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Entertainment

Cuisine

Vibes & Vices

When the Sun Goes Down

Warique Vallarta’s Obsession

ARRRR for Rum on Vallarta’s Pirate Ship

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VallartaTribune.com

FR EE

GU ID E

May 17 - 23, 2018 Year 21 Free Issue 1108

Wind Festival This Weekend! May 18-20 on Flamingos Beach Page 3

CROSSWORD paGE 22

VALLARTA SHOPPING paGES 18-19

Map of Banderas Bay 12 - 13


local

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Wind Festival this Weekend

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rom Friday May 18 to Sunday May 20, the 8th Annual Wind Festival will take place on the beaches of Nuevo Vallarta in Flamingos. This is one of the most important kite surfing events in the world and the most important in Mexico, attracting the world’s best athletes. Over 300 kite boarders will participate in Freestyle, Big Air and Slalom events and the impressive Downwind race from La Cruz to Flamingos.

The downwind race takes place on Saturday and is a great spectacle to watch. During the events you are invited to bring your beach chairs and umbrellas and enjoy the festivities which includes DJ music, giveways, food and drinks. There is VIP access available for $150 pesos a day or $200 for the 3-day event. www.festivaldelviento.mx Tip: Watch the racers take off over lunch at Frascati’s in the La Cruz Marina.

May 17 - 23, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com


welcome

Welcome to Puerto Vallarta and Riviera Nayarit

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t the Tribune we want you to have the best experience possible while you explore Puerto Vallarta, the Bay of Banderas and Riviera Nayarit. Here are some helpful tips for traveling. TIME ZONE: The entire state of Jalisco is on Central Time, as is the southern part of the State of Nayarit starting from San Blas in the north. BUSES: A system of urban buses with different routes can bring you from one end of the bay to the other and all the spots in between. If you’re going further than San Pancho, head to the main bus terminal to catch a ‘Pacifico’ bus. Current fare is 7.50 pesos and passengers must purchase a new ticket every time they board another bus. There are no “transfers.” TAXIS: There are set rates within defined zones of town. Do not enter a taxi without agreeing on the price with the driver first. Make a note of the taxi number in case you leave something behind. Drivers typically do not carry change.

UBER: New in 2017 to Puerto Vallarta, Uber is still experiencing some growing pains particularly in the state of Nayarit. Uber is about 25-50% cheaper than a taxi, but this is subject to change. The benefits of using Uber are set fares and the ability to follow up directly with your driver if there is an incident or you leave an item behind. MONEY EXCHANGE: Typically a bank will give you a higher rate of exchange than the exchange booths (Caja de Cambio). You will need your passport. Better yet, use your bank card to withdraw funds from any ATM. Note that ATM’s in the banks are the safest to use and charge lower fees. DRINKING WATER: While Puerto Vallarta’s water has been

awarded a certification of purity for the past two decades, the quality of the water tested at the source varies greatly from what comes out of the tap at the other end. So do be careful. If you want to be doubly sure, you can pick up bottled water just about anywhere. EXPORTING PETS: Falling in love with the street dog outside your hotel is easy to do and it’s also easy to bring them home with you too. The process is inexpensive and only takes a day or two. You need a certificate of health from a local vet among other things. For the most up-to-date information contact the Puerto Vallarta SPCA at spcapv@ gmail.com. COMMON SENSE: Just as you wouldn’t walk around your hometown drunk and belligerent, it is not acceptable to do that here. While Mexico is a tolerant culture, basic politeness is appreciated. Don’t pee in the streets. Don’t flash your money or expensive gadgets. Pay attention to your surroundings. Know where you are going. Pay your bills (and don’t forget to tip). And have fun! DRINKING AND DRIVING: First off – just don’t. The consequences are not worth it. Taxis or Ubers are cheap and plentiful. Fines are as much as 12,000 pesos. You can be taken to jail and your vehicle impounded. There are many checkstops on the weekends, and you will be asked to blow if they suspect you have been drinking. LEGAL SYSTEM: Not knowing the law is not a valid excuse in Mexico, or anywhere. If you find yourself caught in a legal situation be aware that guilt is presumed until your innocence can be proven. This is a very difficult lesson to learn if you are visiting from the United States or Canada. Immediately contact your consulate for assistance. Director Noemi Zamora noemizamorareynoso@gmail.com Editor Lic. Madeline Milne mmilne@Vallartatribune.com Sales Team editor@vallartatribune.com Designer Cynthia E. Andrade G. cysandra@gmail.com Web Manager Rachel Drinkcard Racheldrinkcard@gmail.com

May 17 - 23, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Calling in Mexico Calling phones in Mexico can be tricky. There are different codes you need to use depending if you are calling landlines or cellular phones and if they are local or long distance. LONG-DISTANCE CALLS FROM WITHIN MEXICO For national long-distance calls (within Mexico) the code is 01 plus the area code and phone number. For international long-distance calls, first dial 00, then the country code (U.S. and Canada country code is 1), so you would dial 00 + 1 + area code + 7 digit number. CALLING CELL PHONES (FROM A LAND LINE) If you are calling from a landline within the area code of the Mexican cell phone number dial 044, the 10 digit number. Outside of the area code (but still within Mexico) dial 045 and then the 10 digit phone number. Cell phone to cell phone only requires the 10 digit number.  PHONE CARDS Phone cards (tarjetas telefonicas) for use in pay phones can be bought at newsstands and in pharmacies. Pay phones do not accept coins. When buying a phone card for pay phone use, specify that you would like a tarjeta LADA. CALLING TOLL-FREE NUMBERS Some toll free numbers work from Mexico to the US and Canada, but many do not.  Those that do work are often not toll-free. You need to dial a different prefix. To call the following toll free prefixes, dial as follows: 800 numbers Dial 001-880-then the number  866 numbers Dial 001-883-then the number  877 numbers Dial 001-882-then the number  888 numbers Dial 001-881-then the number

Emergencies: 911 Red Cross: 065 Fire Department: 322.223.9476 Ambulance: 322.222.1533

Ahoy Cruisers! NAME PASS DATE EURODAM 2,104 01/05/2018 CARNIVAL SPLENDOR 3,200 02/05/2018 NORWEGIAN SUN 2,240 05/05/2018 CARNIVAL SPLENDOR 3,200 09/05/2018 ECLIPSE 2,850 11/05/2018 CRYSTAL SERENITY 1,080 13/05/2018 CARNIVAL SPLENDOR 3,200 15/05/2018 CARNIVAL SPLENDOR 3,200 23/05/2018 CARNIVAL SPLENDOR 3,200 30/05/2018 MS SEVEB SEAS NAVIGATOR 490 31/05/2018

Immigration: 322.224.7719 Consumer Protection: 01.800.468.8722 Tourism Offices Jalisco: 322.221.2676 Nayarit: 322.297.1006

Consulates American Consulate 24 hrs 01-332-268-2100 Canadian Consulate 322.293.0098 322.293.0099 24 hrs: 1.800.706.2900

In port this month

In the month of May Puerto Vallarta welcomes 24,764 passengers!

