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details so you can relax poolside from Punta Mita to Mismaloya. You’re welcome.

LOCAL

DayPass Guide for Banderas Bay

The Street of Green Gold

ENTERTAINMENT

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Page 07

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SUMMER FUN

Siddhartha the Musical

July 12 - 18, 2018 Year 21 Free Issue 1110

It’s too much information to include

in this little spot so we’ve put it in ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE FOR VALLARTA AND RIVIERA NAYARIT ALL INCLUSIVE NEWS AND a handy PDF you can download at:

FR EE

GU ID E

www.vallartatribune.com/daypass

Rooftop pool at the 5-Diamond Hotel Mousai

MAP OF BANDERAS BAY

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VALLARTA SHOPPING PAGES 18-19

EVENTS PAGES 20 - 21

CROSSWORD PAGE 22

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events

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July 12 - 18, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Cheryl’s Shoebox Summer Beach Bash

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he most fun of all summer fundraising events the, 3rd annual Summer Bash will be held August 5th, 2018 at BabelBar located on Isle Cuale. This fundraiser will consist of live music and picnic style games where your favorite restaurants, bars and shops will compete for the title of Cheryl’s Shoebox Summer Beach Bash Champions! Bring down 2017 champions - Nacho Daddy’s! Cheryl’s Shoebox collects hundreds of shoes a year from visitors around the world and has expanded its fundraising efforts to work with schools in low income areas by providing school

shoes, educational supplies and support to educators. In 2016 Cheryl’s Shoebox also assisted the newly constructed Banderas Bay Women’s Shelter as well as provided assistance to families in need due to financial or disaster relief. Location: Babel Bar – Isla Cuale Access on Insurgentes bridge, walk east past The Jazz Cafe Access also available from the Aquiles Serdán Swing Bridge east of Aguacate Date: Sunday August 5th, 2018 2:00 pm to 8pm Admission: $200 pesos. More details including team forms: cherylsshoebox.org/summerbash/

Mexico Magico – Exposition to Continue

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El Parque de Los Azulejos   (The Park of the Tiles)

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ocal artist Natasha Moraga and Mosayko Vallarta volunteers are still reshaping and transforming Lazaro Cardenas Park into another internationally recognized icon in Puerto Vallarta: El Parque de los Azulejos. What an exciting year it was at the park and the team would like to personally thank everyone for all for the support. While things are heating up in Vallarta, they are still diligently working away on the construction of the new benches with some added waves of concrete and small tables adding cohesiveness to the park. The workshops in the park this season were plentiful – there were 15 in total, ranging from 1015 participants. At each Natasha Moraga expertly facilitated how to

design and make your own mosaic. Each team was responsible for coming up with the design, either collectively or in sections. All of the pillars in El Parque de los Azulejos have been completed - and they look amazing! The workshops will be returning for the Fall 2018-Spring 2019 season and upcoming dates will be announced on August 1st when presale of the workshops will begin. Sponsorships for tiles and benches went like gangbusters. This public art installation is all about community and you are welcome to be a part of it. Due to limited availability, there will be doing a price increase in Fall 2018. Please email info@ tileparkpv.com  to learn how you can sponsor a tile or a Celebration Bench.

he successful art exposition of paintings with typical Mexican themes which was held in June at the Galerias Vallarta mall is now continuing at Décor-ArtPV, located at Prolongacion de Brasil 1786, near the Hotel Sheraton.   Viewing is by appointment by calling 221 5126 or email dreamptovta@gmail.com.  Also on display are a number of collectible, limited edition lithographs and serigraphs by famous Mexican artists.   Featured are Raul Anguiano, Rafael Coronel, José Luis Cuevas, Leonara Carrington, Roberto Cortazar, Manuel Felguerez and more. For more details visit: decorartpv.simplesite.com


welcome

Welcome to Puerto Vallarta and Riviera Nayarit

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t the Tribune we want you to have the best experience possible while you explore Puerto Vallarta, the Bay of Banderas and Riviera Nayarit. Here are some helpful tips for traveling. TIME ZONE: The entire state of Jalisco is on Central Time, as is the southern part of the State of Nayarit starting from San Blas in the north. BUSES: A system of urban buses with different routes can bring you from one end of the bay to the other and all the spots in between. If you’re going further than San Pancho, head to the main bus terminal to catch a ‘Pacifico’ bus. Current fare is 7.50 pesos and passengers must purchase a new ticket every time they board another bus. There are no “transfers.” TAXIS: There are set rates within defined zones of town. Do not enter a taxi without agreeing on the price with the driver first. Make a note of the taxi number in case you leave something behind. Drivers typically do not carry change.

UBER: New in 2017 to Puerto Vallarta, Uber is still experiencing some growing pains particularly in the state of Nayarit. Uber is about 25-50% cheaper than a taxi, but this is subject to change. The benefits of using Uber are set fares and the ability to follow up directly with your driver if there is an incident or you leave an item behind. MONEY EXCHANGE: Typically a bank will give you a higher rate of exchange than the exchange booths (Caja de Cambio). You will need your passport. Better yet, use your bank card to withdraw funds from any ATM. Note that ATM’s in the banks are the safest to use and charge lower fees. DRINKING WATER: While Puerto Vallarta’s water has been

awarded a certification of purity for the past two decades, the quality of the water tested at the source varies greatly from what comes out of the tap at the other end. So do be careful. If you want to be doubly sure, you can pick up bottled water just about anywhere. EXPORTING PETS: Falling in love with the street dog outside your hotel is easy to do and it’s also easy to bring them home with you too. The process is inexpensive and only takes a day or two. You need a certificate of health from a local vet among other things. For the most up-to-date information contact the Puerto Vallarta SPCA at spcapv@ gmail.com. COMMON SENSE: Just as you wouldn’t walk around your hometown drunk and belligerent, it is not acceptable to do that here. While Mexico is a tolerant culture, basic politeness is appreciated. Don’t pee in the streets. Don’t flash your money or expensive gadgets. Pay attention to your surroundings. Know where you are going. Pay your bills (and don’t forget to tip). And have fun! DRINKING AND DRIVING: First off – just don’t. The consequences are not worth it. Taxis or Ubers are cheap and plentiful. Fines are as much as 12,000 pesos. You can be taken to jail and your vehicle impounded. There are many checkstops on the weekends, and you will be asked to blow if they suspect you have been drinking. LEGAL SYSTEM: Not knowing the law is not a valid excuse in Mexico, or anywhere. If you find yourself caught in a legal situation be aware that guilt is presumed until your innocence can be proven. This is a very difficult lesson to learn if you are visiting from the United States or Canada. Immediately contact your consulate for assistance. Director Noemi Zamora noemizamorareynoso@gmail.com Editor Lic. Madeline Milne mmilne@Vallartatribune.com Sales Team editor@vallartatribune.com Designer Cynthia E. Andrade G. cysandra@gmail.com Web Manager Rachel Drinkcard Racheldrinkcard@gmail.com

July 12 - 18, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

CALLING IN MEXICO Calling phones in Mexico can be tricky. There are different codes you need to use depending if you are calling landlines or cellular phones and if they are local or long distance. LONG-DISTANCE CALLS FROM WITHIN MEXICO For national long-distance calls (within Mexico) the code is 01 plus the area code and phone number. For international long-distance calls, first dial 00, then the country code (U.S. and Canada country code is 1), so you would dial 00 + 1 + area code + 7 digit number. CALLING CELL PHONES (FROM A LAND LINE) If you are calling from a landline within the area code of the Mexican cell phone number dial 044, the 10 digit number. Outside of the area code (but still within Mexico) dial 045 and then the 10 digit phone number. Cell phone to cell phone only requires the 10 digit number.  PHONE CARDS Phone cards (tarjetas telefonicas) for use in pay phones can be bought at newsstands and in pharmacies. Pay phones do not accept coins. When buying a phone card for pay phone use, specify that you would like a tarjeta LADA. CALLING TOLL-FREE NUMBERS Some toll free numbers work from Mexico to the US and Canada, but many do not.  Those that do work are often not toll-free. You need to dial a different prefix. To call the following toll free prefixes, dial as follows: 800 numbers Dial 001-880-then the number  866 numbers Dial 001-883-then the number  877 numbers Dial 001-882-then the number  888 numbers Dial 001-881-then the number

Emergencies: 911 Red Cross: 065 FIRE DEPARTMENT: 322.223.9476 AMBULANCE: 322.222.1533

Ahoy Cruisers! NAME PASS DATE CARNIVAL SPLENDOR 3,200 04/07/2018 CARNIVAL SPLENDOR 3,200 10/07/2018 CARNIVAL SPLENDOR 3,200 18/07/2018 CARNIVAL SPLENDOR 3,200 25/07/2018

IMMIGRATION: 322.224.7719 CONSUMER PROTECTION: 01.800.468.8722 TOURISM OFFICES Jalisco: 322.221.2676 Nayarit: 322.297.1006

CONSULATES American Consulate 24 hrs 01-332-268-2100 Canadian Consulate 322.293.0098 322.293.0099 24 hrs: 1.800.706.2900

In port this month

In the month of July Puerto Vallarta welcomes 12,800 passengers!

Vallarta Tribune is an activity and entertainment guide and publishes information as it is provided by the advertiser or event host. We do not assume responsibility in errors or omissions other than to correct them as they are made known to us regarding event schedules, locations and/or prices. In addition, we do not assume any responsibility for erroneous inclusion or exclusion of information except to take reasonable care to ensure accuracy, that permission has been obtained to use it, and to remove it as soon as is practical upon receiving your notification of error. We recommend you always confirm prior to attending or visiting an event or establishment. Weekly publication edited, printed and distributed by Ediciones y Publicaciones Siete Junio, SA de CV Grupo Editorial Tribuna Calle 21 de Marzo # 1174 Col. Lomas del Coapinole Del. El Pitillal, Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco México CP 48290 Tel. 226-0800 * www. vallartatribune.com * https://www.facebook.com/VtaTribune/

Cut out and put near your phone for handy reference

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editorial

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Editor’s

SUMMER 2018

Note

editor@vallartatribune.com

Pool by day, theater by night

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he dog days of summer are here, but if you’re like Marcia Blondin, you’re running around checking out all the live shows that we are blessed to have this summer. Or if you’re like me, you’re testing out all the resorts and pools looking for relief from the weather. Or best of both worlds, pool during the day and attend the theater at night. So that’s why this week in addition to all the live music and events we are publishing, we now have a

July 12 - 18, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

relatively comprehensive list of day passes you can purchase to use at the many resorts around Banderas Bay. You’ll need to download it off www.vallartatribune.com because it was too large to publish here. If we’re missing your favorite resort – just send me an email, and I’ll update the list. If you’re holding an event or performing around the bay – be sure to add your event to the online calendar at www.vallartatribune. com/eventos, and we’ll print it in the newspaper and share it through email with all our readers. It seems the nearly daily rains are here again. It was inevitable and much needed, but the humidity and the flash floods are not something to take lightly. If you’re out and about remember to drink lots of water – floating in a pool doesn’t count. From dehydration to kidney problems I’ve expe-

rienced the effects of not hydrating. Don’t take it for granted that those beers and margaritas (or Moscow Mules made with tequila…) are replenishing you – drink water. Lots of it. The flash floods are particularly harmful because they carry debris into the spillways, rivers and the bay. Things like straws, plastic bottles and bags and styrofoam are especially bad. Please make an effort to pick up this trash if you see it around your property and put it somewhere it won’t end up in the water systems. Lots of live events and music still continuing around the bay. Check out the calendar on the back pages to plan your week’s adventures. Me, I’m off to Barra de Navidad for some research and will report back next week! Safe travels, Madeline

Resort Daypass GUIDE

From simple hotels to luxurious resorts the Vallarta Tribune has collected all the available daypass details so you can relax poolside from Punta Mita to Mismaloya. You’re welcome.

