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Banderas Bay, Highest Gas Prices in Mexico

CULTURE

I AM PV, Transforming Music Student Lives

ENTERTAINMENT

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NEWS

Harold Prince’s Legacy

August 8 - 14, 2019 Year 22 Free Issue 1166

FR EE

GU ID E

ALL-INCLUSIVE NEWS AND ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE FOR PUERTO VALLARTA AND RIVIERA NAYARIT

I AM PV

MAP OF BANDERAS BAY

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VALLARTA SHOPPING PAGES 14-15

ENTERTAINMENT PAGES 18-21

CROSSWORD PAGE 22

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editorial

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Editor’s

August 8 - 14, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com

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Note

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editor@vallartatribune.com

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t would seem that my editorial from last week’s issue of Vallarta Tribune, generated a fair amount of traction on Facebook, confirming what some of us already know: the habits, wants needs and expectations of the Banderas Bay local anglophone community are not necessarily the same as those of our anglophone tourists. Of course, it would take time to break down this notion to useable actions that could create and improve a successful connection with said community. Let’s start with a couple notions that are not frequently discussed out in the open. Be it local landlords or restaurant owners, real estate developers or performing arts producers, taxi drivers or beach vendors: many

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business entities in Puerto Vallarta and surrounding areas have capitalized on tourists by raising prices arbitrarily for decades. “They are on vacation, they can afford it,” is a common justification. But in reality, they are not saying that. What they are saying is quite possibly, “they are American, they can afford it.” But can you? Yes, there is a lot of wealth in town. Many local anglophones spent most of their lives working and building a hefty retirement or savings account to spend their golden years comfortably here. But then there are those who were sold a glamorized notion of retirement and have only a limited amount of disposable income at their disposal on an ongoing basis. And

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there’s more to local anglophones than retirees. How about young families, increasingly unhappy with the quality of life available to them north of the border, that are now looking for a fresh start in Mexico. As locals. With limited disposable income. They deserve a place on the table just as Mexican nationals living here under similar circumstances, don’t they? I see you—Mexican and foreigners— standing in line, waiting for a table at a popular taquería on Basilio Badillo that is packed to the brim all year around. Why is that? The tacos are priced for locals. (Mind you, there are glorious taco places all over the place, so no reason they should wait in line there, but don’t get me started…) Am I suggesting Puerto

Vallarta should be entirely priced for locals? Not at all. In fact, it is quite wonderful that our sandbox is spacious enough for just about everyone. But let’s keep being mindful of the wants and needs of the local population, regardless of their native language. I was so very happy to read the latest newsletter sent by the SPCA de PV, in which the successful non-profit reported the number of spayings that have been performed in their various community outreach initiatives, i.e. explaining how the monies raised by them are actually being used. While it is common for local non-profits to communicate their need for increased funding through special events or newsletters of their own, not many seem to be as eloquent

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specifying how the raised monies will be used, and even fewer organizations seem to provide the kind of reporting volunteered by the SPCA de PV. I use the word ‘seem’ because I want to be proven wrong, and I’m fairly certain I’m not alone in that realm. In this increasingly convoluted world, we are craving for success stories. We increasingly want to know that we are instruments of positive change. So, if your non-profit organization has great success stories to share or accountability reports, please send them my way, or kindly subscribe me to your own newsletters using the email address, below. Enjoy, Paco Ojeda Interim Editor paco.ojeda@gmail.com

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Read the first edition of the Best of Banderas Bay and Riviera Nayarit guide online www.vallartatribune.com

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pages of information designed to make your stay in the area the best! From the best beaches to the best activities and more, you can download and view online at www.vallartatribune.com and watch for copies at your favourite VallartaTribune distribution points.


welcome

Welcome to Puerto Vallarta and Riviera Nayarit

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t the Vallarta Tribune we want you to have the best experience possible while you explore Puerto Vallarta, the Bay of Banderas and Riviera Nayarit. Here are some helpful tips for traveling. TIME ZONE: The entire state of Jalisco and the southern part Nayarit are on Central time – if you’re heading further north than Lo de Marcos, Nayarit, remember the time change so you don’t miss your flight. BUSES: A system of urban buses can bring you from El Tuito in the south to San Pancho in the north and all the spots in between. Fares vary according to distances travelled, but the base fare is 10 pesos. If you’re going further than San Pancho, head to the main bus terminal to catch a ‘Pacifico’ bus. TAXIS: There are set fares within defined zones of town. Do not enter a taxi without agreeing on the price with the driver. Make a note of the taxi number in case you leave something behind. Drivers typically do not carry change. UBER: New in 2017 to Puerto Vallarta, Uber is still experiencing some growing pains particularly in the state of Nayarit. Uber is cheaper than a taxi usually. GETTING AROUND: In many places such as Centro Vallarta and Nuevo Vallarta there are paths for bikes and pedestrians. Please be respectful of these designations. MONEY EXCHANGE: The most hassle-free way to exchange money is to use your debit card in the ATM to withdraw pesos. Exchange houses offer higher rates and banks are remiss to change dollars to pesos if you don’t hold an account with them. Best to use ATM’s that are affiliated with a reputable bank located in well lit secure areas. TIPPING: In general you should tip 10-20% in restaurants and bars. Taxi or Uber drivers – 10-20 pesos. The person who bags your groceries or helps load your car – 10-20 pesos. Don’t forget to tip

your maid, bell boy, masseuse, the band, the entertainment on your tour. And by all means, tip more if you want, wages are extremely low in Mexico. DRINKING WATER: While Puerto Vallarta’s water has been awarded a certification of purity for the past two decades, the quality of the water tested at the source varies greatly from what comes out of the tap at the other end. Don’t wreck your holiday – buy bottle water. EXPORTING PETS: Falling in love with the street dog outside your hotel is easy to do and it’s also easy to bring them home with you. The process is inexpensive and only takes a day or two. You only need a certificate of health from a local vet and check with your airline for additional requirements. COMMON SENSE: Just as you wouldn’t walk around your hometown drunk and belligerent, it is not acceptable to do that here. While Mexico is a tolerant culture, politeness is paramount. Don’t pee in the streets. Don’t flash your money or expensive gadgets. Pay attention to your surroundings. Know where you are going. Pay your bills (and don’t forget to tip). And have fun! DRINKING AND DRIVING: First off – just don’t. The consequences are not worth it. Taxis or Ubers are cheap and plentiful. Fines are very expensive. You can go to jail and your vehicle impounded. There are many checkstops on the weekends, and you will be asked to take a breathalizer test if they suspect you have been drinking. LEGAL SYSTEM: Not knowing the law is not a valid excuse in Mexico, or anywhere. If you find yourself caught in a legal situation, be aware that often guilt is presumed until your innocence can be proven. This is a very difficult lesson to learn if you are visiting from the United States or Canada. Immediately contact your consulate for assistance. Director Noemi Zamora noemi.zamora@cps.media Editor Lic. Madeline Milne mmilne@Vallartatribune.com Sales Team editor@vallartatribune.com Designer Cynthia Estela Andrade Gutiérrez cysandra@gmail.com Web Manager Ana Espinosa

CALLING IN MEXICO (Updated August, 2019)

Effective August 3, 2019, Mexico’s Federal Telecommunications Institute implemented new telephone dialing procedures in Mexico, as follows:

LOCAL CALLS WITHIN MEXICO All calls within Mexico can now be dialed using the 10-digit telephone number (usually a two- or threedigit area code plus an eight- or seven-digit number) from a landline or cell phone, eliminating the need for prefixes, such as 01, 044 or 045. In Mexico, most cities use a three-digit area code, notable exceptions being CDMX, Guadalajara and Monterrey. LONG DISTANCE CALLS WITHIN MEXICO Same procedure as above applies.

LONG DISTANCE CALLS TO MEXICO FROM ABROAD If you are making a long-distance call to Mexico from abroad, simply add the country code (52) to the 10-digit number as described above. INTERNATIONAL LONG-DISTANCE CALLS FROM MEXICO No changes. US & Canada: Dial 001 + Country Code + Area Code + Number Elsewhere: Dial 00 + Country Code + Area Code + Number EMERGENCY CALLS No changes (see emergency numbers, below).

CALLING TOLL-FREE NUMBERS (The following procedure predates the August 2019 update. We are waiting for specific information regarding toll-free calls within Mexico and to numbers elsewhere.) Some toll-free numbers work from Mexico to the US and Canada, but many do not. Those that do work are often not toll-free. You need to dial a different prefix. To call the following toll free prefixes, dial as follows: 800 numbers Dial 001-880-then the number 866 numbers Dial 001-883-then the number 877 numbers Dial 001-882-then the number 888 numbers Dial 001-881-then the number

Ahoy Cruisers!