Vallarta Tribune is an activity and entertainment guide and publishes information as it is provided by the advertiser or event host. We do not assume responsibility in errors or omissions other than to correct them as they are made known to us regarding event schedules, locations and/or prices. In addition, we do not assume any responsibility for erroneous inclusion or exclusion of information except to take reasonable care to ensure accuracy, that permission has been obtained to use it, and to remove it as soon as is practical upon receiving your notification of error. We recommend you always confirm prior to attending or visiting an event or establishment. Weekly publication edited, printed and distributed by Ediciones y Publicaciones Siete Junio, SA de CV Grupo Editorial Tribuna Calle 21 de Marzo # 1174 Col. Lomas del Coapinole Del. El Pitillal, Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco México CP 48290 Tel. 226-0800 * www. vallartatribune.com * https://www.facebook.com/VtaTribune/

Cut out and put near your phone for handy reference

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editorial

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Editor’s

May 17 - 23, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

You Are Here: Cartographies Of A Destination

Note

Opening: May 26 from 7PM to 9PM 598 Juárez esq. con Aldama, Centro —OPC’s 4th Anniversary—

T editor@vallartatribune.com

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here are a plethora of things happening right now. I hope you brought your dancing shoes because PRIDE starts this week (May 20-27) On The Pride Parade is next Thursday, May 24 from 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm starting at the Sheraton Buganvilias along the Malecon and Calle Olas Altas. Thousands of people are expected to line the cobblestone streets to celebrate the cities diversity and 100th birthday. Special guests include Alejandra Bogue, international recording artist and Grand Marshal of Vallarta Pride 2018, Lorena Herrera and Puerto Vallarta’s local ambassador Hector Betancourt. Following the parade, then join the fun at “La Fiesta en la Calle” giant Block Party on Lazaro Cardenas Street. The party continues to the wee hours of the morning. Check out their website for all the details on these events and lots of others happening all week long. www.vallartapride.com The largest Kite Boarding

competition in Mexico and a Top 20 event in the world, The Festival del Viento (Wind Festival) is this weekend at the beach in Flamingos, straddling Nuevo Vallarta and Bucerias. It’s a three-day event (May 18-20) with over 300 competitors and 1000’s of spectators. The City of Vallarta continues to host events all month long in celebration of its centennial. We’ve included the Schedule of Events for MayoFest (May 26 - 31) here so you can plan the coming weeks. If that’s not enough, we are in the throes of Restaurant Week, with a review of Warique, a new Latin American themed restaurant in Old Town. I’ve only ever heard good things about it and this review is fantastic. I’ll be checking it out soon. What are some of your favourite restaurants? How many are you planning on hitting during Restaurant Week? Last week I was treated to a customized tasting menu at Tintoque in Marina Vallarta. I have no bad words to say. From the soft-shell crab to the indescribable dessert, it was a tasting party in my mouth. I would eat that dessert a hundred times; it was so sublime.

If you haven’t been to Tintoque – check it out. It’s also taking part in Restaurant Week. Finally, two weeks ago I received an email from a local man who lives in Ixtapa, looking for some help in finding a new wheelchair a the boy who begs outside the Oxxo in town. A quick email to Dennis Rike of the Jay Sadler Project and this kid has a new wheelchair. The Jay Sadler Project has been making significant changes in the lives of local children. They help to repair playgrounds, schools, clinics and other public spaces, among other things. Each month they publish a report of their ongoing and finished projects in the Tribune. If you know of a family or school that needs assistance, consider reaching out the Dennis and the Jay Sadler Project. You can read about all their recent successes here: https://www.vallartatribune.com/category/charities/ jay-sadler-project/ Thank you so much for sharing a bit of your time with us this week. I hope you get out and enjoy the events around the bay. If you’re reading from afar, hurry back! Safe travels, Madeline

Parque de los Azulejos, the sparkling jewel of Old Town By Emily Murray

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s the weather heats up and the humidity envelops us in that all-to-familiar “air you can wear”, we find more and more activity in the early morning hours. Folks begin to step out at daybreak, and even earlier, to get their morning workout in, or walk their dog, or just lounge around with a cup of coffee and greet the day. It’s a magical time to be in the park, as the sun rises and catches the mirrored tiles just so, sending sparks of light every which way and offering rich, eye-catching color. A special texture, a perfect pattern, seen only from your own perspective, meant for your eyes

only. No doubt you’ll begin rising earlier and earlier, if you’ve not begun to already. Consider a walk down the Malecon, and a few moments in the Parque, to consider the incredible work of art that is unfolding daily there. If you’d like to be a part of

Vallarta history, be sure to donate to Parque de los Azulejos, or purchase your own commemorative tile! Learn more at https://www. parqueazulejospv.com/sponsor.

he exhibition You Are Here: Cartographies of a Destination  will take place from May 26 to August 25, 2018. The «You Are Here» series, curated by architect Oscar Morán Guillén, continues to reflect upon urban space in our city. This third and final edition offers a reinterpretation of historical archives and documents that illustrate the chronological development of the Banderas Bay region, including its different settlements throughout history: the pre-hispanic culture in Xiutla, the explorations of the conquerors, the foundation of Las Peñas in the 19th-century, the Montgomery Fruit Company’s early foreign investment, Hollywood’s short gaze on the city, as well as globalization: the monoculture of tourism and its extraction practices.  The show will be of a multidisciplinary nature and will include photographs, video, installation and archival material. The 15 participating creators will produce specific works for the exhibition.  Artists: Alfonso Baños, Davis Birks, César Girón, Arturo Dávila, Fallen Fruit, Kaz Kipp, Tania Mancha, Arturo Montero, Jorge Morales, Gerardo Moran, Oscar Moran, Jimena Odetti, Jorge Ramírez, Alberto Reyes, Andrés Reyes.  Cartographies of a Destination will seek to identify the different facets of the historical development of the region and the different cultural influences over time, as well as those with greater current validity and its consequences and ramifications. Historical archives will be used to identify documents that can serve as a conceptual basis for the pieces. The multidisciplinary exhibition will be part of the official celebration of the centennial of the municipality of Puerto Vallarta.  The series of thematic exhibitions  You Are Here: Urban Approximations  (2016),  Dichotomies of Landscape  (2017) and  Cartographies of a Destination(2018) curated by architect Oscar Morán Guillén have generated urgent reflections on urban space in Puerto Vallarta. The series of “parklets” interventions in public spaces have sought to transform residual or unused spaces as a tactic to strengthen community ties.  In addition to the exhibition in OPC’s main gallery, an open call was launched for university students from

the region studying architecture with the objective of identifying, analyzing and finding solutions to challenges that Puerto Vallarta is facing, as a city and as a destination, today and within the next 100 years. The chosen works will be part of the exhibition You are Here: Cartographies of a Destination and will be exhibited at Taller OPC.   OPC organizes an annual exhibition dedicated to Puerto Vallarta on the occasion of its anniversary (both the gallery and the city). In this case,  You Are Here: Cartographies of a Destination coincides with the centennial of Puerto Vallarta, opening a space that fosters discussion and dialogue about the historical development of this region and the various cultural influences through time and in the present, as well as the consequences of them.   Oscar Moran Guillén  is an architect who obtained his title from ITESO and an Urban Planner from the University of Southern California. He is founder of the Architecture and Urbanism Studio RH+OM. He has more than 15 years of experience in the field in Mexico and the United States. He has lived in Puerto Vallarta since 2012 and is a member of the OPC founding team.  The  Office of Cultural Projects (OPC) is an independent, non-profit organization dedicated to the promotion of Contemporary Art through exhibitions, round tables, public art initiatives and educational services programs. It was born with the aim of contributing to the reflection on the contemporary sociocultural and artistic environment, with the vocation to share with the inhabitants and visitors of Puerto Vallarta. OPC works with different creators such as artists, architects, curators, academics and writers who contribute to the construction of our notion of the city and contribute to the cultural panorama linked to Puerto Vallarta but of global scope.


