlinton USABDA-Ballroom Dancers of Lewisburg • Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm St. James Episcopal Church, 218 Church St, Lewisburg WV, AA • St. James Episcopal Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm 7:30-9:30 pm, 304/536-1337 AA• Big Clear Creek Baptist Church, Anjean Rd, Rupert WV, Doc 304/ AA • St. James Episc Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm closed 392-5456, 7 pm AA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church Annex, Maple Street, Covington VA, AA • OD, NS, St. Andrews Episcopal, Clifton Forge VA, 8 pm 540/962-0137, 8 pm

Diabetes Support Group •

Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038

Buffalo Cabi Cabinn Quilters • newcomers & quilt pieces welcome! 10 am, call Becky Benett for meeting place 304/456-4082

Children's Story Hour • C.P.J. Memorial Library, Covington VA, 10:30am, 540/962-3321

AA • St. James Epis Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon Bingo • early bird 6 pm, Bingo 6:30 pm, The Douglas Center, 108 Douglas St, Princeton WV, sponsored by Concord College Athletics

G.E.D. • Ronceverte Public Library, 304/645-7911, 5:15-8:15 pm Greenbrier Percussion Group •

Greenbrier Community Center, Lewisburg WV, 304/497-3397, 6 pm

NA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Covington VA, 6:30 pm AA • St. James Episcopal Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm NA • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm Richlands Ruritan Club • Calvary United Methodist Church, Rt. 60 W, Richlands WV, John W. Bell 304/645-3418, 7 pm

Union City Council Meeting • City Hall, Union WV, 304/772-5522, 7 pm WSS Friends of the Library • 304/536-1171, 7 pm Eastern Greenbrier JAYCEES • Island Park Club House, Ronceverte WV, 8 pm, 304/536-2940 or 304/536-9111

AL-A-NON • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Maple Street, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

AA • OD, LW, SO, Emmanuel Episcopal Church Annex, Maple Street, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm


CL UBS & OR GANIZA TIONS CLUBS ORG ANIZATIONS THURSD AY Oct ober 9 & N 3 THURSDA October Noovember 113

VALLEY GUIDE

MOND AY Oct ober 113 3&N 0 MONDA October Noovember 110

Yom Kippur • October 9 Columbus Day •Indigenous People Day • October 13 Full Moon in Taurus 1:18 am • November 13 Lewisburg Rotary Club • The Elk’s Club, Lewisburg WV, Greater Greenbrier County Chamber of Commerce • Community Col- John MCCaffrey 304/392-2371, 12 noon lege, Alumni Rm 302, Lewisburg WV, 304/645-1000, 7:30 am AA • U. Methodist Church, Pocahontas & Walnut, Ronceverte WV, noon Lashmeet Ruritan Club • Ruritan Community Building, GFWC of Lewisburg • Greenbrier County Public Library, Lewisburg WV, Ruritan Lane, Lashmeet WV, Gale Shrewsbury 304/467-7442 304/645-3509, 12:30 pm Adult Basis Education & Literacy Programs • free computer classes, typing, writing & math skills, GED prep, tutoring, Adult Basic Education Classes, GED's & more • Peterstown Public 9 am-5 pm, Monroe County Public Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038 Playground for 3 Year Olds • Green Bank Library, Greenbank WV, 10-11:30 am AA • St. James Epis Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon closed WSS Rotary Club • April’s Pizzeria, White Sulphur Springs WV, 304/536-4309, 12 noon TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) • Rhema Christian Center, Fairlea WV, weight-in 4:45-5:45 pm, meeting 6pm, Leader Cindy Rhodes, 304/392-2261 Muddelty-Glade Creek Ruritan Club • Community Building, Darlene Sopp 304/872-6712, 6 pm Family Resource Meeting • Old Stone Church Fellowship Hall, Lewisburg WV, 6 pm Greenbrier County Housing Coalition • Community Building, Lewis Terrace, Lewisburg WV, 304/645-6331 Aglow • Old Stone Pres. Church, Lbg WV, 6pm social, speaker 7pm East River Ruritan Club • Ruritan Community Center, Oakvale WV, Delbert Whitlow 304/898-2141, 6:30 pm Greenbrier Valley Board of Realtors • Greenbrier, Monroe, Pocahontas Co. Realtors & interested affiliates, Martha Hilton 304/645-1900, 7 pm Bozoo Ruritan Club • Ruritan Building, Oliver Porterfield 304/753-9111, 7 pm Muddy Creek Mountain Ruritan Club • Muddy Creek Mountain Community Building, Myron Goodell 304/445-2959, 7 pm Sun Valley Ruritan Club • Ruritan Community Building, Echols Jeffries 304/384-7392, 7 pm Multiple Sclerosis Self-Help Group • All welcome! meet at Greenbrier Medical Center Cafeteria, 202 Maplewood Ave, Ronceverte WV, 7 pm, Joe Pellant 304/645-4779 Ronceverte Merchants Assn • Ronceverte City Hall , 7 pm Rupert City Council • City Hall, Rupert WV, 304/392-5682, 7 pm Alderson City Council • City Hall, Alderson WV, 304/445-2916, 7:30 pm Eastern Star • Masonic Lodge Hall, 304/645-6733, 7:30 pm USABDA - Ballroom Dancers of Lewisburg • St. James Episcopal Church, 218 Church Street, Lewisburg WV, 7:30-9:30 pm, Shirley Griffith 304/536-1337 NA • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7:30 pm AA • First Presbyterian Church, White Sulphur Springs WV, 8 pm AA • Alleghany Highlands Community Services, 305 Monroe Ave, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm Lewisburg Elks Club • Lewisburg Elks CC, 8 pm, 304/645-3660 VFW Post 4482 • VFW Hall, White Sulphur Springs, 8 pm, Morgan Woodhouse 304/536-1230

FRID AY Oct ober 110 0&N 4 FRIDA October Noovember 114

AA • OD, NS, Emmanuel Epis. Church, Covington VA, 12 noon NA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Covington VA, 6:30 pm AA • St. James Epis Church, 218 Court Street, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm AA• Big Clear Creek Baptist Church, Anjean Rd, Rupert WV, Doc 304/ 392-5456, 7 pm

AL-A-NON • St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Clifton Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

AA • OD, NS, St. Andrews Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 8 pm PEO Chapter F • Anna Warren 304/497-2557, 8 pm AA • OD, LS, SO, St. Andrews Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 8 pm

SATURD AY Oct ober 111 1&N TURDA October Noovember 8

AA • Lewisburg United Methodist Church, 214 E. Washington St, use entrance off Lee St, Lewisburg WV (no smoking on church property) 10 am closed meeting: step study, Janeal Q 304/645-6070 Mountain Heritage Quilters Guild of Southern WV • learn, promote & preserve quilting and patchwork, all welcome, lower level, Monroe County Public Library, Union WV, 10 am Honnahlee Saturday Playdays •for pre & elementary, Honnahlee, 117 E Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304/645-6123, 10:30 am Story Time & Crafts for ages 3 to 5 • White Sulphur Springs Public Library, 304/536-1171, 10-11 am AA • Monroe County Public Library, Rt 219, Union WV, Dwight 304/772-3487, 4 pm Bingo • Ronceverte Fire House, Ronceverte WV, 6 pm NA • St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 6:30 pm AA• Big Clear Creek Baptist Church, Anjean Rd, Rupert WV, Doc 304/ 392-5456, 7 pm AL-A-NON • St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Clifton Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • OD, NS, St. Andrews Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 8 pm

SUND AY Oct ober 112 2&N SUNDA October Noovember 9

Lewisburg Library Annex, Lewisburg, WV, 304/645-7936, 10 am

Monroe County Historical Society • meetsMarch, June, Sept & Dec at Monroe County Library, Union, WV, 304/ 772-5208, 3pm

NA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Covington VA, 6:30 pm AA • St. Thomas Epis Church, Rt. 60, White Sulphur Springs WV, 7 pm AA • OD, St. Lukes, Hot Springs VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

Library, Peterstown WV, 304/772-3038, 5:30-8:30 pm

October -No vember 2008 October-No -Nov

23

WEDNESD AY Oct ober 115 5&N 9 WEDNESDA October Noovember 119

Adult Basis Education & Literacy Programs • free computer classes

in Microsoft Word, Excel, typing, writing & math skills, GED prep, college level tutoring, services available 9 am-7 pm, Monroe County Public Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038 Greenbrier Gardeners • 304/645-7014, 10 am

NARVRE National Association of R an Railw Reetired and VVeeter eran Railwaay Emplo 14 Employyees, Inc., Rainelle, Unit #1 #11 all railroaders working or retired are welcome to come join this group,

Civil Air Patrol (CAP) Composite Squadron WV 100 • aerospace Rainelle Public Library at 10am, for more info go to www.narvre.com or call education, cadet programs, emergency services, CAP Squadron facility, Greenbrier Valley Airport, Maxwelton WV, cadets-youth 7th grade & up meet at 6 pm, adults 7 pm WSS City Council • White Sulphur Springs Town Hall, 6:30 pm Alderson Lions Club • The Big Wheel Restaurant, Alderson WV, 304/445-2674, 6:30 pm Carnifax Ferry Ruritan Club • Community Building, Bob Brown 304/872-2043, 6:30 pm Frankford Ruritan Club • Frankford Elementary School, Rt 219, Jody Garavaglia 304/497-2025, 6:30 pm Lewisburg Lioness Club • Dining Room, Greenbrier Valley Airport, RT.219 N, Lewisburg WV, 304/645-6762, 6:30 pm Organ Cave Ruritan Club • Organ Cave Community Center & Elizabeth Chapel Methodist Church, Organ Cave WV, Sue McCormick 304/6474269, 6:30 pm Spanishburg Ruritan Club • BV-VFD Community Room, Beckley Rd, Spanishburg WV, Richard Godfrey 304/425-1282, 6:30 pm AA • St. James Episc Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm closed Williamsburg Ruritan Club • Williamsburg Community Building, Jim Phares 304/392-6064, 7 pm AL-A-NON • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm Rainelle City Council meeting • City Hall, Rainelle WV, 304/438-7191, 7 pm WSS Lions Club • WSS Community Center, Tuckahoe RD, White Sulphur Springs WV, Rodena Belcher 304/645-1831, 7 pm Fort Hill Rebekah Lodge #17 • I.O.O.F. Lodge Hall, Madeline Moses 304/645-2041, 7:30 pm Lewisburg Masons • Greenbrier Lodge #42 A.F.& A.M-Masonic Temple, McElhenney Lane, Lbg WV, Jim Coleman 304/645-3768, 7:30 pm I.O.O.F. • I.O.O.F. Lodge, Main St, Hot Springs VA, 8 pm AA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church Annex, Maple Street, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

TUESD AY Oct ober 114 4&N 1 TUESDA October Noovember 111

Full Moon in Ares 4:02 pm • Sukkoth • October 14 Veteran’s Day • November 11 Adult Basis Education & Literacy Programs •

304.438-6350 or 304.438-8071

Children's Story Hour •

C.P.J. Memorial Library, Covington VA, 10:30am, 540/962-3321

AA • St. James Epis Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon Grief Support • Alleghany Regional Hospital, Covington VA, 3 - 4 pm, call 540/862-6214

Fun & Games • Stories & Crafts • ages 7-12, Bath County Public Library, Warm Springs VA, 540/839-7286, 3:45-4:45 pm

G.E.D. Classes • Ronceverte Public Library, Ronceverte WV, 304/645-7911, 5:15-8:15 pm

Wednesday Bingo • early bird starts at 6pm, Bingo 6:30 pm, The Douglas Center, 108 Douglas St, Princeton WV, sponsored by Concord College Athletics Greenbrier Percussion Group • Greenbrier Community Center, Oak & Feamster St., Lewisburg WV, 304/497-3397, 6 pm NA • Emmanuel Episcopal, Covington VA, 6:30 pm Lewisburg Cub Scouts • Lewisburg United Methodist Church, 7 pm AA • St. James Episcopal Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm AL-A-NON • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Maple Street, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • OD, LW, SO, Emmanuel Episcopal Church Annex, Maple Street, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

Kidney beans actually heal and help maintain kidney function and yes, they do look exactly like the human kidneys.