In port this month

In the month of August and September Puerto Vallarta & Riviera Nayarit welcomes 30,174 passengers! Bienvenido! NAME

CARNIVAL CARNIVAL CARNIVAL CARNIVAL CARNIVAL CARNIVAL CARNIVAL CARNIVAL PRINCESS CRUISES PRINCESS CRUISES

PASS

DATE

3,200 07.08.2019 3,200 14.08.2019 3,200 21.08.2019 3,200 28.08.2019 3,200 04.09.2019 3,200 11.09.2019 3,200 18.09.2019 3,200 25.09.2019 1,974 25.09.2019 2,600 27.09.2019

Vallarta Tribune is an activity and entertainment guide and publishes information as it is provided by the advertiser or event host. We do not assume responsibility in errors or omissions other than to correct them as they are made known to us regarding event schedules, locations and/or prices. In addition, we do not assume any responsibility for erroneous inclusion or exclusion of information except to take reasonable care to ensure accuracy, that permission has been obtained to use it, and to remove it as soon as is practical upon receiving your notification of error. We recommend you always confirm prior to attending or visiting an event or establishment. Weekly publication edited, printed and distributed by Ediciones y Publicaciones Siete Junio, SA de CV Grupo Editorial Tribuna Calle 21 de Marzo # 1174 Col. Lomas del Coapinole Del. El Pitillal, Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco México CP 48290 Tel. 226-0800 * www.vallartatribune.com * https://www.facebook.com/VtaTribune/

Cut out and put near your phone for handy reference

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August 8 - 14, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com


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news briefs

August 8 - 14, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com

Mexican Pop Singer Carlos Rivera to Perform in Puerto Vallarta

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ocal authorities have recently announced that Mexican pop singer Carlos Rivera will at Puerto Vallarta’s International Convention Center on September 27, which is also World Tourism Day. Convention Center Director, Magaly Fregoso, remarked on the importance of taking advantage of the center’s facilities to schedule concerts, along with the very busy convention schedule lined up for the

following months. With a huge following throughout Latin America, Rivera rose to fame by winning the third generation of La Academia, a reality television singing competition produced by TV Azteca, has released four studio albums and participated in six theatre productions. The venue has the capacity for 4,500 attendees and ticket prices will range from $400 to $2,300 MXN. • Tribuna de la Bahia

Banderas Bay Municipality Improves Billboard Guidelines

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anderas Bay has just approved modifications to existing billboard placement guidelines that will hopefully improve the municipality’s appearance along roads and highways, and improve overall safety. According to the new guidelines, all billboards must be installed using sturdy foundations and must include an official government tracking code in the lower right-hand corner

Second Stretch of New GuadalajaraVallarta Highway Completion Announced

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exico’s Communication and Transporation Secretariat has announced that the second stretch (of three) of the new toll highway between Guadalajara and Puerto Vallarta—from Compostela to Las Varas—will be completed this coming October. With only 31 km. (19 mi.) in length, this is the shortest of the three sections of the highway. However, it will bring drivers much relief, as it replaces a section of the existing highway commonly known as las curvas, or ‘the curves,’ the slowest segment of the trip. When it is completed, it is expected that this second stretch of the new highway will decrease travel time between Puerto Vallarta and Guadalajara by 45 minutes. No official

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Sea Turtle Season Off to a Good Start

D date has been announced for the third stretch that connects Las Varas with Puerto Vallarta. However, the state of Nayarit has been expanding the existing highway to four lanes at different stretches between the Punta de Mita exit and Las Varas. • PO

Grupo de Teatro Dionisio Celebrates Seventh Anniversary he local Dionisio Theater Company recently celebrated seven years of successful theatrical productions. Conformed by local, Spanish speaking performers, the group has excelled at choosing and performing thought-provoking works by Latin American playwrights, earning the respect and admiration of both Mexican national audiences and foreigners that understand Spanish. Since its inception, Dionisio has produced 10 plays, participated in 7 tours outside of Puerto Vallarta,

to ensure that they have been authorized by the proper authorities. Any businesses found installing billboards without proper authorization will be fined. This measure also applies to the unauthorized use of walls for advertising purposes. A special call was made to political parties to take responsibility for covering ads placed during past electoral periods with white paint. • Tribuna de la Bahia

and received 14 nominations in state and regional theater competitions, bringing home eight top prizes. To celebrate the anniversary, Dionisio has brought back one of their most successful productions to the stage for a limited run at Act II: Las Anecdotas del Miembro, or ‘The Member Anecdotes,’ a cabaret-style comedy in which five actors represent different penises sharing anecdotal fortunes and misfortunes of their masters. Learn more about their activities at facebook. com/GrupoDeTeatroDionisio. • PO

r. Helios Hernandez of Puerto Vallarta’s Environmental Commission has announced that the 2019-2020 sea turtle season is off to a good start with 2,700 turtle nests along the 14-km. (8.7 mi.) beach span from the Ameca to the Horcones rivers. He added that when taking the Nayarit portion of the bay into account, it is possible that the season will see as many as 6,000 nests in all of Banderas Bay. As years have gone by, more and more people have become mindful of this wonderful annual ritual and the importance of giving sea turtles the necessary space to bury their eggs in the sand, resul-

ting in up to 80% of successful hatchings. Puerto Vallarta is the only municipality in Mexico’s Pacific Coast that operates its own sea turtle protection programs. Other municipalities feature programs sponsored by non-profit organizations or other government entities. • Tribuna de la Bahia / Image by Skeeze


news briefs

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Salty Paw Jazz Orchestra to Perform at Galerias Vallarta

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he local, student-based Salty Paw Jazz Orchestra has announced an upcoming free performance, titled Swinging in the Rain, to take place on Sunday, August 18, 6 - 7 pm, at Galerias Vallarta. The big band ensemble consists of students enro-

lled at the Instituto de Artes Musicales (I AM PV), a non-profit, music education institute dedicated to enriching the lives of all of those in the Banderas Bay Area and Mexico. For more information about the Salty Paw Jazz Orchestra, please turn to pg. 8. • PO

SPCA of Puerto Vallarta Seeks Volunteers to Fly Dogs to Canada, US

Banderas Bay, Highest Gas Prices in Mexico

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he Banderas Bay municipality made national headlines for having the highest gas prices in all of Mexico: $23.29 MXN for a liter of premium. A survey at several gas stations throughout the municipality revealed this price at the Shell gas station on Carr. 200 at Mezcales. The gas station across from the Flamingos Golf Course in Bucerias sells

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any pets in cargo anymore until October. So the SPCA is hoping to rely on Air Transat flyers to Vancouver and Edmonton, and Alaska flyers to Seattle. The organization has the staff to help you check the dogs in, at the Puerto Vallarta airport, and you will meet up with a staff member at the arrival customs who will clear the dog. All it will take you is a little more time on both ends to help. For more information, please email spcapv@gmail.com.

SPCA Adorable Dog in the Spotlight: Jasmine

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asmine is a lovely lady ready for a forever home of her own. She is a Labrador mix just three years old and weighing almost 42 pounds. Jasmine has a higher energy level and gets along with all other dogs. She is not a fan of cats though. She is smart and enjoys playtime with her canine pals and also with her humans. When playtime is over she is ready for some loving from her people. Jasmine has been spayed, dewormed and vaccinated. She is available for adoption and we are accepting applications at spcapv@gmail.com.

premium gas at $22.79, and GasMart on the highway in Bucerias sells premium at $22.54, making these the three most expensive prices in the country. It is worth mentioning that the Banderas Bay municipality also made headlines during the month of June for the most expensive prices for regular gas, as well. • Tribuna de la Bahia

Global Temperatures on the Rise

ccording to the Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S), a European agency that supports society by providing authoritative information about the past, present and future climate in Europe and the rest of the World, this year continues to bring record-breaking temperatures. Every month in 2019 has ranked among the four warmest for the month in question, and June was the warmest June ever recorded. It is now confirmed that July

he summer months are challenging for the local SPCA, as a decrease in flights to Canada and the US impedes the non-profit organization’s goal to have local dogs adopted by US and Canadian owners. They are actively seeking tourist volunteers who would be kind enough to take a dog or two for to their home destination in Edmonton, Seattle or Vancouver. Presently, WestJet has already started their heat embargo, that is, they will not take

August 8 - 14, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com

C3S, image by Ron Porter (pixabay).