The Balance Series

Tom Stickney

tom.stickney@puntamita.com

Tom F. Stickney II is the Director of Instruction and Business Development at Punta Mita, (www.puntamita.com) He is a Golf Magazine “Top 100 Teacher,” and has been honored as a Golf Digest Best Teacher and a Golf Tips Top-25 Instructor. Tom is also a Trackman University Master/Partner, a distinction held by less than 15 people in the world. For more information please email: tom.stickney@puntamita.com

Counterbalancing with Putters

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alance is controlled by your pivot motion- the way you twist and turn and displace weight on the way back and through. This, my friends is the key to a good golf swing and consistent shots. In this series we will help you to better understand how balance works within your entire golf game. Enjoy… A growing trend

on Tour is placing weight at the top of your puttershaft- above your handsto counterbalance the weight of the clubhead. This action helps to smooth out your stroke by allowing you to better control the “steering wheel” of the stroke. This weight also tends to steady shaky hands and coupled with a fatter grip, like the Superstroke, will help to deaden the dreaded flip most bad putters possess within their stroke. To expe-

riment with this just wrap some lead tape around the top of your grip and see if you like the feeling. If so, you can find products like Tour Lock or Cubic Balance to add weight to your existing putter on the web. It worked for Jack Nicklaus and Ben Hogan so it might be worth a try… https://youtu.be/FImB2T_-nDQ

It’s too much information to include in this little spot so we’ve put it in a handy PDF you can download at: www.vallartatribune.com/daypass


news

06 CFE backs off on legal action over regulations governing sale of solar energy Small solar systems will be able to sell the electricity they produce

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he Federal Electricity Commission (CFE) has withdrawn its legal opposition to the regulations governing the sale of solar energy up to 500 kilowatts, meaning that people with small solar systems will soon be able to sell electricity they generate back to the stateowned company. In April last year, the CFE filed an injunction against regulations drawn up by the Energy Regulatory Commission (CRE) for the method used to calculate the rates it would pay to solar energy generators, arguing that they led to a loss of income because of high transmission costs. The legal action effectively meant that people using small solar systems couldn’t sell the energy they produce to the CFE, a situation which the general secretary of the National Solar Energy Association (ANES) said in April was “holding back investment” in the sector. It was also a barrier to unlocking the full capacity of the distributed generation market in Mexico, whose potential value is estimated to be more than US $500 million. With the withdrawal of the CFE injunction, three legally established self-generation electricity schemes can now be implemented. Under net metering, solar energy which a customer generates is measured so that any excess can subsequently be returned to the same customer to meet future energy consumption needs, likely at a time when conditions for solar generation are less favorable. Under net billing, solar generators can sell excess electricity they produce to the CFE and receive a payment from the company in cash that is calculated according to the

rate set by the CRE. Thirdly, solar generators who don’t need any of the energy they produce can send all their electricity into the national grid and receive corresponding monetary compensation, again according to the rate set by the regulatory authority. The ANES said the CFE’s withdrawal of its injunction is a sign of the maturity that the distributed generation market has reached, adding that achieving growth in the sector of 200% or more is now possible. According to the CFE, it has signed 60,000 net metering contracts with power generators who have installed solar panels with less than 500 kilowatts capacity on the roofs of their homes or on those of commercial premises. The withdrawal of the injunction will allow those people to benefit financially from the energy they produce. The CFE also said that 420,000 high-consumption customers could now take advantage of installing solar panels on their roofs with the confidence that by selling the excess electricity they produce, they will get back their initial investment in four to seven years. It is estimated that by the year 2030, generated distribution capacity in Mexico could reach 19,000 megawatts and that the sector could create one million jobs due to an increased demand to purchase solar systems and have them installed. The CFE now has a period of 100 days within which it must publish details of its billing and payments for the three energy sale schemes while the CRE has until the end of the year to announce any changes to the existing rate calculation method. Original: Mexico News Daily

July 12 - 18, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

It was the peso’s best week in more than six years Its value against the dollar rose 3.92%, the biggest one-week gain since December 2011

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he Mexican peso completed its best week in more than six years yesterday, buoyed by a weaker US dollar and a honeymoon period following the election of Andrés Manuel López Obrador, who has sought to calm fears surrounding his economic plans. The peso’s value against the greenback increased by 3.92% this week, its greatest single-week gain since December 2011. The Bank of México said the interbank dollar rate closed at 19.0945 pesos, its lowest mark since May 3. The 3.92% surge also made the Mexican peso the best performing emerging nations currency this week, according to Bloomberg, ahead of the Argentine and Colombian pesos which gained 3.02% and 1.96% respectively. According to the currency exchange website xe.com, one US dollar was trading at 19.1 pesos at 3:00pm CDT today. The dollar declined due to escalating trade tensions between the United States and China, with both countries imposing new tariffs on each other, while mixed U.S. employment data placed additional pres-

sure on the currency. Meanwhile, Bloomberg said “the peso’s rally since Sunday’s election shows that markets are rewarding Andrés Manuel López Obrador, known as AMLO, and his team for their efforts to calm investor anxiety after the populist swept to power with more than half the vote.” As part of the incoming administration’s “charm offensive” to ease economic concerns, AMLO’s pick to be his finance secretary has been particularly outspoken. Carlos Urzúa, who served as Mexico City’s finance secretary when López Obrador was mayor between 2000 and 2005, has reassured investors that the 2019 budget will keep the nation’s finances under control and stressed that the independence of the central bank will be respected. RBC Capital Markets analyst Tania Escobedo Jacob wrote in a note that Urzúa’s “general outline” of the government’s economic plans “has been very well accepted by market participants,” adding that it has “decreased significantly the risk or perception of a radical shift in the management of the Mexican economy.” The president-elect’s

chief of staff also sought to allay fears this week that López Obrador might move to scrap the 2013 energy reform that enabled foreign and private companies to invest in Mexico’s oil industry. Alfonso Romo said that López Obrador won’t seek to wind back the reform but added that his administration would review contracts for graft and if irregularities are detected, it will speak with the companies before any changes are made. “I don’t see changes,” Romo said. “If anything happens, it would be done without hurting private investment.” López Obrador also signaled earlier this week that he would support the current administration’s ongoing efforts to reach an updated North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). While the signs for the peso are good this week, some analysts have expressed concern that the positive trend may not last. Erik Nelson, an analyst at Wells Fargo in New York, said “the conciliatory tone from AMLO has really helped” the peso strengthen this week. Original: Mexico News Daily

Second stage of tariffs on US products takes effect There are now 91 products subject to tariffs of 15% to 25%

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second stage of retaliatory tariffs on a range of United States imports to Mexico took effect last week, just over a month after the U.S. imposed duties on aluminum and steel. The federal government has now introduced tariffs on 91 United States products and the duty on pork increased today from 10% to 20%. Other products targeted include potatoes, whiskey, apples, cranberries, a variety of cheeses and some steel products with tariffs mainly ranging between 15% and 25%. The first round of measures took effect on June 5, just four days after the United States lifted exemptions on Mexican metal imports. The government has said that the tariffs will remain in place as long as the United States continues to tax Mexican steel and aluminum at rates of 25% and 10% respectively. Mexico staggered the introduction of tariffs on pork in two stages so as not to affect supply and thus avoid sudden price changes in the domestic market, said Juan Carlos Anaya, the CEO of agricultural market

consultancy firm GCMA. Mexicans consume 2.11 million tonnes of pork annually, making it the second most popular meat in the country. United States producers sold just over US $1.8 billion worth of pork to its southern neighbor last year to make up for the shortfall in domestic production. The first shipment of German pork  since the tit-for-tat tariffs were imposed arrived in Mexico in the middle of last month. Trump floated the idea that  the U.S. could seek to strike separate deals  with its two neighbors and he reiterated that idea during  a telephone conversation last Monday with president-elect  Andrés Manuel López Obrador. AMLO, as Mexico’s next president is best known, has not directly addressed Trump’s metal tariffs but has said repeatedly that he wants to avoid a trade war with the U.S. given its importance to Mexican consumers and exporters. In a television interview after he spoke to Trump Monday, he said that the two countries “are not going to fight” and stressed that the United

States is “our main economic-commercial partner.” However, he has also said as recently as last week that Mexico “will never be a piñata for a foreign government.” News website Politico said today that “it’s unlikely that Trump’s trade policy will go a long way toward harboring close ties with López Obrador.” There has been little progress on NAFTA since the tariffs were introduced although both Guajardo and Canada’s chief negotiator, Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland, have charged that they are not directly related to the renegotiation talks. The United States’ move to introduce the tariffs on Mexico and Canada was widely seen as a strategy to exert pressure on the two countries to agree to U.S. demands to reach a new NAFTA. Jim Heimerl, president of the U.S. National Pork Producers Council, has already spoken out against the tariffs, charging that it eliminates his country’s ability to compete in the Mexican market. Original: Mexico News Daily


local

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The Street of Green Gold By John Warren

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n the last few weeks of exploring the names of the streets in the old part of Puerto Vallarta we have found that almost all of them have been named after heroes of Mexican history. This week’s street is the one that is due east of Calle Insurgentes and is named after a famous fruit, the avocado; it’s Calle Aguacate. Some say that the origin of the word aguacate harks back to days of yore when the Aztecs looked at these oval fruit that grow in pairs (not pears) and named them in honour of the the testicle or, in their Nahuatl language, “ahuacatl”. The Aztecs must have been magnificent men! Apparently the agaucate is a fruit, not a vegetable and is, in fact, a berry. It is considered a fruit because it has fleshy pulp and a seed, like a cherry, and fits all of the botanical criteria for a berry. So next time when you’re presented with the opportunity to have an avocado smoothie, look at it as a fruit and take a chance. Be more open to eating avocados as desserts and not just in the ubiquitous guacamole or soup.