THURSD AY Oct ober 116 6&N THURSDA October Noovember 20

National Boss Day • October 16 free computer classes, typing, writing & math skills, GED prep, tutoring, Adult Basis Education & Literacy Programs • Peterstown Public Library, Peterstown WV, 304/753-9568 free computer classes, typing, writing & math skills, GED prep, tutoring, Story Hour for 3, 4 & 5 year olds • Summers County Public Library, 10:30 am, Hinton WV, 304/466-4490 9 am-5 pm, Monroe County Public Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038 Playground for 3 Year Olds • Playground for 4 Year Olds • Green Bank Library, Greenbank WV, 10-11:30 am Green Bank Library, Greenbank WV, 10-11:30 am Playground for 3 to 5 Year Olds • A.A.R.P. • Lewisburg United Methodist Church, Lewisburg WV, Hillsboro Public Library, Hillsboro WV, 10-11:30 am Rev. Carl Renick 304/645-6304, 11:30 am WSS Rotary Club • April's Pizza, WSS, 304/536-4309, 12 Noon AA • St. James Epis Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon AA • St. James Epis Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon closed AA • OD, NS, Salvation Army Building, Covington VA, 12:15 pm Greater Bluefield Chamber of Commerce Board Meeting • Adult Basic Education Classes, GED's & more • 12 noon, 304/327-7184 Monroe Co Public Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038, 5:30-8:30 pm Lewisburg BPW Club • Dining Room, Greenbrier Valley Airport, Garnette DAR • Linda Walls 304/645-2441, 1:30 pm TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) • Rhema Christian Center, Fairlea WV, Haynes 304/645-3961, 6 pm Lewisburg Lions Club • Lewisburg United Methodist Church, Lewisburg weight-in 4:45-5:45 pm, meeting 6pm, Leader Cindy Rhodes, 304/392-2261 Coal Valley Ruritan Club • Welch Hospital, WV, Troy Holbrook 304/497-2966, 6:30 pm Walt Garrett 304/436-8682, Board meets at 5 pm; Club meets at 6 pm NA • St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 6:30 pm Gap Mills Ruritan Club • Carmel Presbyterian Church, Zenith Rd, Gap Covington BPW •meet at Best Western, 6pm, Covington VA, 540/965-6360 Mills, Duane Miller 304/772-3369, 7 pm Ronceverte Lions Club • Lion's Den, Ronceverte, 6:30 pm Nemours Ruritan Club • Ruritan Community Building, Alleghany Highlands Orchestra • rehearsal 6:30 - 8:30 pm, fellowNemours Valley Rd, Sandra Hampton 304/979-8778, 7 pm ship hall, First Presbyterian Church, Locust & Maple, Covington VA, for Shenandoah Manor Family Council • membership and auditions 540/962-4847 meeting at Shenandoah Manor dining room, 304/645-7270, 7 pm Maxwelton Ruritan Club • Someplace Else Restaurant, Rockbridge Greens • regular meeting, Rockbridge Regional Lewisburg WV, Patricia Tyree 304/645-7410, 6:30 pm Library, 138 S. Main Street, Lexington VA, 540/261-4306, 7- 9 pm American Cancer Society • Greenbrier Valley Medical Center, Fairlea Greenbrier Habitat for Humanity • all interested are invited to attend, 304/645-3886 for monthly meeting place, 7 pm WV, Louise Machburn 304/647-4530, 7 pm Ronceverte River Festival Meeting • WSS Rescue Squad • WSS Firehouse, 7 pm Ronceverte Public Library, Marty Smith, 7 pm Clifton Forge City Council • main courtroom, 7:30 pm Single Again • Lewisburg United Methodist Church, NA • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7:30 pm Lewisburg WV, Kyle Harper 304/645-2784, 7 pm Greenbrier County Board of Education • Friends of the Greenbrier County Library • County School Board office, Lewisburg WV, 7:30 pm. Lewisburg Library Annex, Lewisburg WV, 304/647-6231, 7 pm Xi Gamma Nu Sorority • 304/647-5051, 7:30 pm Throttle Throbs Car Club Meeting • rotating monthly dinner meetI.O.O.F. • Lodge Hall, Ronceverte WV, 7:30 pm Laureate Alpha Epsilon Sorority of Beta Sigma Phi • Barbara Livesay ings in Greenbrier County every, for more information on club & activities call Ron Ness 304/497-3456, 7 pm 304/647-3100, 7:30 pm Gamma Chi Sorority of Beta Sigma Phi • 7:30 pm Lodge Shryock 47 • Ronceverte Masonic Lodge, 7:30 pm AL-A-NON • St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Clifton Blue Bell Garden Club • 304/645-3403, 7:30 pm NA • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7:30 pm Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • ST/O St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Clifton Eastern Star • Masonic Lodge Hall, WSS, 8 pm, 304/536-2151 AA • First Presbyterian Church, White Sulphur Springs WV, 8pm Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • Alleghany Highlands Community Services, 305 Monroe Ave,. AA • OD, NS, St. Andrews Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 8 pm AA • Caldwell Presbyterian Church, Route 60, Caldwell WV, 7 pm Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm


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VALLEY GUIDE

October -No vember 2008 October-No -Nov

FRID AY Oct ober 117 7&N 1 FRIDA October Noovember 221

AA • OD, NS, Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Covington VA 12 noon NA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Covington VA, 6:30 pm AA • St. James Episcopal Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm AA• Big Clear Creek Baptist Church, Anjean Rd, Rupert WV, Doc 304/ 392-5456, 7 pm AL-A-NON • St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Clifton Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • OD, NS, St. Andrews Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 8 pm

Olives assist the health and function of the ovaries.

SATURD AY Oct ober 118 8&N 5 TURDA October Noovember 115

AA • Lewisburg United Methodist Church, 214 E. Washington St, use entrance off Lee St, Lewisburg WV (no smoking on church property) 10 am closed meeting: step study, Janeal Q 304/645-6070 Story Time & Crafts for ages 3 to 5 • White Sulphur Springs Public Library, 304/536-1171, 10 - 11 am Honnahlee Saturday Playdays • pre-& elementary child activities, Honnahlee, Lewisburg WV, 304/645-6123, 10:30 am AA • Monroe County Public Library, Rt 219, Union WV, Dwight 304/772-3487, 4 pm Bingo • Ronceverte Firehouse, Ronceverte WV, 6 pm NA • St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 6:30 pm AA• Big Clear Creek Baptist Church, Anjean Rd, Rupert WV, Doc 304/ 392-5456, 7 pm AL-A-NON • St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Clifton Forge VA, 540/ 962-0137, 8 pm AA • OD, NS, St. Andrews Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 8 pm

SUND AY Oct ober 119 9&N 6 SUNDA October Noovember 116

NA • Emmanuel Epis, Covington VA, 6:30 pm AA • St. Thomas Epis Church, Rt. 60, WSS WV, 7 pm AA • OD, St.Lukes, Hot Springs VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits. -Albert Einstein

MOND AY Oct ober 20 & N 7 MONDA October Noovember 117 Lewisburg Rotary Club •

The Elk’s Club, Lewisburg WV ,John MCCaffrey 304/392-2371, 12 noon

AA • United Methodist Church, Pocahontas & Walnut Sts, Ronceverte WV, 12 noon

Family Refuge Center Board of Directors •

Family Refuge Center, Lewisburg WV, 304/645-6334, 4:30 pm

Lewisburg Foundation • Old Stone Presbyterian Church, Lewisburg WV, Steve Hunter 304/647-5007, 4:30 pm

Adult Basic Education Classes, GED's & more • Peterstown Public Library, Peterstown WV, 304/772-3038, 5:30-8:30 pm

Civil Air Patrol (CAP) Composite Squadron WV 100 • aerospace

education, cadet programs, emergency services, CAP Squadron facility, Greenbrier Valley Airport, Maxwelton WV, cadets - youth 7th grade & up meet at 6 pm, adults at 7 pm NAACP • 118 S. Lexington, Covington VA, 6 pm Shady Spring Ruritan Club • Perry Memorial United Methodist Church, 100 Shady Lane, Donald Collins 304/763-4336, 6 pm Rock Camp-Wikle Ruritan Club • call for site & time, Randolph Miller 304/832-6820, Union/Lindside WV, 6:30 pm Gauneka Ruritan Club • Community Center, Owen ‘Junior’ Facemire 304/632-2070, Gauley Bridge WV, 6:30 pm AL-A-NON • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm Bereaved Parents • Lewisburg United Methodist Church, Lewisburg WV, Betty Ewart 304/645-3048, 7 pm AA • St. James Episc Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm closed Bluegrass Ruritan Club • call for area church meeting location, Joe Wiley 304/645-2573, Pickaway WV, 7 pm Lewisburg Boy Scout Troop 70 • Lewisburg United Methodist Church, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm Ronceverte Friends of the Library • Ronceverte Public Library, Ronceverte WV, Carrie Curry, 304/645-7911, 7 pm WSS Public Library Board • WSS Library, 304/536-1171, 7 pm Greenbrier Commandery #15 K.T. • Masonic Lodge, Lewisburg WV, Lee Bell 304/645-1525, 7:30pm Roanoke Valley Astronomical Society • Science Museum of Western VA, Roanoke VA 540/ 342-5710, 7:30pm USABDA - Ballroom Dancers of Lewisburg • St. James Epis. Church, 218 Church St, Lewisburg WV, 7:30 - 9:30 pm, Shirley Griffith 304/536-1337 AA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church Annex, Maple Street, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

TUESD AY Oct ober 221 1&N 8 UESDA October Noovember 118 Playground for 3-5 Year Olds •

Public Library, Greenbank & Hillsboro WV, 10-11:30 am Story Hour for 3, 4 & 5 year olds • Summers County Public Library, 10:30 am, Hinton WV, 304/466-4490 Duplicate Bridge Club • Covington Senior Center, Rockbridge Ave., Covington VA, 10:30 am Busy Bees • Emmanuel United Methodist Church, White Sulphur Springs WV, 304/536-4016, 11:30 am AA • St. James Epis Church, 216 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon AA • OD, NS, Salvation Army Bldg, Covington VA, 12:15 pm Greater Greenbrier Valley Home Builders Association • for builders & businesses associated with builders in Greenbrier & Monroe Counties to exchange ideas, discuss regulations governing the building business, meeting at 6:30 pm, call 304/645-3230 for site Quota Club • Ethel Dixon 304/536-1888, 6:30 pm NA • St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 6:30 pm Athens Women's Club • Anderson Hall, Concord United Methodist Church, Athens WV, 304/384-7146, September - June at 7 pm GFWC Rupert Woman's Club • Community Building, Rupert WV, 7pm Cameras In Action • all welcome, St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Oak Hill WV, Nancy Wiseman 304/574-1718, 7 pm Clifton Forge VFW Post 4299 • Clifton Forge National Guard Armory, Room 648C, Clifton Forge VA, 7 pm Hinton City Council meeting • City Hall, Hinton WV, 304/466-3255, 7:30 pm Alderson Junior Woman’s Club • City Hall, Alderson WV, Mary Danberry 304/445-2743, 7:30 pm Covington VFW Post 1033 • VFW Hall, Dolly Ann Drive, Covington VA, 7:30 pm Clifton Forge Main Street, Inc. • Board meeting, Main Street office, W. Ridgeway St., Clifton Forge VA, 7:30 pm I.O.O.F. • Greenbrier Lodge Hall #146, Ronceverte WV, 7:30 pm Lewisburg City Council meeting • City Hall, 7:30 pm NA • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7:30 pm Ronceverte Masonic Lodge Chapter • Masonic Lodge, Ronceverte WV, 304/645-7882, 7:30pm AL-A-NON • St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Clifton Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • ST/O St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Clifton Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • OD, NS, St. Andrews Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 8 pm AA • Caldwell Presbyterian Church on Route 60, Caldwell WV, 7 pm

Spinach and Orange Mix Spinach has lots of iron. To make it a stand-out, your body can absorb this iron better when accompanied by vitamin C because, says Liz A. Applegate, Ph.D., director of sports nutrition at the University of California, Davis, CA, vitamin C converts the iron in spinach into a form that is more available to the body. The same is true for other vegetarian sources of iron — such as broccoli and tofu. It doesn't take a lot of C — One medium orange will do the trick. Other mixtures — half a red pepper in spinach salad, several thick slices of tomato, or 1/2 cup of sliced strawberries -- all good sources of C.

