Page 1

NEWS

Public Bus Pilot Program Launched

CULTURE

A Case For Mexican Wine

ENTERTAINMENT

Page 06

Page 08

Page 20

Happy Birthday, Mae West

August 15 - 21, 2019 Year 22 Free Issue 1166

GU ID E

ALL-INCLUSIVE NEWS AND ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE FOR PUERTO VALLARTA AND RIVIERA NAYARIT

FR EE

TORTAS Mexico’s Culinary Underdog

MAP OF BANDERAS BAY

PAGE 12-13

VALLARTA SHOPPING PAGES 14-15

ENTERTAINMENT PAGES 18-21

CROSSWORD PAGE 22

WWW.VALLARTATRIBUNE.COM | FB/VTATRIBUNE | TWITTER @VALLARTATRIBUNE | INSTAGRAM @VALLARTATRIBUNE


editorial

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Editor’s

August 15 - 21, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com

Note

editor@vallartatribune.com

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hen we read about incidents such as the August 3 mass shooting at a Walmart store in El Paso, TX in which 22 people lost their lives, or drug-related killings that go on in Mexico—you know, those incidents that local English media outlets are so adept at not sharing with you—it becomes inevitable to ask oneself: is it safe here? Whenever such a tragedy takes place, the powers that be will try to defuse the situation with assurances that things are—or will be—ok by implementing this or that legislation, maneuver, procedure, etc. Sometimes the assurances produce a favorable result, and sometimes they don’t. We live in a complicated world. Considering our day-to-day existence, it would seem that, as individuals, we have very little scope and power to affect the safety of our world or to offer one another the necessary assurance to feel safe in light of such tragic incidents. But the subtle dance between security (or lack of thereof) and assurance goes on at many different levels, many of which are definitely within our reach to affect and improve. For example, consider the following scenario: you’ve had a lessthan-perfect day and not wanting to

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day barrier and for you to wait a bit longer if needed without losing your cool. By the end of the evening, you may even forget what you were so upset about when you walked into the restaurant! That said, had the host not acknowledged you, your mood might have reached fowler depths by the time you were seated. Do you go through life being mindful of those around you and volunteering assurance whenever possible? If not, you should try it once in a while. I know these humble gestures of kindness,

acknowledgment and assurance will have little impact on massacres or drug-related crimes, but I think they can go a long way in improving the quality of our lives on a daily basis. After all, who wants to find themselves in unfavorable situations at home, at work or in life, without positive assurances that things will be ok?

deal with cooking dinner, you head to your favorite restaurant to pamper yourself with a nice dinner and a cocktail or two. But you are in a lousy mood, so you sit down at your table and grunt for a menu without greeting your waiter or even looking in his eyes. Guess what? You’ve just given your waiter no assurance that further exchanges between you two will improve. In fact, you’ve probably given him the assurance that it’s going to be ‘one of those nights!’ The waiter is expected to offer you top quality service no matter what,

of course, but chances are the evening would be more enjoyable for both if you take the time to greet staff with a friendly smile. It goes on the other way around: when you walk into the restaurant, the host is taking care of seating other guests. Aware that this might take some time, he turns to you and says “good afternoon, this may take a while but I’ll be with you as soon as I can,” and smiles. This person has just acknowledged you and given you the necessary assurance (hopefully!) to break down your lousy

Enjoy, Paco Ojeda Interim Editor paco.ojeda@gmail.com

Read the first edition of the Best of Banderas Bay and Riviera Nayarit guide online www.vallartatribune.com

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pages of information designed to make your stay in the area the best! From the best beaches to the best activities and more, you can download and view online at www.vallartatribune.com and watch for copies at your favourite VallartaTribune distribution points.


welcome

Welcome to Puerto Vallarta and Riviera Nayarit

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t the Vallarta Tribune we want you to have the best experience possible while you explore Puerto Vallarta, the Bay of Banderas and Riviera Nayarit. Here are some helpful tips for traveling. TIME ZONE: The entire state of Jalisco and the southern part Nayarit are on Central time – if you’re heading further north than Lo de Marcos, Nayarit, remember the time change so you don’t miss your flight. BUSES: A system of urban buses can bring you from El Tuito in the south to San Pancho in the north and all the spots in between. Fares vary according to distances travelled, but the base fare is 10 pesos. If you’re going further than San Pancho, head to the main bus terminal to catch a ‘Pacifico’ bus. TAXIS: There are set fares within defined zones of town. Do not enter a taxi without agreeing on the price with the driver. Make a note of the taxi number in case you leave something behind. Drivers typically do not carry change. UBER: New in 2017 to Puerto Vallarta, Uber is still experiencing some growing pains particularly in the state of Nayarit. Uber is cheaper than a taxi usually. GETTING AROUND: In many places such as Centro Vallarta and Nuevo Vallarta there are paths for bikes and pedestrians. Please be respectful of these designations. MONEY EXCHANGE: The most hassle-free way to exchange money is to use your debit card in the ATM to withdraw pesos. Exchange houses offer higher rates and banks are remiss to change dollars to pesos if you don’t hold an account with them. Best to use ATM’s that are affiliated with a reputable bank located in well lit secure areas. TIPPING: In general you should tip 10-20% in restaurants and bars. Taxi or Uber drivers – 10-20 pesos. The person who bags your groceries or helps load your car – 10-20 pesos. Don’t forget to tip

your maid, bell boy, masseuse, the band, the entertainment on your tour. And by all means, tip more if you want, wages are extremely low in Mexico. DRINKING WATER: While Puerto Vallarta’s water has been awarded a certification of purity for the past two decades, the quality of the water tested at the source varies greatly from what comes out of the tap at the other end. Don’t wreck your holiday – buy bottle water. EXPORTING PETS: Falling in love with the street dog outside your hotel is easy to do and it’s also easy to bring them home with you. The process is inexpensive and only takes a day or two. You only need a certificate of health from a local vet and check with your airline for additional requirements. COMMON SENSE: Just as you wouldn’t walk around your hometown drunk and belligerent, it is not acceptable to do that here. While Mexico is a tolerant culture, politeness is paramount. Don’t pee in the streets. Don’t flash your money or expensive gadgets. Pay attention to your surroundings. Know where you are going. Pay your bills (and don’t forget to tip). And have fun! DRINKING AND DRIVING: First off – just don’t. The consequences are not worth it. Taxis or Ubers are cheap and plentiful. Fines are very expensive. You can go to jail and your vehicle impounded. There are many checkstops on the weekends, and you will be asked to take a breathalizer test if they suspect you have been drinking. LEGAL SYSTEM: Not knowing the law is not a valid excuse in Mexico, or anywhere. If you find yourself caught in a legal situation, be aware that often guilt is presumed until your innocence can be proven. This is a very difficult lesson to learn if you are visiting from the United States or Canada. Immediately contact your consulate for assistance. Director Noemi Zamora noemi.zamora@cps.media Editor Lic. Madeline Milne mmilne@Vallartatribune.com Sales Team editor@vallartatribune.com Designer Cynthia Estela Andrade Gutiérrez cysandra@gmail.com

CALLING IN MEXICO (Updated August, 2019)

Effective August 3, 2019, Mexico’s Federal Telecommunications Institute implemented new telephone dialing procedures in Mexico, as follows:

LOCAL CALLS WITHIN MEXICO All calls within Mexico can now be dialed using the 10-digit telephone number (usually a two- or threedigit area code plus an eight- or seven-digit number) from a landline or cell phone, eliminating the need for prefixes, such as 01, 044 or 045. In Mexico, most cities use a three-digit area code, notable exceptions being CDMX, Guadalajara and Monterrey. LONG DISTANCE CALLS WITHIN MEXICO Same procedure as above applies.

LONG DISTANCE CALLS TO MEXICO FROM ABROAD If you are making a long-distance call to Mexico from abroad, simply add the country code (52) to the 10-digit number as described above. INTERNATIONAL LONG-DISTANCE CALLS FROM MEXICO No changes. US & Canada: Dial 001 + Country Code + Area Code + Number Elsewhere: Dial 00 + Country Code + Area Code + Number EMERGENCY CALLS No changes (see emergency numbers, below).

CALLING TOLL-FREE NUMBERS (The following procedure predates the August 2019 update. We are waiting for specific information regarding toll-free calls within Mexico and to numbers elsewhere.) Some toll-free numbers work from Mexico to the US and Canada, but many do not. Those that do work are often not toll-free. You need to dial a different prefix. To call the following toll free prefixes, dial as follows: 800 numbers Dial 001-880-then the number 866 numbers Dial 001-883-then the number 877 numbers Dial 001-882-then the number 888 numbers Dial 001-881-then the number

Ahoy Cruisers!

In port this month

In the month of August and September Puerto Vallarta & Riviera Nayarit welcomes 30,174 passengers! Bienvenido! NAME

CARNIVAL CARNIVAL CARNIVAL CARNIVAL CARNIVAL CARNIVAL CARNIVAL CARNIVAL PRINCESS CRUISES PRINCESS CRUISES

PASS

DATE

3,200 07.08.2019 3,200 14.08.2019 3,200 21.08.2019 3,200 28.08.2019 3,200 04.09.2019 3,200 11.09.2019 3,200 18.09.2019 3,200 25.09.2019 1,974 25.09.2019 2,600 27.09.2019

Vallarta Tribune is an activity and entertainment guide and publishes information as it is provided by the advertiser or event host. We do not assume responsibility in errors or omissions other than to correct them as they are made known to us regarding event schedules, locations and/or prices. In addition, we do not assume any responsibility for erroneous inclusion or exclusion of information except to take reasonable care to ensure accuracy, that permission has been obtained to use it, and to remove it as soon as is practical upon receiving your notification of error. We recommend you always confirm prior to attending or visiting an event or establishment. Weekly publication edited, printed and distributed by Ediciones y Publicaciones Siete Junio, SA de CV Grupo Editorial Tribuna Calle 21 de Marzo # 1174 Col. Lomas del Coapinole Del. El Pitillal, Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco México CP 48290 Tel. 226-0800 * www.vallartatribune.com * https://www.facebook.com/VtaTribune/

Cut out and put near your phone for handy reference

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August 15 - 21, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com


news briefs

Marriott Invests in Riviera Nayarit

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arriott International, the American multinational diversified hospitality company that manages and franchises a broad portfolio of hotels and related lodging facilities, has announced four new hotels to be developed in Riviera Nayarit. The new hotels will follow the “all included” format and construction is expected to begin in 2023 within NIA, a new development by Artha Capital. NIA is being planned in a 90-hectare area and the resorts will be developed along a 1 km. beach stretch, starting with a 400-room Westin Resort and a

240-room Ritz-Carlton resort, both expected to be completed in 2023. An Autograph Collection, 300-room hotel will follow, along with a 500-room Marriott Hotel, both of which are expected to begin operations in 2025. Presently, Marriott International has two resorts in Riviera Nayarit: The St. Regis Punta Mita Resort and W Punta de Mita, with 130 and 119 rooms, respectively. In December 2018, the company also authorized a Ritz-Carlton Reserve, to be developed within the Costa Canuva development, some 80 minutes north of Puerto Vallarta.

