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news

New turtles species found in the bay Page 06

events

calendar

Mango and Garlic festival at River Café

New live music calendar

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VallartaTribune.com

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June 14 - 20, 2018 Year 21 Free Issue 1106

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VALLARTA SHOPPING paGES 18-19

Map of Banderas Bay 12 - 13


ballet

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Experience Bolero One Night Only

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or one night only the Compagnie François Mauduit Select Ballet Company will be performing Bolero on Saturday, June 16, 8:00 pm, at Teatro Vallarta.

Featuring distinguished French ballet dancers, this prestigious ballet company has performed around the world. Angelica del Rey, the Select

Ballet’s spokesperson in Mexico, said in an interview with Notimex that they will offer audiences a varied repertoire that brings together classical and traditional dance with contemporary avant-garde trends showcasing the dancers’ technical and athletic abilities. Choreographer François Mauduit honors the creative geniuses of the 20th century. Creating his own version of well-known ballets, Mauduit pays tribute to George Balanchine and the famous choreographer Maurice Béjart, initiator of neoclassical dance in Europe. According to Del Ray, ‘Bolero’ is an original neoclassical ballet set to a compilation of emblematic works, a selection of pieces that the public is familiar with, and perhaps, are among their favorites. Some titles include Samson and Delilah, Madame Bovary, Chaikovski Concerto, Quant on a l’amour and  Bolero, classical pieces that, when combined with the choreography will add a new dimension to the stage, where work on the set and lighting elements has already begun. With more than 10 years of experience throughout Europe, this will be the first time that François Maudit’s company steps foot on North American soil, with Mexico being the chosen destination. “The troupe’s presence here is also due to its participation in a dance festival that will begin on June 15 in Guadalajara; from there it will come to Puerto Vallarta before continuing on to Mexico City, and finally to Puebla,” Del Rey explained. Ticket prices range from $385 Pesos to $605 Pesos (VIP seating) and are available at the theater’s box office, open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 am to 8 pm, or online via teatrovallarta.com.

June 14 - 20, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com


welcome

Welcome to Puerto Vallarta and Riviera Nayarit

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t the Tribune we want you to have the best experience possible while you explore Puerto Vallarta, the Bay of Banderas and Riviera Nayarit. Here are some helpful tips for traveling. TIME ZONE: The entire state of Jalisco is on Central Time, as is the southern part of the State of Nayarit starting from San Blas in the north. BUSES: A system of urban buses with different routes can bring you from one end of the bay to the other and all the spots in between. If you’re going further than San Pancho, head to the main bus terminal to catch a ‘Pacifico’ bus. Current fare is 7.50 pesos and passengers must purchase a new ticket every time they board another bus. There are no “transfers.” TAXIS: There are set rates within defined zones of town. Do not enter a taxi without agreeing on the price with the driver first. Make a note of the taxi number in case you leave something behind. Drivers typically do not carry change.

UBER: New in 2017 to Puerto Vallarta, Uber is still experiencing some growing pains particularly in the state of Nayarit. Uber is about 25-50% cheaper than a taxi, but this is subject to change. The benefits of using Uber are set fares and the ability to follow up directly with your driver if there is an incident or you leave an item behind. MONEY EXCHANGE: Typically a bank will give you a higher rate of exchange than the exchange booths (Caja de Cambio). You will need your passport. Better yet, use your bank card to withdraw funds from any ATM. Note that ATM’s in the banks are the safest to use and charge lower fees. DRINKING WATER: While Puerto Vallarta’s water has been

awarded a certification of purity for the past two decades, the quality of the water tested at the source varies greatly from what comes out of the tap at the other end. So do be careful. If you want to be doubly sure, you can pick up bottled water just about anywhere. EXPORTING PETS: Falling in love with the street dog outside your hotel is easy to do and it’s also easy to bring them home with you too. The process is inexpensive and only takes a day or two. You need a certificate of health from a local vet among other things. For the most up-to-date information contact the Puerto Vallarta SPCA at spcapv@ gmail.com. COMMON SENSE: Just as you wouldn’t walk around your hometown drunk and belligerent, it is not acceptable to do that here. While Mexico is a tolerant culture, basic politeness is appreciated. Don’t pee in the streets. Don’t flash your money or expensive gadgets. Pay attention to your surroundings. Know where you are going. Pay your bills (and don’t forget to tip). And have fun! DRINKING AND DRIVING: First off – just don’t. The consequences are not worth it. Taxis or Ubers are cheap and plentiful. Fines are as much as 12,000 pesos. You can be taken to jail and your vehicle impounded. There are many checkstops on the weekends, and you will be asked to blow if they suspect you have been drinking. LEGAL SYSTEM: Not knowing the law is not a valid excuse in Mexico, or anywhere. If you find yourself caught in a legal situation be aware that guilt is presumed until your innocence can be proven. This is a very difficult lesson to learn if you are visiting from the United States or Canada. Immediately contact your consulate for assistance. Director Noemi Zamora noemizamorareynoso@gmail.com Editor Lic. Madeline Milne mmilne@Vallartatribune.com Sales Team editor@vallartatribune.com Designer Cynthia E. Andrade G. cysandra@gmail.com Web Manager Rachel Drinkcard Racheldrinkcard@gmail.com

June 14 - 20, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Calling in Mexico Calling phones in Mexico can be tricky. There are different codes you need to use depending if you are calling landlines or cellular phones and if they are local or long distance. LONG-DISTANCE CALLS FROM WITHIN MEXICO For national long-distance calls (within Mexico) the code is 01 plus the area code and phone number. For international long-distance calls, first dial 00, then the country code (U.S. and Canada country code is 1), so you would dial 00 + 1 + area code + 7 digit number. CALLING CELL PHONES (FROM A LAND LINE) If you are calling from a landline within the area code of the Mexican cell phone number dial 044, the 10 digit number. Outside of the area code (but still within Mexico) dial 045 and then the 10 digit phone number. Cell phone to cell phone only requires the 10 digit number.  PHONE CARDS Phone cards (tarjetas telefonicas) for use in pay phones can be bought at newsstands and in pharmacies. Pay phones do not accept coins. When buying a phone card for pay phone use, specify that you would like a tarjeta LADA. CALLING TOLL-FREE NUMBERS Some toll free numbers work from Mexico to the US and Canada, but many do not.  Those that do work are often not toll-free. You need to dial a different prefix. To call the following toll free prefixes, dial as follows: 800 numbers Dial 001-880-then the number  866 numbers Dial 001-883-then the number  877 numbers Dial 001-882-then the number  888 numbers Dial 001-881-then the number

Emergencies: 911 Red Cross: 065 Fire Department: 322.223.9476

Ahoy Cruisers! NAME PASS DATE MS SEVEB SEAS NAVIGATOR 490 31/05/2018 3,200 3,200 3,200 3,200

Consumer Protection: 01.800.468.8722 Tourism Offices Jalisco: 322.221.2676 Nayarit: 322.297.1006

Ambulance: 322.222.1533

CARNIVAL SPLENDOR CARNIVAL SPLENDOR CARNIVAL SPLENDOR CARNIVAL SPLENDOR

Immigration: 322.224.7719

06/06/2018 13/06/2018 20/06/2018 27/06/2018

Consulates American Consulate 24 hrs 01-332-268-2100 Canadian Consulate 322.293.0098 322.293.0099 24 hrs: 1.800.706.2900

In port this month

In the month of June Puerto Vallarta welcomes 12,800 passengers!

Vallarta Tribune is an activity and entertainment guide and publishes information as it is provided by the advertiser or event host. We do not assume responsibility in errors or omissions other than to correct them as they are made known to us regarding event schedules, locations and/or prices. In addition, we do not assume any responsibility for erroneous inclusion or exclusion of information except to take reasonable care to ensure accuracy, that permission has been obtained to use it, and to remove it as soon as is practical upon receiving your notification of error. We recommend you always confirm prior to attending or visiting an event or establishment. Weekly publication edited, printed and distributed by Ediciones y Publicaciones Siete Junio, SA de CV Grupo Editorial Tribuna Calle 21 de Marzo # 1174 Col. Lomas del Coapinole Del. El Pitillal, Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco México CP 48290 Tel. 226-0800 * www. vallartatribune.com * https://www.facebook.com/VtaTribune/

Cut out and put near your phone for handy reference

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editorial

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Editor’s

June 14 - 20, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

FREE

Note

EVENT AND ENTERTAINMENT LISTINGS Reach more people every week in the Vallarta Tribune, list your events for free. Learn more at: www.vallartatribune.com/list-event-free/

editor@vallartatribune.com

Tropical Storms, Turtles, and New Event Calendar

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ur first tropical storm Bud came in mellower than projected. But with him, he brought much-needed rain and cooler temperatures. From now until November 30th we are officially in ‘Tropical Storm Season’ and while there is no way to know exactly how many storms we’ll see this season and if, or when they’ll arrive on our shores, we can work towards clearing out the garbage that is washed along the streets, canals, and rivers out into the bay. Last weekend there was a local and government effort to clean up many areas of the city, including the river banks and downtown neighbourhoods. Thank you to everyone who participated. Personally, I bagged an entire jumbo bag of mostly empty pop and water bottles and broken bits of styrofoam and cigarette butts. Please check out the newly created Facebook page: Limpia Tu Barrio PV (Clean your neighbourhood PV) for tips on what you can do to help and to participate in any events might be happening. They’ve also launched a petition urging the city of Puerto Vallarta to update the non-existent/ old garbage and recycling cans around town. You can sign this petition at change.org/ Search for Vallarta Basura to find the petition.