WEDNESD AY Oct ober 22 & N WEDNESDA October Noovember 26 Adult Basis Education & Literacy Programs •

free computer classes, typing, writing & math, GED prep, tutoring, 9 am-7 pm, Monroe County Public Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038 Children's Story Hour • C.P.J. Memorial Library, Covington VA, 10:30am, 540/962-3321 Savannah Garden Club • call Phyllis Tuckwiller, 304/645-6633, 11:30 am AA • St. James Epis Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon Lewisburg House & Garden Club • 304/647-5007, 1 pm Valley Trails Garden Club • 304/645-3163, 1:30 pm Grief Support • ARHospital, Lowmoor VA, 3-4 pm, 540/862-6214 G.E.D. • Ronceverte Public Lib, Ronceverte WV, 304/645-7911, 5:15-8:15 pm Greenbrier Percussion Group • Greenbrier Community Center, Oak&Feamster St, Lewisburg WV, 304/497-3397, 6 pm NA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Covington VA, 6:30 pm Greenbrier County Planning Commission • Greenbrier County Courthouse, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm Greenbrier County Democratic Women's Club • Greenbrier County Court House, Nadine Smith 304/645-1276, 7 pm AA • St. James Epis, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm Eastern Greenbrier JAYCEES • Island Park Club House, Ronceverte WV, 8 pm, 304/536-2940 or 304/ 536-9111 AL-A-NON • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Maple Street, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • OD, LW, SO, Emmanuel Episcopal Church Annex, Maple Street, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

CL UBS & OR GANIZA TIONS CLUBS ORG ANIZATIONS THURSD AY Oct ober 23 & N 7 THURSDA October Noovember 227

New Moon in Sagittarius 11:55 am • Thanksgiving Day November 27 Hinton Ruritan Club • First Presbyterian Church, 3rd & Ballengee, Hinton WV, Ron Seaton 304/466-1365

Adult Basis Education & Literacy Programs •

free computer classes, typing, writing & math, GED prep, tutoring, 9 am5 pm, Monroe County Public Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038 Playground for 3 Year Olds • Green Bank Library, Greenbank WV, 10-11:30 am 3-5 Year Old Playground • Hillsboro Library, Hillsboro WV, 10-11:30 am WSS Rotary Club • April’s Pizzeria, WSS, WV, 304/536-4309, 12 noon AA • St. James Epis Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon closed Alleghany Highlands Orchestra • rehearsal 6:30 - 8:30 pm, fellowship hall, First Presbyterian Church, Locust & Maple, Covington VA, for membership and auditions 540/962-4847 We Stitch • learn to stitch & expand your knowledge of stitchery, A-H Embroiderer's Chapter, Embroiderer's Guild of America, Clifton Woods Apts, Clifton Forge VA, 540/863-9581, 7 pm Laureate Alpha Epsilon • Phyllis Boone 304/645-2534, 7 pm Ronceverte River Festival Meeting • Ronceverte Public Library, Marty Smith, 7 pm TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) • Rhema Christian Center, Fairlea WV, weight-in 4:45-5:45 pm, meeting 6pm, Leader Cindy Rhodes, 304/392-2261 Greenbrier Valley Shrine Club • McElhenney Lane, Lewisburg WV, Maynard B. Hinkle 304/645-3291, 7:30 pm USABDA - Ballroom Dancers of Lewisburg • St. James Episcopal , 218 Church St, Lewisburg WV, 7:30 - 9:30 pm, Shirley Griffith 304/536-1337 NA • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7:30 pm AA • Alleghany Highlands Community Services, 305 Monroe Ave, Covington,VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm Lewisburg Elks Club • Elks Club, Lewisburg WV, 8 pm AA • First Presbyterian Church, White Sulphur Springs WV, 8pm

FRID AY Oct ober 224 4&N FRIDA October Noovember 28

United Nations Day • October 24 AA • OD, NS, Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Covington VA 12 noon AL-A-NON • St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Clifton Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

AA • St. James Episcopal Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm AA• Big Clear Creek Baptist Church, Anjean Rd, Rupert WV, Doc 304/ 392-5456, 7 pm

AA • OD, NS, St. Andrews Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge, VA, 8 pm

SATURD AY Oct ober 25 & N TURDA October Noovember 22

AA • Lewisburg United Methodist Church, 214 E. Washington St, use

entrance off Lee St, Lewisburg WV (no smoking on church property) 10 am closed meeting: step study, Janeal Q 304/645-6070 AA • Monroe County Library, Union WV, Dwight 304/772-3487, 4 pm NA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Covington VA, 6:30 pm Pipestem Ruritan Club • Ruritan Community Building, Broadway Rd, Edward P. Lowe 304/466-0845, 6 pm AA• Big Clear Creek Baptist Church, Anjean Rd, Rupert WV, Doc 304/ 392-5456, 7 pm AA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church Annex, Maple Street, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • OD, St. Lukes Episcopal Church, Hot Springs VA, 8 pm

SUND AY Oct ober 26 & N SUNDA October Noovember 23

AA •Lewisburg Library Annex, Lewisburg, WV, 304/645-7936, 10 am NA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Covington VA, 6:30 pm AA • St. Thomas Epis Church, Rt. 60, White Sulphur Springs WV, 7 pm AA • OD, St. Lukes, Hot Springs VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

MOND AY Oct ober 227 7&N 4 MONDA October Noovember 224 Lewisburg Rotary Club •

The Elk’s Club, Lewisburg WV, John MCCaffrey 304/392-2371, 12 noon

AA • U. Methodist Church, Pocahontas & Walnut, Ronceverte WV, noon Adult Basic Education Classes, GED's & more •Peterstown Public Library, Peterstown WV, 304/772-3038, 5:30-8:30 pm

White Sulphur Springs Ruritan Club • White Sulphur Springs Civic Center, White Sulphur Springs WV, Gary Ray 304/536-1099, 6 pm

Alderson Lions Club • 6:30 pm Fairlea Ruritan Club • Fairlea Firehouse, 1st Street, Fairlea WV, Kenny Shafer 304/645-7832, 6:30 pm

Civil Air Patrol (CAP) Composite Squadron WV 100 • aerospace

education, cadet programs, emergency services, CAP Squadron facility, Greenbrier Valley Airport, Maxwelton WV, cadets - youth 7th grade and up meet at 6 pm, adults meet at 7 pm Ronceverte Woman's Club • Ronceverte Public Library , 7 pm WSS Lions Club • WSS Community Center, Tuckahoe RD, White Sulphur Springs WV, Rodena Belcher 304/645-1831, 7 pm AA • St. James Episc Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm closed AL-A-NON • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm Lewisburg Masons • Greenbrier Lodge #42 A.F. & A.M-Masonic Temple, McElhenney Lane, Lewisburg WV, Jim Coleman 304/645-3768, 7:30 pm Fort Hill Rebekah Lodge #17 • 7:30 pm VFW Post 4482 Auxiliary • VFW Hall, A. Butts 304/645-6853, 7:30 pm I.O.O.F. • I.O.O.F. Lodge, Main St., Hot Springs VA, 8 pm AA • Emmanuel EpisAnnex, Maple St, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm


CL UBS & OR GANIZA TIONS CLUBS ORG ANIZATIONS TUESD AY Oct ober 28 & N TUESDA October Noovember 25

VALLEY GUIDE

FRID AY Oct ober 331 1 FRIDA October

Halloween • Samhain • October 31 New Moon in Scorpio • October 28 • OD, NS, Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Covington VA, 12 noon AA Pocahontas County Free Day at the Landfill • house hold/white AL-A-NON • St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., goods(take appliances:refrigerators/stoves free any day landfill is open) Clifton Forge VA, 540/ 962-0137, 8 pm Adult Basis Education & Literacy Programs • AA • OD, NS, St. Andrews Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 8pm free computer class training in Microsoft Word for Windows, Excel, typing, AA • St. James Episcopal Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, Steve enhancement of writing & math skills, GED preparation, college level tutoring, services available at Peterstown Public Library, Peterstown WV, 304/753-9568 Story Hour for 3, 4, 5 year olds • Summers County Public Library, 10:30 am, Hinton WV, 304/466-4490 Playground for 4 Year Olds • Green Bank Library, Greenbank WV, 10-11:30 am Playground for 3-5 Year Olds • Hillsboro Library, Hillsboro WV, 10-11:30 am Duplicate Bridge Club • Covington Senior Center, Rockbridge Ave., Covington VA, 10:30 am AA • St. James Episc Church, 216 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon AA • OD, NS, Salvation Army Building, Covington VA, 12:15 pm Downtown Lewisburg Merchants Association • call Donna Toney for meeting location, 304/645-4022, 5:30 pm Adult Basic Education Classes, GED's & more • Monroe Cty Public Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038, 5:30-8:30 pm Indian Rocks Ruritan Club • Indian Rocks Lodge, Craigsville WV, George Knight 304/742-8822, 6 pm Birch River Ruritan Club • Birch River School, Dille WV, Drema Davis 304/649-2924, 6:30 pm NA • St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 6:30 pm NA • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7:30 pm AL-A-NON • St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Clifton Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • ST/O St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., Clifton Forge VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • OD, NS, St. Andrews Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 8 pm AA • Caldwell Presbyterian Church, Route 60, Caldwell WV, 7 pm

304/645-7294, 7 pm

AA• Big Clear Creek Baptist, Anjean Rd, Rupert WV, Doc 304/392-5456, 7 pm

Add a little extra-virgin olive oil to your zucchini, spinach, and other dark green vegetables to unleash the carotenoid lutein, an antioxidant that may help protect against age-related macular degeneration. Instead of using fat-free dressing on your salad, drizzle on an olive oil--based one to release even more carotenoid lutein.

SATURD AY N TURDA Noovember 29

Flea & Farmer’s Market • WV State Fairgrounds, Rt. 219 S, Fairlea WV, 304-645-1090 or 304/647-5916

AA • Lewisburg United Methodist Church, 214 E. Washington St, use

entrance off Lee St, Lewisburg WV (no smoking on church property) 10 am closed meeting: step study, Janeal Q 304/645-6070 Onions look like body cells. Story Time & Crafts for ages 3 to 5 • White Sulphur Springs Public Library, 304/ 536-1171, 10 -11 am Research shows that onions Honnahlee Saturday Playdays • activities for preschool to help clear waste materials elementary age children, Honnahlee, 117 East Washington Street, from all of the body cells. Lewisburg WV, 304/ 645-6123, 10:30 am Onions even produce tears which wash the AA • Monroe County Public Library, Rt 219, Union WV, Dwight 304/772-3487, 4 pm epithelial layers of the eyes. Bingo • Ronceverte Firehouse, Ronceverte WV, 6 pm NA • St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 6:30 pm WEDNESD AY Oct ober 29 WEDNESDA October AA• Big Clear Creek Baptist Church, Anjean Rd, Rupert WV, Doc 304/ Adult Basis Education & Literacy Programs • free computer classes, typing, writing & math, GED prep, tutoring, 9 am- 392-5456, 7 pm AL-A-NON • St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 516 McCormick Blvd., 7 pm, Monroe County Public Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038 Story Hour • WSS Public Library, WSS, WV, 10 am, 304/536-1171 Clifton Forge VA, 540/ 962-0137, 8 pm AA • OD, NS, St. Andrews Episcopal Church, Clifton Forge VA, 8 pm Children's Story Hour • C.P.J. Memorial Library, Covington VA, 10:30am, 540/962-3321

AA • St. James Epis Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon Grief Support • Alleghany Regional Hospital, Covington VA,

3 - 4 pm, call 540/862-6214 G.E.D. • 5:15-8:15 pm, Ronceverte Public Lib, Ronceverte WV, 304/645-7911 Greenbrier Percussion Group • 6 pm, Greenbrier Community Center, Oak&Feamster St, Lewisburg WV, 304/497-3397 NA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Covington VA, 6:30 pm Greenbrier County Planning Commission • Greenbrier County Courthouse, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm Greenbrier County Democratic Women's Club • Greenbrier County Court House, Nadine Smith 304/645-1276, 7 pm AA • St. James Epis, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 7 pm AL-A-NON • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Maple Street, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • OD, LW, SO, Emmanuel Episcopal Church Annex, Maple Street, Covington VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

THURSD AY Oct ober 30 THURSDA October

Sweet Potatoes look like the pancreas and actually balance the glycemic index of diabetics.