PROGRAMA CULTURAL, TURÍSTICO Y DEPORTIVO

del 9 al 13 de Mayo

26 y 27 de Mayo

COPA VALLARTA

SUPERPOWER FITNESS FESTIVAL

31º torneo de futbol, infantil y juvenil

competencia deportiva de crossfit / Playa Camarones / 8 am

17 campos empastados del puerto

27 de Mayo

del 10 al 20 de Mayo

FERIA DEL TACO

FESTIVAL VALLARTA AZTECA DEL FOLCLOR INTERNACIONAL

Parque Lázaro Cárdenas / de 4 a 11 pm

festival del folclor / Terreno de IPEJAL / de 6 a 10 pm

29 de Mayo

12 y 13 de Mayo

COLOQUIO SOBRE LA ARQUEOLOGÍA E HISTORIA EN PUERTO VALLARTA

DOWN HILL

ciclismo de montaña extremo

Plaza de armas / 6 pm

Centro de Puerto Vallarta / a partir de las 3 pm

30 de Mayo

del 17 de Mayo al 3 de Junio

ENCUENTRO REGIONAL DE CRONISTAS

EXPO CENTENARIO DE PUERTO VALLARTA

Plaza de Armas / 6 pm

exposición nacional e internacional

PROYECCIÓN DEL DOCUMENTAL

“Más que la playa Puerto Vallarta”

Parque Parota / de 3 a 11 pm

por Brett Shwarts y Sebastián Hernández

del 25 al 27 de Mayo

Auditorio IVC / a partir de las 7 pm

ABIERTO MEXICANO DE VOLEIBOL DE PLAYA

torneo deportivo varonil y femenil Playa Camarones/ Gratis / 25 y 26 de mayo de 9 am a 7 pm 27 de mayo de 9 am a 5 pm

MAGNO DESFILE CENTENARIO PUERTO VALLARTA Carnaval / Terreno del IPEJAL / a partir de las 7 pm

25 de Mayo al 30 de Julio

INAUGURACIÓN DE LAS EXPOSICIONES “EL BAÚL DE LOS RECUERDOS”, de Arturo Pasos

“TRAVESÍA CULTURAL POR LOS PUEBLOS DE LA COSTA OCCIDENTE DE MÉXICO”, por el arqueólogo Jorge Morales, IVC, UCLA

Malecón / 6 pm

Civíco / Terreno del IPEJAL / a partir de las 9 am

SESIÓN SOLEMNE: ENTREGA DEL PREMIO VALLARTA PASTEL CONMEMORATIVO Y MAÑANITAS CON EL MARICHI “NUEVO CONTINENTAL”

INAUGURACIÓN DE LA EXPOSICIÓN

“EL GALEÓN DE MANILA”, de INAH, SEMAR, SEDENA e IVC

Museo del Cuale / 6 pm

Escultura “el niño y el caballito de mar” / 8 pm

del 26 de Mayo al 27 de Agosto

Museo del Cuale / 9 am a 6 pm

MAGNO DESFILE CENTENARIO PUERTO VALLARTA

Arcos del Malecón / 7 pm

25 de Mayo

INAUGURACIÓN DE LA EXPOSICIÓN de arte contemporáneo “Usted

31 de Mayo

SINFÓNICA DE ALIENTOS Y MARIACHI DE LA POLICÍA FEDERAL

está Aquí”

concierto sinfónico Arcos del Malecón / 9 pm

PROGRAMA SUJETO A CAMBIOS SIN PREVIO AVISO

cultura

SÍGUENOS EN: www.puertovallartalcien.com www.puertovallarta.gob.mx @gobvallarta @vallartaalcien


Martes 29 de Mayo

Sábado 26 de Mayo

“ALAS”, ESCUELA DE CANTO (Puerto Vallarta) / 7 pm

CORO “VOCES DEL MAR”

música popular (Puerto Vallarta) / 7 pm

TATEWARI

SAL DE MAR

world music (Puerto Vallarta) / 8 pm

reggae, rocksteady, ska y jazz (Puerto Vallarta) / 8 pm

LA BOQUITA

A LOVE ELECTRIC

flamenco (Puerto Vallarta) / 9 pm

LA SANTA CECILIA

cumbia, bossa nova y boleros (Mex-Eua) / 10 pm

rock jazz (México, EUA y Argentina) / 9 pm

GOLDEN GANGA reggae (Guadalajara) / 10 pm

Domingo 27 de Mayo

SALTY PAW JAZZ ORCHESTRA swing jazz (Instituto de Artes Musicales de Puerto Vallarta) / 7 pm

Miércoles 30 de Mayo

ENSAMBLE DE MÚSICA LATINOAMERICANA

JOSÉ CARLOS Y GEORGE GRACIA

(Puerto Vallarta) / 7 pm

JAIME MARTÍNEZ

gipsy folka y rumba balcánica (Guadalajara) / 8 pm

JANETT MICHEL

cumbia freestyle (San Pancho, Nayarit) / 9 pm

trova (Puerto Vallarta) / 8 pm

trova (Ensenada B.C) / 9 pm

XIRANDA

DJ BOLA PIRATA

BOMBA ESTÉREO

pop (Puerto Vallarta / 10 pm

electrónica y cumbia (Colombia) / 10 pm

Lunes 28 de Mayo

PRO DANZA

Jueves 31 de Mayo

danza clásica (Puerto Vallarta) / 7 pm

PLATAFORMA 322

danza contemporánea (Puerto Vallarta) / 8 pm

GRUPO FOLCLÓRICO “VALLARTA AZTECA”

PEPE AGUILAR con Ángela Aguilar

Tour 2018 / pop y ranchero (México, D.F)

danza folclórica (CECyTE Jalisco, Puerto Vallarta) / 9 pm

/ 11 pm

FUEGOS PIROTÉCNICOS show / 1 am

GRUPO FOLCLÓRICO MUNICIPAL “XIUTLA”

SONIDO SATANÁS cumbia (Guadalajara) / 1:30 am

danza folclórica (Puerto Vallarta) / 10 pm

PROGRAMA SUJETO A CAMBIOS SIN PREVIO AVISO

cultura

CONSULTA LOS HORARIOS EN: www.puertovallartaalcien.com www.puertovallarta.gob.mx @gobvallarta @vallartaalcien


local

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Paradise and Parenting

From Here Marcia Blondin

Leza Warkentin

marciavallarta@gmail.com

mommyinmexico.wordpress.com

I am the preschool coordinator and nursery teacher at the American School of Puerto Vallarta. I am also both unsurprised and not a bit sorry that this list of my favorites is mostly about places to eat. If you can live in Vallarta without appreciating some of the good eatin’ around here, you have to be at least half Vulcan.

N

ot sure what it is, but Vallarta’s air feels supercharged somehow. Maybe it’s because there’s so much going on but that’s not unusual. There is a ‘newness’ afoot. Maybe it’s all the great vibes coming from the newbies who have found our chunk of paradise, and they are so excited about the rest of their lives. Maybe it’s because Restaurant Week  starts this week and there are so many places to discover. Maybe because I am having lunch tomorrow with a dear friend I haven’t seen in ages – the fabulous  Georgia Darehshori  of  Casa Karma. We are meeting at  De Cantaro  on Basilio Badillo. It’s new, part of Resto Week and neither of us has had the pleasure so… Another new, no, two new productions I am off to see this week. First, the Boutique Community Theatre  is presenting “Torch Song” this Thursday, Friday, and Saturday; then all of next week at 6 pm. On Saturday, I am going to interview  Artistic Director Dariusz Blajer (I hope!) and some of the  Ballet of  Jalisco  dancers at  Teatro Vallarta’s  presentation of  “Don Quijote.”  I met  Maestro Dariusz  two years ago in Guadalajara with my wonderful friend  Brian  Peterman, who was (is) looking for choreographers and dancers for his opera  “La Catrina.”  I think the last ballet I saw live was at the Kennedy Center and  Mikhai​l Baryshnikov  was dancing. I am a little overdue! I stopped in to see  Warique, a new resto on Aquiles Serdan.  Christian, one of the partners, gave me a tour and we sat and yakked about all kinds of things Vallarta.  Warique  is also part of  Restaurant Week, and I am looking forward to eating there. Haven’t heard one single discouraging word about the food and the place inside is darling. When you walk in, look up. There you will find the coolest ceiling in all Vallarta.  Warique  has such great energy and colors; the food HAS to be good. Oh, and it won  The Tribune’s People’s Choice “Best  New Restaurant”  award.