NEW TURTLES This time of year is also the beginning of the sea turtle migration back to the beaches of Banderas Bay and along the entire Mexican Pacific coastline. The beaches of Mexico are breeding areas for six of the seven marines species of turtles, the most common species found here include: • Olive Ridley turtle, or “Golfina (Lepidochelys olivacea) • Leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea) • Green turtle (Chelonia agassizii) • Hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata) There are conservation efforts that you can join in from being a live-in volunteer (2 month minimum) at the San Pancho Turtle Sanctuary to participating in an evening release through a number of hotels. For more information about turtle rescue visit: www.project-tortuga.

Letter to editor Madeline, I just wanted to express my thanks to you again for introducing our little community group to The Jay Sadler people. We did apply for a Punta de Mita Foundation grant of 15,000 pesos with Jay Sadler

and were successful. The Sadler group will match the grant and our Kinder will be getting a new playscape. We are beyond thrilled! Isn’t it amazing what can happen when we help one another. You certainly did that for us. Thank you so much.

org or speak with the concierge in your hotel. NEW LISTINGS CALENDAR To centralize the events and entertainment information in Banderas Bay the Tribune is launching a new FREE calendar to be published here each week and online at www.vallartatribune.com. It’s in its infancy, so bear with us as we gather event details to ensure it becomes the most comprehensive list possible. If you have an event (now or in the future) you’d like to include – please add it here: www. vallartatribune.com/list-event-free/ and email us at events@vallartatribune.com. Bonus: these events are also emailed to our readership each week. With a little effort from local businesses and ourselves, we should be able to create this much-requested service in the coming weeks.

We would love to have you visit our community any time and we will show you around our school and show you some of our other projects. Thanks again! Shari Cronk

ADORABLE DOG IN THE SPOTLIGHT...RUBY

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uby is looking for a home where she can enjoy the great outdoors. She is a Labrador mix, just two years old and weighing 38.5 pounds. She has a medium high energy level and is well behaved on her walks. She loves to joyfully run in the wide-open spaces. She gets along fine with other dogs, but she is afraid of the felines. Ruby but can be a bit shy initially but warms up quickly and enjoys the company of her people. She has been spayed, dewormed and vaccinated. Now she is looking for her forever home and is available for adoption. If you are looking for a terrific companion to enjoy exploring, contact us at spcapv@gmail.com for an application to adopt Ruby.


news

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Bishop Gomez to dedicate and consecrate new church sanctuary

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he Right Reverend Ricardo Joel Gomez Osnaya, Bishop of the Western Diocese, Anglican Church of Mexico, will be visiting the Anglican Parish of Christ Church by the Sea in Puerto Vallarta on June 17, 2018. Bishop Gomez will officially dedicate and consecrate the new church sanctuary located in the Center Courtyard Palapa at Plaza Genovesa, Ave. Francisco Medina Ascensio 1215. The Parish moved to this location in 2017 from their previous facility by the airport. Christ Church by the Sea was established in 1991 by local Christians to provide English services

and was accepted and registered as a Mission of the Anglican Church of Mexico by Bishop Melchor Saucedo. Ten years ago the Mission of Christ Church by the Sea was granted Parish status at the Diocesan Synod by Bishop Lino Rodriquez. Bishop Gomez is a native of Guadalajara, Jalisco and a third-generation Anglican in a family of eleven brothers. His father and older brother were priests; his paternal grandfather gave his life defending his beliefs in Mexico’s tragic Cristero War. He has served his church since childhood and followed that dedication through studies at seminary to become an ordained priest

of the Anglican Church of Mexico on December 3, 2005. After serving the diocese in many capacities, in 2012 he was appointed Dean of the Cathedral of San Pablo Apostol in the city of Zapopan, Jalisco. Bishop Gomez was elevated to the position of Bishop of the Western Diocese on April 13, 2018 with his consecration by the Most Rev. Francisco Manuel Moreno,

June 14 - 20, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Presiding Bishop of The Anglican Church of Mexico. Bishop Gomez and his wife, Erica Martinez Andrade, have three children, Andrea, Sara Victoria and Isaac Joel. The Anglican Church is the oldest non-Roman Catholic Church in the country. In 1995, after many years of affiliation with the Episcopal Church and the province of the United States, it became known as the Anglican Church of Mexico and was recognized as an autonomous province of the Worldwide Anglican Communion. Father Michael Schirmacher and the congregation of Christ Church by the Sea are pleased to announce that Bishop Gomez will administer the Holy Sacrament of Confirmation and receive those already confirmed in other denominations into the Anglican Church. All are invited to join us on this joyous occasion.

Dancer is first Mexican to win the Oscar of ballet Isaac Hernández was awarded the Benois de la Danse prize in Moscow

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Mexican dancer from Jalisco has won a prestigious international prize considered the Oscar of ballet. Isaac Hernández, the principal dancer for the English National Ballet, was awarded the Benois de la Danse prize at a ceremony held yesterday in the Bolshoi Theater in Moscow, Russia. Hernández is the first Mexican to win the coveted prize. The 27-year-old Jalisco native was nominated for the best danseur award for his performances in Don Quijote  with the Rome Opera Ballet, in which he worked under the artistic direction of legendary Russian ballet dancer Mikhail Baryshnikov, and La Sylphide, with the English National Ballet. After the ceremony, the dancer

posted a photo of himself holding the award outside the historic theater on his Twitter account with the caption, “Everything is possible!” President Enrique Peña Nieto congratulated Hernández for his achievement via his own Twitter account. The recognition further enhances the reputation of the young dancer who last November won the award for best male dancer at the United Kingdom’s National Dance Awards. According to Hernández’s press office in Mexico, the dancer said that it was an honor and a source of great pride to represent Mexico on the world stage. “. . . Being the first Mexican in history to win this important prize

is proof that everything can be achieved if we persevere with our dreams. I dedicate this achievement to the entire Mexican public who is always with me, to all those people who have been part of my life and my journey and to all those who have supported me, believed in me and motivated me to be better as a person and as a professional,” he said. The Benois de la Danse prize was founded in 1991 and is named after the Russian artist and ballet stage designer Alexandre Benois. The award seeks to recognize “the tireless work, professionalism, discipline, virtuosity and passion” of the best dancers in the world, according to the Benois prize website. Prizes are also awarded for best ballerina, lifetime achievement,

choreography, composition and design. London-based Hernández will return to Mexico in August to present his ballet gala Despertares  at the National Auditorium in Mexico City.   Original: MexicoNewsDaily.com

handled. “Copa Airlines has a special place in our hearts because this took several years to come together, but at the end of the day it is persistence that eventually gives you what

you want. We want to send out our special compliments to Pedro Heilbron, President of Copa, and his team, for taking this region of the Mexican Pacific into account.” The Copa Airlines flight begins with two flights per week, on Thursdays and Sundays, departing from Panama City at 9:05 a.m. and arriving at the Puerto Vallarta International Airport at 1:25 p.m. (local time). The return flight departs on the same days from Puerto Vallarta at 3:40 p.m., arriving into Panama City at 8 p.m. (local time). The route will operate on a Boeing 737-700 designed for 12 passengers in Executive Class and 112 in the Main Cabin.

Hotel Barceló donates material to protect the local sea turtle population

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call went out from the Program of Conservation and Protection of Sea Turtles for donations and supplies to help sustain their efforts for the coming season. The staff and volunteers of the program survey the beaches along the south half of Banderas Bay during nesting high season, protecting the nests by moving them to the incubation pen located at El Holi beach in front of La isla. In response to the request, the green team from hotel Barceló which works under a sustainability plan, donated materials such as: boxes for the handling of the hatchlings, gloves for clearing nests and mesh for protecting the incubation pen. The Barceló hotel located in Mismaloya is an international company committed to caring for the environment. They have the Green Globe certification, a

PVR Opens the Door to Latin America with Copa Airlines New turtle spec

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he Panamanian airline lands at PVR after 8 years of hard work and strategic promotional and public relations strategies within the South American market. Beginning in December 2018, Panamanian Copa Airlines will connect Panama City directly with Puerto Vallarta-Riviera Nayarit via two weekly flights, connecting with strategic destinations in South America. The flight is expected to transport over 10 thousand travelers a year. The new route will add optimal connectivity to Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Peru, Ecuador, and Chile, and will likely result in an increase in the number of reservations to and

from this tourism destination. Marc Murphy, director of the Riviera Nayarit CVB and the AHMBB, praised the perseverance with which the negotiations were

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he turtle species is considered to be endangered because of the urban sprawl caused by tourism. Scientists from several different universities have discovered a new turtle species in rivers and streams of the western Mexican resort city of Puerto Vallarta, the country’s National Science and Technology Council (CONACYT) said Thursday. The turtle species - the proposed name for which is “Casquito de Vallarta” (Little Helmet of Vallarta ) due to its wide and flat shell is considered to be endangered because of the urban sprawl caused by tourism, with only nine specimens accounted for so far. University of Guadalajara (UDG)


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June 14 - 20, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Anthony Bourdain had a deep love affair with Mexico and Mexican cuisine

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worldwide recognition for sustainable tourism, which is awarded to companies committed to making positive contributions to people and the planet. With this donation, the personnel in charge of the Turtle Program are preparing to begin patrolling work as of June 15 of this year. Before the development of programs such as these, only 40% of the eggs that were laid along the shores of Banderas Bay survived, but today, thanks to programs such as these, almost 96% of the eggs deposited are incubated successfully. For those interested in participating while on their vacation, turtle

releases run nearly every night to give the hatchlings the best chance of survival. Participating guests are provided with a brief lecture on sea turtles. Children who participate in these marine turtle release programs are given the honour of naming the baby turtles as they’re released into the Pacific Ocean. During the summer and fall months, travelers can volunteer or go on tours of the local nurseries and nesting sites to learn about the life cycle of sea turtles for just one night or by participating in a two-month-long volunteer project, subject to availability. For more information, visit project-tortuga.org.

cies discovered in Vallarta

researcher and scholar Fabio German Cupul Magaña said that his colleagues are currently looking into the turtle’s habits and biology in an effort to prevent its extinction. The fresh-water reptile’s natural habitat consists of ecosystems such as streams and marshlands, which tend to be modified as urbanization expands.