For starters, try this recipe for a morning after the night before…A Kiwi Avocado Smoothie with Lime and Honey. Blend 1/2 perfectly ripe, large avocado, two   kiwis (peeled), ⅛ cup  lime juice, ¼ cup almond milk or coconut milk, (just enough to get the blender going),1-2 tablespoons honey or agave to taste and 2-3 ice cubes. Blend these ingredients together, sip, lay back and relax. Aaaah! Not only do avocados taste good

but also they are good for you. Did you know that an avocado fights free radicals (no darling, not those liberals supporting Bernie), contain an excellent source of carotenoid lutein, which helps to protect against cataracts and macular degeneration, they have anti-inflammatory properties and their acids fight against both prostate and breast cancers. What a fruit! Good for the person and financially good for the country! Mexico

July 12 - 18, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

reaps huge financial rewards from the cultivation and export of avocados and they are known as the Green Gold of Mexico. The Association of Producers and Packers Exporters of Avocado of Mexico say that their organization generates an annual economic gain for the country of approximately 2.5 billion USD. That’s a lot of cash! Mexican avocados are eaten in about 30 countries, and Mexico produces 80% of the avocados consumed in the United States. That’s the good news. However, the state of Michoacán, in which avocado production is a prime industry, has paid a very high cost for its cultivation. For several years, the sowing of the fruit has led to the deforestation of thousands of hectares of pine and oak forests and, in many cases, the producers cause forest fires and then plant avocado trees in the devastated land. Another risk for the villagers below the avocado orchards is that pesticides, herbicides and fungicides, used to boost production, leach into streams and rivers and cause serious health problems downstream. Then there are problems caused by the green gold industry generating truckloads of cash. The  narcos known as the Knights Templar, have

muscled in to the avocado industry in Michoacan. Through its contacts in the state government, the cartel obtained detailed information about each avocado grower and how much money they made, then imposed a “tax” of ten cents per pound produced and $100 USD for each hectare of land they owned. Growers who expressed reluctance to pay were “persuaded” by violent attacks on them or their family. Just like much of life, we have to take the good with the bad. It’s the yin and the yang. Calle Aguacate runs for eight blocks south from the Rio Cuale and contains some good restaurants, Mexican stores and homes. It’s a bit away from the beaten tracks of Basilio Badillo and Insurgentes but is well worth a visit. My favourite restaurant is Los Lirios, which serves great seafood at reasonable prices to diners sitting in the shade of a huge tree on the sidewalk. Here’s a recipe for chocolate mousse that will keep you cool while fighting those free radicals. It takes five minutes to make. Collect two ripe avocados, half a cup of cocoa, about a quarter a cup of milk, a teaspoon of vanilla and, maybe, some honey. Blend, chill, serve and accept the applause of your guests!


local

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Welcome Home Sheryl Novak

sa.novak@solutionsmexico.com

Sheryl Novak is an expat Canadian who has owned a home in Mexico for over ten years. She is the owner of SOLutions Mexico and The Furniture Store by SOLutions Mexico. She is an expert on sourcing all styles of furniture for all sizes of budgets, in Mexico.

Leather in Mexico?

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s leather a smart choice for your sofa or sectional in Mexico? This is a frequently asked question posed to us by new homeowners. There are four generally

accepted types of leathers used for furniture covers. These are full grain, top grain, genuine and bonded. When a cowhide is put into a splitting machine, it is sliced in

to long layers. The cutting blade separates the top (full grain and top grain) from the bottom (genuine or split leather). Full grain leather is the most expensive leather available. It is the outer layer of the hide and has the most variations in both markings and color. In full grain leather, you can see the life of the cow. If the cow pressed up against a barbed wire fence, was bitten by horseflies or injured, you would see the marks. You can even see veins of the cow in most full grain leathers. This is the most natural looking leather with loads of character. Full grain leather does not go through a lot of post-processing at the tannery. Although beautiful, full grain leather sofas or sectionals are more prone to stains since liquids and oils are more easily absorbed. The other top layer of the cow hide is referred to as top grain leather. This grade is much more uniform since it is the split of hide under the top layer of skin. Top grain leather is strong and more consistent in coloring than the full grain. It is usually buffed, sanded and stained to create a uniform look. The pigmentation that is added to the top grain also serves as a water repellant to the leather. Liquid tends to bead on the surface and roll off. For that reason, we suggest the top grain over the full grain for most homeowners in Mexico, especially in our beachside homes with humid climates. The remaining two layers are split from the bottom or inside of the hide. These leathers are put through more manufacturing processes to make them ready for use as furniture covers. It is correct to say that genuine leather is true leather since it does come from the cow. However, it is not considered as decadent as either of the two top grains (full grain and top grain) since it is more processed. Bonded leather is a great way to get a leather sofa or sectional at a very reasonable price. If it is correctly manufactured, bonded leather is an excellent solution for your home in Mexico. Scraps of leather are fused together with glue and pressure to create bonded leather. Be cautious of any bonded leather imported from offshore and items made with “tacto piel.” These are poorly manufactured replicas that crack and peel. Only buy from brand names you know and trust. Since these two grains are highly processed, they will stand up to heavy use and repel stains. This makes them a good option for your home in Mexico.

July 12 - 18, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Medical Matters Pam Thompson

pamela@healthcareresourcespv.com

Pamela Thompson operates HealthCare Resources Puerto Vallarta, a multi-faceted, independent, resource network that is here for your total health and well-being. We offer assistance to help find a physician, hospital and diagnostic service for any healthcare needs. www.healthcareresourcespv.com

Swamp Ass and Other Summer Stuff

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s defined by the Urban Dictionary: A common condition in which the ass crack and crotch becomes overly moist, sweaty, and stinky from one or all of the following: - sweating on a hot day - Not bathing enough - Long day of work, sports, play - Incomplete wipe due to rush or laziness Or it can be just ‘general swamp crotch’. With this brutally hot and humid weather we have here right now, everyone probably suffers from this. You are walking, or sitting when all of a sudden you feel it. It feels like you have sat in a puddle. The sweat glands around your butt — produce a sweat that’s odorless (usually). Normally no problem except a really uncomfortable feeling. But if one sits in the sweat too long, bacteria and germs will accumulate. It can lead to chronic itching and even a secondary infection as the skin will break down. So it is extra important to keep the area clean and dry as possible. When I was Googling this topic (yes, there is a lot!) it mentioned that ‘cutting down on coffee may also help, since caffeine stimulates your central nervous system and activates your sweat glands.’ I for one would rather sit in the puddle. A few suggestions: Carry baby wipes with you. Swipe now and then. Wear loose clothing. Linen is great! Carry some baby powder with you. Cotton granny panties for women work well. Skirts too! If you sweat to the extreme, which is called hyperhidrosis, there is a new trend of using Botox. Although neurologic, endocrine, infectious, and other systemic diseases can sometimes cause hyperhidrosis, most cases occur in

people who are otherwise healthy. Sweating profusely goes hand in hand when living here in the summer months. If you have found a product/good solution to handle this, something different than carrying a regular ‘sweat rag’ with you, please email me! I will post on my Facebook page to share! I have previously mentioned the Cooling Ties (they make them for dogs too!) and if there was ever a time to get one of these ties, it is now! They are a gel filled ‘band’ that one places around the neck and feel heavenly. If you would like contact info for these, let me know. More time in the pool is a luxurious escape. Everyone surely needs more than one swimsuit these days. A big shout out to my friend Robina Oliver who has the shop ‘Curvas Peligrosas’. Top quality women’s swimsuits in real-women sizes abound in her shop. She is having a super-sale right now! Take advantage of these great deals and have a visit! http://www.curvaspeligrosaspv.com/ Or I am happy to put you in touch with her! School is out now and we look forward to the influx of tourists who arrive from all points around Mexico. ¡Bienvenido! Here’s to an invigorating week!


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Paradise and Parenting Leza Warkentin

mommyinmexico.wordpress.com

I am the preschool coordinator and nursery teacher at the American School of Puerto Vallarta. I am also both unsurprised and not a bit sorry that this list of my favorites is mostly about places to eat. If you can live in Vallarta without appreciating some of the good eatin’ around here, you have to be at least half Vulcan.

Surviving Summer with Young Adolescents

I

faintly recall how much I used to enjoy a good summer vacation: getting up late, staying in pajamas until twilight, meals made up entirely of the contents of an ice cream bar. That was BC (Before Children). Now that I am in the DC (During Children) years, vacations are still enjoyable for sure, but quite different for a few reasons: I no longer distinguish between pajamas and street clothes I have to eat vegetables in front of the children Getting up late means sometimes they wait to ask me questions until the sun is up As a teacher, I feel tired and like I need a break from anything that emits a sound. But also as a teacher, I feel like it’s my duty to provide Learning Opportunities for my children during school vacations. It’s a conundrum that takes over much of my reduced awake time during July and August. What’s more, I am the proud owner of a twelve and thirteen year old, whose summer bucket list does not include any of the items that most other people would consider to be important, like Getting Off the Couch Once a Day. So here we are, at home with a couple of very tall, very lethargic people who are embarking on a journey we call Adolescence On Vacation. In three more sleeps, we are going to Chiapas, a trip that Gil and I have been planning for about two years now. But that’s only for ten days. After that we’ll be back home with great WiFi and few other financial resources. Gil and I have made a rough plan, and we’ve already been implementing parts of it. My kids didn’t want to go to a day camp, and, quite honestly, I prefer spending as much time with them as I can during the summer months.

However, I didn’t want them to be completely horizontal all summer. So we promised the kids that they did not have to go to a day camp if they participated in a few key activities. Here are the non-negotiables: Music lessons and practice five times a week (I have my own musician at home who almost always comes in handy). My daughter took up the ukulele, and my son wants to play the electric guitar. Right hemisphere of the brain – check. Sports twice a week – their sports lessons continue. Check out Eagle Park Taekwondo at 322 306 9782 for a variety of skill levels and lesson schedules. For swimming lessons, we like Delfines Fitness Center in Nuevo Vallarta. They have lessons all summer long. Call them at 322 688 5576. Cooking with mom! I did a tricky thing, which is pretty much the definition of good parenting. I asked them what they like to eat more than anything else. I wrote it down,

and then I told them they would be learning to cook those things. My son decided to get smart and tell me things he thought would be impossible to learn at home. I found hundreds of recipes on how to make soda, and we’ve already tried two recipes. Mom wins again. Family novel – About once a year, we read a novel together, usually on a road trip (because “Are we there yet?” is probably one of my least favorite questions of the trillions of questions that exist). Last year we read Wonder and I would have them take turns with me reading passages; not because I was trying to improve their reading skills, but because I couldn’t read and sob at the same time. Charlotte’s Web, The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe, and The Hobbit have all been favorites. This summer we’ll be tackling The Refugee by Allan Gratz. It sounds like I’ll be working on the children’s oral reading skills once again with that one. American Red Cross Babysitting Course which you can buy online! It’s a great opportunity for my children to learn about the skills they need to start making some money and stop asking me for it. I have made up my mind to enjoy the summer, regardless of how well we get through the plan. I hope our children do too. Or at least learn something. Barring that, I figure we should at least survive unscathed (thoughts and prayers).