May 17 - 23, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Teacher Appreciation

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THAT’S why I went there – to present the certificate and the sticker proclaiming they are a Pata Salada winner. Last Saturday was Opening Night of “Princesas Desesperadas” at Incanto. As always it was hilarious; as always, I was the only discernable Anglo in the audience. I will never understand it fully. Even half-fully! But I don’t care. I love the guys and their characters and who ever gets tired of infectious laughter? The princesses are off to  Lagos de Moreno  next month to compete (gently) against the best actors, producers, directors the State of Jalisco has to throw against them. It is an enormous honor to be invited to compete. Now the big question is: will  Juan Pablo, Cesar Bravo, Juan Carlos and Cesar Trujillo  be nominated for Best Actors or Best Actresses? Until we know the answers, be kind to one another, From Here.

uesday, May 15, was Teacher’s Day, which is of special interest to me as a teacher. It is interesting for a number of reasons, two of the most interesting being: I never experienced so much teacher appreciation as I have since I moved to Mexico. I have the day off, which is always very interesting. I am glad that Mexico finds it necessary to appreciate the work we do with her youngest citizens, because sometimes, I will tell you honestly, teachers don’t feel we are as valued as maybe we ought to be. Let’s be honest, it can be challenging to consider yourself appreciated when people are putting their feet on top of your new Kirkland Signature pants because they want their shoes tied and they don’t feel like asking just now. It’s hard to know if people really see what you do as important when they are throwing up on you, or using your shirt as a tissue, or asking you what they should do when you just said it at least three times. It’s difficult to feel appreciated when the people with whom you spend your time tell you they want to go home, or lie down in the middle of the most exciting part of the story, or leave their half eaten grapes on the floor so you can take an exciting ride across the linoleum when you least expect it. But, oddly enough, I don’t really spend a lot of time considering it, I truly don’t. Being a teacher means that you do not have the time or the energy to spend on a lot of deep philosophical questions such as “does anyone even care” because you are too busy eating your lunch with one hand while the other is making photocopies, or handing out real Kleenex, or wiping up grape juice. More importantly, you are

occupied with re-planning tomorrow’s lesson because your students aren’t interested in wild animals, they want to know why their pets die. They spent an hour today telling their various tragic stories about dogs being run over, or dying of cancer, or being taken to the vet and not coming home. So that unit on animal classification is just going to have to wait, because those tender hearts are the priority in your classroom. You are busy wondering why your little student has changed from that happy-go-lucky kid who was always excited to play Alphabet Memory to the withdrawn, sad little person who wants to be alone all the time. You can’t quite fall asleep as easily as

you usually do because you are mentally listing all the ways you can draw her out of her shell. Your time is far too taken up by every child in your classroom to wonder if anyone notices the hours you put in on their learning, on their behavior, on their happiness. And it’s ok, because if you can’t get job satisfaction as a teacher just by doing the actual job, then you probably should change careers. Because if you really do need a lot of continuous back-patting, this job will stop being fun after your first circle time when the first five children ask to go to the bathroom. And you will discover in random, sudden moments that your students really do notice. It’s in the tight hugs around your legs and you have to grab a chair so you don’t fall on them. It’s in the anonymous “i LoF U MiS” written in a crooked heart on your white board. It’s in the excited, shining eyes that catch yours when they sound out their very first word. I’m not going to lie. Having a day where my career choice is celebrated is pretty nice. It kind of makes up for being a human Kleenex on the other days of the year. But having a job where I get to make a difference, that’s even better.


09

local Welcome Home

Sheryl Novak

sa.novak@solutionsmexico.com

Sheryl Novak is an expat Canadian who has owned a home in Mexico for over ten years. She is the owner of SOLutions Mexico and The Furniture Store by SOLutions Mexico. She is an expert on sourcing all styles of furniture for all sizes of budgets, in Mexico.

Why are there not enough closets?

M

ost casas and condos in Riviera Nayarit come with small, basic storage spaces that are only a rod and a couple of shelves. Ever feel you don’t have enough closet space in your home in Mexico? That’s because we are experiencing a bit of a clash of cultures. Unlike in Mexico, American and Canadian households tend to have

a higher amount of disposable income. Coupled with a strong focus on material possessions, this results in a tendency for a lot more stuff in our homes. According to a recent survey, the average American house includes approximately 300,000 items. Even our large houses cannot contain all that we own. Most garages are used for storage rather than for parking cars. We have so many items that one in ten households even rent an off-site self-storage unit. The self-storage and closet

organization industries are primarily an American and Canadian phenomenon. In Mexico, the focus has mainly been on family rather than possessions, again driven a lot by the lack of disposable income. This is starting to change. Mexico is currently experiencing massive growth in its middle class. With this change, we are now also seeing the entrance of self-storage facilities and closet organization companies in Mexico. If not well organized, our stuff can quickly become clutter. Trying to find what we need in a world that is moving at a breath-taking pace causes unnecessary stress. Think back to a time when you felt stress trying to find that one important, albeit misplaced item, as the clock ticked loudly signaling you were late for your appointment. I feel my heart rate spike just thinking about it! The key is not to build more storage. Anyone can go out and get another shelf or hanging rod for their closet, but that will only be a short-term solution. It will undoubtedly help to reduce the number of items we own. The real secret to reducing our stress, however, is to organize our possessions better so that there is a place for everything and everything goes in its place. Yes, that old mantra is true! These professional closet and storage organization companies have been popular in the US and Canada since the 70’s. What makes them work is that they start with a detailed inventory of the items you need to store. The designer creates a dedicated space for each piece in the closet or storage space. You never have to dig through to find anything. When you finish with the item, you return it to its rightful spot. Even though any carpenter can build a closet, they are not experts in spatial design. What makes the professional storage solution work is the personalized inventory and design of the space to fit your items. Ask anyone with a customized storage solution, and they will quickly tell you it is well worth the cost. If you are feeling the stress and anxiety of clutter, consider a personalized storage solution for your home in Mexico. Buying a new home in Rivieria Nayarit? Email me at furniture@solutionsmexico.com to get a free home inventory list.

May 17 - 23, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Medical Matters

Pam Thompson

pamela@healthcareresourcespv.com

Pamela Thompson operates HealthCare Resources Puerto Vallarta, a multi-faceted, independent, resource network that is here for your total health and well-being. We offer assistance to help find a physician, hospital and diagnostic service for any healthcare needs. www.healthcareresourcespv.com

A Potpourri!