The species was discovered in the rivers of suburban Puerto Vallarta by UDG researchers, as well as scientists with Mexico’s Autonomous Juarez University of Tabasco (UJAT), the University of Guanajuato (UGTO) and the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). The researchers are currently working on publishing the results of the genetic studies performed on the turtle to support the claim that it is indeed a new species. The reptile’s scientific name is Kinosternon vogti in honor of renowned American herpetologist Richard Vogt, who specialized in the study of fresh-water turtles in the Americas.

He enjoyed tlayudas in Oaxaca, tostadas in Ensenada and migas in Tepito

exico. Our brother from another mother. A country, with whom, like it or not, we are inexorably, deeply involved, in a close but often uncomfortable embrace. Look at it. It’s beautiful. It has some of the most ravishingly beautiful beaches on earth. Mountains, desert, jungle. Beautiful colonial architecture, a tragic, elegant, violent, ludicrous, heroic, lamentable, heartbreaking history.” There could be no doubting chef Anthony Bourdain’s deep love of Mexico — and particularly authentic Mexican food — that was cultivated during several trips to various parts of the country and which he wrote about in a 2014 essay entitled Under the Volcano. But the writer, television personality and celebrity chef’s love affair with Mexico — and many other countries around the world — has come to an end. Bourdain died in France by his own hand. He was 61. After shooting to fame on the back of a 1999 confessional piece in  The New Yorker  in which he spilled secrets about the restaurant trade and then a follow-up book entitled  Kitchen Confidential, Bourdain entered the world of television. While filming for his first show, A Cook’s Tour, Bourdain made his first professional visit to Mexico, traveling to the hometown of a Mexican cook with whom he worked in the New York restaurant Brasserie Les Halles. In Izúcar de Matamoros, Puebla, Bourdain learned about the elaborate process to make mole poblano, chowed down on  escamoles  (ant larvae) and enchiladas and sampled the viscous, pre-Hispanic drink of the gods made out of the fermented sap of the maguey plant, pulque. An infatuation with  real  Mexican food that would last for years was born. During visits to Mexico City, Bourdain ate tacos al pastor on the streets of the historic center, migas (a traditional soup) — washed down with a  michelada  — at La Güera in the notorious neighborhood of Tepito and fell in love with the  cerdo en salsa verde and refried beans at the breakfast diner Fonda Margarita in Colonia del Valle. He also visited the massive wholesale market Central de Abasto, enjoyed some of the capital’s famous  cantinas  and dined at the upscale restaurant Máximo Bistrot. While making his second show,  No Reservations, Bourdain

Bourdain with Abigail Mendoza, second from left, in Oaxaca. visited Baja California where he ate tacos and drank mezcal in Tijuana and devoured a lobster lunch on the beach at Rosarito. The highlight, however, was undoubtedly his visit to the seafood street stand in Ensenada called La Guerrerense. There, Bourdain ate ceviche, scallop, sea snail, sea urchin and octopus tostadas and met the stand’s owner and namesake, Guerrero-native Sabina Bandera, whom he called a “genius.” He would later invite her to show off her culinary talents at a street food convention in Singapore. Oaxaca was another favorite hunting and eating ground for the acclaimed television personality, whose death triggered an outpouring of emotion from fans around the world. On his first visit to the southern state, Bourdain ate iguana and tamales while on a more recent visit he sampled  tlayudas  (a large, crispy tortilla filled with a variety of ingredients), squash blossom soup and  atole  (a hot corn-based beverage) with internationally renowned chef Abigail Mendoza in  the town of Teotitlán del Valle. While there, he marveled at the delicateness of a Zapotec woman’s hands and the strength of her forearms as she ground corn to make tortillas. Bourdain also ate at the renowned  pasillo del humo, or smoky aisle, in Oaxaca City’s central market, where visitors are usually affected more by the delicious smells of the grilling meats than the wafts of smoke. The New Yorker, however, was more than just a connoisseur of all kinds of weird and wonderful food from all over Mexico and beyond. He was also a champion of the underdog who stood up for immigrants in the United States, aware

The celebrity chef with Sabina Bandera of Ensenada. that they are the backbone of some sectors of the economy. “Despite our ridiculously hypocritical attitudes towards immigration, we demand that Mexicans cook a large percentage of the food we eat, grow the ingredients we need to make that food, clean our houses, mow our lawns, wash our dishes [and] look after our children,” he wrote in his 2014 essay. He also questioned why many of his compatriots embrace Mexican food, beverages, people and other products and aspects of the country but not Mexico itself. “Americans love Mexican food. We consume nachos, tacos, burritos, tortas, enchiladas, tamales and anything resembling Mexican in enormous quantities. We love Mexican beverages, happily knocking back huge amounts of tequila, mezcal and Mexican beer every year. We love Mexican people — as we sure employ a lot of them . . .” Bourdain said. “We love Mexican drugs. Maybe not you personally, but “we,” as a nation, certainly consume titanic amounts of them — and go to extraordinary lengths and expense to acquire them. We love Mexican music, Mexican beaches, Mexican architecture, interior design, Mexican films,” he continued. “So why don’t we love Mexico?” Original: Mexiconewsdaily.com


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June 14 - 20, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Paradise and Parenting

From Here Leza Warkentin

Marcia Blondin

mommyinmexico.wordpress.com

marciavallarta@gmail.com

I am the preschool coordinator and nursery teacher at the American School of Puerto Vallarta. I am also both unsurprised and not a bit sorry that this list of my favorites is mostly about places to eat. If you can live in Vallarta without appreciating some of the good eatin’ around here, you have to be at least half Vulcan.

Dodgeball

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o you have your tickets for “BOLERO”? There is only one performance of this exquisite ballet at Teatro Vallarta this coming Saturday, June 16 at 8 pm. If the turnout is anything like last month’s superb “Don Quijote,” it may very well sell-out so hurry down to the box office and reserve seats. Don’t miss Ravel’s classic “Bolero.” I will see you there! If you are not a balletomane, then get over to  Incanto  to welcome the  Princesas Desesperadas  back from  Lagos de Moreno  – home of the Jalisco State artistic/cultural competition. Our fair ladies came home with two significant awards: one for Best Costumes, built by Cesar Bravo  and the Audience’s Choice for  Best Play. Well done,  Perro Bravo Productions. To  Juan Pablo  as Bella;  Juan Carlos  as Cinderella; Cesar Bravo as Snow White and  Cesar Trujillo  as Sleeping Beauty;  Ramiro Daniel, Director, and Producer Alain Perreault, Vallarta is so proud. Princesas  only has two more shows: June 16 and 23 at 8:30 pm at  Incanto’s  Theatre. “Princesas Desesperadas” is the funniest play ever, and it changes with every performance (trust me on

this!) so, if you’ve seen it before, see it again. Some disappointing news: El Patio de mi Casa  on Guerrero Street is closing. Get over there this week, have some drinks and give owner  Heidi  a big hug. She will likely reopen  El Patio  elsewhere, but for sure she has to move. El Patio has been crucial to Vallarta’s live music scene, and the bar is one of the most comfortable and inviting in the city. Wherever you go Heidi, keep in touch! Tracy Parks is 50 years old! The owner of Incanto threw a helluva birthday party last Sunday. The tacos and tequila flowed like rain, and the entertainment was insanely excellent with  Eduardo and Zoe, the Red Suitcases,  Yuvia, and  Axel  with half the audience willing and capable of getting up and serenading  Tracy. Bob Bruneau, Joan Houston, Ron Spencer, Eric aka Bev, Joby, Hal, Renzo  and  Lady Zen  just some of the great singers/musicians enjoying the evening in near sub-zero conditions. Have a safe week and make sure your gutters are clean before the rains really start. Take care of each other with kindness and say  NO! to straws and anything plastic, From Here.