July 12 - 18, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

From Here Marcia Blondin

marciavallarta@gmail.com

W

ho likes sushi? Did you know there’s a brand new sushi bar in town? Three of us had dinner last week at Katana Sushi & Bar. Katana is on Lazaro Cardenas 315 D between Constitucion and Insurgentes. (The ‘D’ means upstairs.) Very fresh décor with an air-conditioned space and a patio fronting the street. The menu is gigantic and full of all kinds of things that are not on my diet, but I had a chicken salad that would have sufficed for dinner it was so big and delicious. I also had the arrachera with rice – most of that went home with me.  Olivier, the owner of Katana, sat down with us to chat. I was curious why a sushi bar and Olivier, originally from Champagne, France, said he lived more than a dozen years in different parts of Asia and thought Vallarta was ready for some authentic Asian food. As I said, the menu is huge and varied. Another highlight of Katana is: starting next Wednesday, July 18th at 6 pm, Rodolfo, Vallarta’s budding tenor will be performing! I am sure there are lots of “Friends of Rodolfo” still in town, no? I hope everyone will join me at Katana to make  Rodolfo welcome and feel comfortable at his new home base for the summertime. I’ll have a full report on Rodolfo’s debut at Katana next week. Friday night last, stopped at  Incanto to wish Beverly Fairfax a happy birthday. She was in splendid regalia at The Piano Bar that was packed with early well-wishers. I wish we could have stayed for cake but reservations at  TeatroVallarta to see “Siddhartha the Musical” prevailed. Please do read my review on this astonishing production somewhere else in this issue! On Saturday, back to Incanto to see 50% of the Princesas Desesperadas in Boa  Viagem/Director Ramiro Daniel’s latest production called “Que no se Culpe a  Nadie de mi Muerte.”  Cesar Trujillo stars as Aurora/Sleeping Beauty in this comedic tragedy with his co-star from PD,  Jose Carlos Ramirez reprising his role as Cinderella (in the highest heels I’ve ever seen). There is quite a bit

of audience interaction and some really tricky dialogue (in Spanish, of course) that eluded me but I appreciated the complexities. I keep thinking that the more theatre I see in Spanish that one day I’ll emerge from a play and will have magically understood. One thing is definite – good acting is just that in any language. The play runs every Saturday at 8:30 pm until the end of July. Sunday, back at Teatro Vallarta for “Dreaming Together” a glorious melding of three gay men’s choruses from New York City, Mexico City, and Vallarta. The intricacies of events like these baffle me. Everyone is a volunteer so how the hell do you get more than fifty singers from the U.S., fifty from Mexico City, get them here, feed them, house them and have them appear on stage ONCE in an entirely seamless production? Amazing the logistics. When they were all on stage together for their final number, their utter joy at belting out glorious harmonies was palpable. Standing shoulder to shoulder sharing all their differences and their love in common: singing, brought the house to its feet with thunderous applause. Thank you, gentle men, for bringing us such joy. One day – I hope in my lifetime – we can hear all of you again singing as Men’s Choruses from NYC, Mexico, and Vallarta. After last night’s performance, we are a step closer. Alfonso Lopez, the Director of the Vallarta’s Gay Men’s Chorus, is stepping down. He made the somewhat startling announcement last night at “Dreaming Together.” I spoke with Alfonso today to find out why and he had this to say, “I will announce soon what the next chapter for me is, but it is very exciting. I am still going to be involved with the PVGMC  in a lesser degree - I will help them find their new Artistic Director. They may find information in this link: http://www.pvmenschorus.org/ pvmc/position-opening-for-artistic-director/”   So there you have it; perhaps this will be a quieter week. Or not. Whatever you do, keep on singing and always be kind, From Here.


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July 12 - 18, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Vibes & Vices: Movie Night @ Rey de Oros AJ Freeman

cosmiccapt@gmail.com

AJ Freeman is an adventurous spirit, serial friendmaker, and general enthusiast. He lives his everyday life hoping to demonstrate the nearly infinite potential for discovery and wonder on this small wet rock orbiting a dim yellow star in the backwoods of the Milky Way.

R

ey de Oros, yet another translation I trust you to manage yourself, takes inspiration from its name from one of the traditional Tarot cards used by mystic soothsayers to peer into the futures of enchanted believers. The card itself represents the rewarding aspects of maturity, including the good fortune gifted from experience and the invaluable resource of self-determination. As it relates to the namesake establishment, while the bar does offer an array of delightful diversions including live music and pozole nights, you have to be a certain kind of person to attend a movie presentation at a bar on a school night. Predictably, I not only am this kind of person, but go out of my way to seek out same. The Vibes: Rey de Oros is a fairly unremarkable little storefront unless you know what you’re looking for, so it’s easy to miss on a quick walk through the city’s Olimpica neighborhood. Still, the ability to detect value where it may

not be immediately apparent is a central aspect of the wisdom the bar’s name is intended to reflect, so I feel as though it fits in a way. Stepping inside to the spacious seating area around 7pm on a Tuesday, visitors will find an eclectic collection of decor including multicolored lights, various art pieces and a guitar rigged to glow from within. It was sort of like a larger version of where one might imagine I live. Chatty couples and friendly loners were scattered around the common space, where small tables were pushed together into larger seating areas...the message is clear: this is a place for shared experience. I joined a couple of friendly faces I had seen around town, ordered myself a Vicky, and dug into the free popcorn as the double feature was set to begin. As night fell over the colonia, the projection on the wall grew stronger as we gazed through the haze to collectively immerse ourselves into the unfolding

evening. Definitely my kind of time. The Vices: In previous weeks Rey de Oros had showcased Spanish-subtitled selections from the works of Monty Python to various 70s kung fu flicks. This evening the first feature was Mel Brooks’ suspense satire “High Anxiety,” a film I had never seen but that the snow-capped man of leisure sitting next to me was clearly very familiar with. I hadn’t even seen any of the Hitchcock movies it was satirizing, but had sort of seen “The Birds” and “Psycho” through cultural osmosis, the same way everyone is familiar with Indiana Jones’ whole deal whether they’ve actully seen the series or not...he’s, like, the world’s toughest archaeologist or something, right?Anyway, my new buddy was happy to offer the proper context where it was lacking...not that much was needed, I have a great appreciation for the sillier things in life. During the movie I eventually got word that the kitchen was closed for the night, but was quickly offered a couple of tasty slices from the pizza the pair at

the next table had ordered from someplace nearby. I can’t promise you the same outcome--you might be some kind of culero--but it does speak to the like-mindedness of the bar theater community. Next up was “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” (the original, naturally). I’ve used this space to opine on Wonka in passing before, but in my opinion he is exactly the kind of complex genius sociopath that has driven the history of our species, and might deserve a little more scrutiny here.First of all, let’s be honest: at least three of those five children died. You don’t just have your entire physical form filled up with blueberry juice and then go on to live a normal life. Twisted visionary that he was, Willy Wonka tested each child with fulfillment of their fondest wishes, appealing directly to their visible weaknesses to lure them to their unfettered fate. In this way, the film serves as an heady examination of freedom’s ultimate burden: sure, you can color outside the lines a bit if that’s what tickles you, but if you drown in a river of chocolate or shoot yourself with a demons-

trated shrink ray, it’s your own damn fault, idiot. Yes, I did share some of these observations with the class and indeed, was very proud of myself. As the Wonkavator soared jerkily into the distance and the credits began to roll, I suddenly realized that I had a few more beers than I thought I had had, which I reckon is the point of keeping your bar clientele in one place for 90 minutes at a runtime. Floating toward the exit on a wave of “hasta luego,” I took my first look at the time in hours. It was after 11pm...a Tuesday night well wasted. The Verdict: Rey de Oros is an inviting little public living room featuring a variety of fun activities for the drunk and drunk at heart. Tuesday night is movie night, and the event is a weekly reminder of entertainment’s human-bonding potential. Maybe I’ll catch you there. Info: https://www.facebook. com/pages/biz/topic_bar-puerto-vallarta/Rey-de-Oros-PuertoVallarta-1194639750656947/ Calle Sierra Aconcagua 150, Olímpica, 48310 Puerto Vallarta, Jal.

Mexican female impersonators with a Canadian connection Merv Buchanan merv@uvs.com Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.

T

he Crazy Bitches are a troupe of female impersonators from Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. For seven years, they have drawn sellout crowds of holidaying Canadians to the popular Luna Lounge dinner shows, in nearby Bucerias. Their show features humorous musical tributes, warped adult humour and hilarious interactions with members of the audience. Entertainment columnist Debbie White of the Vallarta Tribune says “the girls” have put together a very entertaining show that audiences

love. The song parodies are hysterical and the costumes and skits are superb. The Crazy Bitches show has been a “can't miss” event in the Puerto Vallarta area for years.” Editor Jeffrey Heyden-Kaye of The Ponoka News who attended last year's show at the Ponoka Golf Club, says “Those crazy señoritas sure know how to entertain a crowd”. Admittedly, “drag shows” aren't for everyone. But these young Mexican actors have a way of winning over audiences, who soon forget they are not women, but men disguised as women. Often, the people who were the most reluctant to attend are surprised at how much fun they have. And they return again and again, with relatives and friends in tow. So why has this group of enter-

tainers from Puerto Vallarta, been invited to perform in some 30 communities scattered all over western Canada? It's really no mystery at all. Most of their winter audience is Canadians from BC, Alberta and Saskatchewan, fleeing the cold and snow. Besides being a treat for their many fans, having the popular show in town gives everyone in the area a chance to enjoy it without having to travel to Mexico. Add to this the fact that the tour organizer is from Calgary and it all starts to make sense. For those who can't get enough of The Crazy Bitches, their western tour is the cure. During their two week visit in 2017, the troupe performed 10 shows in western Canada. Every show was a sellout and every

venue invited them back. Their 2018 tour runs from July 26 through September 1, with only three nights off. Clearly, this crazy group has

a special connection with people in western Canada. For complete list of show dates and venues visit www.lunaloungebucerias.com