I

thought I would go through some of the requests that I receive each week and put some contact information here. Of course, I absolutely do not mind answering the emails and sending the info but perhaps some folks reading this might be looking and interested. Where can I rent a wheelchair? We recommend the folks at either Beachcrossers (https://www. beachcrossers.com) or Ortomedica Vallarta (https://ortomedicavallarta. com/). Ortomedica also has other medical equipment, from crutches to bedside commodes. Also, Proviquer Puerto Vallarta has more specific medical supplies. Phone: 1141950 Where can I have my CPAP repaired? Oxygen concentrator equipment? We always recommend the folks at PVSleepwell (http://www. pvsleepwell.com/). They also do sleep studies. I need ostomy care, wound care. We have a wonderful, bilingual nurse who specializes in wound care and also ostomy care and supplies. Adriana is our go-to nurse for this and I can always put someone in touch with her. Is Dialysis available for visitors? Absolutely! We have a special dialysis physician who is bilingual. It

is important to remember though that peritoneal dialysis is not common here so if one is traveling here and is on peritoneal dialysis, supplies are limited so always best to bring your own in sufficient supply. Do I need to see a doctor to have some lab work done? Absolutely not! We are happy to send you an order and even have the results translated into English if you like. Botox: This has to be one of THE most common requests! It is important to have Botox applied ONLY by a physician who has experience! Do your homework! Our two dermatologists are still booked a month out for appointments but hooray! We now have a 3rd dermatologist in our plethora of physicians who is bilingual and stellar! So not such a long wait now. Email for further information! As the humidity and temperatures rise (and for sure they have been!) it is easy to forget to stay well hydrated. If you are not peeing, you are not drinking enough water! Carry that bottle of water around everywhere. Remember that beer, soft drinks or even iced coffee (yes, me!) do not count towards re-hydrating! Any bets on when the rains will start? Soon I hope! Here’s to a no drama week!


entertainment ‘Broadway & Bublé’, The Music of ‘The Gipsy When the sun goes down in Kings’ and ‘Yuvia’ at Incanto

May 17 - 23, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

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pera soprano Vanessa Amaro presents ‘The Beautiful Voice’ featuring stunning renditions of works from Puccini, Verdi and others, accompanied by renowned pianist and composer David Troy Francis. May 17 at 7pm. Jazz, Pop, and Soul recording artist Daniel LeClaire starred in Broadway’s ‘The Book of Mormon’ and ‘Hairspray’. He returns to Incanto celebrating the Best of Broadway and the music of Michael Bublé, accompanied by pianist Ron Bryant. May 19 - 26 at 7:30pm. Cheko Ruiz presents a tribute to ‘The Gipsy Kings’ on Sunday, May 20 at 8pm. An irresistible blend of traditional Flamenco and Latin Rhythms. Special Guest musicians including Eduardo Leon (Piel Canela) and Alex Gonzalez (Gypsy Rumba). Perro Bravo Productions presents Tomas Ustusastegui’s hit comedy ‘Princesas Desesperadas’, the story of four Disney Princesses who get together fifteen years after their “happily ever after”. Princesses has sold out most of the previous four seasons of hilarious performances and contains adult language. Presented in Spanish, May 19, 26 at 8:30pm. Paco Ojeda’s ‘Dinner and a Movie’ series is on Tuesdays at 7pm. Movies are shown on a new giant screen in air-conditioned comfort with a special dinner menu available. Hit comedy Greater Tuna starring Ron Spencer and Tracy Parks plays on Wednesdays at 8pm. The hila-

Christie Seeley www.vallartasounds.com

W rious story of small town Texas with twenty-two eccentric characters played by two actors and forty-two costume changes continues to gain popularity, with many returning for second helpings of ‘Tuna’. This is the first time the show has been presented during the summer season in Vallarta. In the piano bar Tongo plays Latin/Cuban rhythms on his handmade flutes/ drums on Tuesdays at 5pm. Also select mornings on the riverside terrace. Spanish singer/guitarist Santiago Martin Rumberia sings traditional flamenco, pop and Latin rhythms with his full band on Tuesdays at 7pm. Joby Hernandez plays pop/rock favorites in English and Spanish on guitar Wednesdays at 5pm. Also select mornings on the riverside terrace. The Red Suitcases trio plays classic rock/pop covers in English and Spanish Sundays and Wednesdays at 7:30pm. Singer-songwriter Zoe Wood and Eduardo León play Nuevo Flamenco and Latin standards featuring originals and covers. Thur-

sdays at 5pm. Open Mic is on Thursdays at 7:30pm. Sing, dance, play an instrument. The stage is yours. Arrive early to sign up. ‘The Joan Houston Show’ with Bob Bruneau at the piano features ‘The American Songbook’ Fridays at 5pm. Classic music, lots of laughs! Luis Villanueva sings pop/classics accompanied by Fernando Uribe at the piano/guitar on Fridays at 7:30pm. Also see their tribute to ‘Juan Gabriel’ resuming May 24 at 8pm in the theater. Bingo with Pearl is on most Saturdays at 4pm. Drink specials, gift certificates and cash prizes. Special guests Ballet Folklorico Tradiciones will perform. Cheko Ruiz and Alex Gonzalez present acoustic Latin/flamenco covers in the piano bar on Saturdays at 9:30pm. Salsa dancing/lessons is on Wednesdays & Sundays at 8pm on the outdoor upper terrace. All are welcome. Yuvia Niebla is a local singer/ guitarist. Her interpretive, heartfelt style is quite popular with audiences. Sundays at 5pm. Open 9am-Midnight Tues-Sun. Incanto is located at Insurgentes 109 (at the Rio Cuale).

hen the sun goes down in Puerto Vallarta it is time to wrap up the cocktail hour and head out for a wonderful meal and some great music. Late May sees great dining opportunities with the special gourmet offerings from the many restaurants participating in the annual Restaurant Week which seems to expand every year and this year spans from May 15 to June 10 to give you a chance to sample these special chefs’ dishes at reasonable prices. A list of the restaurants and menus can be found at www.vallartatribune.com/ countdown-to-restaurant-week/ Take advantage of this marvelous chance to get to know the places you have always wanted to try. Summertime can be a challenge for entertainment as many of the acts you followed in the high season run off to their native soil for the hotter summer months. We still have plenty of choices however spotlighting many talented local artists. Since these are my favorites, I look forward to lots of great music in the months to come. Venues like Cuates y Cuetes next to the pier in the Zona Romantica offer quality acts to keep those of us who brave the summer months as well as local visitors entertained. Flamenco/Gypsy jazz group Tatewari continues to fire up the evening on Wednesday nights at 9:00 and Moruno brings us more “jazz hot” on Sundays and Tuesdays. 

Cuates y Cuetes also has great music at brunch/lunch time. Esau Galvan Saltos plays Flamenco guitar on Saturdays, Nacho Flores (of Moruno) and friend Magali Uribe play  beautiful traditional pieces on guitar and violin Wednesday and Thursday, and on Friday I just caught a lively jazz set by Diego Mateos, Oscar Terrazas, both of Moruno, with invited guests. Incanto on Insurgentes next to the River Cuale will be offering great vibes from its Piano Bar,  Spanish vocalist Santiago Martin on Tuesday evenings (7:00) and Zoe Woods with Eduardo Leon on Saturdays at 5:00 in the Piano Bar  and Cabaret shows by Gypsy Rumba 8:00 on Sunday evenings. River Cafe right on the River Cuale is beefing up its music program, recently featuring renowned flamenco guitarists Lobo (Wolfgang Fink) and Esau Galvan Saltos playing exciting flamenco music. Catch Raul Simental and Oscar Terrazas on Friday nights. Some of my fondest musical memories are of hot summer evenings near the pier in the Zona Romantica listening to creative Jazz under night skies only Van Gogh could imagine with lightening flashing over the sea and even a nice rain storm to cool us off!  In the golden light of the seaside cabaret, I with a glass of red wine, the musicians, oblivious of the storm, would pour their hearts out to us. Don’t stay home...come out and enjoy the music!