long-held tradition at the American School of Puerto Vallarta, the school where I teach and where my children are students, is the cherished Sixth Grade Against the Teachers game in June. It used to be a competitive soccer game, where the teachers would try their hardest and still be beaten by twelve and thirteen year olds who have been playing soccer since they were able to stand on their own for at least ten seconds. That’s all changed, and now it’s a dodge ball game, where teachers try their hardest and continue to be beaten by twelve and thirteen year olds who transfer their highly developed soccer skills to a much easier game. But now it’s more fun I guess. Theoretically it’s also less dangerous for typically less active people who are desperately trying to save a little face. The Boy is a huge fan of this game. I am unsure of the particular reason and I’m a little afraid to ask. It could either be because it’s fun to watch his teachers in a fun, relaxed setting, or because it’s enjoyable to see the people who assign him homework being pelted by balls. Either way, as I said, he’s a

huge fan. Since grade one he has been talking about how much he was looking forward to grade six for ONLY this reason: because then it would be his turn to take part in the yearly thumping. His only wish was that I would participate in his final game of primary school. Oh yes, I forgot to mention: I don’t usually play in the teachers’ game. “Usually”, in this case, meaning “ever”. First of all, I don’t really enjoy organized sports, and I never have. I was one of those children who would always be chosen second to last (SECOND to last only because I was Trevor’s sister, that guy who was chosen first). Also, sometimes it’s nice if your students don’t see you as a fearful, harmless buffoon who will run away when threatened by a gumball-colored, painless sponge ball. So. Five years of anticipation on my son’s side, and five years of saying “Sure, I’ll participate” because, hey, why worry about a game when it’s five long years away? Only last week, it wasn’t five years away, it was two days away, and The Boy was merrily trash talking me in my own home. I had already picked up my t-shirt, which

should have said “But We GRADE You” but just identified me as a teacher team member, something I could have done without. Then, it happened. The Boy rolled his ankle in P.E. and suddenly he was in the E/R with his father getting an X-ray. As soon as I knew I wasn’t paying for a cast (just a first degree sprain), I was almost unable to bite back the glee. He’s not playing. So I’m not playing. I mean, that was the whole point, right? That night I wrapped my arms around him for a good night hug and couldn’t ignore the long, sad looks he was trying to bury into his pillow. He told me that he was going to miss the game that he had been excited about since he had lost his two front teeth. And that he had really just wanted to play a game with me. Yeah. I kept the t-shirt. I suited up. I ran around awkwardly while trying (and failing) to avoid the brightly colored balls being pelted at me (just a little harder than necessary). My son stood there in an ankle brace, throwing balls at us with the biggest smile he’s had since he tried ice cream for the first time. The children won. The rest of the primary children were a little too happy and a little too vocal about it. The teachers went home, defeated, with varying degrees of injury; fingers swollen, heads bruised, necks strained. There’s at least one on crutches that I’m aware of. But somehow, despite the fact that I spent the evening icing my shoulder, it was wonderful. And somehow it has gone down in the memory book as one of the great days. I think the best part is the discovery that playing a game with my son can still mean the world to him.


local

09

Medical Matters

June 14 - 20, 2018 Patricia Riggen www.vallartatribune.com Biography

Que Paso at UDG CUC

Pam Thompson

Michael Nolan

pamela@healthcareresourcespv.com

104.3wakeupshow@gmail.com

Pamela Thompson operates HealthCare Resources Puerto Vallarta, a multi-faceted, independent, resource network that is here for your total health and well-being. We offer assistance to help find a physician, hospital and diagnostic service for any healthcare needs. www.healthcareresourcespv.com

Michael Nolen is the host of ‘The Good Morning Wake Up Show,’ which is broadcast as part of the University of Guadalajara’s 104.3 FM radio station at the CUC campus in Puerto Vallarta. Every Saturday at 9 AM One of the most accomplished Latin American directors who work internationally, Ri

Nice tootsies!

L

ast week, I finally went in for a medical pedicure. I have known how fabulous these really are forever but for one reason or another, I had not had one for many months. And my feet and toes were looking pretty gnarly. I have a ‘thing’ about someone handling my feet. I don’t like it. As a result, my home toenail polish is crooked, sloppy and pretty awful. But I will allow these gals to handle my feet in a heartbeat! Having a medical pedicure versus a pedicure in a salon or spa somewhere is quite a different experience. What is the difference? All instruments are sterilized in an autoclave at 132 C. for 30 minutes to make sure bacteria and fungus are killed. Soap and water just does not cut it. All knives, files used for the skin are new and only used one time, on each person and then thrown away. The feet are not soaked in water. When a ‘regular pedicure’ does that, the water temperature multiplies the bacteria from someone else who soaked their feet before you. Even from your own! If you have multiple fungus, it will also multiply. Once per week, the location where the pedicures are done has an exhaustive cleaning of every area including walls, seats, tables so that they are free of virus and bacteria. The huge, gigantic and comfortable chairs that one sits in while receiving the pedicure are not with fabric but plastic/leather and are cleaned after each person sits in the chair. The gals that do these medical pedicures have special training at the Technica de Podologia de Nayarit. The have a state and federal cedula (certification) and the school is for two years. Here in Mexico, in order to have a “Foot Clinic”, one must have a “podologo” (which translates to chiropodist), otherwise it can only be called a spa or a salon. Anel, the gal that did my medical

FREE MOVIES! Don’t forget CINEMA CUC

E pedicure wore a mask, cap and gloves the entire time. She cleaned, massaged and softened my feet. She cut my toenails with precision and care and I did not flinch one single time. The only time I pulled away slightly was towards the end when she was softening the bottoms of my feet with a little machine that tickled like crazy! These pedicures are for everyone! But especially important for diabetics who must take extra-special care of their feet and toes. With the humidity around here, the hot sidewalks and cobblestones, our feet take an extra beating. These two appendages take us every single place that we go! Give them some TLC! At 300 pesos, these pedicures are a bargain! Location: Paty Villanueva’s Foot Clinics are located at CMQ Hospital on Basillo Badillo and at the new CMQ Hospital in Bucerias. Her staff will take terrific care of your tootsies! For further information, appointment feel free to email us!

very Wednesday and Friday at 1 pm in the main auditorium, we will be showing FREE movies. The ones on Wednesday have a music theme with concerts from around the world. Friday movies about almost anything. Some are comedies, some dramas, and others are documentaries. This Friday June 15, we will be showing [1900] The epic tale of a class struggle in twentieth century Italy, as seen through the eyes of two childhood friends on opposing sides. Directed by Bernardo Bertolucci and staring Robert De Niro, Gérard Depardieu, and Dominique Sanda. On Wednesday June 20th we will show a Manu Chao concert. On Wednesday June 22 at 11 am we are proud to host director Patricia Riggen where she will speak on her time in Hollywood as a Mexican woman.   An accomplished Latin American director who works internationally, Riggen most recently directed the David Elliot/Danny Strong Fox pilot, Proven Innocent which was ordered to series. Prior to that, she was tapped to helm three episodes

directed the David Elliot/Danny Strong Fox pilot, ​Proven Innocent which was ordere that, she was tapped to helm three episodes on the first season of ​Tom Clancy’s Jac as well as the pilot ​Run for Your Life​ for Blumhouse and USA Network.

In 2016, she directed the feature film, ​Miracles From Heaven starring Jennifer Gar and Eugenio Derbez. It became the top grossing film by a female director that year.

Patricia also directed the English language Chilean mining drama ​The 33​. The film i events of the 2010 disaster in which a group of 33 miners were trapped in the San Jo 69 days. The film starred Antonio Banderas, Juliette Binoche, Gabriel Byrne, Rodrig Diamond Phillips, the film was released by Warner Brothers in the fall of 2015.

Patricia directed and produced her first feature film ​Under the Same Moon​. It pre Sundance Film Festival to accolades and was quickly acquired for worldwide d Searchlight and The Weinstein Company. It was released theatrically in March 2008 t record numbers for a Spanish language film in the US and became a box office succ and the U.S.

Her thesis film, ​The Cornfield​, a period short film set during the Mexican revolution, international film festivals and received 20 awards; among them the Student Ac Mexican Academy Award for Best Short Film, the Student Emmy and DGA Awards. H minute documentary film ​Family Portrait​, a story about poverty in Harlem, featuring the Jury Award for Best Short Film at the Sundance Film Festival 2005. http://patriciariggen.com/

on the first season of Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan for Amazon, as well as the pilot Run for Your Life for Blumhouse and USA Network. In 2016, she directed the feature film, Miracles From Heaven starring Jennifer Garner, Queen Latifah, and Eugenio Derbez. It became the top grossing film by a female director that year. Patricia also directed the English language Chilean mining drama The 33 . The film is based on the real events of the 2010 disaster in which a group of 33 miners were trapped in the San Jose Mine in Chile for 69 days. The film starred Antonio Banderas, Juliette Binoche,

Gabriel Byrne, Rodrigo Santoro and Lou Diamond Phillips, the film was released by Warner Brothers in the fall of 2015. We encourage you to look at the UDG CUC web site each week to get the latest news about all the events taking place. www.cuc.udg.mx RADIO SHOW IN ENGLISH: Be sure to tune in to The Good Morning Wake Up Show every Saturday morning from 9 to 11 am. 104.3 FM or on the web at http://udgtv.com/ radio-puerto-vallarta/en-vivo REMEMBER: “All our dreams can come true if we have the courage to pursue them.”