was also an exceptional month. The global average temperature for July 2019 was on a par with, and possibly marginally higher than, that of July 2016, which followed an El Niño event. This was previously the warmest July and warmest month of all on record. However, the difference between temperatures in July 2019 and July 2016 is small. For more information, please visit copernicus.eu/en.


local voices

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Paradise and Parenting Leza Warkentin

mommyinmexico.wordpress.com

Leza is a nursery teacher and preschool coordinator at the American School of Puerto Vallarta

Best of Two Worlds

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here’s something truly refreshing about spending time in your home country during vacations. For one thing, hanging out with your dearest family and friends can be a real stress reliever. Also, there are few places more humid than Puerto Vallarta in August, so the refreshment is pretty much automatic. Also, did you know that Canadians have their indoor climate control almost perfectly managed? I mean, it makes sense considering that controlling the temperature of their environment is actually a matter of survival for about half the year. But for our family, it’s miraculous to stay in a house that is basically twenty-three degrees Celsius at all times without a direct blast of air in your face. For two and a half weeks, our family spent our time in Winnipeg, Manitoba with my brother and his family, and with my parents in their home in a nearby town. We also saw a variety of relatives and friends. It was love overload, and it was glorious. We did a lot of fun things too, like music and theatre festivals, shopping, biking, hiking and ice

cream sampling across the city. We took in the Canadian Museum of Human Rights and went on a riverboat tour. We ate all the things we knew we’d never find in Mexico (or at least for prices we can afford on a teacher’s salary), like Mountain Dew and Tim Horton’s doughnuts, Smarties candy and root beer. These are prime vacation conditions: lots of love, lots of fun, and lots of sugar. And that means that when we woke up at 4 am on July 26 in order to get to our 6:30 am flight (who invented those?), we were not very happy. I say “not very happy” like I might describe a hurricane as “fairly breezy.” Allow me to describe this through a teenager’s eyes: Getting up on summer holidays before 10 am is not okay. Saying goodbye to your favorite people (because your parents are no longer your favorite people by a long shot) is not okay. Realizing that you are about to go back to a world without 7-11, where Mountain Dew Slurpees are on tap every day, is not okay. So now we are back in Mexico, and might I say that people around here are a bit disgruntled. It’s hot, there are no Timbits, and we ate the Canadian Snack Stash we brought

Canadian Museum For Human Rights. Image by Guy Dugas.

home in the first twenty-four hours. The kids are texting their cousins back in Canada and they won’t let me see. This is the reality of the expat: you go home but then you have to go back home. And when you have children, this can be confusing and sad for them, particularly if they don’t really have an accurate picture of life in the country you are visiting. Sure, it’s amazing to be received like visiting royalty, taken all over the city to do fun things and to eat great food. It’s wonderful to spend time with people who don’t know your most annoying habits or at least don’t have time to become annoyed by them. But they don’t yet realize that life will become regular the longer they spend time anywhere. For example, most of our family in Canada cannot believe our luck as we live our lives in a beautiful beach paradise. They don’t know that the heat can become downright oppressive, and driving your car on cobblestones every day isn’t really as charming as it sounds. Just like them, my children don’t know that I spent twenty-six winters wishing I lived somewhere much warmer. They don’t know the necessity of plugging in your car to an electrical outlet, the only way to ensure you will actually be able to start it on a January morning. The grass is certainly green in Winnipeg in summer, but it’s mighty green to me in Vallarta right around Christmas time. I figure our family is living a “best of both worlds” kind of life. Now, if we could get some Mountain Dew down here, we might convince our kids as well.

August 8 - 14, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com

Life in the Slow Lane Kelly Wilson

mybucerias404@gmail.com

Upon retiring in Ontario, Kelly and her husband finally arrived in Puerto Vallarta—via a one-way ticket during the summer of 2017—where they now call Bucerias home. As avid adventurers, they enjoy exploring the entire Banderas Bay area. Kelly owns an online career coaching business and spends time volunteering for various local organizations.

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oday is my wife Kelly’s deadline for her column. It is also my birthday. Visions of presents with bows, nicely wrapped, cake with chocolate icing, happy hour, dinner out, who knows? Well… I know. Why don’t you write my column for me on your birthday? For the past many years my writing has been for the Ontario Court of Justice. Not great reading unless you were the subject of the trial, and maybe not. So yes, I am writing this column. We are into our third full year in Bucerias. We have many seasonal friends to whom we say “see you next winter.” Of course, they are valued friends. My wife Kelly’s parents, Mike and Diane, have been coming to Banderas Bay for more than twenty years, and in fact stayed one winter in the condo building, at the end of our street before the house we purchased was even built. In addition to our snowbird friends, we have a nice circle of year-round friends. Like us at this time of year, they feature fully functional sweat glands! Over the years we vacationed in different areas of Mexico and eventually focused on Banderas Bay. We tried Puerto Vallarta and found it full of great restaurants and events, but too busy for our retirement. Moved onto Nuevo Vallarta, and found it a bit too

stylish. We settled on Bucerias and it has been the best decision we ever made! When asked at the Mexican Consulate in Toronto, “why do you want to live in Mexico?” my response was firstly the people, secondly the food, and thirdly the climate. Here we are! Bucerias has a future that is unfolding. New condo development, new businesses, pretty much every street has a new house or addition happening. The Highway 200 bypass is of interest. When it happens, does the portion that passes through here become the new Main Street? We currently have four lateral lanes and four highway lanes. Does that mean one day we will see more pedestrian traffic and more parking? A casino is about to open. Is it about gaming? Good bet that it is! Will they have an entertainment venue? Will we see some type of dinner theatre? I heard the other day about Bucerias improving tour bus access and parking. When and where come to mind. I do not have any strong views about any of the questions that come to mind, nor do I seek answers that I can spin to fit some preconceived notion. I leave that to the folks on social media. I am merely expressing curiosity. On that note, I am going to focus on what is left of my birthday.


culture

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August 8 - 14, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com

Discover IAMPV

Puerto Vallarta’s new non-profit Institute of Musical Arts has something wonderful to offer just about everyone, from part-time foreign residents and retired professional musicians to local children. Text and photos by Paco Ojeda

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hen it comes to following the precept, ‘birds of a feather flock together,’ musicians are predictably notorious. ‘What (instrument) do you play’ and ‘let’s jam’ are common utterances among them when they find one another out and about. This is probably what happened some 12 years ago when the Puerto Vallarta Chamber Orchestra (PVCO) began as an informal project made up of seasonal retired musicians looking for practice and subsequently performance opportunities. As time went by, the project began increasing in size and scope, incorporating local professional musicians, teachers and students. As the PVCO grew, so did their need for robust organizational infrastructure and increased funding. At the same time, a segment of the local musician population began looking for jazz-oriented ensembles and performance opportunities. Last but certainly not least came the essential need to inspire young students to embark in musical careers, offering quality music education for Puerto Vallarta’s children and young adults. This is the story of the Instituto de Artes Musicales Puerto Vallarta, or I AM PV, a fairly new local non-profit that is in the process of successfully addressing and championing all aforementioned concerns with the invaluable support of the Guadalajara University and an

increasing number of patrons. “We are, first and foremost, an instituto, an educational institution where anyone, regardless of their age, nationality or musicianship level can further their musical education,” affirms Terence Reilly, a local anglophone who rediscovered his love of playing classical music and joined the PVCO after a 35-year hiatus. As stated on their website, iampv.org, I AM PV is a non-profit, music education institute dedicated to enriching the lives of all of those in the Banderas Bay Area and Mexico. The benefits of music education have been well studied and documented, in giving young people the tools to succeed in not only musical endeavors but scholastic and societal achievements as well. Also involved with the project is Daniel Oliveros, a conductor, woodwind player and teacher from Monterrey. He serves as founding director of I AM PV and also as principal conductor of the PVCO. “I came to Puerto Vallarta in 2011 and immediately became involved with the PVCO as a player,” he recalls. “Eventually I volunteered myself to help improve the quality of our performances, and also with the orchestra’s outreach programs. When PVCO conductor, Don Bieghler asked for a leave of absence, I was thrilled to be invited to become the orchestra’s principal conductor.” Daniel can play several instruments and has performed a broad variety of genres, from classical to Broadway. But most

importantly, he has been a music teacher for over a decade. Another important element is Victor Kris, Founding Director of The Salty Paw Youth Jazz Orchestra. “We chose the name because vallartenses, that is, those that were born here, call themselves pata salada, or ‘salty paw,’” he explains. After moving to Puerto Vallarta, he began playing saxophone in local rock & roll and jazz bands throughout the city. His is the only student-based, jazz ensemble specializing in big band repertoire in the city. “Salty Paw began as a one-time request from the city back in 2016 to organize a big band performance at the Malecon during Mayo Fest, Puerto Vallarta’s annual celebration of its foundation as a city and a municipality. A group that consisted