Banco_VallartaCredito_IntercamDOBLEPLANA.pdf

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Located on Av. Revolución 231, Municipio Bahía de Banderas, Sayulita, Nayarit. (329) 298 8909

Marina Office: (322) 209 0696, Downtown Office: (322) 223 3080, Mega Flamingos Office: (329) 29 661 63


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ISLAS MARIETAS

Sin popote, por favor! BY SEA TOWNS & COLONIAS BEACHES

RESORTS MALECON SHOPPING/ARTWALK

1. MARINA RIVIERA NAYARIT 2. NUEVO RIVIERA NAYARIT 3. MARINA VALLARTA MARINA 4. CRUISE SHIP TERMINAL 5. LOS MUERTOS PIER/ WATER TAXIS

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1. GALERIAS VALLARTA 1. CENTRAL BUS STATION 2 2. WALMART/SAMS CLUB 2. VERSALLES BUS STATION GOLFING 3. COSTCO 3. OLD TOWN BUS STATION 4. LACOURSE ISLA 1. PACIFICO GOLF 4. BUCERIAS BUS STATION 5. PLAZA CARACOL 5. INT’L AIRPORT - PVR 2. BAHIA GOLF COURSE 6. MEGA/ LA COMER BUCERIAS 3. LITIBU GOLF 7.COURSE WALMART NUEVO VALLARTA

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¡ STATE OF JALISCO

BUENAS ARIES

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GRINGO GULTCH CASA KIMBERLY HACIENDA SAN ANGEL

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Tuesday - Sunday, 11:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m Ribs, River, Relax, Rejuvenate! elriobbq • www.elriobbqbar.com

322-225-2202

AMAPAS Optica Oci Vallarta

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CASA CUPOLA RESORTS BY PINNACLE

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Open throughout May

EL NOGALITO

Featured Property

STATE OF JALISCO

BUENAS ARIES

CONCHAS CHINAS

5 DE DECIMBRE

PLA YA L O SAN S ARC VILL P A M LAYA EMP MAR OS ERC LO ERA INO EDE S M DOR S P UER A PLA T E T YA L R O O PIC TIT HO OS A SAN S ARC L A VILL P VAL MAR N H TEL A M LAYA EMP MAPRLAOS LAR RE OTE ERC HLO ERA INOYA EDE YSATM DOR T S L UER A CON S T LIN A SHO ORT P TRO ETI ZIVTO C H PI T H AS A DO R VALALMARGCAN H OCTEL PUE CA S CH MA ES PLA S LAR RREA OTE O R IN R YA C HYA A T TT Z ONC LI TA SH SONRDT L STA O VA KAR AS NDO POR FIE S IVA H M L U A L GRA CO PUERT CASAGSACHIN MARLAEYS STA R RE ART A AME SO A ND STA O VA KARRZAAS A P F S U M L I NTA RIC RT GAR PLAY ESTA UR RE LART A BLA A ZA B A PU AME SOR A H NC A R NEGR N O LAN NTA RICA T T N N E E A HOT CA R EGR L M SOR EL M ESO A OUS T OUS RT AII AII

PUERTO VALLARTA

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Puesta del Sol 422 One bedroom One bath Asking $165,000 usd

AMAPAS

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GRINGO GULTCH CASA KIMBERLY HACIENDA SAN ANGEL

CASA CUPOLA RESORTS BY PINNACLE

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CONCHAS CHINAS

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‘OLD TOWN’

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POINTS OF INTEREST 9. 5 DE DEC. CEMETARY 16. HIDALGO PARK 1. TURTLE RESCUE CAMP 10. MIRADOR CERRO DE LA CRUZ 17. THREE HENS MARKET 2. WHALE OF A TALE HOLE 11. MALECON 18. MARSOL MARKET 3. PLAYA ESCONDIDO 9. BRIDGE 5 DE DEC. CEMETARY HIDALGO PARK MARKET 12. VIRGIN DE LA GUADALUPE16. CHURCH 19. MUNICIPAL 4. KISSING 13. LOS EMILIANO ZAPATA MARKET 5. EL CORA SANCTUARY 10.CROCODILE MIRADOR CERRO DE LA ARCOS CRUZAMPITHEATRE17. THREE20.HENS MARKET 14. ISLA CUALE 21. CUALE CULTRAL CENTER 6. PUERTO VALLARTA SIGN 11. MALECON 18. MARSOL MARKET 15. LAZARO CARDENAS PARK 22. 5 DE DEC MARKET 7. ESTERO EL SALADO 12.PLAZA VIRGIN DE LA GUADALUPE CHURCH 19. MUNICIPAL MARKET 15. OLAS ALTAS FARMERS MARKET 23. HUANACAXLE MERCADO 8. PITILLAL

ORA CROCODILE SANCTUARY RTO VALLARTA SIGN RO EL SALADO LAL PLAZA

13. LOS ARCOS AMPITHEATRE 14. ISLA CUALE 15. LAZARO CARDENAS PARK 15. OLAS ALTAS FARMERS MARKET

20. EMILIANO ZAPATA MARKET 21. CUALE CULTRAL CENTER 22. 5 DE DEC MARKET 23. HUANACAXLE MERCADO

24. FOREVER SPRING MARKET 25. BUCERIAS ARTWALK 26. RIVIERA FARMERS MARKET 27.24. MARINA ARTISAN SPRING MARKET MARKET FOREVER 28.25. MOVIE + PICNIC ARTWALK BUCERIAS 29. RED CROSS 26. RIVIERA FARMERS MARKET 30. LOS ARCOS NATIONAL PARK

27. MARINA ARTISAN MARKET 28. MOVIE + PICNIC 29. RED CROSS 30. LOS ARCOS NATIONAL PARK

his charming colonial style unit surrounded by tropical vegetation features peek ocean views in a highly sought after downtown complex. The light and bright living room opens to a spacious covered terrace; perfect for morning coffee or afternoon sunsets. The fully equipped kitchen features solid wood cabinetry, colorful Mexican tile accents and peninsula counter with bar seating. The spacious bedroom also opens to the outdoor terrace and has a walk in closet, separate owners’ lock-off closet and lovely

adjacent bathroom. The secure and gated complex features 24 hr. security, parking, on-site administration, beautiful pool, fountains and mature tropical gardens. Maintenance fee includes all above plus water and gas consumption in the unit and 1 maid service per week. Electricity is on a separate meter. Sold fully furnished and turn-key, this is a great opportunity to own an affordable place in the sun just a couple of blocks to the Malecon Boardwalk, beach and shops! www.boardwalkrealtypv.com


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real estate Using a Notary Public in Mexico

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he office of a Notary Public in Mexico holds far more legal responsibility than the role of a Notary Public in the United States or Canada, and this legal role should not be confused with its north of the border counterpart. In the US for example, almost anyone can become a Notary Public. Not so in Mexico, where the role is given only to experienced lawyers who are assessed and appointed by the state’s Governor. The Notary Public in Mexico has the power to witness and certify important business and civil documents which require absolute authenticity. The appointment also holds responsibility for the management and secure storage of original legal records. A Notary Public must be a Mexican citizen of at least 35 years in age, he or she must hold a law degree, have at least three years’ work experience at a Notary Public office, and pass a stringent exam. Those who qualify and pass, in time, are appointed as Notary Public by the office of the state Governor. While some buyers hire lawyers to ‘oversee’ their property transactions in Mexico, only the Notary Public has the legal power to process the necessary papers and ensure that legal title is properly passed from seller to buyer. It is feasible to avoid the fees of a lawyer altogether, unless there are complications and you want to seek additional legal advice in relation to the transaction, or you feel more comfortable having a lawyer involved as well.