OVER 600,000 INTERNATIONAL VISITORS AND 430,000 NATIONALS WILL VISIT BANDERAS BAY THIS SUMMER.*

Promote your events in English & Spanish this summer! *2017 STATISTICS WWW.AEROPUERTOSGAP.COM.MX

and

Book advertising in the Vallarta Tribune and receive FREE advertising credit with Radio RadianteFM Contact: editor@vallartatribune.com


local

10

June 14 - 20, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Vibes & Vices: Warique Restaurant AJ Freeman

cosmiccapt@gmail.com

AJ Freeman is an adventurous spirit, serial friendmaker, and general enthusiast. He lives his everyday life hoping to demonstrate the nearly infinite potential for discovery and wonder on this small wet rock orbiting a dim yellow star in the backwoods of the Milky Way.

As the city’s much anticipated and eminently popular Restaurant Week(s) promotion came to an end this past Sunday, I realized that I had somehow skipped out on the festivities. A long procession of “maybe tomorrow,” “okay, this weekend,” and “when I get paid” had culminated in this one final opportunity to get in on the culinary celebration, and so I knew I had to make my single choice count. After browsing the possibilities for what seemed like the eleventieth time, I decided to go with the place I had heard friends mention the most: Warique Restaurant, stationed at Aquiles Serdán 280 in the heart of the downtown area. The word “pupusa” had been trending topic of conversation in watering holes all around Centro including on that day, and so after hearing it one last time at the better local brewery, I drained my pitcher of IPA and set out to discover its hidden wonders. The Vibes: I dig al fresco dining, there’s just something about eating outside in the right environment that enhances the experience. Walking into Warique led me on a path directly through the intimately lit main dining room into the cozy little courtyard area, where I found a good perch for people-watching as well as enjoying the considerable talents of the featured musician as he softly warbled a medley of classic hits.

This evening I was lucky enough to be attended to personally by owner Krys, a service

which immediately highlighted his level of immersion in the dream he and his partner had created here in Puerto Vallarta. After suggesting the Pisco Sour, a South American specialty drink that is the nutmegcrowned lovechild of a margarita and a whiskey sour, he was gracious enough to sit down with me and offer some insight into his vision as well.

“We just felt that the area needed more diversity in the culinary scene, there are enough Italian restaurants here, don’t you think?” He continued to converse even as he encouraged me to order with a waiting notepad... as a restaurateur this was a man well-versed in managing chaos, so mere multitasking came easy. “We go out of our way to locally source the finest ingredients, it took us 4 months to find the right beef supplier!” The note of frustration triggered by recounting of the supply snafu quickly faded away as he recalled a fonder memory: “Our dishes come from our heart to your table. The recipes here are mostly from my childhood, our Warique Torte is based on my mother’s specialty. She was never too happy about me using it...in fact she visited the restaurant during a trip to PV last year and the first thing she said is, ‘okay, let’s have it...the cake, now.’”

A triumphant grin crossed his face as he finished the tale. “She tasted it and was quiet for a long time. Finally she spoke again: ‘This is very painful for me to admit, but yours is better.’”

Poor Mama Krys, cut deep by buttercream insolence. The Vices: The musical accompaniment was perfect for setting the scene, the smooth sounds of acoustic guitar filling the air as I watched other parties dive into their plates with gusto and approvingly discuss their choices. Soon it was my turn, and a performance of “This Masquerade” was the entrance music for the famous pupusa, a savoury beef and cheese filling disguised as a corn biscuit and colorfully adorned with garlands of tangy red cabbage. The topping salad added an intense brightness and zest to the simple street-style snack, transforming both its look and overall flavour. The reputation that preceded the pupusa was well earned. I would eat them as a meal, it was only pretending to be an opening course.

Next up was “Ropa Vieja,” a timeless cuban comfort food dish made with tender shredded flank steak and vegetables served along rice and fried sweet plantains. I admit that one of these four priceless gold doubloons did not make it to print, but that serves as something of a review in itself. The steak was surely worth the supply trip north toward Bucerias, melting away in mouthfuls of perfectly prepared rice with a flavourful flourish. A rendition of “Dust in the Wind” wafted around the outdoor eating area, and I paused to consider the finite nature of existence and the fact that one (hopefully distant) day I would no longer be able to indulge myself with such rich sensory experiences. Like a pinch of salt in buttery caramel, the thoughts only brought the sweetness of the scene to the

forefront. Speaking of sweet treats, the obvious choice for dessert was the very cake Krys had used to defy his mother, the Warique Tort. This pillowy sponge cake was bedecked with handmade European buttercream, that storied harbinger of familial strife, before being soaked in rum punch, dusted with almonds and walnuts, and set before my waiting fork. One taste and I could see why she was so upset. Sweet without being saccharine, rich with varied texture, and decadent beyond a doubt, the cake was apparently reserved for very special occasions in years gone by. However this lucky lifetime allows us to consider dinner a very special occasion, representing our mastery of the natural world as well as the myriad skill sets that sends the materials of this Earth on the long journey from a heart to a table. As I reached the last few bites of dessert, I found myself eating slower and slower, subconsciously desiring to draw this moment out into eternity. The soulful “Ain’t No Sunshine” as rendered by the guitarist was a fitting theme for the end of this experience, manifesting my sadness that it even had an end. Still, as even songwriter Bill Withers himself knew, the despair of loss was well worth the joy of discovery...nothing ends if it never begins in the first place, so it’s best to just enjoy the ride while you can. The Verdict: With an outstanding combination of deliciously inspired fare and welcoming atmosphere, Warique Restaurant is sure to be a hit long after the last day of Restaurant Week. I even have an excuse to go back today (Thursday the 14th) in the form of an art exhibition to be held onsite...maybe I’ll catch you there.


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Located on Av. Revolución 231, Municipio Bahía de Banderas, Sayulita, Nayarit. (329) 298 8909

Marina Office: (322) 209 0696, Downtown Office: (322) 223 3080, Mega Flamingos Office: (329) 29 661 63


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SHOPPING 1. GALERIAS VALLARTA

2. WALMART/SAMS CLUB 1. GALERIAS VALLARTA 2. WALMART/SAMS CLUB 3. COSTCO 3. COSTCO 4. LA ISLA 4. LA ISLA CARACOL 5. PLAZA 5. PLAZA CARACOL 6. MEGA/ LA COMER BUCERIAS 6. MEGA/ LA COMER BUCERIAS 7. WALMART NUEVO VALLARTA 7. WALMART NUEVO VALLARTA

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entertainment

14

June 14 - 20, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Awesome Girl Groups at Incanto!

L

ady Zen’ is an internationally known award-winning lyric poet and singer/storyteller. In her inspiring show entitled, ‘Always Something There to Remind Me’, she pays tribute to the music that influenced her over the years including Aretha Franklin, Elton John, James Taylor, and more. Accompanied by Bob Bruneau at the piano. Fridays, 8pm. Cheko Ruiz and his band

present ‘The Music of The Gipsy Kings’ on Sunday, June 17, 8pm. Special guest musicians including

guitarist Eduardo Leon of Piel Canela and percussionist Alex Gonzalez of Gypsy Rumba.

The Congregation of

Christ Church by the Sea Iglesia Cristo del Mar

With joy and gratitude announcces the Dediccation and Conseccration of our new Sancctuary Sunday, June 17, 2018, 10 AM Bishop Ricardo Joel Gomez Osnaya Officiating Diocese of the West

Anglican Church of Mexico

All are Welccome Center Courtyard Palapa

Plaza Genovesa

Ave. Francisco Ascensio Medina 2015 www.christchurchbythesea.org ~ mypvchurch@gmail.com

Presenter/Musicologist Paco Ojeda will offer another lecture in his Music Appreciation Series featuring ‘Awesome Girl Groups’ on June 21 at 4pm. Paco also hosts ‘Dinner and a Movie’ on Tuesdays at 7pm. He introduces the films, which are shown on a giant screen in the air-conditioned theater. A special dinner menu is available. Vocalist Luis Villanueva sings the hits of Juan Gabriel accompanied by his live band in the theater on select Thursdays. Next show June 21 at 8pm. ‘Princesas Desesperadas’ is the hilarious stage comedy about four Disney Princesses who get together fifteen years after their “happily ever after’s”. Princesses has sold out most of the previous four seasons of performances. Presented in Spanish and contains adult language. June 16, 23 at 8:30pm. Early reservations are recommended. Greater Tuna starring Ron Spencer and Tracy Parks plays on most Wednesdays at 8pm. The hilarious story of small-town Texas with twenty-two eccentric characters played by two actors and forty-two costume changes. This is the first time the show has been presented during the summer season. In the piano bar Tongo plays Latin/Cuban rhythms on his handmade instruments Tuesdays at 5pm. Also select mornings on the riverside terrace. Spanish singer/songwriter and guitarist Santiago Martin Rumberia sings traditional flamenco, pop and Latin rhythms with his full band on Tuesdays, 7pm. Trivia Madness! is on Wednesdays from

2-4pm. Random topics. Free to play. Happy Hour prices and cold A/C. Joby Hernandez plays pop/ rock/classic favorites in English and Spanish Wednesdays, 5pm. Also select mornings on the riverside terrace. The Red Suitcases trio plays classic rock/pop covers in English and Spanish Sundays and Wednesdays, 7:30pm. Singer-songwriters Zoe Wood and Eduardo León play Nuevo Flamenco and Latin standards. Thursdays, 5pm. Open Mic is on Thursdays at 7:30pm. Sing, dance, play an instrument. Hosted by Tracy Parks and Joby Hernandez. ‘The Joan Houston Show’ with Bob Bruneau at the piano features ‘The American Songbook’ Fridays at 5pm. Classic music, lots of laughs! Luis Villanueva sings pop/ Latin classics accompanied by Fernando Uribe at the piano/ guitar on Fridays, 7:30pm. Loteria with Pearl and Bev is on Saturday, June 16 at 4pm. Drink specials, gift certificates, and cash prizes. Special guests Ballet Folklorico Tradiciones will perform. Cheko Ruiz and Alex Gonzalez present acoustic Latin/flamenco covers on Saturdays, 7:30pm. Salsa dancing/lessons is on Wednesdays & Sundays at 8pm on the upper terrace. All are welcome. Yuvia Niebla is a local singer/ guitarist. Her interpretive, heartfelt style is quite popular with audiences. Sundays, 5pm. Incanto Cabaret and Restaurant Open 9am-Midnight Tues-Sun 322 223 9756 www.incantovallarta.com


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entertainment

June 14 - 20, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Mango and Garlic - A marriage of flavours By Christie Seeley Vallartasounds.com

It is raining mangos at River Cafe!