mostly of local professional musicians was put together, but after the performance, many musicians, particularly young students, kept yearning for more jazz performance opportunities, so I founded the group to serve that need.” Today, Victor combines his time as an active musician while teaching and directing the Salty Paws. But just as the chamber orchestra, Salty Paw needed increasing organization and funding. “When we began putting all these wants and needs on the table back in early 2017, we envisioned an entity that could serve as an umbrella organization, sheltering these two important Puerto Vallarta orchestras, and also providing the necessary educational foundation for future generations of local musicians,” adds Terence. “We

took the time to set ourselves as a non-profit organization that can accept tax-deductible donations here and abroad, to be able to meet our needs, continue to expand, and develop a more solid outreach program with our communities.” Speaking of outreach, I AM PV has a successful story in Paso Ancho, a traditional neighborhood located upstream along the Rio Cuale. “We identified the need for music education at a school there,” Terence recalls. “One day we put up a notice in the schoolyard looking for kids that would be interested in taking music lessons.The following day, 27 kids showed up! Thanks to our donors, I AM PV is able to offer music scholarships to all 27 students in Paso Ancho.” The Institute wants to launch a traditional Mexican instrument class


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this fall, but money must be raised to pay for jaranas, a guitar-like

string instrument from Mexico. “Jaranas are expensive,” he adds. Where is all this magic taking place? For years the teachers and both orchestras had struggled to find suitable rehearsal space, not to mention classrooms for music lessons. Before the projects were consolidated they intinerated throughout the city, from the Isla Rio Cuale Cultural Center to a private home in Aralias. “We were always amazed at the students’ resilience,“

recalls Daniel. “In order to continue their music education, they were willing to go anywhere.” The missing piece of the puzzle was found and locked in place when I AM PV formed an invaluable alliance with the Centro Universitario de la Costa (or CUC), Guadalajara University’s Puerto Vallarta campus. Two years ago, CUC decided to begin offering a college degree in culinary arts and sciences but found themselves in dire need for a specialized campus. An ideal space was found at the location of the former Ignacio Jacobo high

school, as you turn right from the Libramiento onto Francisco Villa Ave. The existing buildings underwent a major renovation and the new campus was officially inaugurated on February 2018. Referred to as Estacion Gourmet, the campus now offers hundreds of young students the ability to study a career that is increasingly in demand in Puerto Vallarta and surrounding communities. Thanks to the vision of Estación Gourmet, director, Luis del Sordo, the new campus has the capacity for up to 500 students, and will also feature an extension school

August 8 - 14, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com

for locals to be able to enroll in basic cooking classes. “We had been looking to form alliances with CUC,” recalls Daniel. “We got in touch with Paola Cortes, an outreach coordinator at the university. This resulted in the opportunity for the jazz ensemble to perform at an anniversary celebration at the CUC campus. It was then that I had the chance to meet Estacion Gourmet director Luis del Sordo, and we found that we shared some community-based outreach goals.” Eventually, a formal proposal was submitted to the university that included classroom and rehearsal space for students and ensembles, along with an extension school component for Puerto Vallarta’s population at large. Today, I AM PV is no longer a homeless entity and shares space with Estacion Gourmet, where culinary students use the premises during the morning and the music institute uses classroom and rehearsal space in the afternoons. “Construction is still in progress and nearing completion soon, but thanks to the Guadalajara University and the combined efforts of many concerned individuals, we now have access to comfortable, air-conditioned classrooms where our students can improve their craft,” comments Terence. “Students can enroll and take classes in practically every instrument, and at the same time, they can participate in a variety of small ensembles according to their level, so they can also learn how to play together.” The Puerto Vallarta Chamber Orchestra Is No Longer All things considered, the Puerto Vallarta Chamber Orchestra is no longer comprised of primarily

retired musicians. The number of local professional musicians and advanced I AM PV students that have joined the ensemble is on the rise, such that during their final concert last season, it was formally announced that the orchestra would be rebranded as the Puerto Vallarta Symphony Orchestra. “We have around 50 musicians in the orchestra,” comments Principal Conductor Daniel Oliveros, “and virtually every instrument of the orchestra is represented in the ensemble. As such, we were due for a name change.” The orchestra still relies on outside musicians from other orchestras in Mexico when a specific piece requires it—another essential use for much-needed funding. But the orchestra is selfsufficient for the most part. While no specific dates or venues have been specified, the newly-branded Puerto Vallarta Symphony Orchestra will offer three performances in the coming season. Get Involved Whether you are a musician looking for performance opportunities, have access to musical instruments not being used, or would like to join the Instituto de Artes Musicales Puerto Vallarta as a volunteer or donor, there are many opportunities to get involved. “We want to prove our worth,” says Terence. “That’s what it comes down to. People understand the importance of music education at an early age. Our students have high graduation rates and it has been shown that students that study music excel in life in whatever field they choose later on.” For more information, visit iampv.org.


local voices

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August 8 - 14, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com

When a Poblano Is Not a Poblano By Paco Ojeda

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here are over 150 varieties of peppers in Mexico along with myriad ways to use them to enhance the flavor of your food. As such, Mexican food aficionados choose their peppers wisely according to the flavor they wish to highlight in their dishes. But just as we call dried grapes raisins, there are several chiles that change name, flavor and use, according to whether they are dry or not. For example, poblano peppers are commonly used to prepare chiles rellenos, peppers that are stuffed with meat and cheese. Another popular variant is chiles en nogada, a dish that originated in the state of Puebla, in which the stuffed chiles are served with a white, walnut-based sauce and red pomegranate seeds—green, white and red representing the Mexican flag colors. A dried poblano pepper, however, is known as ancho. When left to dry, the chile loses its bright green color, turning dark brown and acquiring a sweet,

Chile Ancho Chile Guajillo fruity flavor, making it ideal for mole or enchilada sauce. Guajillo peppers are actually the dry form of the mirasol pepper. Mainly produced in the state of Zacatecas, they are mild and primarily used in dry form and are popular in the preparation of tamale salsas and adobos (spice rubs) used to flavor meats. Another mild pepper with multiple personalities is known as chile bola in its fresh form and chile cascabel in its dry form. It

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commonly used in powdered form, to enhance the flavor of popcorn (along with salt and lime juice) or corn on the cob, known locally as esquites, a snack commonly found during the evenings at plazas and popular events throughout Mexico. Last but not least, you are probably familiar with chipotle peppers, as they provide a unique, smoky flavor to many dishes. But did you know that chipotle peppers are nothing more than dry, smoked jalapenos?

Is it jalapeno or chipotle? It’s both!


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Murphys Puerto Vallarta

Welcome Home Sheryl Novak

sa.novak@solutionsmexico.com

Sheryl Novak is an expat Canadian who has owned a home in Mexico for over ten years. She is the owner of SOLutions Mexico and The Furniture Store by SOLutions Mexico. She is an expert on sourcing all styles of furniture for all sizes of budgets, in Mexico.

The Best Sofa for Fido and Puff

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efore we got our fur baby, we thought we would never allow them on the sofa or chairs in our home. Unfortunately, we did not realize how much we would fall prey to their cute little sad eyes. Rather than covering everything with blankets, we decided to get furniture for our home in Riviera Nayarit that is pet-friendly. The key to having the best of both worlds—long-lasting furniture and happy pooch or kitty—is to purchase the right textiles. It is easier to keep everything clean when you get proper material for your sofa, sectional, and occasional chairs. First, avoid open-weave fabrics at all cost. Open-weave fabrics have threads that are interlaced loosely. Little claws get stuck under the weave and then pull them, leaving you with unsightly snags. The other downside of open-weave is that dust and hair are not easy to remove. Open-weave is not the best choice if you have allergies. This fabric can also pose health issues. Instead, opt for a tight

weave. They are less prone to snagging. They also won’t trap allergens, dust and hair as easily. Silk and velvet covers are elegant but never the best choice for pet-owners. Both require a lot of time and expense in upkeep. Velvet almost seems to attract hair when your fur-baby walks in the room. Although suede is a nice-looking cover for upholstery, I do not recommend it if you have pets. Trying to get wet spots out is difficult. Genuine leather is better than suede or loose-weave as a cover for your sofa, sectional or chair. Unlike

Famous Mosaics Parque Guëll, Barcelona By Emily Murray This summer the Tile Park is taking the show on the road! We’re paying a virtual visit to the most famous mosaics of the world... from China to Spain to the US... tile parks, record-breaking installations, ancient murals, points of interest and so much more. Join us!