Banco_VallartaCredito_IntercamDOBLEPLANA.pdf

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9. 5 DE DEC. CEMETARY 16. HIDALGO PARK 24. FOREVER SPRING MARKET 10. MIRADOR DE LA CRUZ 17. THREE 16. HENS MARKETPARK 25. BUCERIAS24. FLEA TALE HOLE ARTWALK 9. 5 DECERRO DEC. CEMETARY HIDALGO RESCUE CAMP FOREVER SPRING MARKET 10. MIRADOR CERRO DE LA CRUZ18. MARSOL 17.MARKET THREE HENS MARKET 11. MALECON LE OF A TALE HOLE CONDIDO 25. BUCERIAS ARTWALK 26. RIVIERA FARMERS MARKET 11. MALECON 18. MARSOL A ESCONDIDO 26. RIVIERA FARMERS MARKET 12. VIRGIN DE LA GUADALUPE CHURCH 19. MUNICIPAL MARKET MARKET 27. MARINA ARTISAN BRIDGE MARKET VIRGIN DE LA GUADALUPE CHURCH 19. ZAPATA MUNICIPAL MARKET28. MOVIE + PICNIC NG BRIDGE SANCTUARY 13. LOS12. 27. MARINA ARTISAN MARKET ARCOS AMPITHEATRE 20. EMILIANO MARKET CROCODILE 13. LOS ARCOS AMPITHEATRE 21. CUALE 20. EMILIANO ZAPATA MARKET ORA CROCODILE SANCTUARY 28. MOVIE + PICNIC 14. ISLA CUALE CULTRAL CENTER VALLARTA SIGN 29. RED CROSS 14. ISLA CUALE 21. CUALE CULTRAL CENTER RTO VALLARTA SIGN 29. RED CROSS 15. LAZARO CARDENAS PARK 22. 5 DE DEC MARKET EL SALADO 30. LOS ARCOS NATIONAL PARK 15. LAZARO CARDENAS PARK 22. 5 DE DEC MARKET RO EL SALADO 30. LOS ARCOS NATIONAL PARK 15. OLAS ALTAS FARMERS MARKET 23. HUANACAXLE MERCADO PLAZA 15. OLAS ALTAS FARMERS MARKET 23. HUANACAXLE MERCADO LAL PLAZA

TS OF INTEREST RESCUE CAMP

www.vallartatribune.com


entertainment

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Siddhartha the Musical – a Review by Marcia Blondin

www.deutsches-theater.de

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fter I saw this production last week, I immediately wrote to my editor, Madeline Milne and said I needed to review it separately and would try to keep it under 10,000 words. An exaggeration somewhat, but I could repeat superlatives for days, the production was so good. I read Siddhartha decades ago like everyone else at that precocious age of looking for answers wherever there are questions. I checked the poster at Teatro Vallarta for the fine print. Yes, from the book by Herman Hesse. First thoughts in my head: how the hell could they/why would they and should they even try to make it a musical? I was mystified, curious and intrigued, to say the least. Sitting in the spacious lobby waiting for show time and watching the gamut of the audience forming, waiting for drinks and potato chips at the bar, I couldn’t get a handle on the people. Young, old, hippies, regular people, mostly Mexicans, not unusual as the production was

in Spanish, but surely everyone had to have thought “Siddhartha, the Musical” a decidedly odd thing. Still, they were nearly sold out. Two seconds into the opening number I was hooked: “Slumdog Millionaire” meets Andrew Lloyd Weber, and all sorts of fabulous broke out all over the stage. Before I start babbling, I have to take each part of this musical apart at

the seams and make it a category otherwise it really will be babble. Actors – everyone on the stage had a job, looked and did their part. Nobody flopped into the wings, hand out for a bottle of water. The Dancers – everyone sang except the ‘chorus,’ and they were so busy acting, dancing, tumbling and stop-action tumbling: (I had to make up that term – one of

July 12 - 18, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

the actors, great, heavily-muscled body, would run, vault onto a platform and stop dead the second he was upside down supporting his weight on one arm, and his legs bent everywhere then five seconds later, off and running again) fighting with gigantic sticks, being beautiful and sexy and all of them lip-synching to perfection. The Principal Singers: Siddhartha, strong, clear tenor; his papa the richest baritone - it was like listening to honey glow in the sunshine. Any cast member could have been plunked onto a stage in the middle of “Othello” and done themselves proud. Costumes: Brocade, flowing silk and a billion sequins to hold everything together. Only flaw – some lycra shorts towards the end but in terrific colors and they were moving so fast it honestly didn’t matter. Music: Rock mixed with Bollywood soundtracks. It was loud, undulating, brash and electrifying. The kind of music that goes from your ears to your solar plexus and just sits there. Awesome. Story: The ideas, themes, and personalities of Siddartha, by Herman Hesse are put forth in the production but a note in the program says it all: “It is not an exact transcription of the novel.” Set Design: The sets were simple furnishings with gigantic screens covering the entire stage of Teatro Vallarta at times with actors in front of and behind the screens with mapping going on all around. One scene in the second act had white fabric oozing like snow all over the stage floor until wires moved and the fabric became something else. It was surreal watching everything morph and change before our eyes, seemingly like a projection but happening live twenty feet away. It was like being in the middle of a multi-million dollar movie shoot. But LIVE! I wonder if they had staff from Cirque du Soleil in designing the sets – that’s the quality of this production – and not starting at USD $100/seat. Did I understand everything? Of course not – it was in Spanish. Did it matter? Not one bit. Do you feel sorry that you missed this extravaganza? The Director of Teatro Vallarta, Salvador Luna, was grinning ear to ear when Siddhartha’s standing ovation was finally over. I was so upset it was the only performance because I would have gone the next day again. His Cheshire cat smile was because the cast told him during intermission that they wanted to come back this coming winter. I will keep you posted.

Hannah Brady’s Lady Zen sings

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ynamic vocalist Hannah Brady captivates her audience with jazz, pop, soul, and beyond! You never know what you’re going get with this insatiable singer. Originally from the New York theatre scene, Hannah has performed everywhere from Mexico to China. Having started in musical and contemporary theater, she has also dabbled in classical, country, rock, Top 40 hits, eclectic house music, disco, soul, and jazz. Hannah’s musical taste offers a nostalgic insight into the music that influenced her growing up, and it has served as a unifier in every country she’s lived. In her all-new show ‘Paloma En La Playa’ (‘A Dove On The Beach’), Hannah honors such legends as The Jackson 5, Ella Fitzgerald, Nancy Wilson, Donna Summer and Stevie Wonder accompanied by several local musicians. There will also be guest appearances by singer Luis Villanueva and other local artists. ‘Lady Zen’ is an internationally known award-winning lyric poet and singer with an incredible vocal range. Now extended by popular demand, she will continue through July with an all-new show featuring ‘The Best of K.D. Lang’, who has long been an inspiration for her, from her fashion sense to her liquid delivery of a song. Pianist Dennis Crow will accompany her on Fridays at 8pm. Recently discovered talent singer/songwriter Axel Solis, a resident and mentor/role model for other youth at the Corazon de Nina Foundation, has a beautiful, powerful voice and plays his acoustic guitar equally well. He will make his debut headlining his own show for one night only in the piano bar on Friday, July 13 at 5pm. Greater Tuna starring Ron Spencer and Tracy Parks plays


entertainment

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s ‘Paloma En La Playa’ premiers and s K.D. Lang at Incanto

on most Wednesdays at 8pm. The hilarious story of small-town Texas with twenty-two eccentric characters played by two actors and forty-two costume changes. This is the first time the show has been presented during the summer season. Ballet Folklórico Tradiciones performs a variety of traditional dances from various states in Mexico with narration in English

and Spanish. They will perform the exciting ‘Dance of the Machetes’ from Nayarit, and as the handsome Charros and beautiful ladies of Jalisco, among several others. The group, made up of children and young adults between 6 and 30 years-old, was founded in 2016 by director and choreographer Alexis Guadalupe Jimon Garcia. Two shows only July 21 & Aug. 4 at 7pm. Happy Hour 2-6pm and 10pm-close. ‘The Zen Hour’ is 4-5pm daily with 2x1 tickets offered for select shows. For more information and online tickets visit www.IncantoVallarta. com. No cover in the piano bar. Open 9am-Midnight Tues.- Sun. Casual dining in the air-conditioned piano bar and upper/lower terrace available 9am-11pm. Contact General Manager Gilberto Figueroa for event bookings at Incantopv@gmail.com. Incanto is located at Insurgentes 109 (at the Rio Cuale). Call 322 223 9756 for reservations.

Featured Property Turn-key Luxury at D’Terrace 1 bed, 2 bath, 904 sq.ft. Asking $315,000 USD

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his home features a spacious covered terrace overlooking the garden and fountain. The amazing chef’s kitchen showcases honed granite counters, custom cabinetry and stainless steel appliances. The spacious bedroom suite is a haven of restful relaxation with spa-style bathroom and marble accents. A pull out couch and adjacent half

bathroom are perfect for occasional guests. Absolutely stunning in design and finishings this gorgeous property is just a block from famed Los Muertos beach and dozens of shops and restaurants that make this area so desirable. D ́Terrace has an array of amenities including stunning lobby, water feature, gym, rooftop

lounge and entertaining areas. The common rooftop entertainment area sets a new standard of luxury entertaining options with infinity-edged pool, oversized jetted tub, fire pit, gym and hi-tech surround sound system. Offered with gorgeous custom furnishings and decor this contemporary masterpiece is a perfect second home or rental investment property in the heart of the popular “Zona Romantica”! www.boardwalkrealtypv.com/ properties/dterrace-405/

July 12 - 18, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com


riviera nayarit

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July 12 - 18, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Life in la Cruz Cindy Bouchard

cindy@VillaAmordelMar.com

Cindy Bouchard, an expat Canadian runs a Boutique Inn, Villa Amor del Mar in La Cruz de Huanacaxtle. She and her husband Chris are living and lovin’ in Vallarta–Nayarit. If you want more info on La Cruz or desire… A very special vacation contact cindy@VillaAmordelMar.com

Pickleball Inspires La Cruz Kids

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oan Gil grew up in Yonkers, New York. She met her handsome Eduardo (an architect) in Mexico City. They married and raised three daughters in Mexico City, Juárez and El Paso, Texas. In 2009 they retired and moved to La Cruz de Huanacaxtle. Joan loves when her ‘proudest achievements’ visit - her six grandkids! When I met Joan nine years ago she had no voice and was fighting cancer. Today at 74 she speaks with passion and told me, “I am beating cancer!” Joan is a force to reckon

and does much for our community. Always active, Joan loves swimming and boogie boarding four or five times per week. She’s always played tennis and when she found pickleball she was hooked and now plays either sport five times a week. In the last three years, the number of expat pickleball players has increased from a few to over 250 people throughout the Banderas Bay area. In La Cruz, there are eleven courts at the marina and various other locations. Joan is inspired by children, an

inspiration that has informed her entire life. She taught for 40 years and was honored with Teacher of the Year for the State of Texas and was a national finalist. She wrote and implemented multiple grants for her school district that reached the million-dollar mark. In La Cruz Joan initially spearheaded the curriculum for the summer school camp for local children and her ‘current’ favourite cause is the Telesecundaria