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ell, not quite, but Chef Bruce Angel and Owners Eva Sanchez and Margarito Latió have come up with a special and exciting menu for their food festival called “for the love of garlic and mango” from June 11 to July 31.  They will again be celebrating the happy union of mangos and garlic, which they have done for the last 10 years to the delight of their guests. I had a sneak preview of this year’s menu last Tuesday evening and can tell you that you are in for a treat!  Though now extremely plentiful in Mexico, mangos originated in India and Southeast Asia. Mango season in Mexico is from May to September and importers report this year’s crop from Mexico to be of excellent quality.  Both green and ripe they offer a wonderful  array of flavours, from sweet to sour. Add to that the healthy benefits of garlic and you have a perfect marriage. On my visit last Tuesday evening the first dish served by my well-informed and attentive waiter was a roasted head of garlic accompanied by a mango chutney prepared with ripe mango, cilantro, red bell pepper and served with jalapeño crostini. The roasted garlic was smooth and mild and the chutney had a slight heat and hint of cilantro that offset the delicate sweetness of the mango.  In total the dish was not picante but left a nice warmth in the  mouth, a delightful amuse bouche to start off the meal. The shrimp salad that followed was made of a variety of fresh, delicate greens (lechugas mixtas) and sautéed shrimp, (camerones salteados) all tossed in a fine herbed vinaigrette made with fennel, basil and parsley, and two fine mustards, Dijon and Antigua.  The dish was then beautifully adorned with mango vinaigrette that added a complimentary sweetness to its savory counterpart.   The main course was a grilled adobado chicken breast served on a bed of quinoa and delicate baby vegetables cooked al dente.  Adobado is made with guajillo chile, garlic, onion and spices.  It is ground in house to

assure perfection. The meat was topped with a mango sauce, mango chutney, cilantro and tomatoes. The slightly spicy adobado set off the mango very nicely. As if that was not enough, along came the dessert of mango and coconut mousse, a delicate toasted coconut crust, smooth mango cream with a sweet mango topping, adorned with a cherry, mint leaf and mango sauce.   Doña Eva has a long history with fine food in Puerto Vallarta. She spent years at Le Bistro with Chef Thierry Blouet and moved with him to Cafe des Artistes.  She then opened the River Cafe in 1996. Chef Bruce is a charming young man who started as assistant chef

16 years ago and has become an excellent executive chef. The owners of River Cafe have always been supporters of music and often have live music. Currently, one can count on wellloved troubadour Raul Simental performing with his invited guests including maestro Oscar Terrazas on soprano sax who joins him on Friday evenings. I can’t think of a better way to spend the hot summer nights than at River Cafe, located on Isla Cuale just off Ignacio Vallarta, with the river flowing gently by and the tropical vegetation cooling the air.  Add to that the refreshing mango and garlic menu they have waiting for you and you have a perfect evening.


riviera nayarit

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June 14 - 20, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Welcome Home Sheryl Novak

sa.novak@solutionsmexico.com

Sheryl Novak is an expat Canadian who has owned a home in Mexico for over ten years. She is the owner of SOLutions Mexico and The Furniture Store by SOLutions Mexico. She is an expert on sourcing all styles of furniture for all sizes of budgets, in Mexico.

Part II - The secret to a comfy sofa

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n harsh humid climates and when your furniture is going to be used a lot, it is important to ensure you get a filling that is going to wear well. Last week we covered two types of filling or padding for sofas and sectionals - down/feather filling and foam. This week, we will cover two other common types. Polyester, also referred to as polyfoam, is found in low-cost upholstered pieces. It is generally the lowest cost filling available. It has been around since the 1960’s. Polyfoam is made using the same process that is used in making petroleum from crude oil. Unfortunately, with the lower price also comes some downsides. The first is its questionable safety. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) consider facilities that manufacture polyfoam potential sources of harmful pollutants. According to studies, when polyfoam breaks down, it can be released in to the air as microscopic particles. These particles which could be inhaled have the potential to cause health issues. Polyfoam tends to flatten out very quickly resulting in lumpy cushions. It is also very porous. In our humid climates, any material that holds moisture runs a higher risk of mildew and mold. Another downside is that it is extremely flammable. Firefighters refer to polyfoam as solid gasoline. Unless it is treated, it will burn very hot and very fast. When it does so,

the resultant fumes are toxic. Just one breath of super hot toxic gas would incapacity an average sized human. Fire retardant polyfoams still carry some potential risk due to the type of coatings used. Batting, commonly made from wool, cotton and polyester is used to wrap foam. Batting keeps everything smooth and prevents the cover from slipping. The cheaper the batting, the more problems you will have. 100% cotton batting tends to poke through the sofa cover so it is not recommended for seat cushions. Poly cotton blends work much better. Wool batting is best used to cover sofa springs, but not generally used as a cushion. Newest to the scene is foam made from soy beans. Manufacturers claim it to be a great alternative option since it is a renewable resource and it further reduces our dependence on fossil fuels. Since it is so new, there are a lot of unknowns. Whether it is healthier for us and the environment is still up for discussion and debate. Today, very few upholstery manufacturers use soy foam but we can expect this to most likely grow in future years. When you purchase an inexpensive sofa, its poor quality materials means it will collapse quicker, and pose potential health and environmental issues. The average lifespan for an inexpensive sofa made from lower grade materials is 2 to 3 years. Investing in a well made item, with quality materials should give a life span of 20 to 25 years. And a lot more comfort!

Changes are afoot in Lo de Marcos

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o de Marcos has long been a sleepy coastal Pueblo on the Riviera Nayarit coast, but recent real estate activity and new construction starts say the area is on the cusp of a major boom. Lo de Marcos has seen a great upswing in real estate sales, states Armando Contreras, Broker Galvan Real Estate and Services. The town is one in transition. You can find many properties, some of which are fixer-uppers at very attractive prices. There is also an occasional opportunity to purchase a multi-million dollar home at a price that is very attainable. One such example of attainable luxury is Hacienda La Floresta, recently listed for sale. This new home is straight out of Luxury Homes Magazine! With no detail overlooked in its design and construction, this Hacienda occupies the prime corner is just two blocks to the beach. From the moment you enter the property, you will be awe-struck with the attention to detail, including an electric entry gate, a flagstone driveway, and cantera marble columns marking the stately entry to the home. The large corner lot of hosts the gracious 2 bedroom, 2.5 bath turn-key house, a salt water swimming pool, an outdoor kitchen area with a BBQ and oven, and detached building that could be turned into an additional guest suite. To see this hacienda in all of its splendor, visit -- https://bit. ly/2JHuLc3


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Life in la Cruz Cindy Bouchard

cindy@VillaAmordelMar.com

Cindy Bouchard, an expat Canadian runs a Boutique Inn, Villa Amor del Mar in La Cruz de Huanacaxtle. She and her husband Chris are living and lovin’ in Vallarta–Nayarit. If you want more info on La Cruz or desire… A very special vacation contact cindy@VillaAmordelMar.com

Tis the season to enjoy, explore and meet new folks!