SUND AY N SUNDA Noovember 30 1st Sunday of Advent • November 30 Religious Society of Friends (Quaker) Meeting for Worship Worship• Lewisburg Library Annex, Lewisburg, WV, 304/645-7936, 10 am

NA • Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Covington VA, 6:30 pm AA • St. Thomas Epis Church, Rt. 60, White Sulphur Springs WV, 7 pm AA • Alderson Presbyterian Church, basement on Monroe County side, Alderson WV, 7 pm

AA • OD, St. Lukes, Hot Springs VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm

Thaddeus James Searle’s 9th Birthday • October 30 Adult Basis Education & Literacy Programs •

free computer classes, typing, writing & math, GED prep, tutoring, 9 am5 pm, Monroe County Public Library, Union WV, 304/772-3038 Playground for 3 Year Olds • Green Bank Library, Greenbank WV, 10-11:30 am 3-5 Year Old Playground • Hillsboro Library, Hillsboro WV, 10-11:30 am WSS Rotary Club • April’s Pizzeria, WSS, WV, 304/536-4309, 12 noon AA • St. James Epis Church, 218 Court St, Lewisburg WV, 12 noon closed TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) • Rhema Christian Center, Fairlea WV, weight-in 4:45-5:45 pm, meeting 6pm, Leader Cindy Rhodes, 304/392-2261 Alleghany Highlands Orchestra • rehearsal 6:30 - 8:30 pm, fellowship hall, First Presbyterian Church, Locust & Maple, Covington VA, for membership and auditions 540/962-4847 USABDA - Ballroom Dancers of Lewisburg • St. James Episcopal , 218 Church St, Lewisburg WV, 7:30 - 9:30 pm, Shirley Griffith 304/536-1337 NA • St. James Episcopal Church, Lewisburg WV, 7:30 pm AA • Alleghany Highlands Community Services, 305 Monroe Ave, Covington,VA, 540/962-0137, 8 pm AA • First Presbyterian Church, White Sulphur Springs WV, 8pm

Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away. - Antoine de Saint-Exupery

October -No vember 2008 October-No -Nov

25

Carnegie Hall Fall 2008 Class & Workshop Schedule Embr oider Embroider oideryy with Evelyn Lewis meets Thursday evenings in the Board Room from 6:30pm-8pm for 4 sessions, ages 13+ to learn how to embroider raised roses & other basic stitches, beginners welcome, bring your own thimble, 6” or 8” embroidery hoop, October 20, 23, November 6, 13, $80 for 4 classes Creative W riting: Building a Community of Inf luence with Tim Writing: Influence Armentrout meets Wednesday evenings in the Board Room, 7-9pm, for 7 sessions, writers ages 14+ construct a literary community, experiment with writing, performance & grass roots publication, Oct 15, 22, 29, Nov 5, 12, 19, Dec 3- no class Nov 26, $100 for 7 classes Zumba – Latin American Aer obics with Cate Bennett meets WednesAerobics day evenings in the Dance Studio, 5:45pm-7pm, for 6 sessions, ages 12 + for Latin dance aerobics including hiphop, merenque, and salsa, October 15, 22, 29, November 5, 12, 19, , $60 for 6 classes Pilat es with Cate Bennett meets Tuesdays & Thursdays mornings in Pilates the Dance Studio, 7-8am, for 12 classes ages 15+, bring an exercise mat if you have one, to start your day with mind/body exercises using the core of your body, learn the basics of Pilates: breath, balance, centering & alignment, wear “movable” clothes, October 14, 16, 21, 23, 28, 30, November 4, 6, 11, 13, 18, 20, $85 for 12 classes Beginning PPen en & Ink Dr awing with Lynda Howe mets Tuesday mornDrawing ings in Art Studio, 10-11:30am, for 6 sessions for those who have always wanted to draw — a class just for you, designed for those with little or no experience, October 14, 21, 28, November 4, 11, 18, $60 for 6 classes (this INCLUDES materials) Oil PPainting ainting in the FFauvis auvis auvistt SStyle tyle with Mark Cline meets Tuesday evenings in Art Studio, 6:30-8:30pm, for 6 sessions for ages 16 + to learn how to paint in the fauvist style, learn color theory & color mixing, October 14, 21, 28, November 4, 11, 18, $100 for 6 classes (materials may cost extra) Pott er or all Le vels with Gary Roper meets Thursday evenings in otter eryy ffor Levels Pottery Studio, 6:30-9:30 pm, for 6 sessions, ages 18+ to learn basic techniques & fundamentals of hand building & throwing clay on potter’s wheel, October 16, 23, 30, November 6, 13, 20, $155 for 6 classes includes 25 lbs of clay, glaze, firings Dining Etique tt or TTeens eens with Christoulla Rock meets Saturday, Etiquett ttee ffor October 18 in Old Stone Room, 9am-12 noon, ages 13-19 learn the ABC’s of table manners, do’s and don’ts of dining & how to eat difficult foods, $85 (includes materials) Dem al R ugs – TTribal ribal R ugs of Centr al Asia with Demyy s tifying Orient Oriental Rugs Rugs Central Stephen Jackendoff meets in Old Stone Room Monday, October 20, 7-9pm, for all ages to explain how oriental rugs are made, using an actual working loom, $15 for lecture/demonstration/discussion — ALL PROCEEDS from this class benefit Carnegie Hall Intr se with Dave Buhrman features 1 class on WednesIntroo ttoo the Univer Universe day, October 22 from 6:30-9pm, Thursday, November 20 from 6:309pm on the stage in the auditorium; or Saturday, December 13 from 1-3:30 pm in Dance Studio/Annex, $24, for ages 8+ to watch a video presentation & discuss the images captured with 15” telescope, then enter Carnegie’s Starlab planetarium to learn how to find some of the major constellations and appreciate their significance, optional outdoor stargazing after evening class Learn ttoo Knit – Mak Makee a bag with Mariah Miller meets Saturday, October 25 in Art Studio, 9am-2:30pm, ages 3 + make a small felted bag & learn basics of knitting: cast on, knit, pearl, seam, cast off, beginners & others welcome, $35 + $9 for materials fee, bring your own needles (size 10.5 or 6.5 mm) straight or circular, yarn provided, bring your own lunch, or plan to eat in downtown Lewisburg Dining Etique tt or Adults with Christoulla Rock meets Saturday, Etiquett ttee ffor October 25 in Old Stone Room, 9am-12 noon, ages 20+ learn the ABC’s of table manners, do’s and don’ts of dining & how to eat difficult foods, $85 (includes materials) Theatre Super rivia & Pr anks Supersstitions TTrivia Pranks anks, a lecture/demo with Lynda Howe in auditorium, Thursday, October 30, 7-8:30pm, for all ages to learn why ... you can’t whistle in a theatre, it is called a green room, do all theatres have ghosts-find answers to the mysteries behind the curtain, $10 per person Nuno Felt scar kshop with Lynn Creamer meets Saturday, Noscarff wor workshop vember 1 in Art Studio, 10am-4pm, ages 16 + make delicate silk & wool scarf using a process which felts the wool onto the silk, $65 + materials fee based on materials used appx $10, bring 2 bath towels, plastic bag to carry wet items home, scissors, lunch. Optional: a camera to document the process or Children with Christoulla Rock meets Saturday, Dining Etique tt Etiquett ttee ffor November 1 in Old Stone Room, 9am-12 noon, ages 8-12 learn the ABC’s of table manners, do’s and don’ts of dining & how to eat difficult foods, $85 (includes materials) Creating an Inspiring Envir onment ffor or Learning with Barry Harel on Environment Saturday, November 8, for classroom teachers, workshop leaders, Sunday school teachers, or anyone who leads a group and wants to learn strategies to enhance learning using the Tribes cooperative learning process, Board Room, 9am-2 pm, $40, bring your own lunch Intr al SLR Phot ogr aph Introo ttoo Digit Digital Photogr ograph aphyy with Frances Dowdy meets Saturday, November 15 in Board Room, 1-5pm, ages 16+ learn essential camera functions, exposure concepts & more, $50 (NOT for those with point & shoot cameras.) Bring your own Digital SLR camera Knitting with Double-point ed needles with Mariah Miller meets SatDouble-pointed urday, November 15 in Art Studio, 9am-4pm, ages 13 + make a winter hat: add to knitting skills, learn to knit in round & on doublepointed needles, beginners & others welcome, $55, bring darning needle, set of size 7 double pointed needles, 1-2 colors of 200 yds worsted wt wool yarn (Nature Spun or Ella Rae Classic is good), materials available at All About Beauty, Lewisburg, bring lunch


26

VALLEY GUIDE

October -No vember 2008 October-No -Nov

Ent er om page 1188 Enter erttainment Calendar continued frfrom

Tuesday, November 11 Old Time Music Jam Live from Work Horse Cafe

Tilting at Windmills

GOING PL ACES PLA

by Charles Garratt

The ultimate test of a man's conscience may be his will-

FREE mountain music jam session, 6:00 pm, musicians welcome, audience encouraged to dance and sing, concessions available, ingness to sacrifice something today for future generations whose words of thanks will not be heard. Virginia Horse Center, Lexington VA, 540.464-2950

Wednesday-Sunday, November 11-16 The SSttoc ockked Mar Markket

~ Gaylord Nelson

Now I know what happened between early ’07 and presented by Junior League of Roanoke Valley, Roanoke Civic Cenlate spring ’08. I went to work for a local newspaper and ter, Roanoke VA 540.853-5483

Wednesday, November 12 Homestead Postcard Club

Reynolds Homestead, 7pm, Critz, VA, 276.694-7181

High Tech Wednesday, guided tours through parts of NRAO

normally off-limits, reservations suggested, National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Green Bank WV 304.456-2150

Thursday, November 13 NAMI New River/Greenbrier Valley , all welcome,

meet at 7 pm, Shepherds Care Worship Center, Stokes Drive-near McDonalds & Kroger’s, Hinton WV, 304.445.7866

Frida da 4-1 5 ridayy-Satur -Saturda dayy, N Noovember 114-1 4-15 In Praise of the Needle, all farms 9-5 daily, Frontier Culture Museum, Staunton, 540.332-7850

Frida 4-1 6 ridayy-Sunda -Sundayy, N Noovember 114-1 4-16 Wine/Gourme eek end Wine/Gourmett W Week eekend & FFall all Scr apbooking W eek end, Canaan Valley Resort, Davis WV Scrapbooking Week eekend

kept very busy at board meetings and around the county. I also revived an old column in that newspaper which reaches a wide audience. But now I am back on my own and it is past time to get this type of work back up and running. And who knows, perhaps I can reach as many people reading this as I did my old newspaper column. One thing I do know is that I cover a different range of plants and have a different view of nature from those doing flower articles in other periodicals. A brief recap of the summer: I Saw many great native orchids this year. Some Bath County populations have taken a beating, including the S. lacera in Douthat State Park. Ladies Tresses or Spiranthes orchids have small,

304.866-3858, 1.800.622-4121

Ar tis tr ations Artis tistt Demons Demonstr trations

beginning at 10am, Tamarack, Beckley WV, 1.800.tamarack

Satur da 5 Saturda dayy, N Noovember 115 Hunter’s Turkey & Oyster Dinner begins at 5 pm, Stonewall Ruritan Club, McDowell VA, 540.396-3415

Dinner Theat er Theater

dinner & evening entertainment with Karen Vuranch, North Bend State Park, Cairo WV, 304.643-2931

Sunda ednesda 6-1 9 Sundayy-W -Wednesda ednesdayy, N Noovember 116-1 6-19 Capital City Art & Craft Show

180+ craftsmen & fine art, concessions, music, demonstrations, Charleston Civic Center, Charleston WV, 304.388.4250 , for more info email: www.kclccac@aol.com

Monday, November 17 Ornament Making Cont es Contes estt

beginning Nov17, make an ornament out of natural or recycled materials & bring to park for judging, prizes awarded, Douthat State S. lacera, Ladies Tresses or Spiranthes orchids Park, Clifton Forge VA, 540.862.8114 540.862-8100 delicate flowers that spiral around the stem. The year be-

Thursday, November 20 fore last these neat little orchids could be found along the Third Thursdays in White Sulphur Springs & White Sulphur road in Douthat at many places. But last year the park Springs Merchants’ Christmas Open House adopted a scorched earth mowing that has left little growshops open late, refreshments, entertainment, special offers & lots of cheer, 5-8pm, White Sulphur Springs WV, 304.536-9206

Friday-Sunday, November 21, 22, 23 Tellabr ation! National SSttor yt elling Celebr ation ellabration! oryt ytelling Celebration

begins at 10am, Tamarack, Beckley WV, 1.800.tamarack

Satur da Saturda dayy, N Noovember 22 Youth Intern Thanksgiving Dinner

Frontier Culture Museum, Staunton, 540.332-7850

Youth Intern Thanksgiving Dinner, Crab Orchard Museum, Rts. 19 & 460, Crab Orchard Road, Tazewell VA, 276.988-6755

American Herit age Music Hall Heritage

4th Saturday music, dance, featured band 7-11 pm, welcome all ages, family atmosphere, kids play area, donations appreciated, former Island Park Roller Rink, Ronceverte WV, 304.645-2298

Saturday-Sunday, November 22, 23 Ar tis tr ations Artis tistt Demons Demonstr trations

beginning at 10am, Tamarack, Beckley WV, 1.800.tamarack

Sunday, November 23 Lewisburg Holiday Open House

decorations, refreshments, live music, carolers & choirs, cookie decorating, ornament making, booksignings, holiday movies, exhibits, and Santa Claus!, downtown Lewisburg WV, 304.645-1000

Booksigning with Belinda Ander son Anderson

The Open Book, 113B E. Washington St, Lewisburg WV, 304.645-7331

Sunda ednesda 1 Sundayy-W -Wednesda ednesdayy, N Noovember 23-December 331 Holida ver Holidayys at AAvvampat ampatoo Disco Discover veryy Museum

one-of-a-kind trees, wreaths, gingerbread houses created by local artists, designers & chefs, holiday planetarium shows, Saturday holiday plays, Holly Days Friday, Nov 28, Avampato Discovery Museum, The Clay Center, Charleston WV, 304.561-3575