Whether you hire a lawyer or not, the Notary Public is the most important legal person you will deal with when you make a property investment in Mexico. Under Mexican Law, the deed to the property must be prepared and processed by a Notary Public. As a buyer, it is your right to choose the Notary Public, and it should be your first port of call after you have agreed in principle the purchase of a property. The Notary Public will ensure that all documentation and permits are in order so that the transaction can proceed in a matter that ensures title can be confidently transferred. They will also advise you of any legal problems or liabilities that might associated with your intended purchase. Most buyers tend to find their Notary Public through the realty agent they used to find their property.  A good, well-established,  real estate agent in Mexico  will have strong working relationships with known legal professionals in their locality, and none more so than the area’s Notary Public community.  In absence of recommendations from your agent, talking with local friends or family can be helpful, and you can also check the directory on the  collegiate website for Notary Publics in Mexico. www.notariadomexicano.org.mx If you are the buyer in a property transaction, it is your prerogative to choose the Notary Public and it is suggested that you choose your Notary independent of the seller’s influence. Original: Mexperience

All documentation should pass through the Notary Public Everything official to do with your transaction should be done via the Notary Public: Do not take anyone’s word about documentation (like property deeds) being valid — take copies to the Notary Public for cross-check and official verification.

May 17 - 23, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

s we settle into nearly four weeks of dining at the 59 restaurants taking part in this years annual Restaurant Week Festivities, you may be faced with a dizzying array of beverages to accompany your meal. In Mexico we have a number of spirits that are derived from agave including everyone’s nemesis Tequila and its artsy cousin Mezcal. While Tequila, Mezcal, are traditional Mexican drinks all made using agave succulent plant varieties each beverage is distinct and offers very different taste experiences. Tequila Tequila is Mexico’s national drink, and one of the icons synonymous with the country. The ‘Tequila’ marque is now protected world-wide, and production of the drink is tightly regulated: only a handful of Mexican states have production rights, and the best Tequilas  emanate from Blue Agave grown in the rich volcanic soils situated in the state of Jalisco. Tequila is made by harvesting the hearts (known in Spanish as  piñas) of the Blue Agave plant, slowly baking them in large ovens, and then pressing the pulp into a sweet liquid that is passed through a prescribed distillation process.  Afterwards, the Tequila is transferred into specially-prepared wood barrels and left to age.  The highest quality Tequilas are made from 100% agave, whereas less expensive varieties use a mixture of agave and sugar cane.  Tequila can be enjoyed straight or mixed into a variety of cocktails, the most of popular of which is the Margarita.   To learn more about Tequila and the nuances of its flavours book a tasting with Vallarta Tequila Tastings – they’ll come to your hotel or villa or set up a tasting at a local restaurant and explain how its so much more than one tequila, two tequila, three


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a drink? tequila floor! vallartatequilatastings. com Mezcal Mezcal is distilled using a similar production process to tequila, but the tastes and nuances of the final blend are quite distinct.  As Mezcal recently regained widespread popularity, the Mexican government acted to regulate its production, helping to improve the quality of mass-produced varieties and thus giving confidence to the wider market.  As with Tequila, Mezcal is produced by baking the hearts (piñas) of the agave; but unlike Tequila, which is made exclusively from Blue Agave, Mezcal may be produced from nearly 30 different varieties of agave.  Most Mezcals are made using the  espadín  agave, although distillers also blend different varieties of the plant with the intention of creating unique flavors.  The drink undergoes an aging process and, like Tequila, the aged Mezcals feel more robust and often smoother on the palate than the younger alternatives.  The best Mezcal, like the best Tequila, is made from 100% agave; and like Tequila, less expensive varieties use cane sugars and contain other flavorings.  Mezcal has a distinctively smoky flavor which for many is an acquired taste.  Traditionally, Mezcal is taken straight with a pinch of  sal de gusano: a condiment made by grinding together dried larvae,  chiles, and salt. Mezcal may also contain a ‘worm’ (larvae) at the base of the bottle—this is a ploy concerned with marketing and does not alter the taste.  Tequila never has a ‘worm’ in the bottle. El Barracuda on Playa Cameron has a great Mezcal cocktail list for those looking to explore the flavours. Bar la Playa on Lazaro Cardenas makes exceptional craft cocktails with your choice of Mezcal or Tequila.

cuisine

May 17 - 23, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Warique: Vallarta’s New Obsession The ultimate dining experience that marries arts and culture to bring you an authentic taste of Mexico and Latin America. Warique Restaurant brings an infusion of flavours to Vallarta’s food scene

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e would best describe Warique’s flavor as authentic home cooking away from home. This cozy and inviting restaurant is engaging to the eye, with rich colors and rustic accents that brighten the setting. Tables are neatly arranged throughout the two dining areas and an intimate outdoor patio, with an open kitchen visible in the back. Executive chef Eduardo Aguilar describes Warique as, “a fusion of cuisines from various Latin countries, like Bolivia, Peru and Cuba.” But you can also find a European influence; especially their incredible in-house desserts – Warique Torte and Chilean Chocolate Cake – both extraordinary in their textures and flavors. Unique to Vallarta, the menu includes a variety of appetizers, soups, salads, entrees and desserts, in addition to Mexican wine, Peruvian Pisco and freshly made cocktails. All of the menu items are very reasonably priced, including the drinks. An instant winner for us was the Pisco Sour, the signature cocktail, made from Peru’s clear grape brandy, lime, egg white, sugar syrup and cinnamon - sour and sweet, smooth but with an underlying raw bite. Truly, fantastic aperitif. Our food started arriving and didn’t seem to stop, a happy parade of bold flavors and fresh, colorful presentations. You will enjoy everything, from the delightful chilled avocado and cucumber soup, crunchy Cuban potato balls and fresh red snapper ceviche to the Mexican arrachera steak topped with chimichurri and grilled pineapple. The chilled avocado and cucumber soup is a new addiction. It’s a cool, frothy, light and refreshing mixture of avocados, fragrant cucumbers, zesty lime juice, cilantro, and as Warique’s Chef describes it: “a kiss of jalapeno”. It truly had our taste buds dancing! Stuffed potato balls come perfectly crusted, paradoxically light for the carbohydrate payload, stuffed with fragrantly seasoned ground beef. No wonder they remain the talk of the town! Their Peruvian ceviche, fleshy cuts of fresh red snapper mari-

nated in tongue-tingling lime, garlic, cilantro, spices and crunchy red onions, is as fresh as can be. A perfect feast of textures and cooling flavors for a warm night’s dinner. Another star of the night, marinated steak arracherra, which was beyond reproach, the skirt steak was excellent, cooked to perfection - medium rare, and insanely tender.