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his slow-season I’m committed to try new things and spend time with awesome people. This past couple of weeks I’ve had the best Zarandeado fish, acquired a recipe to make my own, tasted Mezcal and enjoyed the Lucido Burrito, created by Greg Lucido. Greg retired here with his lovely lady, Mary and their two boys as they call them, their cats. As my mission is to share about the good folks that make up La Cruz I asked Greg about what inspired the burrito and his decision to retire in paradise. He told me they were looking for a place to retire

when they went to Panama. Then they went to Roatán and then they came to visit Puerto Vallarta and said, “We might consider here.” They got a call from an agent who told them she had a really good property, sent some pictures and they made an offer but did not get it. They decided to come down for a week and looked at more properties but didn’t really see anything that they liked. Greg looked on the MLS and saw a condo in La Cruz with the most amazing views across the bay and said, “We’ve got to go check this out!” They did their homework and learned that there were quite a few expats living in the area and that La Cruz had a reputation for being a live music center where music often starts between six and eight pm! It was like being in Old Mexico

June 14 - 20, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

but being able to see familiar faces where most people speak English. They bought that condo taking time to settle in and have made many new friends and are thrilled to call it home. What surprised Greg the most in moving to La Cruz was the friendliness of the expats and the locals living here, the very reasonable cost of living and that he ordered burritos several times and didn’t like a single one of them. Being from Southern California near Los Angeles there are a great number of Mexican restaurants with one particular burrito that he liked at a small mom-and-pop chain call El Ranchito. He told me “It’s a ‘wet’ burrito and this one had a unique flavor so we would always go back for it. During our pre-move trips we visited many places to listen to music and enjoy a meal. Octopus Garden was one of our favorites and we became friends with Alfredo and Marichuy and told them about the burrito that we missed from home. Alfredo said “Bring me the recipe and we will see if we can make it!” Getting the recipe was difficult and experimenting ensued until the tantalizing creation was added to the menu. It has evolved with two choices of sauce or you can have a little of both, known as divorced. Be sure to say hi to Greg who’ll likely be at a table beside you on Taco Tuesday. Summer Solstice “aka” Summer Sailstice, June 21, 2018 is sure to be as fun as ever. Join local La Cruz’ers for the Umbrella Downwind Race at Marina La Cruz. Boats might be put away for hurricane season but paddleboards, dinghy’s, umbrellas and your imagination are all you need; simply something that floats and an umbrella! Contact Mike at PV Sailing for more details or Katrina at Marina La Cruz 322 183-3843. Take it slow, linger and explore your neighbourhood.

June events in Riviera Nayarit

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oncerts and sports, culinary, and cultural events are just some of the many activities travelers can enjoy in Riviera Nayarit this month. 58th San Blas International Fishing Tournament (June 13-17)  The Historic Port of San Blas is getting ready to welcome the 58th  San Blas International Fishing Tournament from June

13-17, held at the Marina Fonatur and organized by the Tepic Sport Fishing Club. The three competition categories include Sailfish, Marlin, and Mahi-Mahi (Dorado). The tournament is considered the best in class in the Mexican Pacific and one of the Riviera Nayarit’s top ten events of the year. For more details: https://www. facebook.com/clubdepescatepic 2018 North American

Optimist Championship (June 24-July 1) The Riviera Nayarit will be the official host of the 2018 North American Optimist Championship from June 24th  through July 1st at the Vallarta Yacht Club. This is one of seven continental championships held worldwide in the Optimist class, backed by the Mexican Sailing Federation (FMV) and endorsed by the IODA

and the World Sailing Federation. The competition is open to athletes from North America, South America, and the Caribbean; boys and girls between the ages of 12 and 15 who have been selected by their respective associations. For more information: http://www. vallartayachtclub.org/ Battle of the Saints in Mexcaltitán (June 29)

The patron saint feasts for Saint Peter and Saint Paul on the Island of Mexcaltitán, the Birthplace of Mexican Heritage, are some of the most iconic traditional festivities in the region. They are celebrated with a pilgrimage that reenacts the one the Mexica or Azteca people embarked on centuries ago when they left Aztlán to found the Great City of Teochtitlán.


BANDERAS BAY SHOPPING AND SERVICES

Marsol Friday Market by the Pier by Marcia Blondin

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LOCAL FOOD. LOCAL PLACES. LOCAL PEOPLE Enjoy a Culinary & Cultural Journey though Old Town, Pitillal & Downtown Neighborhoods of Puerto Vallarta! MX: 322-222-6117 US: 1888-360-9847

rated on

NEX T TOU R DEPARTS SOO N!

vallartafoodtours.com

Tel. (322) 222 2675, (322) 222 5402, w Celular: 322 175 0412 mundodeazulejos@hotmail.com www.talavera-tile.com

f you are out walking your dog down around the pier any Friday morning, stop into our Market and get your pooch some treats. One of our newest vendors is Karen; she offers dehydrated chicken parts that your dog and your cat will love! No worries about added ingredients and Karen does clip the toenails off the chicken’s feet. She has human foodgrade chicken breasts; all of her dehydrated dog and cat treats are suitable for human consumption. Always you are welcome to try before you buy. Rather, your dog! If you are looking for paintings or posters suitable-for-framing, see Barbara for a good selection at fair prices. Talk to her about your likes and dislikes in art and she can probably get you exactly what you want; she has been in the art business in Vallarta for decades. Have a look, too, at her jewelry some of which she creates herself; others come from various Mexican artisans. If you are a painter or handcrafter and are looking for a Market to call home, please come on Friday with a sample or photos of what you create. Our Summer Market is open rain or shine until November 1st. One of Ricardo Mazcal’s lesser-known products is a

muscular-pain-relief gel; it works so fast and lasts for hours. (The vital ingredients may surprise you!) As with all of Ricardo’s remedies, everything is made by his hand. For incredible jewelry from sterling to silk; fabulous barbequed burgers, brand new women’s clothes and more, join us! The Marsol Friday Market by the Pier is open from 9:30 am to 1:30 pm all year-round.


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We Recommend:

FABFABRICFELLOWS Aprons - Pillows Masks - Cooling Ties

Dancing Children!

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othing is more adorable than children on stage dancing their hearts out and last week there was a presentation of Baila Bahia Ballet School at Galerias shopping Centre with dozens of tiny tappers. The school is run by esteemed costume designer and choreographer Luisa Briseño. Ballerinas danced across the stage stealing our hearts

On Facebook contact: William Bill Scott Kelly Delivery Arranged Email: unonumerobomb@gmail.com

with their tutus and perfect plies. Tap dancing and performing body bending routines these dancers took our breath away. Summer classes are open now for children of all ages. Stay tuned for the next presentation. Baila Bahia Classic Ballet School 12 de Octobre Local 6-B Porvenir Nay 322-132-6862

MURPHY’S irish pub Located on the Historic Malecon across from the lighthouse statue (El Faro) beautiful sunset views every night! Delicious traditional pub menu. Live Rock Music - Wed - Sat @10:30pm Watch all sports w 2 satellites. Pool Table.

484 Morelos - 2nd floor - Centro Vallarta Open daily 11 am

Murphys Puerto Vallarta

Sherry Vallarta HOME DE’COR

Personal Shopper

Buy & Sell ~ Anything & Everything

sherryvallarta@yahoo.com 044 322 137 7063 VOLUNTARIO / VOLUNTEERING VALLARTA THE JAY SADLER PROJECT MAKING A DIFFERENCE

www.jaysadlerproject.com

EL PROYECTO JAY SADLER HACIENDO LA DIFERENCIA

COMMUNITY SERVICE / SERVICIO A LA COMUNIDAD

Marsol Friday Market by the Pier Three Hens & A Rooster Market on Saturdays

mexicasupplement@gmail.com

www.thewitcherysalon.com


charity

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Beauty, High Waves and a Dead Poet By John Warren

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he street names of Old Town (Col. Emiliano Zapata) are fascinating. Amapas, for example, is named for the beautiful tree of the same name. Other names for this gorgeous piece of evolution are pink lapacho, pink poui, and rosy trumpet . Its scientific name is “abebuia rosea”. It is the national tree of El Salvador. Together with the yellow primavera, the pink amapa is one the most noticeable and best–loved flowering trees in town. Even though the tree is prolific from Mexico to Argentina, it also grows in Hawaii and on the west coast of Africa. It is used for furniture because of its light weight, amber colour and purplish veins. Even the wood is beautiful. The amapa tree enjoys living in salty soil beside the ocean and is very tolerant to windy conditions. It thrives here in PV and can reach a height of ninety feet with a crown of thirty feet or more, so be careful where you plant it: you might get more than you wish for! When in flower, the Amapa

has few equals among Central American trees for beauty. When it blossoms it is like a huge bouquet of flowers, which can vary in colour from deep rose-purple to pure white. It is used to provide shade in coffee and cocoa plantations. You can’t get better than beauty combined with usefulness! Calle Amapas runs from north to south for five blocks, from Rodolfo Gomez crossing Pulpito, Pilitas, Abedul and Almendro before it blends into Calle Santa Barbara, which continues south towards Conchas Chinas. The next street to the east of Amapas is named Olas Altas, which translates to High Waves. It starts at Calle Venustiano Carranza

and heads south, crossing Basilio Badillo and ending six blocks later in a dead end over which the very lively and excellent fish restaurant, Jorge’s Hideaway, presides. In those five blocks there are at least twenty restaurants, bars and bistros listed on Google Maps. I assume that “High Waves” relates to past hurricanes and high tides but, perhaps, its named after the waves of pleasure available in this area? Wandering east from Olas Altas along one of a few streets in this area named after presidents, in this case Venustiano Carranza, I came to a street that is named after another hero of the Mexican Revolution and the last vice-president of

Anglican Church Puerto Vallarta Formerly Christ Church by the Sea Worldwide Anglican Communion

“Celebrating conservative family values” Services Sunday 10:00 a.m. English-Traditional Holy Communion All faiths welcome-Casual Dress

How cool it is! Yes, we are now celebrating in our air-conditioned Chapel. Come join us! Fr. Jack continues to welcome people from all walks of life and denominations. Across from airport, northbound service road next to Sixt and Thrifty Car Rental Blvd Fco. Medina 7936, Puerto Vallarta Father Jack Wehrs/Lay-minister Fer Sandoval e mail: jackandshirley1@att.net Text 1 619 300 7377 Tel 044 322 130 5073