Anglican Church Puerto Vallarta Formerly Christ Church by the Sea Worldwide Anglican Communion

“Celebrating conservative family values” Services Sunday 10:00 a.m. English-Traditional Holy Communion All faiths welcome-Casual Dress

How cool it is! Yes, we are now celebrating in our air-conditioned Chapel. Come join us! Fr. Jack continues to welcome people from all walks of life and denominations. Across from airport, northbound service road next to Sixt and Thrifty Car Rental Blvd Fco. Medina 7936, Puerto Vallarta Father Jack Wehrs/Lay-minister Fer Sandoval e mail: jackandshirley1@att.net Text 1 619 300 7377 Tel 044 322 130 5073

Web site: www.anglicanchurchpuertovallarta.org Complimentary parking at Sixt Rental Car

in La Cruz; she’s always involved in teaching and learning. Joan’s passion for pickleball extends far beyond exercise. Joan and others are teaching 150 middle school students during the school year and she’s raising funds for both the school year and summer camps thru 2019. The summer camp project will allow for thirty students to carry on through the year at the local school, but lacks basic necessities. If, like me, you have no idea what this sport is, I checked Wikipedia; Pickleball is a paddle sport (similar to a racquet sport) that combines elements of badminton, tennis and table tennis. Two or four players use solid paddles made of wood or composite materials to hit a perforated polymer ball, similar to a wiffle ball, over a net. The sport shares features of other racquet sports, the dimensions and layout of a badminton court, and a net and rules are somewhat similar to tennis, with

several modifications. Joan is joined by five teachers and two coaches which include a professional tennis teacher and a local school quarterback. Their mission is to continue to improve the pickleball program and to educate secondary students, empowering them to collaborate, respect others, and enjoy physical activities in safe and positive environments. Their goals include developing students to participate at both recreational and competitive levels and to invest in and improve the playing facilities. The cost per student is $3.33 usd per child per year. To meet Joan, watch the children play and learn how to get involved visit: gofundme. com/wsm8cy-pickleball-for-kids-playit-forward In similar news: Clara Sabina and Claudia Mclean, La Cruz winter expats from Vancouver Island, BC, won the Gold Medal in the women’s 4.0 category at the Canadian National Pickleball Championships in Kelowna, BC this past weekend. Go forth and Pickleball, La Cruz’ers!


travelers

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July 12 - 18, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Laundry Day By Michael Osias

http://www.juanfranciscocaro.es/

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fter the mid-day sun has passed the roofline, I kick back on our balcony with a cold drink to read a novel and relax. It is also a good time for watching the goings on in this little Mexican beach town. Most days, I get very little reading done. With the jumbo Corona and Coca-Cola trucks grinding gears and barely negotiating the narrow street, the numerous vendors calling out their wares, children playing, scooters zooming by, animals barking, crowing, and squealing this little road has plenty of entertainment day and night. And, that’s the beauty of it. I can sit there, and the entertainment comes to me. I don’t have to wait in line, pay admission or squirm in uncomfortable seats. I have a perfect vantage point on the second story directly above it all. There’s no start or end time; always a show. Fortunately, by mid-afternoon, the balcony has ample shade, and the whisper of a warm breeze aids my laziness allowing me to drift along with it and float over the rooftops effortlessly. Of course, a few icy Margaritas assist in making this flight (of fancy) possible. The opening act on this particular day was my neighbor, Conchita. Our second-floor balconies meet at a waist-high brick and plaster partition that separates the properties. We exchanged brief greetings and smiles as she hung her clothes to dry. Like most of the neighborhood, she has lines strung outside and depends on nature to do the drying. What a concept, rarely seen in the civilized world. Some municipalities and suburban areas north of the border (NOB) have banned clotheslines altogether. Eyesores, some say. ‘Loco,’ I shout back at them. For an opener, it was pretty good. Conchita had each shirt, pair of pants, dress and anything else she had dug out of the washing machine on a hanger. Humming and mumbling to herself she hung them on the rope suspended between a couple of support columns. Not the norm for the neighborhood, but a time saver for sure. She didn’t have to pin them up, unpin them, put them in a basket, take them out and finally place them on hangers. Conchita had a system. After a couple of hours, they were dry and ready for the closet. Apparently, she has done a lot of laundry in her day. After filling my glass with a fresh blended Margarita, I sat my saggy butt back down and continued my

journey. The house directly across the street is one of my favorites. It’s one story and has no clotheslines on the roof. The roof is a blend of palm fronds (palapa), some corrugated metal panels with a few strategically placed wooden boards and pieces of cardboard. I doubt it can support anything more than a few roosters and the three cats who test it daily. The clothesline at this place is in behind the house, and I have a partial view of it over the roof. I can also see an old open-top washing machine and a hand crank wringer under a palapa shade along the wall shared with their neighbor. The señora of the house was hanging freshly washed clothing belonging to her five-year-old twin boys. Each day when they came out to play their clothes were always clean. After a few hours of doing what boys do, their spotless t-shirts and shorts were covered in street dirt and food stains. Momma bathed them in a big metal tub at the end of the day, lathering them up and rinsing them off with a leaky garden hose. She placed their dirty pants, shirts, and underwear in the tub, added detergent to the water and left them to soak until she put them in the old washing machine. Not the most modern approach but simple and effective. Dropping the wet jeans into the plastic clothes basket, she halted her

task and quickly dried both hands on her apron. She reached into the catch-all front pocket yanked out an iPhone 8 and answered whoever was calling her. The contrast was evident, and that simple action brought me to another place, and I recalled a phrase I heard when I first came to Mexico many years ago, ‘This country is one of many contradictions.’ My daydreaming took me back to Puerto Vallarta circa 1980. I noticed something both ironic and contradictory those many years ago, and I’ve never forgotten it. While walking the streets of ‘old town’ (most of it was old back then), I came to a bridge over a river; Rio Cuale. I could hear laughter and banter from below so I stuck my head over the rail to see the source. Three women and a young girl crouching in the shallow water rubbed and pounded clothing against the smooth rocks along the river shore. Laundry day. One of the ladies broke into a delightful song her voice an echo thanks to the acoustics provided by the stone bridge and the water. Her strong vocals as she effortlessly exhaled the lyrics enchanted me. The other women fell into a rhythmic pattern complimenting the song as they slapped the clothing to the beat and hummed in the background. I’m not sure how clean they managed to get the laundry, but the dresses, pants, and blouses that were draped over

the bushes on the bank drying were brilliant in the sun as they danced in the breeze. The show was interrupted by a fellow tourist carrying a large bag that brushed against me and took me out of my reverie. After a polite ‘I beg your pardon,’ he continued across the bridge. Usually, I wouldn’t have given it a second thought, but the bag that knocked me caught my attention. Slung over his shoulders a mesh backpack loaded to the extreme with dirty laundry wobbled on his back. I could easily see it was dirty. First of all, nobody would pack clean laundry the way these items were crammed into the bag, and secondly, a musty odor was evident. Dirty traveler’s clothes. Perhaps, the lowest and most scorned when it comes to soiled laundry. I followed the guy because I was curious. I wondered if he was going to scurry down the bank of the river, wash his clothes on the rocks and hang them on the bushes to dry. Now, that would be something to see. He didn’t do that. Instead, he went into the first building on the other side of the bridge. I stood in front and read the small sign above the door, Lavanderia. I had never seen a laundromat in Mexico before this one, and still curious I stepped through the entranceway. To my left three brand new washing machines vibrated through their cycles and beside them two equally modern clothes dryers rotated smoothly. The

traveler’s laundry sat on a scale as the cleaning service is charged by the kilo. Shelves held neatly folded stacks of clean laundry awaiting pickup. An efficient looking set-up and such a contrast to the three women and girl a few yards away in the river. The laundromat had a large open window that ran parallel with the river bank offering a clear view of the washing ladies below, and above the din of the machinery, I could hear their joyous voices harmonizing while they slapped the laundry rhythmically on the smooth rocks along the shore. A mufferless Nissan pick-up truck spewing black smoke and loaded with watermelons tore down the road in front pulling me out of my daydream. Which was fine, I needed another Maggie refill anyway. A couple of houses down on the opposite side of the street the rooftop rippled like sails in the wind. Pinned to the spider web of clotheslines were linens, at least five beds worth. I couldn’t see the whole roof; there may have been more. The suns rays bounced off the pillowcases, sheets, and bedcovers as they flapped in the breeze. I closed my eyes and tried to imagine how fresh and clean they would smell as the kids crawled into bed that night. Without much effort, it came back to me; the essence of sun and wind dried bedding and the memory of our family’s clothes hanging on the backyard line, and of Mother gathering them and placing them in the large wicker clothes basket. When I was small, I’d get into that basket while Mother laughed as she piled the clean clothes on top of me. I will never forget the feeling or the scent. It is my earliest memory of feeling loved. And, now, I love sitting on that small balcony and seeing the laundry on the rooftops swaying in the ocean breeze. It brings the neighborhood alive. I love waving to people I have never met as they hang or take in the clothing from lines strung forever in every which way. I love their smiles and greetings, ‘buenos dias, cómo estás, buenas tardes,’ and so on. I love listening to them chat and gossip with each other across the roofs. I love that the sun and the wind still dry most of the clothes in Mexico. And, I love that laundry day is every day in my neighborhood.

Michael Osias lives with his wife, Diane, in the beautiful Fraser Valley just outside Vancouver, British Columbia. They spend their winters in a small pueblo on Mexico’s Pacific coast with a cast of quirky characters, each of them a story waiting to be told. Contact Michael at: osiasmichael1974@gmail.com


BANDERAS BAY SHOPPING AND SERVICES

Marsol Friday Market by the Pier by Marcia Blondin

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LOCAL FOOD. LOCAL PLACES. LOCAL PEOPLE Enjoy a Culinary & Cultural Journey though Old Town, Pitillal & Downtown Neighborhoods of Puerto Vallarta! MX: 322-222-6117 US: 1888-360-9847

rated on

NEX T TOU R DEPARTS SOO N!

vallartafoodtours.com

Tel. (322) 222 2675, (322) 222 5402, w Celular: 322 175 0412 mundodeazulejos@hotmail.com www.talavera-tile.com

e are so pleased that artist Michele Savelle has joined our Friday Market! Her digital prints are more than suitable for framing and very inexpensive. You will find her original, large, black pen drawings at the Loft Gallery on Corona in downtown Vallarta. Michele’s subject matter – humpback whales, baby turtles and more are accented by painstakingly-drawn ancient fabric patterns. You really have to see these prints to appreciate their fantastic complexity. And, the fact they are in black and white with shades of grey, they will blend with any color décor but most certainly can stand proudly alone or in series on any wall. She is happy to do commission works; just don’t ask her for color; maybe in the future she will get back to it, for now, she loves the expression of black on white; welcome Michele! Bill and Suzie have added three-tiered sea glass earrings – small white pieces sandwiched between sea-foam green. Each piece of sea glass is unique; Bill and Suzie do a great job of drilling, sizing, and pairing colors. Come early before they sell out of their latest creation!