Monda 4 Mondayy, N Noovember 224 Alleghany Highlands Poetry Workshop

meets last Monday of every month, 6 pm, all welcome, public welcome free of charge, Clifton Forge Public Library, 535 Church St,

Ent er Enter erttainment Calendar continued on page 29

ing along the roads. Sadly the little orchids are gone. Perhaps a less intense mowing schedule could allow the plants to survive for the flowers to return next year. In the meantime, S. lacera can be found in grassy fields and pastures and even corners of yards that aren’t regularly mowed. The grass-like leaves blend in most of the year and then are gone by the time the flower spike comes up. The flowers can be hard to see until you spot them once and then the distinct spiral stand out. But then the weedeaters allow people to mow down to bare dirt and I guess people think that is a good thing since it keeps them from having to mow more than once or twice per summer. Meanwhile, wind and water erosion eats away the soil, the grasses and plants like the ladies tresses die off, and all that will seed and live in the bare soil are invasives and plants no one wants. Rather counter productive in the long run. But then we humans are very good at the counter productive in our long run type of decisions. On the first of August, I found a small population of an orchid never recorded here in Virginia. This orchid is known from a number of sites in West Virginia and even further north. There is a lot to tell about this particular plant, but I’ll let that wait until after October when a major journal article about the species may come out. What I find most interesting about the new site in Virginia, is that it is in Highland County, less than a mile from the proposed wind turbine facility. This is not the only rare orchid in the immediate area of the wind turbines. Nor are the orchids likely to be the only rare plants on or near the property. However, the big

pale frilly orchid in Virginia current argument the state is having with the developers is over the view shed of the civil war battlefield on Allegheny mountain. Every one seems to be most worried about the ruined view and the possibility of bat and bird kills. Now I don’t want to minimize either of these concerns, but I wish people could realize how much damage is done just cutting the roads and building the pads for the giant machines. To me, the damage is done long before the towers are finally in the air. We humans just don’t know how to even seem to care about the fragile nature of the soil and plant communities on which life depends. A wind turbine project in Ireland caused 450,000 cubic meters of peat bog to slide down a mountain in 2006. The slide took trees and soil from the mountain along with it, eventually to a river and lake. Tens of thousands of fish were killed. Certainly a real tragedy, but no one seemed concerned about the rare and fragile bog community that was lost and will take centuries to rebuild. The river and lake will be clean in a couple of years and the fish restored by stocking, but the bog community, home to orchids and critters, is centuries old. I don’t know of any bogs on the mountain near the Highland County wind turbine site. There are some seeps and wet areas that I know harbor some rare species. I suspect there are many rare plants and animals yet un-known. When the big trucks are gone, they’ll spray grass seed grown in the Pacific Northwest on everything and when it turns green call it—all fixed. How stupid and short sighted can we be? But at the same time, I haven’t seen solar photovoltaic panels going up on the roof of any local area business or newspaper buildings in some of our Virginia and West Virginia communities. I guess most of those businesses operate mostly during daylight hours and since a lot of work is not done here any more, the main power use is computers and lighting. The whole operation for many of these businesses could be run with solar power. What a statement that would make about priorities and putting resources into things that matter long term. Until we are all willing to make those statements by changing our lifestyles and investing in alternative energy sources, complaining about our view sheds at old battle fields really is Quixotic. There is an old saying about putting your money where your mouth is. Few of us really do. We rant about people mowing orchids we love or putting towers in the landscape we cherish, then we drive our big vehicles an hour to save 10 cents on a can of beans and load up on fads we won’t even remember next year. As much damage as wind turbines do to our mountains, they are far more a symbol of what we do to our own bodies, our relationships, our communities, our environment and the world we live in when we continue to plow through life proudly riding on our white horse, blinders firmly in place, lance in hand, charging forth as the hooves of our faithful steed tear up and sling aside clods of the very fabric upon which our lives and happiness depends. More about Charles Garratt can be viewed on his blog located at http://bathblooming.blogspot.com/


VALLEY GUIDE

FOOD

October -No vember 2008 October-No -Nov

27

Tastefull astefullyy Speaking: Squashes by Chef Ed McArdle

The name ‘squash’ comes form the Algonquin word askutasquash, which means, “eaten raw” and probably derives form the kind of summer squash encountered by early European settlers. The Native Americans taught the settlers how to store and use winter squashes as a staple and demonstrated the curative and hygienic properties of squash seeds. Following the practice of the natives, the settlers ate whatever was available in the wild — fish, fowl, venison — which often carried parasites, and cured themselves by eating squash. Summer Squash Yellow squash and long, slender, dark green zucchini are probably the two most familiar summer squashes, but there are other good varieties. These include the chayote, which is pear-shaped, with white, pale, or dark green skin, the cocozelle, which is shaped like a zucchini and striped green and yellow, and the tiny scalloped pattypan, which has white, yellow, or green stripes and looks like a little flying saucer. Winter Squash Winter squashes all have a hard skin. There are many varieties and a hundred ways to cook them. Today, some are used only as ornamentals. Acorn squash, so named because it’s shaped a bit like a large acorn, is one of the smaller winter squashes. It has a dark green skin and orange flesh. Butternut is fairly large and pear-shaped, with a smooth, cream-colored skin and orange flesh. Delicata, which I think is one of the best-tasting squashes, is long and slender— something like a cucumber. It has a green and beige striped skin and yellow flesh. Golden acorn looks just like acorn squash, except the skin is bright orange and the flesh is sweeter than that of the green acorn squash. Golden nugget is closely related to the acorn variety. A very deep orange color inside and out, it is mostly available in small, single-serving sizes. It can be opened like a small pumpkin, which it looks exactly like, scooped out, basted with butter, and baked whole. Hubbard squash may be the least attractive-looking of the lot, but it’s terrific tasting. Very large in size, with a hard, thick, bumpy, gray-green or orange shell, Hubbards have a very sweet orange flesh. An uncut one can be stored in a cool, dry place for months without losing flavor and sweetness. An average Hubbard squash can weigh twenty pounds. Therefore, most produce stands sell cut halves or quarters. Cut Hubbards should be wrapped and refrigerated, and only keep about a week. Hubbard squash can be baked, mashed, added to soups, or mixed with other vegetables in a casserole. A Hubbard also makes an excellent pie. The flavor is similar to a pumpkin pie, yet sweeter and requires less sugar. The texture is thicker and firmer than fresh pumpkin so it sets up better. An especially nutritious squash variety, Hubbard squash has a high vitamin content and delivers enormous quantities of beta-carotene. Pumpkins are another variety of winter squash, with an orange or tan shell and orange flesh. Pumpkins provides more beta-carotene per serving than any other fruit or vegetable. Spaghetti squash has a round or oval yellow shell. The yellow to cream-colored flesh comes out in strands, which gives the squash its name. Sweet dumpling squash is another one of my favorites. Dumpling squash has a green skin streaked with white and yellow-orange flesh. Turban squash has bumpy orange to red skin with green stripes. The flesh is usually orange. Most turban squash are better to look at than to eat.

Ser ving the Alle ghany Highlands Serving Alleghany for oovver 30 YYear ear earss

Catering • Parties Meetings • Take-Outs

next to the Alleghany Highlands Arts & Crafts Center in Clifton Forge, VA

540-862-1620 Monday-Friday 11:00-9:30 Saturday 3:30-9:30 Closed Sunday

visit www.vicsfamilyrestaurant.com *We are Now a Smoke Free Restaurant!!*

Gingered Butternut Squash Soup with Shiitake Mushrooms Yield 6 servings Ingredients: 1 large, or 2 small butternut squash 1 tablespoon chopped garlic 2 teaspoons fresh ginger, minced 1 teaspoon ground ginger 1 1/2 quarts sodium free chicken stock 1/2 pint non-fat buttermilk 2 ounces honey Juice of 1/2 Lemon Pinch of ground all spice Black pepper to taste 12 medium Shiitake mushrooms 4 leaves of fresh basil, thinly sliced for garnish

Hubbard, acorn, & miniature pumpkins with some fresh picked peppers and grandma's table cloth in the background. photo by Charles Garratt

528 Main Street Clifton Forge, Virginia 24422

Preparation: Cut squash in half and remove all the seeds (save seeds for toasting, see below) and inner fibers. (It’s best to remove with a grapefruit knife.) Place skin side up in a baking dish with a little water and roast in a preheated 350 degree oven for 30 minutes. Cool to touch and remove all skin. Cut into 2” squares. Place squash with fresh garlic and fresh ginger in a large pot with 1/2 cup of chicken stock and sweat over low heat for 10 minutes. Add remaining stock and bring to a boil. Turn down to light simmer and cook until squash is tender approximately 30 minutes. Add remaining ingredients except for shiitake mushrooms. Puree in a food processor until smooth. Remove the stems from the Shiitake mushrooms and slice a 1/4” thick. Simmer in squash soup for 2 minutes. Ladle 6 oz. into each serving bowl and garnish with sliced basil.

Terrific Selection of Antiques and Collectibles

Toasted Winter Seeds: In a colander, rinse seeds well. Place on paper towels or cotton cloth to

A Bit of Everything for Every One

dry. When dry, spread seeds on oiled cookie sheet and bake at 250 degrees for 1 hour. Raise oven temperature to 400 degrees for last 5 minutes to brown lightly. Season as desired and store in an airtight container. Make great additions to soups or to enjoy for themselves.

Friday, Saturday & Sunday October 17-18-19 Clifton Forge Fall Festival Days Hope to see ya!!!

Monday through Saturday 10 am - 5 pm Sunday 12 Noon to 5 pm


28 VALLEY GUIDE

October -No vember 2008 October-No -Nov SPOR TS SPORTS Year-Round Fishing: Back Fork of/and Elk River, North Fork Thursday Thursday,, October 2, 9, 16,. 23, 30 of/and Cranberry River, Blackwater River, North Branch of the Star Lab - unique look at the sky, NRAO, Green Bank WV,

SPORTS October -November 2008 October-November

although presumed correct at the time of publication, do call ahead to verify information as times and events may change Bird Hotline: 804.367-1000 Bowling Leagues Leagues: Greenbrier Bowling & Recreation Center at Spare Time Bowing Sports Bar & Grille, Rt. 219N, Lewisburg, WV, 304.645.0065 - call now about youth & senior programs! Cass Scenic Railroad State PPark ark ark: old logging town with history, walking tour, Cass Scenic Railroad SP, 1-800-CALL-WVA Catch & Release Fishing: Milligan, Second Creek, Dogway Fork of the Cranberry River, Shavers Fork of Cheat River, North and South Branch of the Potomac River Daily Walks, Hikes & Programs: Bluestone State Park, Canaan Valley Resort State Park, Greenbrier State Forest, Pipestem Resort State Park, Seneca State Forest, Twin Falls State Park, Watoga State Park, 1.800.CALL WVA Douthat State Park: cabin rentals, interpretive programs, jon & canoe rentals, paddle boat tours, canoe trips, nature strolls, Douthat State Park, Clifton Forge, VA, 540.862.8100

Potomac River, North Fork of the South Branch, Williams River reservations suggested 304.456-2150

Daily/Weekly Exercise Classes: On the Ball Ball, Fitness for Saturday, October 4 Weight Loss Loss, Tai Chi Chi, Yoga Yoga, Relax Class Class, WVPTs Wellness Wild W alks W eek end Walks Week eekend Classes, Rt 219N, Lewisburg WV, 304.645.2525

leaf peepers guided 8-mile walk through colorful Canaan Moun-

Every Tuesday: Birds & More Walks: meet at Canaan tain between Blackwater Falls & Canaan Valley Resort State Valley National Wildlife Refuge, 7:30-9:30am, 304.866.3858 Parks with park naturalist Destiny Phillips, shuttle service pro-

Jazzercise: 5:45 pm, White Sulphur Springs Civic Center, vided, registration fee, Davis WV, 304.866.4121 or White Sulphur Springs, WV, 800.284.9440; Street Hockey: 800.622.4121 7-11 pm, Lewisburg Tennis Courts by Elementary School, skaters Proper P runing TTimes imes & TTechniques echniques Pruning or not, all welcome!, 304.647.9613 A Demonstration W orkshop Workshop Every Tuesday & Thursday: 30% off Tuesdays on Lower with special guest Bart McDowell, arborist with Bartlett Tree New River One Day Trip, Appalachian Wildwater, 800.624.8060 Experts, for informative pruning workshop: best methods, tim-

Every Friday & Saturday: Catfish Derby, 12-acre lake, ing & techniques of pruning trees & shrubs, also common pests