Amazon Opens New Distribution Center in Mexico for a one million MXN donation for educational programs. It is estimated that, to date, Amazon has invested 125 million USD in Mexico, generating jobs and bringing prosperity to thousands of local employees. It is worth mentioning that articles available through the Amazon US website are not always available through their Mexico store (amazon.com.mx) or vice-versa. Furthermore, prices can vary from store to store, so it always helps to compare prices on the same product in both stores if the US store can actually deliver it to Mexico. • PO.

Reference image by Wikimedia

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ast week, Amazon opened its largest distribution center in Latin America, located in the municipality of Tepozotlán, in the state of Mexico. Referred to as Mex3, the facilities are large enough to fit over 18 soccer fields within them and will hold products from around the world for more efficient storage and distribution throughout Mexico, not to mention faster deliveries. This is the fourth distribution center that the online retailer opens in the country. The opening ceremonies were attended by State of Mexico Governer Alfredo del Mazo, who thanked the corporation

Riviera Nayarit Promotes Destination in Midwest USA

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epresentatives of the Riviera Nayarit Conventions and Visitors Bureau traveled to Minneapolis, Salt Lake City, Denver and Colorado Springs to train over 200 travel agents on the destination’s many appeals, in preparation for the upcoming Fall-Winter holiday season. The caravan also included representatives from some of Riviera Nayarit’s most important hotels, such as Occidental Nuevo Vallarta, Villa del Palmar Flamingos, W Punta de Mita and St. Regis Punta Mita Resort. All of the previously mentioned US cities—except for Colorado Springs, one hour away from the Denver International Airport—offer direct connectivity with Puerto Vallarta’s International Airport during the winter months. The Riviera Nayarit Conventions and Visitors Bureau works in conjunction with the Bahia de Banderas Hotel and Motel Association to promote Riviera Nayarit as the prime beach destination in Mexico’s Pacific Riviera. For more information, please visit rivieranayarit.com. •

Fotos: Riviera Nayarit

Riviera Nayarit, image courtesy of Marriott International

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August 15 - 21, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com


news briefs

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Puerto Vallarta Attempts to Control Local River Trash

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t is not uncommon during the summer rainy season for plastic bottles and other non-bio-degradable contaminants accumulated in nearby rivers to flush downstream and accumulate in local beaches. To help trap and contain all this trash, Puerto Vallarta’s Environmental Department has developed biobardas, floating traps created using recyclable materials, to prevent solid residues floating downriver from reaching the ocean. “We have operated 30 cleanup campaigns over the past six months and our efforts have been insufficient,” commented Helios Hernandez Hurtado from said dependency, and the person in charge of implementing the new floating traps, which are being positioned in the Rio Cuale and Pitillal Rivers. Biobardas are created by placing thousands of capped, empty plastic soda bottles into 65 ft. long ‘netted’ pouches and deploying them at strategic spots along river streams in such a way that they capture debris floating downstream. The project is being co-developed with Bahia Unida, a local non-profit lanched in 2016 to focus on the protection of natural resources in Banderas Bay (bahiaunida.org). Pedro Ulloa, who directs the organization, commented that the use of biobardas originated in Central America, where they have been instrumental in decreasing ocean contamination. Although it may not seem necessary, project organizers ask the general public to respect the biobardas boundaries when they see them and to stop throwing contaminants in local rivers. • Tribuna de la Bahia

Mexico Soars in Panamerican Games

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exico, Canada, the United States and Brazil are the countries that garnered the highest number of medals during the 18th Pan American Games that took place in Lima, Peru, July 27 - August 11. Also known colloquially as the Pan Am Games, they are a major sporting event in the Americas featuring summer sports, in which over 5,000 athletes participate in 36 sports and nearly 400 events. The first, second, and third-place finishers in each event receive gold, silver, and bronze medals, respectively. As the games concluded, the United States, Brazil, México and Canada took home the largest number of medals (293, 171, 152 and 136, respectively). Mexico managed to break its own medal record, having won 133 when the Pan Am Games took place in Guadalajara in 2011. Originally from San Luis Potosi, Mexican racketball star Paola Longoria came home has won nine gold medals in the Pan Am Games, the highest number for any Mexican athlete. Vallartense Lupita Hernández won the gold medal this year, along with Ariana Cepeda, in racketball doubles after beating Yasmary Medina and Leyanis Castillo from Cuba. The 2023 Pan American Games, officially the XIX Pan American Games, are scheduled to be held from October 22 to November 5, 2023, in Santiago, Chile.• PO

August 15 - 21, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com

Puerto Vallarta Launches Public Bus Pilot Route Program

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n order to alleviate increasing traffic problems in Puerto Vallarta’s downtown area, the city implemented a pilot program last weekend to decrease bus numbers in town by up to 50 percent. Puerto Vallarta is served by almost 30 different bus routes. Given Puerto Vallarta’s layout, most if not all routes converge in the city’s downtown area. However, whereas buses usually begin their routes full of passengers, by the time they reach downtown, many are traveling back to back, with only a handful of passengers each, even when up to 9,000 people take the public bus downtown on a daily basis. In the past, locals have been reluctant to consider downtown as a pedestrian-only area, and they have been equally disinclined to consider having to take more than one bus to reach their destination. As part of the new pilot route program, some of the routes covering the northern outskirts of the city would only travel as far as the stadium (across from the Sheraton hotel) at which point, passengers would have to take a

free transfer to another bus that would only circulate through the downtown area. In doing so, the number of buses going through downtown Puerto Vallarta would decrease. Last weekend’s pilot program was successful in transferring over 3,000 passengers from one bus to another to continue their trip downtown without considerable delays. Amilcar Lopez Zepeda, Director of Jalisco’s Public Transportation Department, traveled from Guadalajara to

oversee the operation. “We didn’t have any major problems,” he commented. Early on we had waiting times of up to six or seven minutes for passengers to transfer from one bus to another, but on average, the waiting time for the transfer was around two minutes.” The pilot program will continue, moving forward with additional transfer spots considered at Parque Hidalgo and Parque Lazaro Cardenas, until the new transfers are fine-tuned and made official. • Tribuna de la Bahia

Women on Wednesdays Aid Local Charities

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omen on Wednesdays (WOW) is a social organization comprised of 60+ local foreigners that live year-round in Puerto Vallarta and the Nuevo Vallarta/Bucerias area. They started getting together twice a month, primarily to help ladies with or without partners connect with local goods and services, from doctors and mechanics to

home repair practitioners and in-home care support services. Not content with the social aspect of their organization, WOW has also begun raising funds or donating time to local charities. Some of the members have gotten involved with the Hospiten Hospital in Marina Vallarta volunteer program, pushing a book cart filled with

books for all ages and in three different languages, making books available for patients. They are presently looking to start similar volunteer programs in other area hospitals. To learn more about WOW, visit their Facebook page, Women on Wednesdays, or email nevamore@ shaw.ca using the subject line ‘WOW Group Info.’ • PO


local voices

Emily Majewski

emilyannmajewski@gmail.com

Emily Majewski is Co-Founder of Phytostone, a small firm based in Nayarit dedicated to creating advanced natural materials for home and garden.

Optimizing Road Design

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or those of us living around Banderas Bay through the summer, this time of year we are reminded of the powerful force that is water. Our roads, when poorly designed, can imitate ephemeral streambeds that leave gullies in their wake and maintenance without end. Today we will address several principles that can make all the difference when you are creating or re-shaping a road in these parts. The type of road these principles improve are low-volume, unpaved roads like dirt jungle access roads on hills. However, “proper” paved roads can also benefit from these considerations and are sometimes modifiable. When rain strikes, plants absorb a large amount of the water volume. But water in excess of this absorption, and in excess of what the soil can hold, runs down slopes in sheets. Water, combined with gravity, wants nothing more than to wash the contents of your road into the ocean. That is how you interpret the sight of a gully: a little message that says ‘this way to the ocean.’ When roads are pitched incorrectly, they actually channel sheet erosion into gully-forming erosion, by concentrating the force

of the water. A poorly designed road will accelerate the force of the water as if humans were designing a faster delivery route to the beach. It stands to reason, therefore, that slowing the water down has the opposite effect. This is what we want. In general, roads in low, flat areas have very bad quality results. You never want a road sited where the full volume of water wants to be: the lowest point. Flash floods and boggy conditions will continually eat away at your road. Even with impermeable surfaces like bitumen, erosion can attack the subsurface, creating air pockets that eventually result in sink holes. Ideally a road is placed on the contour of a gentle slope, higher than the lowest point. It should be perpendicular to the slope (like the lines on a topography map), which acts like a speed bump to sheet erosion. Think of roads as terraces! A comfortable grade in many circumstances is 10 degrees. But the other important grade to consider is the pitch of the road itself. Because water follows the path of least resistance, if the grade of the road’s length is steeper than the grade of the road’s width, water will then follow that course, swiftly creating a ravine. If the grade of the width is steeper than the length (causing you to drive at a slight

angle), the road will effectively shed the water without concentrating its force. This tactic de-accelerates the destructive potential. A good rule of thumb is that the pitch degree of the width should be double the pitch degree of the length, and at least 5 percent. Another strategy is to “undulate” the road every 5-10 meters (designing it to rise and fall, usually following natural grade changes). The water that does manage to follow the road is reduced in speed and channeled off the road intentionally at the low points of the undulation. This tactic is also about interrupting momentum. Channeling water off a road requires attention. Usually an effective method is to install a French drain—a ditch with a perforated pipe and backfilled with gravel. Any perforated pipes should have a sleeve that protected them against getting clogged from sediment build-up. Ultimately water should be dispelled from these pipes onto thickly vegetated zones, boulders, gabion, geotextiled slopes, constructed dams, or any discharge method that will prevent new gullies from forming. Road bases should always be well compacted and, where gravel is chosen, the gravel should be angular and not rounded for greater effectiveness. Incredible amounts of maintenance can be avoided when proper design and material selection is prioritized. There are many more best practices that you can delve into online. If there is one takeaway notion from all of the above, it’s ‘design roads to dissipate water’s force, not enhance it!’ And enjoy those extra hammock naps where you no longer are overseeing the bulldozer grading your road for the umpteenth time.