David and Elizabeth Ruesga add to their enormous selection of sterling silver jewelry each and every week. Rings, pendants, necklaces, and bracelets are loaded with natural and man-made stones, and they accept credit cards! Cotton wine bags galore in dozens of different colors and patterns bump up giving a gift of wine or any spirits to a new and recyclable level. Always encourage your host or hostess to pass along your lovely gift bag the next time they are invited out. Ribbon is included! Also, remember the handmade cards to go with your

wine bag; you’ll be invited back soon and often! The Marsol Friday

Market by the Pier is open from 9:30 am to 1:30 pm all year-round.


www.vallartatribune.com

SPCA of Puerto Vallarta ADORABLE DOG IN THE SPOTLIGHT...ROSITA By Janice Gonzalez

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e opened our sanctuary in January of 2012 on the outskirts of Puerto Vallarta. We are a no-kill shelter and can house up to 130 animals at once. We rescue and find permanent homes for over 250 animals each year. The mission of SPCA de PV is to help fund and promote sterilization, adoption and healthcare efforts for companion animals in the Puerto Vallarta area, with the goal of eliminating the euthanasia of healthy and adoptable animals. Our main focus is to rescue the abused, homeless animals from Puerto Vallarta’s streets and place them in foster homes in both the United States and Canada until permanent homes are available. We are not supported by the government, corporations, foundations or businesses. We fully function on private donations. Animals are often found living on the streets after being discarded and/or extremely abused. We devote ourselves to their physical and emotional rehabilitation and invite everyone to join one of our escorted tours and interact with the animals at our

private shelter. We offer one tour per week during the summer months, either Tuesday or Thursday, and special arrangements are necessary. Contact us at spcapv@ gmail.com. To see our animals available for adoption, visit our Facebook page at www. f a c e b o o k . c o m / s p c a p v. There are photos as well as individual albums of our rescues which include a bit of their background. Please be aware that our adoption fee within Mexico is $2,000 pesos. Contact us at spcapv@gmail. com to obtain an adoption application. To make donations via PayPal, select the “Donate” option on our Facebook page www.facebook.com/ spcapv or on our website at http://spcapv.com/donate/. You can drop off any donations for the SPCA at Hacienda San Angel located at Calle Miramar 336, above Our Lady of Guadalupe Church in El Centro. Get involved…rescue, adopt, foster, volunteer, donate or educate. You can learn more about the SPCA Puerto Vallarta by checking us out at www.spcapv.com/ home or on Facebook.

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ook at the smile on her face! Our Rosita is a lovely, friendly Staffordshire Terrier mix just two years old and weighing a bit over 34 pounds. She has a medium energy level and gets along fine with other dogs. Rosita will chase felines, however. We think Rosita would make a wonderful family dog as she is very sweet and loving. When not playing with her people or other dogs, Rosita is happy off by herself playing with her toys. She is now ready for a forever home of her own. Rosita has been spayed, dewormed and vaccinated. If this girl sounds like the dog you’ve been looking for, contact us at spcapv@gmail.com for an application to adopt Rosita. ero was rescued by our sister organization in Mexico where

he was neutered, dewormed and vaccinated. He is now ready for his forever home in the Vancouver/Vancouver Island, BC area. If you are looking for a very special boy look no further! Contact us at info.pvca@gmail.com for an application to adopt Hero.

OVER 600,000 INTERNATIONAL VISITORS AND 430,000 NATIONALS WILL VISIT BANDERAS BAY THIS SUMMER.*

Promote your events in English & Spanish this summer! and

MURPHY’S IRISH PUB Located on the Historic Malecon across from the lighthouse statue (El Faro) beautiful sunset views every night! Delicious traditional pub menu. Live Rock Music - Wed - Sat @10:30pm Watch all sports w 2 satellites. Pool Table.

484 Morelos - 2nd floor - Centro Vallarta Open daily 11 am

Murphys Puerto Vallarta

VOLUNTARIO / VOLUNTEERING VALLARTA THE JAY SADLER PROJECT MAKING A DIFFERENCE

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EL PROYECTO JAY SADLER HACIENDO LA DIFERENCIA

COMMUNITY SERVICE / SERVICIO A LA COMUNIDAD

Book advertising in the Vallarta Tribune and receive FREE advertising credit with Radio RadianteFM Contact: editor@vallartatribune.com *2017 STATISTICS WWW.AEROPUERTOSGAP.COM.MX

2pm - 10:30pm www.thewitcherysalon.com


events

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Summer Festivals and Events in Riviera Nayarit

Is your venue or organization hosting an upcoming or ongoing event? To be included please add your listing at vallartatribune.com/eventos. Deadline for print publication is Friday but events appear online instantly and may still be included in our email newsletters.

July 21 – 22

VI Sea Turtle Festival This festival, held in the community of Platanitos, serves up activities aimed at protecting the environment and the conservation of the sea turtles. More info: facebook.com/ Festival-tortuga-marina-playa-platanitos July 26 – 28

12th Bahía de Banderas International Fishing Tournament

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LA CRUZ MARINA FREE MOVIE NIGHT— In the VIP room at

Marina Riviera Nayarit every Thursday at 8:00pm.

COMMUNITY

August 4 – 5

Friday, July 13

This fun family summer event mixes sports, gastronomy and luxury in Mexico’s most exclusive residential community. More info: events.puntamita.com/

ARTS

Corn Festival A visit to Jala and Xalisco this August can be a great way to experience the Riviera Nayarit and its traditions. Located just a short distance from the coast of Nayarit, the communities of Jala and Xalisco plan all sorts of events including dances, entertainment, horse races and cockfights. The festivities originated with the celebration of Our Lady of the Assumption and in Jala the biggest ear of corn wins a prize. August 8 – 11

Masters Of The Kitchen Culinary Event with the presence of renowned chefs at an international level; Gilles Epie, Rob Gentile, Elizabeth Falkner among other international chefs. More Info: villagroupresorts.com/culinary-fests-2018/en/home/

COMMUNITY

EXPATS IN VALLARTA: SPECIAL DINNER— Special Dinners

are scheduled for Thursday, July 12th at El Andariego in Colonia 5 de Diciembre and on Thursday, July 26th at Buenos Aires Steak House in Marina Vallarta. Advance reservations and purchased tickets for the dinners are necessary.

SIN FIN ASTROLOGY— Sin Fin Astrology presents an Astro-

Organized by the Bahía de Banderas Fishing Club, this traditional event that focuses on catching marlin and tuna returns to the waters off of the Riviera Nayarit with a slew of national and international participants. More info:.fishingnayarit.com

August 6 – 15

up the idea of taking her own life? Incanto Vallarta (Insurgentes 109, Old Town Puerto Vallarta | 322.223.9756 | www.incantovallarta.com) BOHEMIO 3— Come and enjoy the trova, ballads and pop of BOHEMIO 3 with this special evening event. 8:30 pm at A Page in the Sun (Lazaro Cardenas #179, Vallarta)

Thursday, July 12

logy Wisdom Workshop on the Moon falling on the same day as the new moon in Cancer and a partial solar eclipse. What better way to kickoff eclipse season than with an educational workshop in the company of stargazers like yourself. Drinks and snacks provided as well as some fun take home materials. 5 pm at Hacienda de Arte/Sin Fin Astrology (Lazaro Cardenes #71, Bucerias)

6th Punta Mita Beach Festival

July 12 - 18, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

BINGO WITH PEARL— Saturdays at 4pm. Drink specials, gift certi-

ficates, and cash prizes. Special guests Ballet Folklorico Tradiciones will perform. Incanto Vallarta (Insurgentes 109, Old Town Puerto Vallarta | 322.223.9756 | www.incantovallarta.com) SPIRITUAL & METAPHYSICAL LECTURE— Journey of self discovery at the Center For Spiritual Living Puerto Vallarta. Each week offers inspirational talk using spiritual tools for personal growth, along with discussion and fellowship afterwards. An open and inclusive spiritual community, all are welcome. From 12:00 - 1:00 pm at Centro Cultural Cuale (Aquiles Serdan #437)

CINEMA CUC— New film every week, free and open to the

public. 1:00 pm in the main auditorium at Centro Universitario de la Costa (Av. Universidad 203, Ixtapa | 322.222.1512 | www. cuc.udg.mx) CINE CLUB EL MUÉGANO: FRIDAY CINEMA CYCLE ON SOCIAL NETWORKS— Enjoy movies about Social Networks at the Los

Mangos Library Martes de Clássicos Cultural Center, 7pm. 20 pesos. (Av. Francisco Villa No. 1001 | bibliotecalosmangos.com) Saturday, July 14

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QUE NO CULPE A NADIE DE MI MUERTE— Ramiro Daniel, award-winning director of ‘Princesas Desesperadas’, presents ‘Que no culpe a nadie de mi muerte’ (‘Let no one be blamed for my death’) returning Saturdays through July 28 at 8:30pm. Written by Humberto Robles and starring actor César Trujillo, it’s a tragic/comedic monologue, presented in Spanish, about a thirty-year-old woman waiting for a phone call to stave off her pending suicide. Will a phone call finally convince her to give

Sunday, July 15

COMMUNITY

JOHNNY BARBER BATTLE POOL PARTY— 2nd annual

battle of the Vallarta barbers. La Wera Loca presents Johnny Barber Battle hosted by the most beautiful social club in the Marina Vallarta at Villarouse. The pool party starts at 2 pm followed by five judged categories: Fast Fade, Scissor Cut, Freestyle Design, Changed Look, Beard. Registration required. 1000 pesos include lunch and up to all 5 categories. Limited space. Live poolside DJ Vacay from Portland, Oregon USA. Many vendors attending from tattoo shops, supply stores, barberías, smoke shops, swimwear lines, and more! Full Bar and menu, beautiful cabanas, and gorgeous people. Free to public. And includes a welcome drink for all guests. Begins 2 pm at Vallarouse (Pelicanos 104, Marina Vallarta | www.facebook.com/theacademiateam) Tuesday, July 17

ARTS

DINNER AND A MOVIE: WEST SIDE STORY— This week’s film

begins at 7:15 pm, and will be preceded by a short, 15-minute introduction by local musicologist, Paco Ojeda. Presented in English with Spanish subtitles when available. Incanto Vallarta (Insurgentes 109, Old Town Puerto Vallarta | 322.223.9756 | www.incantovallarta.com) CINE CLUB EL MUÉGANO: MARTES DE CINE— Enjoy movies at the Los Mangos Library Martes de Clássicos Cultural Center, 7pm. 20 pesos. (Av. Francisco Villa No. 1001 | bibliotecalosmangos.com)

COMMUNITIES

EXPATS VALLARTA HAPPY HOUR— The local group of Expats In Vallarta is open to all ExPat residents, visitors and investors from other countries. This week’s happy hour will be at Champions Sports Bar at the Marriott Marina Hotel. Happy Hours are from 5-7 pm. There is no charge to attend, just pay for what you order. To make reservations for the Happy Hours and the Dinners, email sarawise45(at)gmail.com.