$500 tag fish, 7pm-1am, Mountain Meadow Hunting Preserve, & diseases of trees & shrubs,1:30-3:30 pm, pre-registration Ellison Ridge Rd, Greenville WV, 304.832.6635 required. $20.00 fee, 2 for $35.00, Andre Viette Gardens, Every Saturday: Shooting Match: shotguns & 22's, 1.5 miles up Long Meadow Rd, Fishersville, VA, 800.575.5538 Rt. 92, White Sulphur Springs, WV, 304/ 536-1213, 7 pm Saturday & Sunday Sunday,, October 4 & 5

Friday-Sunday riday-Sunday,, September 19-31 Nature W onder W eek end Wonder Week eekend

Gun Show

Salem Civic Center, Salem VA, 540.375.3004 nature hikes, wild foods programs, wild foods banquet—for more SaturdaySaturday-TTuesday uesday,, October 4-7 info contact Emily Fleming 304-558-2754, North Bend State Charleston Boulevard Rod & Doo -W op FFestival estival Doo-W -Wop 4-day car show, poker runs, doo wop concerts, river cruises, Driving Course Classes Classes: AA (Accident Avoidance), Park, Cairo WV 304.643-2931 ednesday-Sunday,, tours, auto parts vendors, crafters & more, Charleston WV, 1MDC (Masters Driving Course) review & advanced course Wednesday-Sunday October 12 — FFall all FFoliage oliage RRuns uns 24-October 800-733-5469 for AA graduates, EDC (Evasive Driving Course), Execu- September 24Sunday,, October 5 tive Security Training, FATT (Fridays at the Track), enjoy fall colors at Cass & surrounding area, Cass Scenic Rail- Sunday Summit Point Race Track, Summit Point, WV, 304.725.8444 road State Park, Cass WV, 1-800 CALL WVA, 304.456-4300 Fall Fling in White Sulphur Springs Mud Bog Thursday-Sunday,, September 25-28 12 noon–6pm on McCloud Road, about 1-mi plus out Big Draft Elk River Touring Center: mountain biking, snow touring & Thursday-Sunday Rd on right, begins 12 noon, McCloud Rd, White Sulphur Springs ASHA V Horse Show for Saddlebreds ASHAV more, Slatyfork, WV, 304.572.3771, www.ertc.com WV, 304.536-9206 or 304.536-5060, or online at airy Stone State Park: Little Mountain Trail System open all Virginia Horse Center, Lexington VA, 540.464.2950 Fairy www.wssmainstreet.org, see story pg 5 F riday , September 26 riday, year - hiking, bicycling, horseback riding, 276.930.2427 F all TTrail rail Ride Murder Mystery Dinner T rain at Cass Train Great Train Excursions: 1.5hr, 10 mi roundtrip on Durbin meet at Rt 619 off Rt 654 by 9:30 am, Highland Co, 'who-done-it' ride to Whittaker Station includes dinner , Cass RR Rocket powered by Climax #3 steam locomotive, departs Durbin $15 includes meal, sponsored by McDowell Firehouse, Depot, scenic vistas & wildlife viewing; 2-hr-36 mi. roundtrip on SP, Cass WV, 1-800 CALL WVA 540.396.6244, 540.396.6200 F riday-Sunday , September 26-28 riday-Sunday, Cheat Mountain Salamander goes over the river and the mounW ednesday , October 8 ednesday, Roadkill Killer Road Ride & Dirtbean’s 3rd Anni tain, train departs from Cheat Bridge, Durbin & Greenbrier Valley ech W ednesday, guided tours through parts of NRAO Tech Wednesday Railroad, Durbin, WV, 877.686.7245, www.mountainrail.com pasta dinner at Dirtbean Hale Fri, continental breakfast Sat. High T off-limits, reservations suggested, NRAO - National Hawk’s Nest State PPark ark Nature Center, Aerial Tram, Scenic before ride, post ride fun, choose shorter or longer ride, Dirtbean normally Radio Astronomy Observatory, Green Bank WV, 304.456-2150 Hale, Marlinton WV, 304.799-4038 Overlook, 1-800-Call WVA Draconids Meteor Shower: appx 25 per hour for 2 days The Homestead golf & shooter’s choice packages, Hot Springs Homestead Couples Invitational W ednesday ednesday,, October 8, Saturday Saturday,, October 11 golf with friends & family, 36-hole best ball net, using 100% of VA, 540.839.7721, www.thehomestead.com & Sunday , October 12 Sunday, handicap for ladies & men, overall net, gross winners, flight Hunt by Reservation Only: 1.800.933.PARK Appreciation Days! Huntington Blizzard Ice Hock ey Club weekly games awards, Closest to the Pin competition, give-aways, The Home- Customer Hockey $100 Shopping Spree & Garden Tour with a member of our stead, Hot Springs VA, 540-839-7510 through March, 763 3rd Avenue, Huntington, WV, for schedule Garden Center staff and enter to win a drawing for an on-theSaturday,, September 27 ey Club weekly Saturday 304.697.PUCK & Roanok Roanokee Express Ice Hock Hockey spot $100.00 Perennial Shopping Spree, to participate come Har vest Day , Harvest day-long special event full of old-fashioned fun, games through March on any of the above days at 1:30 pm, Andre Viette Gardens, games, live entertainment, apple butter making on the river bank, October & November Nature Photography W orkshops Workshops Long Meadow Rd, Fishersville, VA, 800.575.5538 crafts & wares, hand-powered rail car rides, bicycles & kennel includes lodging, Nature’s Image: Photography Field Workshops Thursday-Monday Thursday-Monday,, October 9-13 service, fall colors, special evening train departs at 5pm to 804.883.7740, lanephotoworkshops.com TRAILFEST TV & DirtBik TRAILFEST:: National A ATV DirtBikee Rally Whittaker Station with turkey dinner & all the fixings on the Living History Golf Course: play with hickory clubs the oldHatfield-McCoy Trails, activities for all age riders, ATV parade, train, also Whittaker trains at 9:30 am, noon & 2:30 pm, Bald fashioned way, clubs & gutta purcha balls provided, scheduled tee geo caching, carnival, music, demo tours/rides, rider friendly times 8am-4:30pm May-October, Oakhurst Links, Montague Knob train at 11 am, Cass Scenic Railroad State Park, Cass WV, events, Pineville, WV, limited space for spot call 1.800.7321-800 CALL WVA, 304.456-4300 6980, www.trailsheaven.com Drive, White Sulphur Springs WV, 304.536-1884 ALKS NAMIWALKS Friday-Sunday riday-Sunday,, October 10-11-12 Longdale Trout Pond: Rainbow Trout 10” & up, I-64 exit 35, NAMIW ings Road Riders Association State Rally Wings 6400 Longdale Furnace Rd, Clifton Forge VA, 540.862.4295 please, join our walk, NAMI/New River/Greenbrier Valley, 1-800- Gold W 950-NAMI, coatsrus@suddenlink.net Salem Civic Center, Salem VA, 540.375.3004 Migration of the Raptors: a top Peters Mountain, near Gap W ashington & Lee vs A verett University Averett 25th L umberjackin’ Bluegrassin’ Jamboree Lumberjackin’ Mills WV, at Hanging Rock Raptor Observatory Salem Football Stadium, Salem VA, 540.375.3004 bluegrass music, food, arts, crafts, woodsman competition, Motorcycle Rentals & Tours in West Virginia Saturday-Sunday Saturday-Sunday,, September 27-28 down-home atmosphere, FREE admission, Twin Falls Resort State Mountain Thunder, 1-888-WV-BIKER, www.wvbiker.com Civil W ar Reenactment War Park, near Beckley WV, 304.294-4000 New River Smallmouth Bass: reenactments & encampments, Chief Logan State Park, Logan Saturday Saturday,, October 11 guided fishing trips & floats, Spencer, WV 540.726-3452 WV, 304.792.7125 10 Mile FFall all Hik Hikee NRAO - National Radio Astronomy Observatory Sunday, September 28 bring lunch & water for walk along Rail Trail, North Bend State guided & group tours, solar viewing, high tech tours, star lab, star Pistol Shoot: small bore pistols/rifles, big bore hunter's pistols, Park, Cairo WV, 304-643-2931 parties, Green Bank WV, 304.456-2150 Organ Cave Guided and Wild Cave Tours: it’s always the silhouette targets, regis 10-3 pm, Rupert Pistol Club, Big Mt. Rd, Blast into ALL of Fall: Fall Decorating with Sam Harris! A Demonstration Workshop same 52 degrees inside the cave, Organ Cave WV, 304.645.7600 Rupert, WV, Howard Scruggs, 304.392.5028 Bath County Chamber of Commerce Golf Classic 2nd seminar with Sam Harris focuses on elegant designs for Pocahontas Co. Info: 1.800.336.7009 Captain’s Choice, 1:30 pm, Cascades Course, The Homestead, special events - weddings, anniversaries & fall entertaining, feaRiverview Golf Range: 300 yd target range, target greens, tures beautiful fall tablescape complete with refreshments, first Hot Springs VA, 540-839-5409, 800.628-8092 clubs available, Rt 60 & Stonehouse Rd, Caldwell WV, 304.661.4656 4 to sign up for each seminar get to help create & take home Seneca Rocks Discovery Center: 304.636.1800 one of four designs, from a natural grass and bamboo wreath Snowshoe Mountain Resort Events Events, WV, 877.441-4Fun to a beautiful, fruit-filled tabletop tree, 1:30-3:30pm, pre-regGauley River Whitewater Season Open! Swiss Mountain Retreat’s Hunter ’s Haven, Grandpa Hunter’s istration required, $25.00 fee, 2 for $40.00, Andre Viette Garthroughout October & November John’s Hilltop Heritage Farm, Helvetia WV 304.924-5503 dens, Long Meadow Rd, Fishersville, VA, 800.575.5538 Getaway Packages , Pipestem Resort State Park, Pipestem WV State Parks & Sportsmen Specials: 1.800.CALL WVA Star PParty arty WV, 304.466-1800 for reservations WV Hunting, Fishing, Trapping Hotline: 304.558.3399 introduction to the night sky beginning at dusk, free observing Getaway Packages, Nature Center Open, Aerial Tram, Scenic White Sulphur Springs Civic Center : with optical telescopes, NRAO - National Radio Astronomy ObOverlook, Jetboat rides, Hawk’s Nest State Park, Ansted WV, exercise/gym/rooms, certified kitchen, 304.536.2010 servatory, Green Bank WV, 304.456-2150 1.800.CALL WVA for reservations White Sulphur Springs Fish Hatchery Tours: Saturday-Sunday Saturday-Sunday,, October 11-12 riday ednesday-Friday riday,, October 1-31 learn how eggs are harvested from rainbow trout & how freshwater Wednesday-F Shawnee TTrail rail orest mussels are protected, visitor’s center self-guided tours with 4 October Haunted FForest Sat. 10 am-4 pm, Sun. 12 noon-4 pm, $2/pp, or for school aquariums, 400 E Main St, White Sulphur Springs WV, 304.536.1361 Canaan Valley State Park, Davis WV, 304.866.4121 groups and by reservation Oct 8, 9, 10 from 10am to 4pm ,

October 2008


VALLEY GUIDE

SPOR TS SPORTS

Chief Logan State Park, Logan WV, 304.792.7125, or Jeannie vations suggested, NRAO - National Radio Astronomy ObserGore 304.752-7044 vatory, Green Bank WV, 304.456-2150

Saturday Saturday,, October 18 riday-Sunday,, November 14-16 Friday-Sunday New River Gor ge Bridge Day, only day pedestrians can Virirginia ginia Horse Shows Association Championships Gorge

walk across world’s 2nd longest single arch steel bridge, base Virginia Horse Center, Lexington VA, 540.464.2950 jumpers parachute off bridge, craft & food vendors, New River Saturday Saturday,, November 15 Gorge, Fayetteville, WV, 1.800.CALL WVA, 800.927-0263 Fall Shooting Match Children’s Har vest Day: A “HANDS-IN” FUN-D AY Swiss Mountain Retreat, Grandpa John’s Hilltop Heritage Harvest FUN-DA paint pumpkins, trick or treat through the gardens, other fun Farm, Helvetia WV 304.924-5503 activities for an unforgettable “fun-day”, fee includes 2 pump- Begins Monday, November 17 kins, 2 home-grown sunflower seed heads, a bag of goodies, Ornament Making Contest refreshments & “loads of fun”, 1:30-3:30pm, pre-registration 10am, Douthat State Park, Clifton Forge, VA, 540.862-8100 required, $10.00 fee per child, 2 for $15.00, Andre Viette Sunday Sunday,, November 18 Gardens, Long Meadow Rd, Fishersville, VA, 800.575.5538 VMI Rat March to New Mark et Market Helvetia Day Celebration from Lexington to New Market VA Swiss Folk Dancing & Helvetia Square Dance workshop 3pm, Saturday Saturday,, November 22 historic walk 4pm, traditional dance: round, square & couples Star Party - NRAO, Green Bank WV, 304.456-2150 dances 8pm, Star Band Hall, Helvetia WV, 304.924.6435 Wednesday ednesday,, November 26 Wednesday ednesday,, October 22 High TTech ech W ednesday, guided tours through parts of NRAO Wednesday High TTech ech W ednesday, guided tours through parts of NRAO normally off-limits, reservations suggested, NRAO - National Wednesday normally off-limits, reservations suggested, NRAO - National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Green Bank WV, 304.456Radio Astronomy Observatory, Green Bank WV, 304.456-2150 2150