Paradise and Parenting Leza Warkentin

mommyinmexico.wordpress.com

Leza is a nursery teacher and preschool coordinator at the American School of Puerto Vallarta.

Welcome Home

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ast week I had a craving for a bao sandwich. If you’ve never had one, you really should. I don’t believe it’s a coincidence that bao rhymes with wow. There’s something about that pillowy, soft steamed bread wrapped around a deliciously marinated slice of tofu that I can never quite get out of my head, especially when I am on holiday and not required to think about anything other than food. And I had options. Bonito Kitchen was having a special on bao (and anything is incredibly special at Bonito Kitchen even on a regular day), so I could have happily gone out of my way to stop there. However, I found myself in Versalles on another errand so I headed to Budaixi, a great little Taiwanese place on Hamburgo. As I waited at the counter for my order, a wonderful guy stopped me and let me know that he enjoyed reading my column each week in the Tribune, telling me that the articles about family life in Puerto Vallarta always made him smile. We had a little chat, at the end of which he encouraged me to keep writing. I walked out not only with one of the best meals in town, but with a boost to my self-esteem. I love this! And truly, there are so many obvious things that make Puerto Vallarta such a fantastic place. You get your first taste of it when you come down on vacation. You can shake a pineapple in any direction and you will hit a beach, or a jungle, or a surprised local who won’t even be upset about being hit with a spiky fruit. The hotels are gorgeous and there are more things to do than there are paid days in your vacation time. There are wonderful companies that can help tourists check off every item on their bucket list (whale watching; check! Zip-lining; check! Best margarita ever; check!). On top of it all your dollars, so timid and shrunken at home, are having a blast being stretched so far. Let’s face it: visit Puerto Vallarta once, and you’ll spend most of your days dreaming about the day you get to return. Maybe you finally decide that

simply visiting is not enough, because you can’t imagine leaving this incredible place of palm trees and happiness in a glass called a Pina Colada. You sell it all and move down, renting a place near the beach. And it’s great at first because it’s sort of like a vacation, except it’s permanent. But then some of those initial feelings of elation fade just a bit, because now there are legal documents to take care of, and you have to figure out how to make sure your car is legal, and you get stung by jellyfish at least once. There are lines in immigration that last for days, particularly because you can’t imagine all the paperwork from your past that is actually required. Your kids are being kids even when you ask them not to for just a second, and it all seems overwhelming. Like maybe you made a huge mistake, and you should have left the margarita dreams for your yearly holiday. I know this because I have been there. If you’re new here and you’ve decided this is your home, I can’t tell you with a clean conscience that all of those feelings go away. I can tell you that once you find your rhythm in your new life, you are going to go out and find a little restaurant (probably Budaixi, but it could be any of a multitude) that serves something that tastes like pure, pillowy happiness. It will become that place you go to when you’ve just had to renew your driver’s license, you’ve stepped on a pufferfish or you just need a taste of something amazing. When you get there, you will find people who recognize you. They may even tell you something that makes your day. You’ll walk out with some comfort food and a big smile. And you’ll be reminded, as you often are, that you are home.

Image by HarshLight (Flickr).

Sustainably Yours

Image by Skeeze (Pixabay).

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August 15 - 21, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com


culture

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August 15 - 21, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com

A Case For (Of) Mexican Wine, Please By Paco Ojeda

With an increasing number of Mexican wines winning top accolades in international wine competitions around the world you’d think we’re up to something new. How can this be possible, however, when the oldest winery in the Americas (Casa Madero) is in Mexico and was founded in 1597?

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hile it is commonly believed that the Spanish conquistadors were responsible for bringing grapes to the New World, there is evidence of wild grapes throughout the continent that predates the Spanish conquest. After the conquest, local species, such as Vitis rupestris and Vitis labrusca were identified, although these were not suitable for wine production. Spanish conquistador Hernan Cortes is credited for being the main promoter of harvesting grapes for wine production, and he ordered seeds of the Spanish variety Vitis vinifera to be brought to the New World and planted. To that effect, he signed a decree in 1524 stating that all land-owning settlers with indian slaves should plant 1,000 Spanish grape plants per year for every 100 slaves. By the 1530s, King Charles I of Spain ordered that all ships traveling to the New World should carry grapes and olives, as he thought it wise to cultivate these plants throughout the new Spanish territories in the America. Missionaries were particularly set on growing the vines as wine was required for mass. As the Spanish settlers began exploring the territory while looking for gold, they reached Coahuila, in northern Mexico, where they found grapes thriving in the wild. It is there that the first American wine was produced around 1574. Two decades later, Hacienda San Lorenzo was created with the blessing of King Phillip II. In 1597, it came to be known as Casa Madero. By this time, over half a century had passed since Cortes had ordered grapes to be cultivated and harvested wherever possible. Spanish grapes thrived in several regions of Mexico to such extent that back in Spain, local grape producers began feeling threatened by the enormous success vineyards had in the new world. Under pressure, in 1595, King Phillip II prohibited new wine grape production in Mexico, limiting it to sacramental wine only. It was in the late 17th century that Jesuit missionaries brought grape cultivation to Baja California,

where they found a climate similar to that in Coahuila. As was common throughout Europe, vineyards were created around churches and monasteries. Without easy access to wine, most locals developed a taste for other alcoholic beverages, such as pulque, a tequila predecessor (the fermented sap of the agave plant), beer, tequila, and imported alcoholic drinks such as rum. Meanwhile, wine production in South American countries such as Argentina and Chile continued being developed. It wasn’t until the Mexican Independence from Spain in the early 19th century that local winemaking was once again promoted, this time by Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, a Mexican Roman Catholic priest and a leader of the Independence, in 1810. In 1824, three centuries after Cortes’ decree, Mexican Emperor Agustin Iturbide ordered importation taxes as high as 35 percent applied to all imported wines in order to stimulate local production. Winemakers

continued settling in Coahuila, in Baja California (in an area now known as Valle de Guadalupe) and other states where dry weather allowed for the creation of wines of increasing quality. Mexican wine production began coming of age during the third decade of the 20th century when Mexican President Abelardo L. Rodriguez purchased the Bodegas de Santo Tomas in Baja California and building a wine production plant in Ensenada. Renowned European winemakers began settling in Mexico, as was the case of Italian Angelo Cetto, who began producing wines in Valle de Guadalupe in 1936. Since then, the number of award-winning wineries in Mexico has increased exponentially, with internationally-renowned names such as Casa Madero, L. A. Cetto, Monte Xanic and Domecq showing up in international competitions, as well as the menus of some of the world’s most prestigious restaurants. Today, and thanks to King Phillip

II’s 1595 ruling, wine consumption in Mexico is not nearly as popular as beer or other beverages. In fact, Mexicans consume an average of 65 liters of beer annually, while annual wine consumption in Mexico is approximately 750ml. per person (or about 4.5 wine glasses). To make things worse for the Mexican wine industry, as much as 69 percent of the wine consumed in Mexico is imported. But this is changing. And fast. There is no holding back Mexico’s burgeoning wine industry. A quick visit to the Concours Mondial de Bruxelles website, concoursmondial. com (also known as the United Nations of Fine Wines) reveals that their competition’s quest to seek out the world’s finest quality wines has revealed quite a few Grand Gold, Gold and Silver Medal winners in Mexico over the past few years, alongside top producers from Spain, Portugal, Italy, France and South Africa, among other countries.

Getting Started with Mexican Wines When it’s time to resist the urge to shop for California wines as many folks from north of the border do, the best thing to do is to visit a local wine purveyor with expertise on Mexican wines. One such purveyor is Nina Goodhope, who has a small shop, Cork+Bottle, at Los Mercados in Colonia Emiliano Zapata. Not only does she carry mostly Mexican wines, but she also ongoing wine tastings open to the public by reservation. Or you can stop by her shop where you can sample some varieties before purchasing. Here are some of her favorites: White: Duquesa Cuvee Blanc, by Vinos de la Reina (an unoaked blend of chardonnay, sauvignon blanc and viognier) Rosé: V, by Casa Madero (a cabernet sauvignon) Red: Nebbiolo, by L.A. Cetto (medium-bodied, super food-friendly)


culture

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August 15 - 21, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com

Tortas!