FOOD & BEVERAGE

WINE TASTING: PAIRING MEXICAN WINES AND CHEESES—

Enjoy the best Mexican wines paired to perfection with the best Mexican artisan cheeses. All wines are exclusive, premium bottles and the cheeses are sourced directly from small producers. All cheeses are made in the European style (think


events Live Music Calendar

21 Camembert, Morbier, and gruyere) but produced locally and with a Mexican twist. 6:30 PM at Medregal Restaurant (Pulpito 120 | www.uncorkmexico.com | hola@uncorkmexico.com) Wednesday, July 18

ARTS

CINEMA CUC— Free. 1:00 pm in the main auditorium at

Centro Universitario de la Costa (Av. Universidad 203, Ixtapa | 322.222.1512 | www.cuc.udg.mx) CINE CLUB EL MUÉGANO: JAVIER BARDEM FILMS— Enjoy a retrospective of the cinema of actor Javier Bardem every Wednesday in July. $20 pesos. 7pm at the Library Los Mangos Cultural Center (Av. Francisco Villa No. 1001 | bibliotecalosmangos.com)

FOOD & BEVERAGE

This listing features ongoing acts and events at bars, restaurants and venues. Please see our events listings for special one-time music events.

VALLARTA Act II Entertainment (Basilio Badillo 330) Us Two & The Band on Wed at 7:30pm Bob’s Karaoke Party on Wed at 8:00pm More @ act2pv.com Babel Bar (Aquiles Serdán 437, Isla del Cuale) Live Flamenco on Sun from 1:00 to 3:00pm

July 12 - 18, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Joby Hernandez on Wed at 5:00pm More @ incantovallarta.com The Jazz Foundation (Allende 116) Live Music from Wed through Sat at 8:30pm More @ facebook.com/thejazzfoundation Kelly’s Pour Favor (Lazaro Cardenas 245) Tequila Rush on Tue at 7:00pm 3:Tones on Thu at 7:00pm Soul Trip on Sat at 7:00pm Luke’s Bar (Peru 1231) Trez Cuartoz on Fri at 3:00pm Soul Trip on Tue at 3:00pm

CHEF RUBEN’S MAGICAL MEXICAN SALSAS— Chef Ruben

will take us on a journey of different sauces that can be used in many different ways. Taking classic Mexican ingredients and by doing a variety of cooking techniques he will show how you can get many different flavors, textures and options for other dishes. You will help in the preparation and we will eat different salsas as we prepare them. We will also learn how to make classic sopes with a filling and test all the salsas that we have made to have some wonderful flavors. Beer, wine, local spirits and jugos are included. $45 USD per person. 6 pm at ART Vallarta (213 Calle Pilitas | artvallarta.com)

HEALTH & WELLNESS

BEACH YOGA— Bring your mat down to the beach for a gentle morning flow, every Wednesday at 9am at playa los camarones, in front of Barracuda restaurant. 70 pesos per person and children under 12 are free when accompanying an adult. Barracuda (Calle Paraguay 1290)

ONGOING EVENTS

FOR THE LOVE OF GARLIC AND MANGO— Special menu available through July 31 featuring Mango & Garlic merged in majestic ways for a unique dining experience. River Cafe (Isla Rio Calle 4 | rivercafe.com.mx) SALSA DANCING/LESSONS— Wednesdays & Sundays at 8pm (upper terrace). All are welcome. Incanto Vallarta (Insurgentes 109, Old Town Puerto Vallarta | 322.223.9756 | www. incantovallarta.com) DANCE HOT VALLARTA— Have fun, gain confidence, become a sought after partner, get your mind and body fit to the rhythm of music. No partner needed or date your mate. These classes are ongoing throughout the summer on Mondays, Thursdays and Sundays. $50.00 pesos per class or $500.00 for the month (12 classes). Call Alberto for detailed information. Thu 7:32 PM · Vallarta’s First Ballroom (479 Juarez Street | 322 292 0026 | vallartasfirstballrom.com) MALECON SCULPTURES 101— Enjoy a relaxed walk by the ocean while chatting about the sculptures on the Malecon and the local art scene, plus a delicious Mexican brunch or snack at a charming and very unique spot. A fantastic cultural experience with a local friend. Wed, Thu and Fri at 9:00am. Make reservations through Vallarta101 (facebook.com/welovevallarta | 01 322 100 2253) ART EXHIBITION: MARTINE SECHOY WOLFF— The works of Paris born artist on display from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm MondayFriday at Art VallARTa Gallery through July 16. Free. (Calle Pilitas 213 | artvallarta.com) PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION: 100 YEARS 70 IMAGES IN THE ROSITA—Photographers Estrellita Velasco, Josef Kondoll, Andrés Barria Davison, David Diaz, Soko Sandoval, Eva Sica, Arturo Pasos, Kristians Sics, Alma Castro, Luz Aurora Peres. 11 AM to 8 PM through July 16 at Hotel Rosita (Paseo Díaz Ordaz # 901 Centro | facebook.com/VallartaPhotographer) WORLD KIZOMBA FLASH MOB PROJECT— A group of more than 70 instructors, DJs and promoters recognized internationally seek to create a beautiful dance and cultural expe-

Cafe Roma (Encino 287) Karaoke Party with Catherine on Wed and Fri at 6:30pm Captain Don’s (Honduras 126) Sylvie & The Zippers on Fri from 9:00pm to 12:00am Da Crew on Sat from 9:00pm to 12:00am Cuates y Cuetes (Calle Francisca Rodríguez esq. con la playa Los Muertos) Esaú Galván on Saturday at 10:30am to 1:00pm Fiery Flamenco Group Tatewari on Wednesday from 8:00pm to 10:00pm

Mi Pueblito Live Mariachi on Sat at 6:00pm Folclorico Dancing & Music on Wed at 6:30pm Nacho Daddy (Basilio Badillo 287) Da Crew on Thur at 8:30pm Texas Embassy Blues Band on Fri at 8:30pm Damaged Goods on Sat at 8:00pm Roxy Rock House (Ignacio L Vallarta 217) Live Rock on Fri and Sat at 11:00pm Service Industry Night with Live Music on Sun

Daiquiri Dick’s (314 Olas Altas) Esaú Galván on Friday at 7:30pm

Warique (Aquiles Serdan 280) Luis Ortega on Fri and Sun from 7:00 to 10:00pm

Devils Bar Live (527 Morelos) 3:Tones on Friday from 11:00pm to 1:00am Soul Trip every Saturday from 12 - 2:00am The Zippers every Sunday from 9 - 11:00pm

Wingman (Paseo Díaz Ordaz 552) Live Music Every Night at 9:00pm

El Bar at Food Park PV The Black Tequila on Sat at 9:00pm El Sonador (Calle Ignacio Luis Vallarta 229) Soul Trip on Sun from 11:00pm to 2:00am Hot Spot (Allende 120, Malecon) DJ Raul with Electronic and Beach House Music on Fri at 8:00pm Incanto (Insurgentes 109) Zen Hour is Tue - Sun at 4:00pm Tongo & Joby for breakfast Tue - Sun at 9:00am Red Suitcase Band on Sun and Wed at 7:30pm Zoe Wood & Eduardo Leon on Thu at 5:00pm Open Mic on Thu at 7:30pm Joan Houston on Fri at 5:00pm Luis & Fernando on Fri at 7:30pm Lady Zen on Fri at 8:00pm Cheko & Alex on Sat at 7:30pm Yuvia on Sun at 5:00pm Cheko Ruiz Gypsy Kings on Sun at 8:00pm Tongo on Tue at 5:00pm Santiago Martin on Tue at 7:00pm

Que?Pasa (625 Aquiles Serdan) Adriana Ramirez “Electric Grandma and The Gorillas” on Fri 7:30-10:30 pm Tequila Rush on Sat from 7:00 to 10:00pm Zapata Antojería y Bar (Lázaro Cárdenas 308) Electrocumbia & Dance Mixes on Fri at 10:00pm Salsa, bachata, son, cumbia DJ on Sat at 10:00pm

RIVIERA NAYARIT Ana Banana’s (La Cruz) Paul and the Availables on Fri from 7:00 to 10:00pm Drunken Duck (Avenida Mexico, Centro, Bucerías) The Gecko Band on Wed at 8:00pm Que Tal Band on Thur at 9:00pm Pacific Rock at 5:30pm and LaBandra at 9:00pm every Fri Calavera Beach every Sat at 9:00pm The Gecko Band at 6:00 and Que Tal Band at 9:30 every Sun El Atico (Jose Mariscal 33, Sayultia) Soul Trip on Tue at 9:30pm Octopus’s Garden/Hikurir (Coral 66, La Cruz) Los Oscaritos every Thu at 8:00pm

To be included in this directory: Add your listing at vallartatribune.com/eventos Deadline for Publication: Friday before Thursday publication date.

rience with a unified platform open to all. The FLASH MOB will be held Sunday July 22 in more than 30 countries around the world and we have the opportunity to be part of this historic

moment. Register by July 11. Attend rehearsals beginning Thursday, July 5. More information at www.worldkizombaproject. com or www.facebook.com/AcademiaSalsaenvallarta


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here is no better way to experience the magic and splendors of San Miguel de Allende than being a guest at Casa de los Chiqueados! A true gem, the five-star bed and breakfast offers six private suites, each with luxury amenities and all the comforts of home, while you explore one of Mexico’s most treasured destinations. The restored villa reveals the true character of San Miguel de Allende - its history, architecture, art and furnishings. Named for precious gemstones, each private residence is a jewel in its own way. Located in the Historic Centro, it is a short, easy walk to the famous Jardine Allende. Enjoy exquisite shopping, gourmet dining and an immersive experience in the rich, cultural heritage of Mexico’s cool, central highlands. Travel from Puerto Vallarta has never been easier with new direct flights to Leon and Queretaro or take the luxury bus and arrive in style. We’ll help you make your travel arrangements and take care of all your needs.

Six private suites | Two additional casas | Rooftop terrace Outdoor dining area | Full-time onsite staff | High speed internet | Luxurious amenities | Onsite laundry We invite you to choose the jewel box that’s just right for you. Contact us today!

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Issue 1110, July 12 - 18, 2018  

Puerto Vallarta, Mexico The Vallarta Tribune is the longest running free English language newspaper in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. We publish w...

Issue 1110, July 12 - 18, 2018  

Puerto Vallarta, Mexico The Vallarta Tribune is the longest running free English language newspaper in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. We publish w...

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