Web site: www.anglicanchurchpuertovallarta.org Complimentary parking at Sixt Rental Car

June 14 - 20, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Mexico, Pino Suárez. Although born into a privileged and wealthy family Suarez, who lived in Merida, Yucatán had a strong sense of social justice and for three years, from 1896–1899, he practised law in Mexico City. He then returned to Merida to go into business with his wealthy father-in-law. It was after his return to Yucatán that Suárez’s political career began with his founding of the newspaper, El Peninsular. The paper soon caught the public eye for its criticism of the Diaz dictatorship and for publicizing the bad treatment of workers in the Henequen plantations of Yucatán. In 1905,  El Peninsular  was forced to close by the government and Suárez faced prosecution and time in jail, so he fled to the USA and joined Francisco Madero, who was also seeking asylum there. In anticipation of leading a revolution against President Diaz, Madero and Suárez, drafted the plan of San Luis Potosi, which declared the 1910 re-election of Diaz to be null and void and called for revolution to replace the president and to reform much of Mexican law. The Revolution started in

November 1910 and six months later Diaz resigned from the presidency. In the new elections that year Madero became president and Suárez vice-president. However, things went badly for the Madero government and, in 1913, some army officers attempted a coup that was unsuccessful. One of the apparently loyal generals, Victoriano Huerta, entered into negotiations between the rebels and the US Ambassador, Henry Lane Wilson. Huerta suddenly changed sides, captured the president and vice-president, forced them at gunpoint to resign, and had them shot “while trying to escape.” Not only was Suárez a politician, he was a man of letters. From an early age he was a member of the Merida Literary Academy and was introduced to authors who included many of Europe’s finest writers. Suárez became an accomplished poet and published two books of his work. He was also a loving family man who left a widow and six orphans when he died. Born in September 1969, Pino Suárez was yet another Mexican politician who died by gunfire. He was just 43 years old.

SPCA of Puerto Vallarta By Janice Gonzalez

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e opened our sanctuary in January of 2012 on the outskirts of Puerto Vallarta. We are a no-kill shelter and can house up to 130 animals at once. We rescue and find permanent homes for over 250 animals each year. The mission of SPCA de PV is to help fund and promote sterilization, adoption and healthcare efforts for companion animals in the Puerto Vallarta area, with the goal of eliminating the euthanasia of healthy and adoptable animals. Our main focus is to rescue the abused, homeless animals from Puerto Vallarta’s streets and place them in foster homes in both the United States and Canada until permanent homes are available. We are not supported by the government, corporations, foundations or businesses. We fully function on private donations. Animals are often found living on the streets after being discarded and/or extremely abused. We devote ourselves to their physical and emotional rehabilitation and invite everyone to join one of our escorted tours and interact with the animals at our

private shelter. We offer one tour per week during the summer months, either Tuesday or Thursday, and special arrangements are necessary. Contact us at spcapv@gmail.com. To see our animals available for adoption, visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/spcapv. There are photos as well as individual albums of our rescues which include a bit of their background. Please be aware that our adoption fee within Mexico is $2,000 pesos. Contact us at spcapv@gmail.com to obtain an adoption application. To make donations via PayPal, select the “Donate” option on our Facebook page www.facebook. com/spcapv or on our website at http://spcapv.com/donate/. You can drop off any donations for the SPCA at Hacienda San Angel located at Calle Miramar 336, above Our Lady of Guadalupe Church in El Centro. Get involved…rescue, adopt, foster, volunteer, donate or educate. You can learn more about the SPCA Puerto Vallarta by checking us out at www.spcapv.com/home or on Facebook.


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Live Music Calendar

June 14 - 20, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

The Jazz Foundation (Allende 116) Live Music from Wed through Sat at 8:30pm More @ facebook.com/thejazzfoundation Kelly’s Pour Favor (Lazaro Cardenas 245) Live Music throughout the week at 7:30pm La Explanada Vallarta (Malecon) Chuy Lizarraga & Jorge Medina on Sat at 8:00pm Nacho Daddy (Basilio Badillo 287) Da Crew on Thur at 8:30pm Texas Embassy Blues Band on Fri at 8:30pm Damaged Goods on Sat at 8:00pm

Act II Entertainment (Basilio Badillo 330) Closing Night Bash & Diana’s B’Day Party on Thu at 8:00pm Dreaming of You Selena on Fri at 8:00pm Bob’s Karaoke Party on Wed at 8:00pm More @ act2pv.com BabelBar (Aquiles Serdán 437, Isla del Cuale) Live Music on Sun from 1:00pm to 3:00pm Cafe Roma (Encino 287) Karaoke Party with Catherine on Fri at 6:30pm The Sunset Raiders on Sat at 6:00pm Captain Don’s (Honduras 126) Sylvie & The Zippers on Fri from 9:00pm to 12:00am Da Crew on Sat from 9:00pm to 12:00am Cuates y Cuetes (Calle Francisca Rodríguez at Los Muertos Beach) Live Music Daily from 8:00 to 10:00pm Devils Bar Live (527 Morelos) 3:Tones on Friday from 11:00pm to 1:00am Soul Trip every Saturday from 12 - 2:00am The Zippers every Sunday from 9 - 11:00pm

El Patio de Mi Casa (Guerrero 311) Live Jazz Farewell Anniversary Jam Session Thu - Sun at 9:30pm

Rey de Oros (Sierra Aconcagua 150-C) Local Rap & Hip-Hop on Fri at 7:00pm

El Sofa Cafe (Venustiano Carranza 306) Open Mic 1 Year Anniversary Show on Fri at 8:00pm

Wingman (Paseo Díaz Ordaz 552) Live Music Every Night at 9:00pm

El Sonador (Calle Ignacio Luis Vallarta 229) Soul Trip on Sun from 11:00pm to 2:00am

Que?Pasa (625 Aquiles Serdan) Adriana Ramirez “Electric Grandma and The Gorillas” on Friday nights 7:30-10:30. Saturdays is Tequila Rush 7-10pm with 20 pesos tequila shots!

Incanto (Insurgentes 109) Zen Hour is Tue - Sun at 4:00pm Tongo & Joby for breakfast Tue - Sun at 9:00am Red Suitcase Band on Sun and Wed at 7:30pm Zoe Wood & Eduardo Leon on Thu at 5:00pm Open Mic on Thu at 7:30pm Joan Houston on Fri at 5:00pm Luis & Fernando on Fri at 7:30pm Lady Zen on Fri at 8:00pm Cheko & Alex on Sat at 7:30pm Ballet Folklorico Tradiciones on Sat at 8:00pm Yuvia on Sun at 5:00pm Cheko Ruiz With “Gipsy Kings” on Sun at 8:00pm Tongo on Tue at 5:00pm Santiago Martin on Tue at 7:00pm Joby Hernandez on Wed at 5:00pm More @ incantovallarta.com

Zapata Antojería y Bar Electrocumbia & Dance Mixes on Fri at 10:00pm Salsa, bachata, son, cumbia & More DJ on Sat

To be included in this directory: Events@VallartaTribune.com Deadline: Friday before Thursday publication date.

OVER 600,000 INTERNATIONAL VISITORS AND 430,000 NATIONALS WILL VISIT BANDERAS BAY THIS SUMMER.*

Promote your events in English & Spanish this summer! *2017 STATISTICS WWW.AEROPUERTOSGAP.COM.MX

and

Book advertising in the Vallarta Tribune and receive FREE advertising credit with Radio RadianteFM Contact: editor@vallartatribune.com


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© 2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

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by C.C. Burnikel / Ed. Rich Norris

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June 14 - 20, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com


local

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Long Drive Series Tom Stickney

tom.stickney@puntamita.com

Tom F. Stickney II is the Director of Instruction and Business Development at Punta Mita, (www.puntamita.com) He is a Golf Magazine “Top 100 Teacher,” and has been honored as a Golf Digest Best Teacher and a Golf Tips Top-25 Instructor. Tom is also a Trackman University Master/Partner, a distinction held by less than 15 people in the world. For more information please email: tom.stickney@puntamita.com

Smooth Transitional Tempo

I

n this video series, we will examine the one of the most asked questions I hear on the Lesson Tee, “How can I hit my driver further?” Enjoy this eight-part series on adding distance! One of the most misunderstood aspects of driver distance output is the idea of maintaining a slower transitional tempo from the top. The idea is best shown by turning your club upside down and making a swing, you should hear the loudest woosh at the very bottom of the swing not right from the top. If you jerk the club down from the top you will set up a poor transitional sequence, which can lead to more problems down the line. In fact, this jerky transitional motion will cause players to usually throw their rear shoulder out at the ball from the start of the transition setting up an over the top motion. This over the top motion causes the path to be left of the target and from there slices and pulls will begin costing you distance. So, remember slow and smooth, allowing the club to gather speed, from the top is the key to longer drives NOT yanking it down violently! Youtube Video https://youtu.be/801192LwbFw

June 14 - 20, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com


Issue 1106 June 14 - 20, 2018  

Puerto Vallarta, Mexico The Vallarta Tribune is the longest running free English language newspaper in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. We publish w...

Issue 1106 June 14 - 20, 2018  

Puerto Vallarta, Mexico The Vallarta Tribune is the longest running free English language newspaper in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. We publish w...

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