Mexico’s Culinary Underdog Text and photos By Paco Ojeda

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sk your recently-arrived foreign friends to mention the Mexican foods they are looking forward to trying while they visit Puerto Vallarta. Chances are they will mention—in no particular order—tacos, enchiladas, quesadillas and guacamole. Some might even volunteer burritos, which are more Tex-Mex than Mexican, as a matter of fact. But standing anxiously at the tail end of the culinary row call is the omnipresent, yet oft-overlooked torta. Tortas are everywhere, and this is a problem. The word itself is considered to be a Spanish word with Latin roots—torta in Latin means ‘pie’ but is also used in other languages, including Italian, Albanian, Maltese, Croatian, Portuguese and so forth, with a broad variety of culinary meanings. In Spain and several Latin American countries, the word is used for sweet cakes, whereas in the Philippines it is more of an omelet (tortang). In Mexico, a torta bears structural similarity to that of a sandwich, in that both are foods placed between two pieces of bread that serve as a container, but you will definitely ruffle some local feathers if you refer to a torta as a sandwich, as this is where the similarity ends. Tortas are prepared using a bolillo, a savory bread that is a variation of the French baguette, but shorter in length. There are several regional versions of this bread throughout Mexico. For example, a telera is similar to the bolillo, but it is usually softer, has a rounder shape, and is divided into three sections on top. In Jalisco, it is called birote, and is usually crunchier, as tortas in our state are traditionally served on a broth (see below). To prepare a torta, the bread is sliced in half and frequently part of the inside is removed (the white part) to make room for ingredients. Once hollowed, the bread halves are first covered with a variety of dressings, which include mayonnaise, sour cream, refried beans and avocado, just as you would spread mayo and mustard in a sandwich. Once this is done, it is the actual fillings that give a torta its flavor, personality and versatility: sliced ham, shredded chicken, beef, cheese, pork roast are just some of the options. Tortas are the perfect

convenience food. They can be enjoyed all day long, warm, cold or room temperature. The bread can be used as-is, or it can be grilled or toasted in a press. Its crust is thick enough to contain sauces and meat juices without spilling or disintegrating, so they can be prepared or purchased ahead of time, wrapped in a paper bag and saved for the ideal time to enjoy, even if it is hours later—try that with a hamburger! And since they can be hand-carried, they are often sold at concerts, parades and other massive events. But historically, this convenience has also contributed to the torta’s bad rep. Since bolillos are usually prepared with baking soda instead of yeast, they have been considered an inferior form of bread through times, as evidenced by this popular Spanish aphorism: A falta de pan buenas son tortas. Where there is no bread, tortas will do. Or even worse, the Mexican variation: A falta de pan, tortillas. Where there is no bread, tortillas will do. Poor torta! Now, step into any gourmet restaurant in town and chances are you will find some sort of fancy taco in their appetizer or entrée choices. A torta? Forget about it! Since all the ingredients required to put together a great torta can be found at a local supermarket, tortas can easily be prepared and enjoyed at home. However, neophyte foodies want to look for a dedicated place. Just as you go to a taquería to enjoy tacos, the place to go is a tortería, or a street vendor. Once you are there, the choices can vary, but here are some of the most common tortas you can find throughout Mexico: Torta de Jamon—a very basic

torta, with sliced ham as the main ingredient. Torta Toluqueña—named after the city of Toluca, its main ingredient is chorizo, or Mexican sausage. Torta Cubana—or Cuban, it features all available ingredients. Torta de Cochinita Pibil—quite common in Southern Mexico, think about them as Mexican Sloppy Joe! Torta de Tamal—an odd bird common in Central Mexico, the bread is stuffed with either a pork or a chicken tamale. Lonche—another oddity! In Northern Mexico, tortas are sometimes called ‘lonche’ influenced by the English word ‘lunch,’ as they are perfect for lunch break, although lonche is also used as a more generic term for lunchtime. Our Own Variation Guadalajara, our state capital, is famous for its tortas ahogadas, or drowned tortas, in which the torta is smothered in a red sauce and served on a deep plate. This is the only torta you wouldn’t want to try holding with your hands as you eat it! In Puerto Vallarta, it is more common to come across a torta ahogada stand than any of the other dry versions popular in the rest of the country, unfortunately. That said, if you wish to experience a good Mexico City-style torta, a great option is to visit El Caballo de Villa (on Francisco Villa 473 in Versalles), where many of the variations mentioned above are prepared, sold and packaged for the perfect picnic or road trip. More Aphorisms The Spanish phrase se comió la torta antes del recreo (in English, he/she ate the torta before school recess) is usually used to refer

to someone that had sex before getting married, or even worse, got pregnant in the process. The phrase se quedó como el perro de las dos tortas (in English, he/she ended up like the dog with the two loaves of bread) makes reference to Phaedrus’ fable, in

which a dog steals a loaf of bread from a baker and runs as fast as it can. While crossing a bridge, he sees his own reflection in the passing river. Thinking it is another dog trying to take his bread away, he attempts to bite, losing his prized possession.


local voices

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August 15 - 21, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com

Medical Matters Pam Thompson

pamela@healthcareresourcespv.com

Dental Implants – A Different Option

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his week we had a chat with Dr. Siegfried Lopez (we just call him Dr. Ziggy!) who is a maxillofacial specialist/surgeon. His specialty covers a wide variety of issues but today we are discussing “zygomatic dental implants.” These are an alternative to traditional dental implants, appropriate when there is insufficient bone in the upper jaw (maxilla). Thanks to modern technological advancements, zygomatic implants allow many people to forgo the lengthy process of bone grafting and sinus lifts. Known as rescue

implants, they can even be used after reabsorption or infection results in a failed bone graft. Zygoma implants (or zygomatic implants) are different from conventional dental implants in that they anchor in to the zygomatic bone (cheekbone) rather than the maxilla (upper jaw) but the main difference between zygomatic and regular implants is that they may be used when maxillary bone quality or quantity is inadequate for the placement of regular dental implants. Inadequate maxillary bone volume may be due to bone reabsorption as well as the development of air cells of the maxillary sinuses, or a combination

MARINA DEL REY 203 3 bed, 2 bath, 1,269 sq.ft. $275,000 USD

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ttention Marina view lovers! This is a unique opportunity you need to consider. A wonderful 3 bed, 2 bath condo in the heart of Marina Vallarta. There is a relaxing view from the guest bedroom, a Marina view from the terrace and master bedroom! Marina del Rey offers covered and uncovered parking, elevators, on-site administrator, a huge pool

with jacuzzi, ping pong tables, two waterfalls, palapa, outdoor showers, on-site maid service and laundry service if desired. A very easy lifestyle at a very reasonable price. Contact information: BOARDWALK REALTY OF: 322 224 0014/ 322 223 0001 rocio@boardwalkrealtypv.com https://bit.ly/2Kwmmrq

Image by Michal Jarmoluk (Pixabay).

Pamela Thompson operates HealthCare Resources Puerto Vallarta, a multi-faceted, independent, resource network that addresses all things related to your health and well-being. They offer assistance to help find a physician, hospital and diagnostic service for any healthcare needs.

of both, when the patient does not want bone grafting or if previous bone grafting has failed. This procedure involves the use of general anesthesia. After surgery, the zygomatic implants will be typically “loaded” with a fixed bridge, so in a period of approximately two weeks, the patient can return to normal tasks. Dr. Ziggy says that zygomatic implants offer a better alternative for those who have extreme bone

deterioration in the maxilla. They can be used in the event of failed implants or failed bone graft. The cost of the treatment varies from patient to patient but it is approximately $12,000 USD or peso equivalent. What exactly does a maxillofacial specialist do? Everything from head and neck cancer to procedures to reduce snoring. Facial traumas, dental work, such as the implants, TMJ disorders, some

hearing-related disorders—it is a very long list! For an appointment with Dr. Ziggy, just send an email. We are lucky to have him in Banderas Bay. It is hard to believe we are almost to mid-August! It won’t be long when snowbirds return. October is going to be a huge month with a plethora of activities focusing on Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Keep an eye out for our special calendar! Here’s to a restoring week!


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TOWNS & COLONIAS BEACHES

RESORTS MALECON SHOPPING/ARTWALK

BY SEA

LAND & AIR

1. MARINA RIVIERA NAYARIT 2. NUEVO RIVIERA NAYARIT 3. MARINA VALLARTA MARINA 4. CRUISE SHIP TERMINAL 5. LOS MUERTOS PIER/ WATER TAXIS

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‘OLD TOWN’

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BANDERAS BAY SHOPPING AND SERVICES Thinking about selling your property? Virtual tour Market analysis of your property Adverrsing on mullple plaaorms Alfredo Herrera

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Tel. (322) 222 2675, (322) 222 5402, w Celular: 322 175 0412

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mundodeazulejos@hotmail.com www.talavera-tile.com


www.vallartatribune.com MURPHY’S IRISH PUB Located on the Historic Malecon across from the lighthouse statue (El Faro) - beautiful sunset views every night! Delicious traditional pub menu. Live Rock Music - Thurs - Sat @10:30pm Watch all sports w 2 satellites. Pool Table. Happy Hour Daily 3 to 6 pm. 2 x 1 Corona or Pacifico. 50 pesos Well Drinks.

484 Morelos - 2nd floor - Centro Vallarta Open daily 11 am

Murphys Puerto Vallarta

Welcome Home Sheryl Novak

sa.novak@solutionsmexico.com

Sheryl Novak is an expat Canadian who has owned a home in Mexico for over ten years. She is the owner of SOLutions Mexico and The Furniture Store by SOLutions Mexico. She is an expert on sourcing all styles of furniture for all sizes of budgets, in Mexico.

The Acapulco Chair

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any owners of a home in Mexico are furnishing their vacation, retirement or rental properties in the mid-century modern décor style. It is currently one of the most popular styles. Mid-century modern is known for its use of geometric shapes, clean lines and unadorned, tapered legs on furniture. It was popular in the US from about 1933 to 1965. As the saying goes, everything old is new again. Those who are familiar with furniture designers of this period will remember the names Eames, Miller, and Saarinen. Another popular chair of this era was born right here in Mexico—the Acapulco chair. There are lots of rumors as to who may have designed this iconic piece of furniture initially. Sadly, no one has ever been officially credited for its creation History does record that a Mexican designer by the name of Cecilia Leon de la Barra was the one that claimed to give it the iconic name. The Acapulco chair takes its name from the

hot spot holiday location of the 1950s and 60s. At that time, this resort location was considered one of the most glamorous holiday settings for the rich and famous. An Acapulco chair is easily identifiable by both its shape and color. It is hand-made by wrapping and weaving colorful vinyl cords around a pear-shaped metal frame. In the beginning, steel was used for the structure; however, it tended to rust quickly from the ocean air. Today’s chairs make use of commercial-grade, powder-coated aluminum making them more durable for the climate. The vinyl cords of an Acapulco chair are all bright and eye-catching: blues, yellows, pinks, greens, and oranges. In the 50s,

plastic was used to make the cords. Today, materials used include PVC (not recommended), HDPE, or nylon. These materials make the weave more elastic and comfortable. The intended result is that when you sit in this chair, you feel like you are floating. The feeling is meant to make you feel like you are in an ancient Mayan hammock with the breeze gently cooling your skin. Over 1000 years ago, Mayans created hammocks out of woven tree bark and plant fibers. The purpose of the weave was to allow air to flow through. And the objective of being off the ground was to be protected from rodents, bugs, and snakes. An Acapulco chair, made with proper materials, can run anywhere from $4,000 to $10,000 MXN. Lower priced options are available but will not last as long and tend to be made from materials that are not good for our health nor for the environment. The other reason they cost more is that each Acapulco chair is hand made. It takes many hours to hand weave from a single cord of material. This colorful iconic chair is easily recognizable, incredibly comfortable, and symbolic of not only mid-century modern design, but also Mexican culture. If you are furnishing your home in Mexico in this style, make sure to add in a couple of these stunning pieces. Furnishing a new condo in Mexico? Contact me at furniture@solutionsmexico. com for info on where you can find reasonably priced, well made mid-century modern furniture like the Acapulco chair.