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h, Parque Güell. Arguably the brightest feather in architect Antoni Gaudi’s cap, this is the whimsical mosaic wonderland known the world over, and for good reason. It is gorgeous, sweet, and bright. The long serpentine lines are easy on the eyes, and the expansive city views from the property are incredible.

Images by Czu Czu Pl and Николай Фирсов (pixabay).

MURPHY’S IRISH PUB

loose weave fabric, it won’t snag. It wipes up better than regular fabric, silk, velvet, and suede. There is the risk of punctures if you go with a real leather hide cover. Unfortunately, the cost of a genuine leather hide sofa is more expensive. IMPORTANT: If you are buying leather furniture in Mexico, be wary. Many stores claim their items are made with real leather when, in fact, they are made with a cheap leather-like product. The bad leather that cracks and peels in a few months is called tacto piel. Always purchase your leather furniture from a reputable leather furniture retailer. I recommend Palliser here in Mexico since they are known for their quality of covers and warranty. By far, the best option available in Mexico is a material called performance fabric. I am a big fan of these covers. It was the one we went with for our upholstered items for our home in Mexico. Not only are they available in tons of colors and patterns, but they are also soft to the touch (good luck trying to get Fido or Puff off them). They are virtually unstainable and available in a tight weave. It’s a slam dunk for pet-friendly homes. Another tip: Select a darker color that does not show dirt as much or look for one that matches the color of your pet hair. If you are looking for furniture with a performance fabric or genuine leather hide cover, contact me at furniture@ solutionsmexico.com.

Why do we love Parque Güell so much? What’s not to love? Whimsical organic shapes, jurassic looking vegetation, the impressive scale of the mosaic work. I mean, there’s a giant lizard at the entrance and he really seems pleased to see you. It’s like stepping into a Dr. Suess book, igniting that fanciful, childish spark within us. Parque Güell holds a special distinction for many people: It’s become a universal young backpacker rite of passage, something to really write home about. Güell is confirmation for a young mind of delicious imaginative possibilities that you thought you might find out there in the great big world. You were right. You’re standing in it. Gaudi was certainly a forward-thinking architect, and in some regards, he was way ahead of his time. But not just because of his love for curves and colors. One of the genius things about Güell is that it has a built-in rain catchment and filtration system... one of the first ever. The Hall of a Hundred Columns is where the magic takes place, with the columns themselves doing the collection and filtering. That famous mosaic lizard fountain at the entrance was originally hooked up to it, so after the plants had received their needed water, the excess could flow out his mouth and back into storage for later.

Failed Project, Historical Treasure Though it is now a public park and a UNESCO World Heritage Site, it was actually designed as a high-end neighborhood. Each of the 60 homes was to be a bespoke mosaic work of art, surrounded by lush mosaic gardens. An exclusive gated community for the creative and eccentric. It was the brainchild of Gaudi’s longtime associate, Eusebi Güell, for whom he had designed many buildings in the past. The idea behind this commission looked great on paper, but in the early 1900s it was just too far off the beaten path to draw any buyers. At the time, public transportation wasn’t an option yet for commuting, so only 3 houses out of the proposed 60 were ever completed. Of the three, only two were sold, and one of those was Gaudi’s. The Torre Rosa, built by Francesc Berenguer, is where he hung his hat for the last 20 years of his life,1906 to 1926. Today it is the Gaudi Museum. Gaudi planned and directed the construction of the park from 1900 to 1914. After work on Park Güell ended, his remaining years were spent on Sagrada Familia. He never took another commission, and in 1926 he was tragically hit by a streetcar and died. Park Güell became municipal property in 1923 and is still open to the public for tours. It’s 100 percent worth the trip, should you ever find your lucky self on holiday in Barcelona.


local voices

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Life in la Cruz Cindy Bouchard

cindy@VillaAmordelMar.com

Originally from Canada, Cindy Bouchard runs Villa Amor del Mar, a boutique inn, in La Cruz de Huanacaxtle. Along with Chris, her husband, they are living and loving it in Vallarta Nayarit! She and her husband, Chris, are living and lovin’ in Banderas Bay. If you want more info on La Cruz or desire a very special vacation, drop her a line!

By The Sea, At An Octopus’s Garden

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he Octopus’s Garden is truly the cultural center of La Cruz. The scent of freshly roasted coffee beans draws folks in to savor the flavorful Nayarit coffee, available to take home or sit and sip in the garden café. Enjoy breakfast or lunch in the loveliest patio. Relax at the upstairs bar with a magnificent tree branch growing through it. The sprung wood dance floor with its beautiful arched roof made of laminated bows, is a delightful place to move and groove. Yoga and other

fitness classes are offered, along with dance classes—salsa, tango and the local favorite, cumbia. Creative workshops, talks and movie nights are additional events. The volunteer-created English School of La Cruz, overtakes the venue once per week, with 125 students and 37 teachers. The hostel, a home away from home for travelers, is entering its fourth year, attracting travelers from all over the world. It has simple, comfortable and reasonably priced accommodations. Located at the back of the property, the busy hostel includes Wi-Fi, a great book exchange and many chill-out spaces.

It is popular with crewmembers arriving to sail as well as surfers and travelers of all ages. There are six private rooms—doubles and singles—and two dormitories, one for women and one mixed. Most include shared showers, kitchens and common areas. One has a private bathroom, kitchenette and air conditioning. Rates range from $200 – $750 MXN a night. When Wayland and Aruna first set up business in La Cruz they were printing T-shirts to finance their work with the Huichol. They built several spinning wheels and introduced them to the Huichol women so they could augment their traditional weaving skills. Their screen-printing business was one of the first industries of La Cruz. Over the years more than sixty people from the village worked in “Hikuri,” as the business was called. The eight-armed printing machines are called “octopus” in Spanish. When people started knocking on the door to buy wholesale shirts, and they had no time to cook for themselves, they opened a small café in the patio and called it “The Octopus´s Garden” after the Beatles song. Through their connections with the Huichol, they started a collection

August 8 - 14, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com

of artwork. Their yarn paintings are like a window into another world, all presented in the Huichol Gallery with many beautiful pieces for sale as well. Aruna told me, “When we began we were printing T-shirts. We’ve moved from the T-shirt industry towards entertainment, turning the shady garden patio into a restaurant and music venue with a palapa covered bar upstairs. As there was nowhere for dancing or classes in La Cruz, we decided to build the large salon upstairs in the cool breeze between the trees.” Aruna shared how their family arrived and created this La Cruz community center. “Wayland, Kaerolik and I sailed into La Cruz de Huanacaxtle in March, 1990, on our thirty-six-foot catamaran, Taulua, after eight years traveling from England. We came to Banderas

Bay to meet the Huichol people. Twenty-five years later we’ve made many friends and visited the Sierra Mountains often, learning about the Huichol way of life and their remarkable traditions. Of all the indigenous people in the world, they have the most shamans per capita and are some of the most expressive.” The little village of La Cruz remains a friendly family town where people sit at their doors to chat in the cool of the evening, and visitors are welcomed. The large Huanacaxtle trees that grace the town have ear-shaped seedpods, and we like to say, “so many musicians have moved here because all the trees are listening.” Do yourself a favor and visit The Octopus’s Garden or follow them on Facebook at facebook.com/ HikuriOctopus.


local voices Vanishing World/ Vanishing Home

John Warren

john3984@me.com

John Warren is in charge of publicity for the International Friendship Club in Puerto Vallarta (IFC). During the summer, he writes about traveling while also raising environmental awareness.

A Cry From The Heart

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hat do you do when the temperature rises? “Crack another cool one from the fridge,” you say. Correct, some of the time, but the answer I wanted was “Turn on the air-conditioning.” What about “What do you do when the temperature drops?” “Drink some mulled wine,” is the wrong answer. The right one is “Crank up the thermostat.” (Assuming you are living in a place that has thermostats.) In 2018, around the world, there were more scorching days and more frigid days than ever before, and they caused us to call for more energy for our personal comfort. That was part of the reason we burned more energy that year than ever before. B.P. is a huge oil company, has been in business since 1909 and has published its annual “Statistical Review of World Energy” for sixty-eight years. It’s not the title of a best seller to be found in Listopia, but the story in the latest one is riveting. It’s about what happened when we turned on our air-conditioners in 2018, and it was published last week. (https://www.bp.com/en/global/ cor porate/energy-economics/ statistical-review-of-world-energy/ using-the-review/group-chief-executive-introduction.html) Both the Chief Executive, Bob Dudley, and Chief Economist, Spencer Dale, of this mega oil company, have dire warnings for the planet. I thought I’d share some of them with you. They scare me. “During 2018 energy consumption grew at a rate of 2.9%, almost double its 10-year average and the fastest since 2010. At the same time, carbon emissions from energy use grew by 2.0%, again the fastest expansion for many years. That’s roughly equivalent to the carbon emissions associated with increasing the number of passenger cars on the planet by a third.” What? Say that’s not true!