Saturday Saturday,, October 25 Thursday January 1, 2009 Saturday-Thursday Thursday,, November 2929-January Saturdayechniques of Plant PPropagation ropagation Hands-on W orkshop Christmas in the PPark Techniques Workshop ark, Chief Logan State Park, Logan WV, learn the best methods for many different plants with Mark 304.792.7125 Viette, includes techniques of dividing, taking cuttings, layer- Friday-Sunday riday-Sunday,, November 28-29-30 ing & seeding, take home loads of plant divisions, propagating Gem & Mineral Show demonstration tour included, 1:30-3:30pm, pre-registration 8:30-1 pm, Salem Civic Center, Salem VA, 540.375.3004 required, $30.00 fee, 2 for $50.00, Andre Viette Gardens, Long Meadow Rd, Fishersville, VA, 800.575.5538 Star PParty arty, NRAO, Green Bank WV, 304.456-2150

Sunday Sunday,, October 26 Pistol Shoot Shoot: small bore pistols/rifles, big bore hunter's

pistols, silhouette targets, regis 10-3 pm, Rupert Pistol Club, Big Mt. Rd, Rupert, WV, Howard Scruggs, 304.392.5028

Saturday Saturday,, October 26 Halloween PParty arty

fun games, crafts, prizes, North Bend State Park, Cairo WV, 304643-2931

Friday riday,, October 31 Sign-Up for 10% Discount on Holiday Decorating W orkshops Workshops

with Andre Viette, Jef Naunchik & Sam Harris on how to preserve Christmas greens, make candle centerpieces, door swags, wreaths, boxwood kissing balls, plus NEW ideas & tour Claire & Andre’s home & Christmas decorations that takes Andre two weeks to complete! Choose from 6 workshop dates and times: Thursday Thursday,, December 4 at 10am; Friday riday,, December 5 at 10am; Saturday Saturday,, December 6 at 10am AND 1:30pm; Sunday Sunday,, December 7 at 1:30pm; Wednesday ednesday,, December 10 at 10am, pre-registration required, $40.00 fee, Andre Viette Gardens, Long Meadow Rd, Fishersville, VA, 800.575.5538

Hunting & Trapping 2008-2009 Virginia

Crow through March 21 (Mon, Wed, Fri & Sat only) Squirrel: Gray, Red, Fox general firearms through Jan 31 Opossum & Raccoon Oct 15-March 10 Grouse Oct 25-Feb 14 Rabbit Nov 1-Feb 28 Quail & Pheasant Nov 1 - Feb 28 Bear archery Oct 11-Nov 8 , muzzleloading Nov 11-14 firearms Nov 24-Jan 3 for certain counties Deer & Elk firearms Nov 15-29 & Jan 5-March 28 in some counties, archery Oct 4-Nov 14 & Dec 1-Jan 3, muzzleloading Nov 1-14 & Dec 13-Jan 3 in most counties Turkey firearms Oct 25-Nov 7, Nov 27, Dec 8-Jan 3, April 11-May 2, May 4-16 - April 4 Youth Hunt archery Oct 4-Nov 8 in most counties Bobcat archery Oct 4-31; firearms Nov 1-Feb 28 Fox Nov 1-Feb 28 Trapping: Fox, Bobcat, Opossum, Raccoon Nov 15-Feb 28 Beaver, Mink, Muskrat, Weasel, Otter Dec 1-Feb 28 Trapping Rabbit w/box traps Oct 14 - Jan 30

Friday-Sunday riday-Sunday,, October 31-November 2 Continuous Hunting/Trapping Season Virirginia ginia Horse TTrials rials & The Golden National Horse Groundhog, Skunk, Nutria & Coyote in most counties Show Virginia Horse Center, Lexington VA, 540.464.2950

November 2008 Saturday Saturday,, November 1 31st Annual Pumpkin Run

Pipestem Resort State Park, Pipestem WV, 304.466-1800

Wednesday ednesday,, November 5 raining ASSE Competitive Driver TTraining

8:30-1 pm, Salem Civic Center, Salem VA, 540.375.3004

Thursday Thursday,, November 6, 13, 20 Star Lab - unique look at the sky, NRAO, Green Bank WV, reservations suggested 304.456-2150

Friday riday,, - Sunday Sunday,, November 7-8-9 Frontier Days

Chief Logan State Park, Logan WV, 304.792.7125

Southwest V irirginia ginia Hunter inals Vir Hunter--Jumper Association FFinals Virginia Horse Center, Lexington VA, 540.464.2950

Thursday Thursday,, November 6 Taurids Meteor Shower: 15 per hour for weeks Saturday Saturday,, November 8 Star PParty arty

introduction to the night sky beginning at dusk, free observing with optical telescopes, NRAO - National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Green Bank WV, 304.456-2150

Wednesday ednesday,, November 12 High Tech Wednesday

guided tours through parts of NRAO normally off-limits, reser-

West Virginia

Wild Boar gun Oct 25-Nov 1; archery Oct 18-Dec 31 Deer archery Oct 18-Dec 31 muzzleloading Dec 15-20 Deer: bucks only in selected counties Nov 24-Dec 13 Deer: antlerless in selected counties Nov 24-Dec 13, Dec 24-27, Hampshire Oct 31-Nov 1 Deer: antlerless, youth class Nov 1 & Dec 22 & 23 in selected counties Bear archery Oct 18-Nov 22; gun select counties through Sept 27, Nov 24-Nov 26, Dec 8-31 Turkey Oct 25-Nov 22, April 27-May 23 Spring Youth Hunt April 25 Squirrel: Gray, Black, Albino, Fox Oct 11-Jan 31, youth Squirrel hunt Oct 4 Ruffed Grouse, Raccoon Oct 18-Feb 28 Bobwhite Quail, Ring-necked Pheasant Nov 1-Jan 3 Cottontail, Snowshoe, Varying Hare Nov 1 - Feb 28 Crow only Thurs, Fri, Sat Oct 1-Nov 22, Jan 1-March 7 Trapping Raccoon, Rabbit, Hare, Red Fox & Gray Fox, Bobcat, Mink, Muskrat, Nov 1 - Feb 28 Trapping Fisher Nov 1 - Jan 31 Trapping Beaver Nov 1 - March 31 Continuous Open Season: Coyote, English Sparrow, European Starling, Opossum, Pigeon, Skunk, Weasel, Woodchuck Totally Protected • NO Open Season: Mountain Lion, Elk, Otter, Hawks, Owls, Falcons, Eagles, Song & Insectivorous Birds

October -No vember 2008 October-No -Nov

29

Ent ererttainment & Ar om pg26 Enter Artsts Calendar cont’d frfrom Clifton Forge VA, 540. 862-4502

Wednesda ednesdayy-Sunda -Sundayy, N Noovember 26-30 Thanksgiving Holida Holidayys

lavish Thanksgiving buffet, craft classes, live music, Great Hall traditional Christmas tree lighting ceremony, The Homestead, Hot Springs VA, www.thehomestead.com

Thur sda 7 Thursda sdayy, N Noovember 227 Helve tia Thanksgiving Dinner Helvetia

all invited, bring a covered dish, turkey supplied, 6 pm Community Hall, Helvetia WV, 304.924-6435

Thanksgiving Dinner

Twin Falls State Park, Mullens WV 304.294-4000

Thanksgiving Buf ac Bufffet & PPac ackkage Buf Bufffet

buffet 11am-6 pm, $21.95 adults, $9.95 children under 10, Thanksgiving Package from $176.46 per couple for 1 hotel night; Thanksgiving buffet, breakfast buffet, tickets to Natural Bridge, Caverns, Wax Museum, Toy Museum, Natural Bridge VA, 800-5331410 or 540-458-3750

Frida ridayy, N Noovember 28 Downt own Charles tW alk Downtown Charlestton Ar ArtW tWalk

showcases Charleston’s art scene with best of local, regional & nationally recognized artists, free reception 5-9pm, The Clay Center, Charleston WV, 304.561-3570

Friday-Sunday, November 28, 29 ,30 Ar tis tr ations Artis tistt Demons Demonstr trations

beginning at 10am, Tamarack, Beckley WV, 1.800.tamarack

Thur sda da 7-29 Thursda sdayy-Satur -Saturda dayy, N Noovember 227-29 Canaan Thanksgiving Celebr ation, Canaan Valley Resort, Davis Celebration WV 304.866-3858, 1.800.622-4121

Thursday-Friday, November 27-January 4, 2009 Holiday of Lights at dusk, Bluefield City Park, Bluefield WV, 304.327.2448

Thur sda Thursda sdayy, N Noovember 28 Downt own Charles tW alk Downtown Charlestton Ar ArtW tWalk

showcases Charleston’s art scene with best of local, regional & nationally recognized artists, free reception 5-9pm, The Clay Center, Charleston WV, 304.561-3570

Friday-Sunday, November 28, 29, 30 Mountain Magic Makers

arts, crafts, seasonal gifts, 10 am-8 pm, Highland County Public Library, Monterey VA, 540.468-2958

Gem & Mineral Show

Salem Civic Center, Salem VA 540.375-3004

Crock, Stock & Barrel Food preservation, all farms 9-5 daily, Frontier Culture Museum, Staunton, 540.332-7850

Satur da sda Saturda dayy-Thur Thursda sdayy, N Noovember 29-Januar 29-Januaryy 11,, 2009 Chris tmas in the PPar ar Christmas arkk

free winter wonderland light displays dusk-10pm, donations accepted, Chief Logan State Park, Logan WV, 304.792-7125

COMING-UP

Saturday, December 6-7 Holida Holidayy Bazaar

opens Saturday, 9am-4pm; Sunday 12:30-2:30pm with $5 lunch offered, Johnson Memorial United Methodist Church, Alderson WV, 304.645-3499 or 304.445-7814

Sunda Sundayy, December 7 Chris tmas at the Andrew Johns Christmas Johnstton House

a World War II Christmas at the Andrew Johnston House, 1-5 pm, Giles County Historical Society, 208 North Main Street, Pearisburg, VA 24134, 540.921.1050

Saturday, December 13 Br amwell Chris tmas TTour our of Homes Bramwell Christmas

tours conducted rain or shine, 5 pm, $15/pp, Bramwell, WV, 304.248-8381 or 304.248.7114

Thur sda 8 Thursda sdayy, December 118 own Charles tW alk Downtown Charlestton Ar ArtW tWalk Downt

showcases Charleston’s art scene with best of local, regional & nationally recognized artists, free reception 5-9pm, The Clay Center, Charleston WV, 304.561-3570

Monda Mondayy, December 29 Alleghany Highlands Poetry Workshop

meets last Monday of every month, 6 pm, all welcome, public welcome free of charge, Clifton Forge Public Library, 535 Church St, Clifton Forge VA, 540. 862-4502

Wednesda 1 ednesdayy, December 331 Goodnight Celebr ation Celebration

free New Year’s Eve event for the entire family with variety of performances by local musicians & entertainers at various venues, presented by Charleston Community Music Association, Charleston WV, 304.774-1400