Famous Mosaics For the Love of Public Art By Emily Murray This summer the Tile Park is taking the show on the road! We’re paying a virtual visit to the most famous mosaics of the world... from China to Spain to the US... tile parks, record-breaking installations, ancient murals, points of interest and so much more. Join us!

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ast week we paid a visit to Barcelona’s whimsical and remarkable Parque Guell. Now a worldclass travel destination, but once, a downright total failure of a project. Gaudi was always a little ahead of his time, and Parque Guell proved that. The concept was a little extreme for some who could afford it, and it was too far off the beaten path to be accessible to any average Joe with flair. This incredible project could have gone down in history as a failure, left to deteriorate and fall by the wayside, but it didn’t. Instead, it went on to become one of the most exciting public parks in the world. Outsider art, before it was even a thing. He really was ahead of his time. No matter where you live, chances are pretty good that public art is a part of your daily existence. Seemingly no public space is constructed anymore without an art budget, and what they come up with is sometimes quite a conversation starter! (Even when… sometimes particularly when… we don’t really love what they’ve come up with.) Art can hit us on a primal level, make us feel something different, offer a new conclusion. Public art, in particular, has a way of allowing us to look at things in a fresh way. Like a piece that appears to be a random, almost chaotic arrangement of objects... but when light is cast the right way, the shadow on the wall is a perfect, softly detailed, human face. Or a 50-foot mural, the entire face of a grey downtown building, with every shade of green imaginable, foliage painted lush and leafy like a jungle,

right in the midst of a concrete one. And over there is… yes… that’s definitely a 20-foot tall brass ice cream cone. Why? Why not, is public art’s sassy retort. The “why” part isn’t your concern. Your job is only to feel whatever you’re going to feel. Public art commands attention in different ways than museum art. For one, often public art invites you to interact with it in some way. You can touch it, lean on it, even sit on it. It is unapologetically present, and on some level that is an invitation to us as well, to do the same. To be here, right now as we are, with this piece of art, just as it is too. And we can do it for no other reason than just to have an experience. Communit y-funded public art installations take that experience to new heights. With joy, play, and a strong sense of community,

Puerto Vallarta’s very own Tile Park continues taking shape piece by piece. Every day we bring the intention not just of creating a fun and beautiful place for folks to hang out, but a place that holds real meaning... a place in people’s hearts. Individual pieces of real lives, arranged to fit together harmoniously, telling the story of an entire town. Art offers us a new perspective on communicating, another avenue through which to process information and express it. This is a method of communication irrespective of language, and that’s just one reason it is so important. Another is that it is a gift, offered equally to everyone. It’s meant just for you, for your consideration. Hopefully, you feel something. But whether you appreciate it, is of little consequence. The love of public art is there for the taking, the rest is up to you.


local voices

16

August 15 - 21, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com

On The Water Capt. Gregory Pilkington Greg@fishfc.com

Capt. Greg operates the sportfishing boat TOPLESS II out of Marina Riviera Nayarit at La Cruz.

Marlin, Sailfish, Tuna, Dorado and Roosterfish On the Move

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he dog days of summer are upon us and that means great fishing, calm seas and no crowds. The only problem is picking a target species and locating them. Take black and blue marlin, for example. One day they are near Roca Corbatena (30 miles offshore) and the next near El Banco (40 miles offshore). The same with the tuna. And, for some unknown reason, the dorado are noticeable by their absence. Best Bet For The Serious Angler Now is the time to head offshore and target big marlin at the world-famous grounds of Roca Corbatena and El Banco. These fish are currently averaging over 400 pounds. This requires a lot of patience and a bit of luck. Sure, you might get one in the first few hours fishing, but if you want an outstanding chance of catching that fish of a lifetime, I’d suggest

fishing at least two full days on a top boat. Best Bet For The Weekend Warriors and Casual Anglers Head around the corner from Cabo Corrientes and spend the morning chasing a prized roosterfish up the beach. Then shoot just a short distance offshore in the afternoon and you could add a sailfish, marlin, dorado or tuna. This is a region few people ever visit and even without the exceptional fishing, it would be the highlight of most people’s holiday. This coast lined with spectacular deserted beaches is as breathtaking as any place on the planet. Note: This past week an elusive cat species similar to a puma called a Jaguarundi was caught on camera playing on this beach— way cool! Best Bet For Those Just Wanting To Get On The Water Now that we are finally seeing some rain, the water temperatures

SPCA Adorable Dog in the Spotlight: Rusty

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usty is one sweet little dog! We think him to be a Cocker Spaniel mix. He is already about 8 years old, weighing 20 lbs. Rusty is the perfect family dog. He has a medium energy level and loves everyone he meets instantly! He gets along with other dogs but doesn´t really like cats. His favorite

thing is to receive cuddles from his humans. We think he would make a wonderful family pet. Rusty was fixed, dewormed and vaccinated and is now available for adoption. If your family is looking for the perfect addition, contact us at spcapv@ gmail.com to request an application to adopt Rusty.

in the bay are starting to cool down a bit. That should mean dorado and sailfish in Banderas Bay. These brilliantly colored fish are perfectly sized for children and novice anglers and put on an amazing show. For some reason, they are still scarce but that could and should change as the rains

become more consistent. Combine this trip with a stopover at Yelepa for a beachside lunch and an easy hike to the waterfall. We guarantee this will be one of the best days of your life. Conservation Corner—Keep ‘em in the water! If you are going to keep a fish

for dinner it doesn’t really matter how you treat it. Great tasting local fish include dorado (those over 10 pounds), tuna, and many of the reef fish. Marlin, sailfish, and roosterfish, however, are such a prized catch that they are released in most places in the world. Studies show that the economic value of a sustainable recreational billfish fishery far outweighs the price realized for a dead fish to the local community. We encourage you to insist that your crew only use circle hooks when using live baits as the fish is almost always hooked in the side of the mouth. This allows for a quick and easy release. Traditional J-hooks, often result in gut hooked fish which leads to increased mortality. Lastly, please don’t pull your marlin or sailfish out of the water for a ‘hero shot’ photo. Studies show that this increases the chance that the fish will not survive. Instead, lean over the side and send her back to make someone else’s dream come true. Topless Tip It’s the rainy season. If you are heading out of the bay, choose a boat with a good radar as we get some big thunderstorms this time of year. Your family’s safety should be your number one factor in choosing a boat and crew. A boat with radar can maneuver around these storms much easier than a boat without radar.

Volunteer With the SPCA Puerto Vallarta

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t the SPCAPV, we have lots of volunteer opportunities for dog lovers. For example: 1. Come and visit the sanctuary and interact with the dogs. This helps us a lot in their socializing process. This you can do pretty much any day or time. But the sanctuary is in quite a remote location. Do you have a car? 2. Twice a week we take our dogs to local parks or shopping centers to get them used to strangers, noises, kids, etc. and we need help walking them there. The more volunteers we have, the more dogs we can take there and this helps them a lot in their socializing process, too. This usually happens Sundays and Tuesdays. 3. We need volunteers to help at our Spay/Neuter clinics organized every other week, Mondays and Tuesdays. Time commitment is from 8 am to 2 pm. If you can only

do one day, not both, that´s ok too. It is helping to register the people who bring their pets and then doing the post-operation care, monitoring the dogs and cats until they come out of the anesthesia. If you have never done that, it´s no problem, as it is not difficult and you get taught everything there. 4. We have started signing up volunteers for the Fall-Winter season who can help at our farmer´s market

booth. We are at the Olas Altas Farmer´s market, every Saturday from November through April. We take donations and sell t-shirts and hats with our logo and such. Time commitment 8 am -2 pm. You can sign up for once a month, or more often, or less. Any day you can volunteer, helps us. It´s usually fun and you meet a lot of people. If any of that speaks to you, please email us to spcapv@gmail.com


local voices

The Private (Tax) Bill Collector

Vanishing World/ Vanishing Home

Orlando Gotay, Tax Attorney

John Warren

Orlando Gotay is a California licensed tax attorney (with a Master of Laws in Taxation) admitted to practice before the IRS, the U.S. Tax Court and other taxing agencies. He devotes part of his practice to federal and state tax matters of U.S. expats in Mexico. This article is informational only and not meant as legal advice.