So what drove these increases in 2018? And how worried should we be? The growth in energy demand was driven mainly by China, US, and India, which, together, accounted for over two-thirds of the growth. “Relative to recent historical averages, the most striking growth was in the US, where energy consumption increased by a whopping 3.5%, the fastest growth seen for 30 years and in sharp contrast to the trend decline seen over the previous 10 years.” The weather effects in the US, China, and Russia alone could account for around a quarter of the increase in energy consumption. If the erratic weather in 2018 was just bad luck, we might expect weather in the future to revert to more normal levels. This might allow the growth in energy demand that we saw in 2018 to fall back. “But if there is a link between the growing levels of carbon in the atmosphere and the types of weather patterns observed in 2018, this would raise the possibility of a worrying vicious cycle: increasing levels of carbon leading to more extreme weather patterns, which in turn trigger stronger growth in energy (and

carbon emissions) as households and businesses seek to offset their effects.” Mexico was OK in 2018. “In Mexico, energy consumption fell by 1.3% last year, the sharpest decline in over two decades after growing in the last five years. In other good news, it was one of only a handful of countries to reduce coal consumption.” Bob Dudley, B.P.’s top guy, concluded his review by saying, “My guess is that when our successors look back at statistical reviews from around this period, they will observe a world in which there was growing societal awareness and demands for urgent action on climate change, but where the actual energy data continued to move stubbornly in the wrong direction. A growing mismatch between hopes and reality. In that context, I fear—or perhaps hope— that 2018 will represent the year at which this mismatch peaked.” “As people protested, school children went on strike, and shareholders passed resolutions, energy demand and carbon emissions grew at their fastest rate for years.” “What does seem fairly clear is that the underlying picture is one in which the actual pace of progress is falling well short of the accelerated transition envisaged by the Paris climate goals. Last year’s developments sound yet another warning alarm that the world is on an unsustainable path.” Coming from an oilman, that is astounding. It’s a cry from his heart! Albert Einstein said, “We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.” He was right. Now is the time for both thought and action.

Image by Engin Akyurt (Pixabay).

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August 8 - 14, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com

From Here Marcia Blondin

marciavallarta@gmail.com

Aside from contributing regularly to the Tribune for several years, Marcia is a skilled artisan, specialized in repurposing recycled jewelry and selling her creations at the Friday Marsol Market by the Pier.

On Stage

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equila Rush did it again: aced a second tribute to extraordinary British band Led Zeppelin. After two and a half hours straight, many of the audience members waited to congratulate Danny Hermosillo, lead singer, and Steven Tenney, drummer, when the concert was done. A handful of us knew what to expect of Tequila Rush having been to the Roxy in March for their first tribute to LZ—the rest were blown away! This was a better concert with great lighting and sound by Sebastien Lepage, the comfort of Act II’s Main Stage’s seats, super wait staff, and no smoking! I sincerely hope TequilaRush will revisit Act II soon. Meanwhile, hear them Wednesdays at Kelly’s Pour Favor on Lazaro Cardenas and Fridays at Captain Don’s on Honduras. They are the best all-round rock and roll band in Vallarta. Period. Cristobal and Lovely Lilia entertained an enthusiastic crowd of well-wishers at the grand re-opening of Ropero de Jovany on the corner of Hidalgo and Guerrero in Centro. Go see the amazing vintage clothes for men and women; Chanel, Coach, and Michael Kors handbags; shoes, scarves, movie posters, and much more. Jim Davis and David Wilhoit held a splendid 45th Anniversary party at their home last weekend. Fed by uber-talented caterer Robin Spencer, watered by Juan behind the bar and serenaded by Martin on guitar, the conversations were lively, loud and punctuated every couple of minutes by rolling laughter. It was a happy place, indeed. Congratulations to two of the finest gentlemen I know in Vallarta. Their

hearts are full of goodness; how wonderful they found each other so many years ago. Thanks, David and Jim for inviting me to yet another fabulous party on such an auspicious occasion. While we are on the subject of anniversaries – congrats go to Grupo de Teatro Dionisio on their seven years as a going concern in Vallarta’s vibrant live-theatre scene. I was delighted with the reprised, refreshed and reinvigorated “Las Anecdotas del Miembro” that relaunched last weekend. A series of predominantly funny monologues about the penis, although with a dose of tragedy and some interesting historical and scientifically salient facts. Enjoy this comedy in Spanish, Saturday, August 10, 17, and 24 in the Red Room at Act II at 9:30 pm. This past weekend ended with a bang at BabelBar on the Isla, celebrating the Fourth Annual Cheryl’s Shoebox Summer Bash. Eight teams competed viciously (not!) for the honor of winning the faux leopard-skin boot. Nobody escaped getting soaking wet! The team from Captain Don’s won hands-down with two perfect scores. Congratulations to all who worked and played so hard to win! Cheryl’s volunteers and the wait staff of BabelBar did not stop running for a second. The live music didn’t stop either; thanks to all who came to dance, play, eat, and drink: all the numbers are not in, but over $75,000 MXN was raised. Thanks to everyone for caring in Cheryl’s name. See you next year! Enjoy the glorious mornings we are having and be sure to tell someone they are loved every single day. Spread the gentle Peace we live in, From Here.


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August 8 - 14, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com

The Muppets perform at NPR’s Tiny Desk Concert series.

Three Free Places to Discover New Music By Paco Ojeda here comes a time for folks that truly enjoy music to explore new artists. This used to be a lot simpler when less music was produced around the world. Not today, however. According to Susy Frankel, Daniel Gervais’ book, The Evolution and Equilibrium of Copyright in the Digital Age (Cambridge University Press), the number of CDs released around the world used to be about 40,000 per year, but that’s gone up by about 150% in the last decade and a half to over 100,000 per year. That’s a lot of music! One could easily pay attention to the Grammy nominations for a nice cross-section of extraordinary music being produced and released around the globe, but of course, Grammys are only presented once a year. Another annual option suitable for classical music lovers are The Gramophone Classical Music Awards, launched in 1977, and considered one of the most significant honors bestowed on recordings in the classical record industry. What if you do not wish to wait for a year? Here are three free places where you can discover new music, gain a new perspective on music you may already know and love, and celebrate with your friends and

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Hrishikesh Hirway, producer and host of the Song Exploder podcast. loved ones. National Public Radio’s Tiny Desk Concerts Tiny Desk Concerts is a video series of live concerts performed at the NPR Music offices in Washington, D.C. The project came about in 2008 when Bob Boilen, host of All Songs Considered (a weekly online multimedia talk radio program started in January 2000) found himself frustrated at a bar where he couldn’t hear the music over the crowd noise. A friend joked saying that musicians should perform at his desk. What ensued is more than 800 concerts that have been performed and videotaped at said offices. The Tiny Desk Concerts are available on YouTube where they have been viewed a collective 2 billion times.

Tiny Desk Concerts have showcased a broad variety of artists, from familiar names such as Adele or Yo-Yo Ma to many indie rock acts you may have never heard of. There have been many international musicians (including Mexican pop sensation, Julieta Venegas) and even Big Bird, Elmo and the rest of the Sesame Street gang have been there. They usually last between 15 and 20 minutes and can be found on NPR Music’s YouTube channel. Simply visit YouTube online, and search for the channel and subscribe to be notified of new concerts. Song Exploder In order to truly appreciate the beauty of this extraordinary podcast, an important clarification is necessary. Just as films are

created out of many different takes at different locations (often out of sequence) and subsequently pieced together by a film editor, music is recorded in separate audio tracks, allowing sound engineers precise control over the sound of each individual instrument during the recording process, and equally precise control when it’s time to mix the individual tracks down to the stereo mix we enjoy as the final product. Song Exploder is a podcast where musicians take apart their songs, and piece by piece, tell the story of how they were made. Each episode is produced and edited by host and creator Hrishikesh Hirway in Los Angeles. Using the isolated, individual tracks from a recording, Hrishikesh asks artists to delve into the specific decisions that went into creating their work. He then edits the interviews, removing his side of the conversation and condensing the story to be tightly focused on how the artists brought their songs to life. There are presently over 160 different episodes available at his website, songexploder.net, and again, the variety of artists that have been his guests is quite broad in scope and musical style, from Fleetwood Mac to Norah Jones and many more. A particularly beautiful

episode with Mexican superstar Natalia Lafourcade comes to mind. So, if you browse the episode list and run into an artist you already know and love, chances are that you will gain new insight as to how a particular song was produced. Song Exploder was named “Best Music Podcast, 2016 and 2017” by the Academy of Podcasters. New York Times said about the podcast: “In the world of beautifully produced podcasts, Song Exploder is the beacon. Short version: It’s a show that dissects a song. Long version: It’s a show filled with serious lines of honesty, cinematic production and peeks inside the creative process.” Your Own Home Are you throwing a dinner party and your guests are asking what to bring? Put someone in charge of background music! Just make sure you have the proper cables to hook up their cell phones or portable music player to your stereo system. Better yet, put together an evening with your friends in which you ask each one of them to bring a handful of songs they like and have them take turns sharing the music and the reasons why they are drawn to it. You may think you know a lot about your friends, but you’d be surprised at how much music you can discover by sharing musical tastes this way. Not only will you likely gain a few favorite performers, but you will also strengthen your friendships at the same time.