30

VALLEY GUIDE

October -No vember 2008 October-No -Nov

Roland Layton’s Review of

Studs Terkel, with Sydney Lewis, Touch and Go, A Memoir NY: The New Press, 2007

People who like to read have their favorite books – and among mine are the following oral histories by Studs Terkel: Hard Times Times, An Oral History of the Great Depression; “The Good War”: An Oral History of World War II; and Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Do. Terkel has written quite a few Feel About What They Do books, on topics ranging from jazz, to baseball, to America’s racial problems, to American history, and even to religion (Terkel calls himself an “agnostic” which he says is a synonym for a “cowardly atheist”). I wish I had time to read more of his books, but there are many good books and life is short. But now that I’ve read this memoir, I think I will just make time to delve more deeply into Terkel’s oeuvre. The three I have read are wonderful evocations of their subjects — one feels what it was like to live through the Depression, or to be in World War II, or what characterizes various professions. This memoir is not a systematic account of Terkel’s life, as it roams from one subject to another without much of a pattern. Terkel is in his 90s, and I suspect that he reminisced to his co-author (Sydney Lewis), who put the account together more or less as it came out. Pattern or not, we certainly come to the end of the book with a vivid picture of Studs Terkel. (Incidentally, “Studs” of course is a nickname: Terkel’s real first name is Louis. He was acting in a play with other actors who happened to have the same first name so the director christened him “Studs” because Terkel was reading James T. Farrell’s American classic The Studs Lonigan Trilogy at the time.) Terkel was born in 1912, in the Bronx, shortly after the Titanic sank. Terkel jokes “Make of it what you will” and “As the Titanic went down, I came up.” His parents were Jewish immigrants from Russia. His father Sam was a skilled tailor and his mother an accomplished seamstress (he says that all these decades later he has a vivid recollection of her on her knees, pins in mouth, fitting a dress to a customer). Judging from the memoir, his parents’ marriage was not made in heaven. He writes: “These two were not born to be a vaudeville team.” They were “creatures of different spheres whom some God of the perverse had blessed and cursed into union.” He wonders “how did these ill-matched two ever share a bed?” and “more to the impertinent point, how did they ever cohabit?” But they did cohabit, at least three times, to produce three sons to whom the parents were devoted. When Terkel was still a child the family moved to Chicago, where Terkel, except for brief periods elsewhere, has spent his whole life. He has a long-running love affair with his home city, and the memoir comes back again and again to lovingly caress one aspect or another of what he calls “his town” which he loves with all its “carbuncles and warts.” He points to the city’s lively arts scene, to the famous authors who called Chicago home, to the great architectural achievements of Louis Sullivan and Frank Lloyd Wright. He recalls Chicago’s history — all the great party conventions that took place there, beginning with the Republican one that nominated Lincoln. He recalls the waves of immigration that populated Chicago, for example with more Poles than live in Warsaw, and with blacks from the South who would hear the train whistle as they worked in the fields and say “There goes the Illinois Central to Chica-a-ago” where there was work in the mills and a black didn’t have to get off the sidewalk to make way for a white man. We read about the famous stockyards and also about Hull House, that wonderful experiment in relieving the misery of slum life. He is amused by the fact that the two Daleys, father and son, who have ruled over Chicago for decades, are referred to with one word: “maredaley” and it’s a synonym for “city chieftain” all over

America, as in “Who’s the maredaley of your town?” Hinting at Chicago’s rough politics, he quotes a high official who says abruptly: “Chicago ain’t ready for reform.” He takes us on a tour of his favorites spots, such as “Washington Square,” (also known as “Bughouse Square”), like London’s Hyde Park, a site for free speech. Terkel gives us vivid portraits of the speakers: Communists, Socialists, Vegetarians, speakers for various religious persuasions, and “Lucy,” widow of one of the Haymarket martyrs who had been hanged by the government in one of the awful miscarriages of American justice, giving the labor point of view decades after her husband’s death. Finally Terkel quotes the great writer Nelson Algren who “said it best”: loving Chicago is “like loving a woman with a broken nose, you may find lovelier lovelies, but never a lovely so real.” When the family moved to Chicago, the parents took up a new profession: running first a rooming house, and then a hotel. Young Studs spent years helping his parents. He says it was great preparation for his oral history work, because the residents, who came from all sorts of backgrounds, were characters who spent much time arguing with each other in the lobby, and Studs learned how to listen carefully. When Terkel finished high school he enrolled in the University of Chicago School of Law. He graduated in 1934, but he concedes that his heart was never in his studies. He recalls that he tried to sit behind tall people so he wouldn’t be called on. And he was only called on once, giving a smart-alecky answer, to which the professor responded “Not very amusing. Zero of course.” But he graduated and passed the bar exam on his second try. It was the Depression and jobs were hard to find. He passed the civil service exam and was hired by the FBI as a fingerprint classifier. But he was soon fired, and many years later, using the freedom of information act, Terkel found out why: one of his professors had written: “I remember him, slovenly, didn’t care much, a low-class Jew. He is not one of our type of boys.” His dossier contained a memo from J. Edger Hoover: “Take Louis Terkel off the payroll.” He managed to get another job with a government agency, FERA, the Federal Emergency Relief Administration. In the late thirties, Studs fell in love and married Ida Goldberg, a social worker and graduate of the University of Chicago. He describes Ida as “pretty, beautiful really” and he liked how people were drawn to her. The courtship was “easy, very delightful.” He took her to meet his mother, who said to her (what a way to be greeted by your date’s mother!): “You should kiss my hands and feet for giving you such a man.” After a year of courtship he said “Let’s get married” to which she answered “Great.” The book returns to her again and again; they were truly soul mates. Terkel asks in a bit of sardonic tone: “Did she play a tremendous role in my life? Yeah, you could say so.” The memoir again and again refers to the large role that the theater and the cinema played in Stud’s life. He seems to have total recall for every play or movie he saw in his life — and when he would meet an aged actor, he would say “I loved your performance in ...” (some play from forty years before) which of course gave the actor great pleasure. Studs himself eked out his income by performing on the stage and in radio soap operas. He comments that with his “gravelly voice” he usually played gangsters. He served in the Army Air Corps in World War II, although he was older than the average recruit. He comments that he loved the camaraderie but couldn’t handle the physical demands of service. He tried again and again to leap over a fence, as required of the recruits in basic training, but without success until finally the authorities put him in “Special Services” which arranged entertainment for the troops. After his service he got into radio and TV, and had a

BOOK REVIEW

number of programs, usually of the type called variety shows — a mix of interviews, music, even Studs reading short stories. He was a mainstay on radio station WCFL, the mouthpiece of organized labor (for a full account, see Nathan Godfried, WCFL: Chicago’s Voice of Labor, 1926 – 78 78, Urbana, U. of Illinois Press, 1997). His success with conducting interviews brought him to the attention of a publisher in New York who commissioned his first oral history, Hard Times, the title of course taken from Dickens’ great novel about the Industrial Revolution. And the other great works have followed. In conclusion, we should note that Terkel refers again and again to his political views, which were strongly liberal and indeed, left-wing enough to attract the attention of the FBI and the House Un-American Activities Committee. He says he cried when Roosevelt died, because FDR was like a father to him, and he lists the great achievements in social justice of the New Deal. He was an active participant in Henry Wallace’s campaign in 1948. (He states that Truman didn’t win in spite of Wallace — he won because of Wallace, meaning that Truman stole Wallace’s domestic program.) Terkel greatly regrets the conservative turn the United States has taken in recent years, ascribing it to the lack of interest in and knowledge of history. He calls the country “The United States of Amnesia.” he has Terkel notes that three Jeopardy contestants (and they’re supposed to be the cream of the crop!) failed to identify the late Strom Thurmond, the “drum major of segregation” for decades. Another set of contestants didn’t know who Kofi Annam was. Terkel has a point when he discusses how ignorant so many of us are when it comes to American history. Think of the people screaming about “big government” but who completely fail to remember that it is government that brought us such worthwhile things as Social Security, minimum wage and hour laws, civil rights laws that ended segregation, clean water and air, and on and on. These same people assert that the “market,” without government interference, should run the economy. But as soon as the economy runs into trouble, they run to the government to bail them out. Indeed, as I write these words in mid-September, the great Wall Street firms are crashing down, and begging the formerly scorned government to save them from their greed. Terkel also laments the low quality of news broadcasting which puts more stress on Britney Spears shaving off her hair than on real news. And, in another example, just over a year ago the networks cancelled their regular programs to report the earth-shaking event of the death of Anna Nicole Smith. Imagine that happening in the era of Edward R. Murrow! If you haven’t read any of Terkel’s work, I hope this review will stimulate you to do so. Also, I might mention that I found some informative websites on Terkel — perConversation with Studs Terkel — haps the best was “Conversation Harry Kreisler interviews Studs Terkel, October, 2003 2003”. Finally, I wish to express my appreciation to my son-inlaw, Bob Novak, who gave me this book as a birthday present! Thanks Bob!


17 Lovely Guestrooms nestled in the beautiful Alleghany Mountains Evening Dining and Sunday Brunch in the Old Mill reservations appreciated

The Inn at Gristmill Square & The Waterwheel Restaurant

P.O. Box 359, Warm Springs, VA • 540.839-2231

ONE STOP VACUUM NEEDS! 715 Edgar Avenue

My business is always picking up!

next to Ronceverte Feed Store

Ronceverte WV 24970

Sales • Service • Bags • Belts • Parts

Repair of Most Vacuum Brands New & Used Vacuums For Sale FREE ESTIMATES

SAVE THE D ATES FOR 2009 DA 1965 - 2009 45th Annual

New Record: 143 Spring flowers in bloom identified in 2008

SHOWM EH IKE Greenbrier County, West Virginia

7:30 pm Friday Evening Program, April 24 In Celebration of Our Areas Wide Diversity of Plant Life with Steve Adams, Biologist and Naturtalist, Ware Room, WSS Civic Center, White Sulphur Springs, WV Saturday, April 25 8am Charlie’s Bird Walk, meet at cabin area entrance of Greenbrier State Forest 10am Show-Me-Hikes, meet at main picnic shelter area select morning, afternoon or all day tours for all the details call 304.536.1994 or 304.536.2500

Over10,000 different rare and unusual flowering plants, trees, shrubs and bulbs collected from all over the world by Barry Glick,

Now available WHOLESALE to the gardening public! We ship UPS. Call, write, fax or e-mail for directions: Sunshine Farm & Gardens, HC 67, Box 539B, Renick, WV 24966 304.497-2208 Fax: 304.497-2698 E-Mail: barry@sunfarm.com www.sunfarm.com


Step back in time... Walk in history... Where our traditions began...

Huntersville Traditions Day

1821 Huntersville Court House Model by Levi Carr

Saturday, October 4, 2008 9:00 am to 6:00 pm

Old Timey Demonstrations * Plenty of Food * Join-Ins! apple cider & apple butter makin’, baked goodies, basket makin’, butter & ice cream makin’, candied apples, chair canin’, Civil War living history, corn meal grindin', cow milkin', gospel music, historic site tours, Historical Huntersville USPS cancellation stamp, horse shoein’, jams & jellies, muzzle loadin’, soap & candle makin’, special colonial Mary Engles display, special dedication at cemetery, wagon rides, weavin’ & wool spinin’

For more information: 304.799.4747 or 1.800.336.7000

Christmas Open House at The Craft Shops of Covington Refreshments Served Prize Drawings Every Hour

Saturday, November 1 10 am - 5 pm The Craft Shops of Covington Fall-Winter Hours: Monday-Saturday 10 to 5

120 W Main St • Covington VA 24426

540 . 962 - 0557

Special Drawing for a Craft Shop Gift Certificate at 5 pm on Saturday (need no be present to win)

150 crafters - 75 booths of decorating & gift ideas, antiques, collectibles

Alleghany Mountain Crafter’s Association

15th ANNUAL FALL SHOW Saturday, October 18, 2008 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Mountain View Elementary School Gym/Cafeterian & Clifton Middle School Cafeteria Low Moor, Virginia

Jewelry • Ceramics • Hand-Baked Goodies • Bird-Houses Wreaths • Flower Arrangements Home Interior • Wood & Primitive Type Items • Pampered Chef • AVON • Fabric and Needle Crafts Seasonal items for Fall & Christmas Food Sold by Callaghan Ruritan Club

Cash Door Prize Drawing at 4 pm; You Must Be Present To Win I-64 exit 21 at Low Moor, follow signs. For Further Information call: 540-962-0557

ORIGINAL

TRADITIONAL & CONTEMPORARY

ART

Evan Boggess New Work October 3-31 artist reception 5 - 8pm, Fri, October 3 Shir Wooton New 9x12 Pastel Studies November 7-30 artist reception 5 - 8pm, Fri, November 7 custom framing/sculpture/photography paintings/fine crafts/free consultation www.coopergallery.com 304-645-6439 / 888-868-5129 122 E. Washington Street, Lewisburg, WV 24901 Open Mon-Thurs 10-5 Fri-Sat 10-6

ALDERSON

Fall Heritage Festival

Saturday, October 4 9:00 am-3:00 pm Alderson Bridge photo courtesy of G..P. Cooper, available at Cooper Gallery, Lewisburg, WV and Alderson’s Wolf Creek Gallery

in the Historic Business District Alderson est Virginia Alderson,, W West

BRING THE WHOLE FAMILY

FOOD! FUN! ENTERTAINMENT!

www .greenbrier wv .com www.greenbrier .greenbrierwv wv.com

Valley Guide October November 2008  

arts, entertainment, news, sports, and community events in southwest Virginia and southeast West Virginia

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