John Warren is in charge of publicity for the International Friendship Club in Puerto Vallarta (IFC). During the summer, he writes about traveling while also raising environmental awareness.

john3984@me.com

tax@orlandogotay.com

It’s All in the Cards

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arthquakes can be catastrophic events due to massive forces and unpredictability. Science always looks for clues to figure out when the next “big one” will arrive. In the tax arena, I can’t predict but there’s an earthquake looming, aimed at persons who own, trade or use virtual currencies (“crypto”). The IRS responds slowly to technology. Early 2014 guidance simply said crypto was “property” and that crypto income or gain just had to be reported like any other property. In November 2016 the IRS went after Coinbase, a large San Francisco based crypto exchange, seeking trader information. In 2017 the IRS won—a list of persons with at least one transaction of $20,000 or more between 2013 and 2015. In June 2019 the IRS sent letters to 10,000 persons urging “review” of tax reporting on account of crypto transactions. Two additional versions of the letter exist, in which the IRS states “potential misreporting” of transactions, or even requesting specific taxpayer responses. This month, H.M. Revenue and Customs (the British IRS) requested user names and transaction data from UK based exchanges. The tectonic plates are beginning to shift all over. Tax administrators have seen not just

massive money floating around, but unreported and untaxed money. From IRS court filings: “There has been an explosion of billions of dollars of wealth in just a few years from bitcoin, a significant amount of which has no doubt accrued to United States taxpayers, with virtually no third-party reporting to the IRS of that increase in income.” And that takes me to the next point, the likely earthquake. So far, “foreign” crypto is not reportable under Foreign Bank Account Report (FBAR) or Form 8938, Report of Specified Foreign Financial Assets. But all those IRS letters can’t be seen in isolation, they must be part of a broader effort. That could be updated guidance, including new reporting requirements for “foreign” crypto. And if this concerns you, you should follow this closely. If “foreign” crypto holdings are reportable, I would expect some type of shoehorning into existing FBAR/8938 reporting schemes… akin to a square peg in a round hole. This would likely require potentially massive information gathering from its owners, just to be able to comply. I would urge crypto holders to begin looking now at their holdings, to begin getting a grasp of the magnitude of data that could be needed: exchanges, transactions, digital wallets, valuation of e-coin, and more. Forewarned is forearmed!

The Trouble With Water

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he trouble with water is that it needs to be in the Goldilocks zone of not too much and not too little. In Puerto Vallarta, we are in that perfect zone with no droughts and no floods. But things can change, and we don’t know what the future holds. But there are some things we do know. We know that 97.5% of the Earth’s water is salt and 2.5% is fresh. According to the U.S. Geologic Survey, glaciers and ice caps contain 69% of the fresh water, surface water (lakes and rivers) contain just 1%, and the other 30% is in groundwater. We know that the water that comes out of our taps, like much of the drinking water around the world, is groundwater. Any precipitation, whether it’s rain or melted snow, that is not absorbed by plants, may percolate down into the subsoil and bedrock and then it is known as “groundwater.” This water is found in the pores between particles in sand and gravel or in the cracks in rocks, and forms reservoirs of freshwater, which are known as “aquifers.” Punch a well into an aquifer and water flows to the surface. Some aquifers stretch over areas of thousands of square miles, and, in some, their water was deposited thousands of years ago. This water is usually replenished very slowly, and we know that in many places aquifers are being used up faster than they’re renewed. This is happening in Mexico City. According to a report in May 2018 titled “How a city that floods is running out of water,” (bbc. com/future/galler y/20180510how-a-cit y-that-floods-is-r unning-out-of-water) Mexico City has a severe problem. With a population of 20 million, the city’s demands for water are staggering. But the amount of rain coming down is not keeping up with the groundwater being pumped up. If trends continue, the city’s aquifers

are expected to dry out within the next thirty years. Let’s read that again… Mexico City’s natural water reserves could be gone by 2049. Then what? How old, dear reader, will you be then? According to Arnoldo Matus Kramer, the city’s Chief Resilience Officer, “We are exploiting our local aquifers at a very high rate. At the same time, we haven’t invested enough resources to have a robust monitoring system. So there’s a lot of uncertainty as to how the local aquifers work.” The over-exploitation of its water reserve also risks increasing seismic activity and is causing subsidence within the city. Parts of the city are sinking by 30cms. (12”) a year; the result of the aquifer not being ‘pumped up’ by water enough to support the ground above. This type of sinking has been linked to the earthquake of 2017. The subsidence also affects infrastructure above and below ground—damaging the very pipes that bring water to people, as well as removing their waste. If the remaining water in the lake basin is lost, it will have a ripple effect. It will reduce humidity in the city and higher temperatures will

cause more water to disappear— while, at the same time, making the parched city ever thirstier. It’s a vicious cycle with no easy solution in sight. As a first step, Kramer says that the city is developing a “robust monitoring system” and identifying the key problems that must be overcome in order to save itself. We know that the depletion of aquifers is happening worldwide. Here’s another example: the US Geological Survey issued a report, on June 20, 2019, on the state of the Mississippi River Valley aquifer. The report included this statement: “The Mississippi River Valley aquifer caps a shallow system of aquifers in the Mississippi Alluvial Plain that extends across 45,000 square miles of the midwestern and southern United States from Illinois to Louisiana… Increased groundwater withdrawal is expected to continue and threatens complete and irreversible aquifer depletion.” What? Mexico City! The Mississippi River Valley! Depletion of aquifers are happening and they are happening more frequently as populations increase, demand for water by the agricultural industry and cities sky-rockets and the wells run dry. We know that Seapal provides the water services to Puerto Vallarta and they pump that water from aquifers. In a meeting held a couple of months ago, professional hydrologist, Jose Antonio Gomez Reyna, expressed concern about the lack of proper management of Puerto Vallarta’s aquifer and the forecasts of severe water shortages within the next two years. Will Puerto Vallarta soon be added to that list of cities running out of water? That is what we don’t know.

Image by Birgl (Pixabay).

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August 15 - 21, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com


entertainment

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From Here

August 15 - 21, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com

A Table in the Corner

Marcia Blondin

Bronwen White

AJ Freeman

Aside from contributing regularly to the Tribune for several years, Marcia is a skilled artisan, specialized in repurposing recycled jewelry and selling her creations at the Friday Marsol Market by the Pier.

Originally from London, Bronwen White has moved to Puerto Vallarta from the US, where she lived in many of its great cities. She is presently embarking on her journey of discovering the local culinary scene delights.

Singing in the Rain

De Cantaro Bar y Parrilla

AJ Freeman is an adventurous spirit, serial friend-maker, and general enthusiast. He lives his everyday life hoping to demonstrate the nearly infinite potential for discovery and wonder on this small wet rock orbiting a dim yellow star in the backwoods of the Milky.

marciavallarta@gmail.com

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week ago, Lady Zen took the stage at Ella bar, upstairs on Lazaro Cardenas, to sing a requiem for one of her lifelong heroes, Aretha Franklin. Fans of the undisputed Queen of Soul were in their glory—Lady Zen’s mezzo voice soared effortlessly into the high registers. Those in the audience providing happy backup were mercifully unplugged! The sound throughout Ella is unvarying and was made sublime by Santiago, an exceptional sound tech in Vallarta with years of experience. Halfway into her performance, it started to rain and hard. The retractable roof quickly covered our heads, and the volume increased a tad so we could hear over the pounding water. The only downside to the entire evening was that Lady Zen sang to tracks; unavoidable under the circumstances, but for the future, I hope we can hear her reprise this concert with live musicians. Wow. (There would likely be a call for backup vocals!) While we are on the subject of Ella, a stand-up comedian from Mexico City and dear friend of Lady Z’s will appear Friday, August 16, at 8:30 pm in English and again at 11 pm in Spanish. Martin Leon will have another two back-to-back shows on August 23rd. One of my closest friends returned to Vallarta after many weeks of traveling in the US. Many of you have seen Sandra Cesca conducting her walking tours of Vallarta. What you may not know about her is that besides being a gifted writer of several books, she has taken her photographic skills to a new level. She has embarked on a new business venture blogging about her travels and those interesting people she meets along the way. Look for “Blogger for your Cultural Insider.” You can find Sandra in November at Marsol Friday Market by the Pier with some of her photos made into greeting cards and large giclees suitable for walls in your home. We had a delicious dinner at Co-Exist then walked to Captain Don’s on

cosmiccapt@gmail.com

walesbw@gmail.com

Honduras to hear Tequila Rush play. A long walk home through a packed Malecon at midnight (in August?) and non-stop chatter the entire way to catch up! The next night was more good food and delightful camaraderie at my Swedish gal pal’s new house that I have been waiting a year to see. With still a few details to be sorted out (nothing ever moves quickly when building in Mexico!) the house was glorious with views so riveting I never wanted to leave her terrace. Living right at sea level as I do, it is incredible to get up high and be reminded of the vast expanse that is Banderas Bay. Finally got in to see Bagel King, Peter Hardy’s new place on Ignacio Vallarta: Big Apple & Co. Deli. Peter has lots of shelf space, and he would love to fill it with “Farmers Market-type stuff.” So, if you are chomping at the bit for season to roll around so you can get back into your Market space, get to work and take your goods over to Peter. Ideally, he would like to have specialty foodstuffs from all our local markets available to the public every day, all year-round. Update on our Artist’s Cooperative: a SNAFU has popped up with our intended locale so, we are looking in downtown Vallarta (only!) for a suitable space. Please send me an email if you have—or know of—a large commercial space for rent. We want to be open by October 1, so time is really pressing. Thanks in advance for any help. Nineteen weeks to Christmas… I think that means, enjoy the quietness and the warmth we are experiencing now! In no time, the tourist switch will be turned on to full, and we’ll be up to here joyously welcoming back friends, family and the crowds that fill our city to near bursting. Remember these dog days and keep them close to your heart. Extend your hands to strangers and welcome them to our city. With a smile, you can show them Puerto Vallarta and the why-we-live-here. Take care of one another, don’t forget. Hugs, From Here.