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August 8 - 14, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com

Image by Playbill.

Who Was Harold Prince?

With Stephen Sondheim (Image by Playbill).

By Paco Ojeda

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ne of Broadway’s brightest lights faded when theater mogul Harold Prince died on July 31 at the age of 91. Throughout his professional career, which spanned six decades, he was involved with many of the best-known Broadway musical productions of the 20th century as a producer or director. Along the way, he won 21 Tony awards, the highest number any single person has received in history—eight for directing, eight for producing the year’s Best Musical, two as Best Producer of a Musical, and three special awards. He was born in Manhattan on January 30, 1928, and remained a New Yorker for his entire life. His family was of German Jewish descent. He began working in theater at an early age, as assistant manager to George Abbott, an American theater producer, playwright and director, responsible for over 50 shows, including the 1926 production of Chicago, best known today as the inspiration for the 1975 eponymous stage musical. Along with Abbott, he co-produced The Pajama Game, which won the 1955 Tony Award for Best Musical. It is difficult to categorize musicals today, as they are structured in many different ways. Back in the early 60s, however, most musicals followed a rather straight-forward plot. Composers and lyricists used to search for a good story and once they found it, they simply musicalized it (for example, Richard Rogers and

Oscar Hammerstein II’s 1943 musical comedy, Oklahoma!). Along with director-choreographer Bob Fosse, however, Harold Prince was instrumental in making defining contributions to a new type of show in the late 60s: the concept musical. Rather than emphasizing a narrative plot, concept musicals follow a non-linear structure and emphasize a theme or message. And while concept musicals began being developed during the 40s, it was Harold Prince’s Cabaret in 1966 (John Kander and Fred Ebb wrote the score, Prince directed) that paved the way for a series of concept musical collaborations with Stephen Sondheim in the early 70s. Prince had produced West Side Story in 1957, where Sondheim made his debut as lyricist for Leonard Bernstein. He produced Sondheim’s A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum in 1962, in which Sondheim handled both music and lyrics. He then directed original productions for several Sondheim musicals, including Company (1970), Sweeney Todd (1979), and Merrily We Roll Along (1981), among others. As a director, he created powerful moments for some of Sondheim’s most cathartic songs, such as “Being Alive,” “Losing My Mind,” and “Send In the Clowns.” Always searching for new ways to innovate, he was not only concerned with large productions. In fact, he turned down Sir Andrew Lloyd Webber’s invitation to direct Cats. He did direct Lloyd Webber’s Evita in 1979, however, and his

production of The Phantom of the Opera, debuting on Broadway in 1988, eventually became the longest-running show in Broadway history. All directors have successes and flops, and Prince was no exception. For Merrily We Roll Along, his wife, Judy, had been insisting that he do a musical about teenagers. When the show opened, it received mostly negative reviews, closing after running for only 16 performances. In his New York Times review, Frank Rich wrote, “As we all should probably have learned by now, to be a Stephen Sondheim fan is to have one’s heart broken at regular intervals.”

Prince also directed operas, including Josef Tal’s Ashmedai, Puccini’s Madama Butterfly, a revival of Bernstein’s Candide, and Turandot for the Viena State Opera. In 2000, Harold Prince was awarded the National Medal of Arts, an award and title created by the United States Congress in 1984, for the purpose of honoring artists and patrons of the arts. A prestigious American honor, it is the highest honor given to artists and arts patrons by the United States government. Prince of Broadway, a retrospective of his work, premiered in Tokyo in 2015 and later opened on Broadway in August 2017. A documentary about his life, titled

Still from the original West Side Story production (Gee, Officer Krupke).

Harold Prince: The Director’s Life, was directed by Merrily alumn Lonny Price and broadcast on PBS Great Performances in November 2018. (While Price may be best known for his creation of the role of Charley Kringas in Merrily, he is now one of the most sought-after TV directors, being responsible for numerous musical productions, both concert and non-concert, with the New York Philharmonic.) Sir Andrew Lloyd Webber said: “There isn’t anybody working on musical theater on either side of the Atlantic who doesn’t owe an enormous debt to this extraordinary man…”


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August 8 - 14, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com

Summer Music Christie Seeley

vezelay@mac.com

Christie is a steadfast promoter of local music and musicians. Learn more about her explorations at www.vallartasounds.com.

Act II Finalizing Shows for Next Season

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his is always the fun time of the year when Act II puts the final touches on the selection of shows that will be presented during the next season. Danny Mininni, Act II Managing Partner, has assembled an incredible team this year! Danny commented that “Act II has never had a better team in place, with Corie DuChateau on Video production, Diego Lozano and Elizabeth Garza on Graphics and website, Marsha Ward Ross as Staff Writer, Luis Olvera, Production Assistant, Pablo Corona as Marketing Director and Laura Prods as Coordinator. I think we have the dream team!” The new 2019/2020 season will be announced soon. Many favorites are returning to Act II, but there are lots of exciting new shows, as well. The shows on the Main Stage are already in full rehearsal mode, and season tickets will become available in September. Act II’s winter entertainment season will begin on Saturday, November 2. Watch for the announcement coming soon. Act II’s Summer Concert Series has been a great boon to the summer entertainment that’s available here in Puerto Vallarta. Each year, Act II has used the summer season to promote some of the incredible talents of the people that live right here in Puerto Vallarta. As a result of this exposure, many have been given opportunities that might otherwise not have been available to them and locals and tourists have enjoyed being a part of this experience. This week’s summer concert is: Sal de Mar Thursday, August 15 - 8:00 pm Featuring Reggae, Rocksteady, Ska, and a Touch of Tropical Jazz! The Sal de Mar band is a very popular, up-and-coming band that originated in Puerto Vallarta in 2016.

This 9-member group of musicians features guitars, horns, saxophone, keyboard and drums. They have performed all around Mexico, have already produced one EP and are working on their second one. Their laid-back, rhythmic music is featured on YouTube, Spotify, Instagram and Facebook, and represents the perfect permanent vacation lifestyle of Puerto Vallarta. Seeing this amazing band perform is the perfect entertainment for a hot, August night. Act II’s Summer Concert Series continues in August and features Us Two and the Band on August 22. Act II also features several other programs this week. On Tuesday night, Bob’s Karaoke Party begins at 8 pm (with happy hour from 6-8 pm). On Wednesday night, the one-and-only UsTwo presents their Best of ABBA & Elton John show, beginning at 7:30 pm. On Friday at 8:30 pm, “El Ornitorrinco” (The Platypus) presents their final show. It is a stage comedy about relationships in postmodern social networks (adults only and Spanish). And, on Saturday at 9:30 pm, “Las Anecdotas del Miembro” a comedy of short monologues in which the protagonist is the penis! (adults only and Spanish). Are you an aspiring Singer? Dancer? Actor? Auditions for all of next season’s shows are available right now. Act II is specifically looking for two men for one of its musicals right now. If you would like more information, or are interested in auditioning, contact marsha@act2pv.com. For more information, or to purchase tickets, go to www.act2pv.com. Act II Entertainment is located at Basilio Badillo at Insurgentes, Colonia Emiliano Zapata. It was voted Best Entertainment Venue by the Vallarta Tribune “Best of Vallarta” Readers’ Poll.