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liver Applegate whose family pioneered real estate here in Puerto Vallarta over 50 years ago is at the helm of this lovely restaurant. I have taken to going a lot this summer to partake of the BBQ spareribs, which are great and served with a compote of grilled corn and sour cream, and their signature “deluxe potatoes” which are actually quite addictive, very soft and potatoey inside with a lovely exterior crunch. In all my time in Mexico I don’t think I had ever ordered BBQ spareribs, thinking I couldn’t do better than Memphis but I was wrong. Now I count them as an essential component of Mexican foodstuffs. In fact, as De Cantaro is a grill, they have a lot of steak and pork on the menu, including a whopping 380 gram Tomahawk porkchop. Specialities include rack of lamb and carne asada served with onions and grilled nopal cactus. Cuts of steak run the gamut—ribeye, bone-in ribeye, porterhouse, and picanha, or rump steak. They’ve also a buffalo burger and the ever-popular ground Angus beef version topped with smoked Provolone. Grilled too are boneless chicken or duck for those watching their calories—although duck is actually quite fattening but it’s full of good fat, not bad fat, so they tell me. As far as seafood goes, their octopus and squid dishes are crowd-pleasers. There are octopus tacos (quite a visual), sautéed or deep-fried baby squid or grilled fillet of squid and a

seafood salad with shrimp, squid and octopus, perfect for a boiling summer day. So if you are partial to these cephalopoda, as they are classified, you will be in marine heaven. If not settle for scampi, grilled yellowfin tuna, red snapper, Banderas Bay lobster or the catch of the day. As in so many Mexican restaurants, you can see fresh fish being delivered in the mornings. I love that! The menu is a combination of Continental and Mexican, as illustrated by the soup selection which includes a French onion soup and a poblano pepper soup, made more delicious with the addition of panela cheese. If you are going the soup and salad route, the latter are inventive, I like their house salad with roasted zucchini and eggplant. De Cantaro is quite a new restaurant opened a couple of years ago and a sister restaurant to the ever-popular Vallarta Factory which has been going for eons and is my neighborhood hangout. The Factory’s chocolate, coffee and cigars can also be purchased at De Cantaro—love the chocolate and coffee. I am not sufficiently macho to attest to the cigars but I love the smell of them wafting in the (open) air. Talking of open-air, if you are suffering from heat exhaustion De Cantaro has a nice air-conditioned room off the side of the terrace. You feel you are in an aquarium and it is very welcome in August. As we are in the summer doldrums and so many of our favorite restaurants are closed, the fact they never close their two restaurants is to be applauded. So go clap at De Cantaro!

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can paint a picture with words as well as pretty much anyone this side of Hunter S. Thompson—very good at what I do, tremendous—but as I’ve mentioned many times in these pages, skilled visual artistry is a skill that has eluded me all my life. In any event, my limited control over paint and pencils means I have a great respect for anyone who actually can sublimate the colorful fabric of their perspective into tangible and aesthetically pleasing forms, and so when I was invited to enjoy an exhibition from the talented Pia Malinali Rivera, who had come all the way from Jalisco’s capital city for this special event, I set out for Benitto’s in the Marina district in the hope that I could touch the hem of her robe or something. The Vibes: I arrived on the scene in uncharacteristically punctual time to scope out the restaurant and get an early glance at some of the featured work. A striking piece depicting a falling cat in various stages of landing on its feet immediately caught my attention for its arrangement of color and appreciable sense of motion. This was the work of an individual with skills to spare. As I browsed the selection, I dropped eaves all over the conversation of two fellow attendees who expressed disappointment that a piece they apparently were eyeing for their personal collection had already been sold. On a career path where many can barely find one person who wants to purchase their inspiration, Pia had managed to attract at least three on the same day. Art is subjective, but clearly she is doing something right. The Vices: Pia’s unique vision was showcased alongside a fresh-made strawberry martini offered by Benitto’s as a welcome drink to art lovers and wanderers-in. A few sips later, Benitto himself came around to


entertainment

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August 15 - 21, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com

Summer Music

Vibes & Vices: Benitto’s Paninoteca Bar Christie Seeley

vezelay@mac.com

Christie is a steadfast promoter of local music and musicians. Learn more about her explorations at www.vallartasounds.com.

A welcome guests to the gallery, eventually encountering yours truly hanging out on the patio of the restaurant with my… um, asthma inhaler. After discovering we used the same type of device, and devoting the proper amount of delighted conversation to the subject, Benitto ignored the fact that I already had a full drink by my side and brought me another. This time the star of the cocktail was passion fruit, sweet and tangy with plenty of punch. If the whole conversation was a ruse to get me munchied enough to suddenly want a French dip sandwich, it worked to perfection. Piled high with savory roast beef and Swiss cheese and served on a crusty baguette, it was quite the savory and satisfying sandwich. The French dip is also among the more fun sandwiches to eat, giving oversized children like myself a socially acceptable method of playing with their food. The evening at an end, I wished Pia the best of luck with her blooming career and saluted Benitto on a fine establishment. All told, it was quite the enjoyable Tuesday night.

The Verdict: Benitto’s is another outstanding option in the city’s Marina Vallarta district, offering a full menu of Italian favorites along with a selection of scrumptious sandwiches and salads. With special events like Pia’s pop-up gallery on the schedule, the restaurant adds another layer of interest to what is already an appealing atmosphere...maybe I’ll catch you there. Av. Paseo de la Marina Sur 121, Marina Vallarta.

ct II is delighted to announce the opening night of Vallarta’s largest Broadway musical production, Mamma Mia, on Tuesday, October 2. This show has been a long-time dream of Act II, and the entire cast is already hard at work! Producers Alfonso Lopez and Danny Mininni have announced that the beautiful and talented, 17-year old Ximena Peña Esparza landed the lead role of Sophie when she left them speechless at her audition. Ximena has been a regular at Act II since she appeared in Act II’s very first production, A Chorus Line, six years ago. Since then, she has been in many other Act II productions. Ximena is in her last year of high school at UNIVA Vallarta, and is thrilled to be playing the iconic Sophie She is a perfect example of how dreams can be fulfilled if you combine them with hope, determination, effort and a natural talent. Starring as Sophie’s mother, Donna, is one of Act II’s favorite actors, Stephanie Wright Watts. A native of Maryland, Stephanie has lived in Puerto Vallarta for the past nine years and has appeared in numerous productions at Act II, including A Chorus Line, Murder Comedy Mysteries of 1940, Equus, Whose Line is it Anyway, and Cinderella. She and her husband own two local businesses, Agave Villas (luxury villa vacation rentals) and the restaurant, Los Muertos Brewing Company. Stephanie is looking forward to working with this amazing cast and crew. Act II also welcomes two talented young actors to the cast, including 16-year old Layla Bloch, in her first role, playing Lisa, and 12-year old Isabela Orlando, who will be one of the ensemble members. Isabela is now the same age that the talented Ximena was

when she first appeared on stage at Act II. Danny Mininni said, “I could not be more excited to welcome so many young people to our stage. It was the arts that saved me! It kept me interested in school and made me the first Mininni in history to not only graduate high school but go on to college. Keeping the arts in schools has always been something that I fought for when I lived in the US, and I’m proud that Act II can continue with that passion.” Mamma Mia opens October 29. It will begin with a spectacular party where attendees will be invited to wear all white This will be a night to remember! Final Summer Concert Series Show This Week: Thursday, August 22 - 8:00 pm The Best of Us Two! The “Best of the Best” Oldies from All of Us Two’s Shows! For the past two years, the musical duo, Us Two, has been performing at Act II twice a week. They have performed five different shows. This one-night extravaganza will feature the “best of the best” hits from all of their shows, including audience favorites from the 80’s & 90’s, ABBA, Elton John, Country and Acoustic music! No matter what the genre is, Us Two always brings its best in the form of song and dance, rock and roll, fun and games, and humor and chat, all bundled into a 90-minute Vegas-style show. Coming in September: “A Night Around Mexico” A Celebration of Mexico’s Independence Day September 13, 7 pm. For more information, or to purchase tickets, go to www.act2pv. com. Act II Entertainment is located at Basilio Badillo at Insurgentes, Colonia Emiliano Zapata. It was voted Best Entertainment Venue by the Vallarta Tribune “Best of Vallarta” Readers’ Poll.

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he sound of the sea is music to our ears. It carries our minds to far off places lending tranquility that is difficult to find elsewhere in today’s hectic world. We relax to the sound of waves lapping on the shore and imagine the abundance of gentle as well as fierce creatures that live in the immense waters providing us with sustenance. What if that sea and the creatures that inhabit it were not there? Impossible? No, unfortunately not. Research is telling us that our careless and excessive use of plastics is threatening our oceans, rivers and wildlife on a scale never before imagined and moderate efforts to stop that damage are not even a drop in the bucket. We simply must change our thinking and our habits drastically. Making changes can be upsetting, but every little change we make to correct this situation is a change for our lives and that of our children and grandchildren. A change for the world. We have all seen images of islands of plastic refuse in the sea larger than many countries and remote beaches littered with plastic bottles and bags. Where will all of that plastic go? Scientists say nowhere. It will remain there and grow more and

Monsieur Perine image by Ed Vill.

more until the end of time if we don’t act. Imagine this. All those beautiful bags and baskets you see in the markets made from natural materials by local people would be lovely to carry your groceries and other purchases. And, by the way, you don’t need plastic covering everything. A damp towel is a great cover for lettuce in the fridge and after all, vegetables should be consumed when they are at their freshest—soon after harvest. We need to come up with alternative methods to store our food and producers need more reasonable ways of packing them for us especially if we shop in supermarkets. We can be the beginning of that change. If each of us begins to make an effort, we can make a difference. It is easy to think a little effort is not worthwhile but that, combined with a voice in our communities to encourage others to follow suit, can snowball into a great effort. As singer/songwriter Leonard Cohen taught us “Ring the bell you still can ring…” may be as easy as giving up the use of a harmful substance that takes centuries to disappear, destroys our sea and our land making its way back through the food chain into our bodies to our detriment, not to mention the harm it does to our wildlife. Be wise. If you listen closely, you may hear the sea weeping.

Image by OlafPictures (Pixabay)

Mamma Mia Opens on October 29

Save Our Beloved Sea


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Happy Birthday, Mae!

entertainment

August 15 - 21, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com

By Paco Ojeda

Way before Sinead O’Connor ripped a photo of Pope John Paul II on live TV while singing the word ‘evil,’ or Lady Gaga attended the MTV Video Music Awards wearing a dress made of raw beef, or Madonna’s so-called obscene sexual imagery of her 1990 video, “Justify My Love,” there was Mae West, who was born this week in 1893, and who pretty much invented all the tricks of the trade, rocking the entertainment boat more profusely and shockingly than any other performer since.

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ary Jane West was born on August 17, 1893, in Kings County, New York. Her father was an American boxer, while his mother, of Bavarian descent, was a former corset and fashion model. She was barely five when she began entertaining crowds during church social gatherings and by the time she was seven, she was a regular in amateur shows, often winning prizes. By age 14, West was appearing regularly in a vaudeville company playing several characters. She made her first appearance on Broadway in 1911, at age 17, and was singled out by a New York Times reviewer only a year later. She began using Jane Mast as a pen name to write her own risqué plays. In 1926, she had her first starring role on Broadway for her own play, titled Sex, which she also produced and directed. Ticket sales were strong but the production didn’t go over well with conservative critics, leading to a theater raid in which she was arrested along with the rest of the cast. While she could have easily paid a fine, she chose to serve time, spending 10 days in jail for “corrupting the morals of youth.” Her next play, The Drag, dealt with homosexuality and never opened on Broadway. Whereas other actresses considered ‘sexy comediennes’

(Marilyn Monroe, for example) relied on their looks exclusively, West wrote all her material choosing sex as her subject matter. Despite being what was considered late to embark on a film career, West accepted a contract by Paramount Pictures in 1932 when she was almost 40. She was allowed to rewrite her scenes to better suit her zingy one-liners, such that her co-star, George Raft, is said to have remarked, “She stole everything but the cameras.” In a matter of months, references to Mae West appeared everywhere, from Cole Porter Songs to Betty Boop cartoons, to a painting by Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. By 1935, her ability to make fun of sex—and tap into subconscious fears of it—made her the United States’ highest-paid woman in any field with only five motion pictures under her belt. By 1934, however, the Motion Picture Production Code, a set of industry moral guidelines that was applied to most US films, tarnished her genius as a playwright, actress and singer. She continued to appear in film and television during the ensuing decades, but the censorship Code was not lifted until 1968 when it was replaced by the film rating system currently used today. Her comeback film after a 27-year absence from motion pictures, Myra Breckinridge (1970, see below), is now considered among the worst films of all time. In 1971, the student body of University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) voted Mae West “Woman of the Century” in honor of her relevance as a pioneering advocate of sexual frankness and courageous crusader against censorship. Some Films to Consider Who could possibly count the number of drag impersonators professional imitators or animated

cartoons in which some semblance of West’s sexy moves has been imitated or parodied? In order to discover (or rediscover) the original, consider the following films: She Done Him Wrong (1933) and I’m No Angel (1933) These were her first two starring roles in the movies. The former film offers a beautiful glimpse at how crazy Hollywood could be before vigilant censors began restricting her actions in subsequent films. Belle of the Nineties (1934) This film gets additional music-related nods, as West lobbied successfully for the film to feature the Duke Ellington Orchestra, which also meant that it was the first time a white female singer shared the screen with so many black musicians. My Little Chickadee (1940)

A unique opportunity to see West working alongside renowned vaudeville comedian, W.C. Fields. Myra Breckinridge (1970) Based on Gore Vidal’s 1968 novel of the same name, this comedy film has been cited by many critics among the worst ever made. It stars Rachel Welch as a transgender woman who has undergone a sex-change operation. A 77-year-old West stars as Leticia van Allen, an octogenarian casting agent who seduces young men who come to her for auditions, including a 25-year-old Tom Selleck, in his film debut. Ouch! And a Bit of Music… Given the sexual revolution that took place during the 60s and 70s, it seemed like a good time for West to consider a comeback to the silver screen. To test the waters, she recorded a few rock albums,

including Way Out West (1968) in which she covers versions of the Beatles’ “Day Tripper” and “Twist And Shout.” And if this doesn’t seem twisted enough for you, go to YouTube and search for her 1972 version of “Light My Fire,” recorded at age 79. Consider consuming some strong spirits or mind-altering substances prior to enjoying the latter, for a more palatable experience. Memorable One-Liners by Mae West “I believe in censorship. I made a fortune out of it.” “When I’m good I’m very, very good, but when I’m bad, I’m better.” “When choosing between two evils, I always like to try the one I’ve never tried before.” “A hard man is good to find.” “Is that a pistol in your pocket, or are you just happy to see me?”


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entertainment Live Music Calendar

August 15 - 21, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com

This list features bars and restaurants that may have live music and ongoing acts. We do not take responsibility for misinformation. Listings are published free of charge but are subject to space availability. Email editor@vallartatribune.com to update or add your listings.

Upcoming Events

Act II Entertainment (Insurgentes 330) Tue: Bob’s Karaoke Party 8 pm Wed: Best of ABBA/Elton John 7:30 pm Thur: The Best of Us Two 8 pm Babel Bar (Aquiles Serdán 437, Isla del Cuale) Fri: Faralae 7 - 9 pm Sat: Nacho and Diego 1 - 3 pm Sat: Oscar & Raul 7 - 9 pm Sun: Esau & Lobo 1 - 3 pm Captain Don’s (Honduras 126) Fri: Tequila Rush 8 - 11 pm Sat: Da Crew 8 - 11 pm Cuates y Cuetes (Francisca Rodriquez 101) Tues: Moruno at 8:30 - 10pm Wed: Tatewari 6 - 8 pm Sun: Moruno at 8:30 - 10 pm Daquiri Dick’s (Malecon and Lazaro Cardenas) Sun: Esaú Galvan 7:30 - 9:30 pm El Oasis de Holi (River mouth by La Isla Mall) Sat: Dr. Groove 6 pm Incanto (Insurgentes 109) Thur: Open Mic 7:30 pm Fri: The Renteria Bros. 5 pm Fri: Zoe & Leon Trio 7:30 pm Sat: Benji Gutierrez & Aaron Hernandez 7:30 pm Sun: Joby & Tongo 5 pm Sun: Benji Gutierrez, Piano 7:30 pm Kelly’s Pour Favor Saloon and Cookhouse (Lazaro Cardenas 245) Mon: Hoochie Coochie Men 8 - 11 pm Wed: Tequila Rush 8 - 11 pm Thur: 3Tones 8 - 11 pm Fri: Dr. Groove 8 - 11 pm Sat: Soul Trip 8 - 11 pm

Murphy’s Irish Pub (484 Morelos, Malecon) Thur: Adriana and the Freaks 10 pm Fri: Adriana and the Freaks 10 pm Sat: Adriana and the Freaks 10 pm Que/Pasa (625 Aquiles Serdan) Tues: The Change at 7-10 pm Sun: Sylvie&The Zippers 7 - 10 pm Roxy Rockhouse (Ignacio L Vallarta 275) Nightly music after 11 pm with the house band Aloha Bar (Plaza Parabien #16) Thur: Dr. Groove 10 pm Chasers Sports Bar (Avenida Mexico 570A) Fri: Gecko Band 8 - 11 pm

NUEVO VALLARTA Eddies (Boulevard Nayarit 70) Weekly - Live music 6:30 - 9:30 pm

BUCERIAS Drunken Duck(Avenida Mexico, Centro | Bucerias) Wed: The Gecko Band 9 pm Sun: The Gecko Band 5pm

LA CRUZ Ana Bananas (Tiburón #42 | La Cruz) Sun: Live Music 7 pm

Handbuilding With Clay, With Rob Marsh (August 19 • 10 am) This class takes beginner students through each step of coil and slab building. The instructor will familiarize you with terms,tools and processes, supporting your creative vision. You will build simple projects from choosing your idea, applying techniques you learn, finishing with firing and glazing. This is a fundamental class to enjoy, inspire and explore clay work as an artist. ART Vallarta. Details at facebook.com/events/2366865913593121. Fridays For Future Global Climate Strike (September 20 • 11:30 am - 2:30 pm) Organized by students around the world, Fridays for Future is a movement against global warming and climate change that began in when activist Greta Thunberg led a manifestation before the Swedish parliament in 2018. City Hall. Details at facebook.com/events/404373453623018. Joven Ballet HH (September 20 • 6 pm) A young Guadalajara-based ballet company travels to Puerto Vallarta to perform classics of the repertoire, along with a few selections that draw their inspiration from Mexico. Teatro Vallarta. Details at facebook.com/ events/525451278194854. Carlos Rivera in Puerto Vallarta (September 27 • 8 pm) Mexican pop singer Carlos Rivera will present a concert at the city’s Convention Center. With a huge following throughout Latin America, Rivera rose to fame by winning the third generation of La Academia, a reality television singing competition produced by TV Azteca, has released four studio albums and participated in six theatre productions. Details at facebook.com/events/1552558258212321. Vallarta Nayarit Gastronomica 2019 (September 29) This annual event brings together stars of the culinary world, presenting special events (from multi-course dinners to cooking classes) for local and visiting foodies. Sheraton Buganvilias. Details at facebook.com/ events/2186869038067804.

OSO’s Oyster Bar ( La Cruz Marina) Sat: The Remedy 7 pm Britannia (Coral, La Cruz) Tues: Open mic with The Turn 7pm

SAYULITA & SAN PANCHO Don Pato (Marlin 12, Sayulita) Live music nightly

View these listings and more online at www.vallartatribune.com/eventos/live-music-calendar/

Image by Miguel Pereda.

VALLARTA

The Salty Paw Jazz Orchestra (August 18 • 6 pm) Established and led by Victor Kris in 2016, the Salty Paw Jazz Orchestra will perform a free concert at Galerias Vallarta near Liverpool. The program will consist of a mix of funk, blues, swing, reggae, and Latin, including favorites like Uptown Funk, Green Onions, and Tequila. Fun for the whole family!


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games

August 15 - 21, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com


Anglican Church Puerto Vallarta

Iglesia Anglicana Puerto Vallarta

Worldwide Anglican Communion Anglican Church in North America

Puerto Vallarta (322)-308-0022

Read the first edition of the Best of Banderas Bay and Riviera Nayarit guide online www.vallartatribune.com

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pages of information designed to make your stay in the area the best! From the best beaches to the best activities and more, you can download and view online at www.vallartatribune.com and watch for copies at your favourite Vallar taTribune distribution points.


Profile for Vallarta Tribune

Vallarta Tribune - Issue 1167 August 15 - 21, 2019  

Puerto Vallarta, Mexico The Vallarta Tribune is the longest running free English language newspaper in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. We publish w...

Vallarta Tribune - Issue 1167 August 15 - 21, 2019  

Puerto Vallarta, Mexico The Vallarta Tribune is the longest running free English language newspaper in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. We publish w...

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