New Music and Another Way of Life

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spent the month of July in Oakland, California just across the bay from San Francisco. Taking advantage of my relatively free time I visited my son and his family on their little farm with their tiny home in the town of Sebastopol. The house is still in progress and looking great although, yes, it is tiny. We spent several days exploring the rural area around their home that was once famous for Gravenstein apples but is rapidly becoming wine country with an influx of upscale visitors from San Francisco. The town is very close to the Russian River providing nice swimming and picnic areas and there is a kind of laid back farming community, making it a pleasant place to live with good neighbors, fresh veggies and excellent locally raised meats. Several evenings we grilled fresh lamb from the farm and drank good red wine accompanied by the music of my son’s newest favorite, Natalia Lafourcade. This wonderful young musician from Veracruz is a treasure. Her original compositions, as well as her innovative covers, keep you in a marvelous mood all day long. A Latín Grammy

Monsieur Perine image by Ed Vill.

recipient, she and her amazing group are sought after for concerts and festivals all around. My favorite of her many albums are the covers of Augustin Lara’s beautiful songs and boleros. I have long been enchanted by his music so popular back in the ’40s and ’50s, but her modern interpretations are almost better! I also love listening to her more folkloric pieces like Mi Tierra Veracruzana. You can find her music on Spotify, iTunes and YouTube and if you haven’t already discovered her, I highly recommend you look her up an add her to your playlist. Since San Francisco’s Jazz Foundation always has a plethora of music going on, I just had to jump over the bay one evening to hear another group new to me. The talented group Monsieur Periné from Colombia are also Latin Grammy winners. The group enjoys exposure to all types of music from Latin America and Europe and they play traditional as well as original pieces with energy you won’t believe. They love mixing the modern with the classics. The Afro Latino beat was heavy and the rhythm produced by a dual percussion section impressive. In addition to the guitars and electric bass, the energetic synchronized trombone and saxophone players made for a dance party on stage.

One of the group’s original pieces, the moving Me Vas a Hacer Falta got lots of attention that evening as well as their hot rendition of Sabor a Mi—they love Mexican ballads. When the sax player moved over to keyboard for fellow Colombian Carlos Vives’ spirited Bailar Contigo, the dance floor went wild. I had thought I was smart picking up one of the last tickets available located down close to the stage but had not counted on the dancers that almost obliterated my view. The evening was so exciting it did not bother me. I recommend their Tiny Desk Concert on YouTube for an introduction to their music. Great group to follow. Whenever I hesitate about stepping out to see something new, I give myself a pep talk and I am happy to say music comes out on the winning side!


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entertainment Live Music Calendar

August 8 - 14, 2019 www.vallartatribune.com

This list features bars and restaurants that may have live music and ongoing acts. We do not take responsibility for misinformation. Listings are published free of charge but are subject to space availability. Email editor@vallartatribune.com to update or add your listings.

Upcoming Events

VALLARTA Act II Entertainment (Insurgentes 330) Tue: Bob’s Karaoke Party 8 pm Wed: Best of ABBA/Elton John 7:30 pm Thur: Sal de Mar 8 pm Babel Bar (Aquiles Serdán 437, Isla del Cuale) Fri: Faralae 7 - 9 pm Sat: Nacho and Diego 1 - 3 pm Sat: Oscar & Raul 7 - 9 pm Sun: Esau & Lobo 1 - 3 pm Captain Don’s (Honduras 126) Fri: Tequila Rush 8 - 11 pm Sat: Da Crew 8 - 11 pm Cuates y Cuetes (Francisca Rodriquez 101) Tues: Moruno at 8:30 - 10pm Wed: Tatewari 6 - 8 pm Sun: Moruno at 8:30 - 10 pm Daquiri Dick’s (Malecon and Lazaro Cardenas) Sun: Esaú Galvan 7:30 - 9:30 pm El Oasis de Holi (River mouth by La Isla Mall) Sat: Dr. Groove 6 pm Incanto (Insurgentes 109) Dennis Crow, Piano Sing-along - Most evenings 9:30 pm Sun: Joby & Tongo 5 pm Sun: Benji Gutierrez, Piano 7:30 pm Tues: Lady Zen 7:30 pm Wed: The Renteria Brothers 7:30 pm Thur: Open Mic 7:30 pm Fri: Joan Houston 5 pm Fri: Zoe & Leon Trio 7:30 pm Sat: Benji Gutierrez & Aaron Hernandez 7:30 pm Kelly’s Pour Favor Saloon and Cookhouse (Lazaro Cardenas 245) Mon: Hoochie Coochie Men 8 - 11 pm Wed: Tequila Rush 8 - 11 pm Thur: 3Tones 8 - 11 pm Fri: Dr. Groove 8 - 11 pm Sat: Soul Trip 8 - 11 pm

Mexican Ceramics Adventure-Lecture & Demonstration (August 10 • 11 am - 1 pm) This two-hour class will take you on a journey through all aspects of ceramics, from seeing live demos of wheel-thrown pottery, to hand building with slabs and coils of clay, we will explore examples of everything our studio has to offer. As clay takes several steps to complete, we encourage you to sign up for our on-going classes to complete your own ceramics. Details at facebook.com/artvallarta. Murphy’s Irish Pub (484 Morelos, Malecon) Thur: Adriana and the Freaks 10 pm Fri: Adriana and the Freaks 10 pm Sat: Adriana and the Freaks 10 pm Que/Pasa (625 Aquiles Serdan) Tues: The Change at 7-10 pm Sun: Sylvie&The Zippers 7 - 10 pm Roxy Rockhouse (Ignacio L Vallarta 275) Nightly music after 11 pm with the house band Aloha Bar (Plaza Parabien #16) Thur: Dr. Groove 10 pm Chasers Sports Bar (Avenida Mexico 570A) Fri: Gecko Band 8 - 11 pm

NUEVO VALLARTA Eddies (Boulevard Nayarit 70) Weekly - Live music 6:30 - 9:30 pm

BUCERIAS Drunken Duck(Avenida Mexico, Centro | Bucerias) Wed: The Gecko Band 9 pm Sun: The Gecko Band 5pm

LA CRUZ Ana Bananas (Tiburón #42 | La Cruz) Sun: Live Music 7 pm OSO’s Oyster Bar ( La Cruz Marina) Sat: The Remedy 7 pm Britannia (Coral, La Cruz) Tues: Open mic with The Turn 7pm

SAYULITA & SAN PANCHO Don Pato (Marlin 12, Sayulita) Live music nightly

View these listings and more online at www.vallartatribune.com/eventos/live-music-calendar/

Artwalk at the Q (August 13 • 6 - 8:30 pm) Sip a bit of free sangria and stroll the many art studio galleries at dotting the courtyard restaurant at Qulture every second and fourth Tuesday of the month. Sip, Stroll, and Dine! Details at facebook.com/qulturepv. Democrats Abroad Summer Social (August 14 • 5 - 7 pm) Enjoy drink and food specials at Pal’Mar, and meet some of the Democrats Abroad local membership. Details at facebook.com/events/512616882822594. Fridays For Future Global Climate Strike (September 20 • 11:30 am - 2:30 pm) Organized by students around the world, Fridays for Future is a movement against global warming and climate change that began in when activist Greta Thunberg led a manifestation before the Swedish parliament in 2018. City hall. Details at facebook.com/events/404373453623018. Joven Ballet HH (September 20 • 6 pm) A young Guadalajara-based ballet company travels to Puerto Vallarta to perform classics of the repertoire, along with a few selections that draw their inspiration from Mexico. Teatro Vallarta. Details at facebook.com/events/525451278194854. Vallarta Nayarit Gastronomica 2019 (September 29) This annual event brings together stars of the culinary world, presenting special events (from multi-course dinners to cooking classes) for local and visiting foodies. Sheraton Buganvilias. Details at facebook.com/events/2186869038067804.


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Anglican Church Puerto Vallarta

Iglesia Anglicana Puerto Vallarta

Worldwide Anglican Communion Anglican Church in North America

Puerto Vallarta (322)-308-0022

Read the first edition of the Best of Banderas Bay and Riviera Nayarit guide online www.vallartatribune.com

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pages of information designed to make your stay in the area the best! From the best beaches to the best activities and more, you can download and view online at www.vallartatribune.com and watch for copies at your favourite Vallar taTribune distribution points.


Profile for Vallarta Tribune

Vallarta Tribune - Issue 1166 August 8 - 14, 2019  

Puerto Vallarta, Mexico The Vallarta Tribune is the longest running free English language newspaper in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. We publish w...

Vallarta Tribune - Issue 1166 August 8 - 14, 2019  

Puerto Vallarta, Mexico The Vallarta Tribune is the longest running free English language newspaper in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. We publish w...

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