It was complemented by a fruity and delicate salad and a perfectly grilled veggie medley. We are not afraid to say it was the best piece of arracherra we have had thus far in Puerto Vallarta. We wrapped the night up with two absolutely decadent desserts. The flourless chocolate cake with a hint of cayenne pepper will seduce your

palate, and the moist layered torte’s butter cream literally melted in our mouths. Warique provides a perfect blend of sophisticated flavors in an inviting, comfortable, and genuinely authentic Latin setting. With so much to offer at such an affordable price, folks are sure to agree that it’s truly one of the top ten restaurants in the city. Warique Aquiles Serdán 280 Emiliano Zapata Sun – Fri 5pm – 11pm 322/223-0889


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Life in la Cruz Cindy Bouchard

cindy@VillaAmordelMar.com

Cindy Bouchard, an expat Canadian runs a Boutique Inn, Villa Amor del Mar in La Cruz de Huanacaxtle. She and her husband Chris are living and lovin’ in Vallarta–Nayarit. If you want more info on La Cruz or desire… A very special vacation contact cindy@VillaAmordelMar.com

Slower summer days ahead in La Cruz

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love the vibe of the slow season, there’s still so much to do. My recommendation is to walk around, check out the little, lesser known, restaurants, and taco stands. Practice your Spanish as you meander. Try something new. Introduce yourself to someone you hadn’t met before. Notice plants, flowers and all things Mexican. One of my fave walks takes me to what I call the Mexican beach as rarely do I see non-Mexican folks there unless I bring them with me. Just before you get to the marina restaurants turn left on the sand and walk until you can go no further. La Saranderia is open every day from nine to seven. I ‘shop’ for earrings,

necklaces, bracelets and gifts. Try something new; a refreshing drink I enjoy is a Rusa/Chelada. They salt the rim of the glass, fill it with ice, put in an ounce or so of fresh squeezed limejuice and bring me a bottle of beer, which I pour over the mix. Their namesake style of fish, Saranderia, comes perfectly spiced and big enough to share! Enjoy. During the day look to the sea and watch the many sailboats, motorboats, windsurfers and more. This weekend is the Festival del Viento or Wind Festival; May 18, 19 and 20. Such magnificence watching the windsurfers giant sails pick the operator up carrying them high in the sky. Hundreds of windsurfers leave from the La Cruz Marina going to Bucerias; a delight for the eyes! Speaking of the sea, summer is a perfect time to learn to sail,

there are very few zero wind days so you’ll learn in light breezes, which is a great way to start out. Not that adventurous? Book a sailing charter with Rock Star Sailor Private Charters & Sailing School. Capitano Rick stays open all summer so you can learn to sail or have him and his crew do all the work so you can sit back and enjoy! A kind gesture, for all private charters they always keep two days open after the original charter date just in case the winds don’t behave. www.rockstarsailor.com In the evenings relax on the beach and look to the sky. When looking across the bay I always spot at least one fireworks display. I’m told they’re put on for weddings at the various hotels. As a self-confessed fireworks-aholic this is such a gift! Slow season bring changes to the restaurant scene. What I know so far; Black Forest is continuing their tradition of 2x1 Schnitzel on Sunday nights and have added a daily deal for the summer months which They’ll close on Thursday’s, Friday’s and Saturday’s until high season. The local hangout The La Cruz Inn is open daily from 8:30am-8:30pm. With great appreciation to their patrons they’re offering a daily special; check Facebook to find out the daily delectable. They will be closing approximately July 15 for two to three months. La Peska and Frascati have once again merged and will be operating from the beautiful top floor of the Marina Riviera Nayarit building with that gorgeous vista overlooking the marina boats. Masala has closed for the season. I’ll keep you updated in the coming weeks. Enjoy the slow time and I hope something splendid pops up for you.

May 17 - 23, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Open Invitation - 7th Jarretaderas Fishing Tournament

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he first three places in the Freestyle Category will take home cash prizes; the children with the best catches will receive gifts from the sponsors. Everything is set for the 7th Jarretaderas Surf Fishing with Lure Tournament 2018, which will take place on May 20. The tournament is held every year at the mouth of the Ameca River near Nuevo Vallarta and seeks to attract tourists in who are interested in sport fishing. The species on the catch list are bass, Pacific crevalle jack (toro), snapper, and grouper. The minimum size for acceptance is 1 kg and, in keeping with conservation standards, catches will be released. The awards The top three best catches usually receive the awards during this tournament, though this year there will be prizes for fourth and fifth place that consist of a fishing trip for two valued at US $380 each. The organizer adds that while the traditional tournament is going on there will also be a kids’ tournament that will be held in a special area; the only condition for participation is that minors be accompanied by an adult, whether it’s a parent or guardian. There will be

sponsor prizes for the children who record the top catches. As far as safety is concerned, the organizers announced the area will be patrolled by the Municipality’s Civil Protection lifeguards with an ambulance and logistical support on hand for the duration of the event. The event is intended to be a family-friendly celebration, which is why there will be refreshing beverages and food for sale, but no alcohol. The details: Registration is open through May 19, 2018. The cost is $150 pesos for adults until right before the tournament. Those who register the day of the tournament will pay $200 pesos. The children can compete for free. The competition begins at 7 a.m. and ends at 3 p.m. First place wins $15 thousand pesos; second place takes home $10 thousand pesos; and third place $5 thousand pesos. For more details visit: https:// bit.ly/2wmBOBm Tickets are on sale at Vallarta Fishing Center, Tienda Pesca y Pesca, Computec Bahía, Mariscos El Vaquetón, Vidriería Charly Brocas and the Bros Fishing Club in Tepic.

Panteón Rococó Headlines First Riviera Nayarit Rock Fest

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he first Riviera Nayarit Rock Festival will be headlined by the world-famous Mexican ska band (yes, that’s a thing,) Panteón Rococó on Saturday, June 9, 2018 in the first ever Riviera Nayarit Rock Festival, to be held at the Hard Rock Hotel Nuevo Vallarta. Local legendary Jalisco acts Sal de Mar, Renglón and The Black Hardies will open the show for a full bill of adrenaline-pumping Spanish rock. Organizers expect approxima-

tely 6,000 followers of this iconic national ska and rock fusion band that recently celebrated its 20th anniversary. Of the attendees, around 2,000 will be from out of town and 4,000 local, from the area of ​​ Puerto Vallarta and Bahía de Banderas. The 1st Riviera Nayarit Rock Festival will take place from 6:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. on Saturday, June 9, at the Hard Rock Hotel concert venue in Nuevo Vallarta. For more information visit: bit. ly/2wmBOBm


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The Bucerias Beat By Kiri Westby

kiri.westby@gmail.com

Kiri Westby is an international activist and a writer, whose unique blogs have been featured on HuffPost and Good Morning America, and translated into multiple languages. Kiri is a mother of two and a practicing Buddhist, who was born in Boulder, Colorado, but has lived all over the globe. She recently relocated with her family to Bucerias. Nayarit.

Bucerias Emergency

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planned to write this week’s column on the change of seasons, as “low season” finds many of Bucerias’ favorite hot spots closing down, while a few gems stay open for us locals. But then my family had its first real emergency since moving to Mexico—on Mother’s Day no less—and I spent my writing time pacing the halls of Bucerias’ brand new CMQ hospital, waiting for my son to get out of surgery. Not five minutes after being released from “time-out” for being too rough with our new puppy, my three-year-old boy Jupiter walked up to our elderly dog, who was innocently eating dinner, and made some ignorant attempt to ride her like a horse. My four-legged girl responded in her very dog-like way, giving my two-legged boy a grumpy nip, effectively telling him to back off while she finished her long-awaited grub. But my human child doesn’t have fur or thick skin, and when he cried out seconds later, his face was already covered in blood. His big sister’s shrieks joined his echoing wails to throw my amygdala into fullblown “fight or flight” mode. My first thought? The new CMQ Hospital Emergency Room is just three minutes away. I know because I pass it driving Jupie to school every day, hoping I’ll never have to need it. I somehow managed to remember to turn off the stove, grab my son a change of clothes, and strap both kids in the car. I double parked in the OXXO across the street (who were kind enough not to tow me all night), and flew into the capable hands of several ER Nurses, kicking into high gear, bat-signaling Vallarta’s top plastic surgeon on a Sunday night, and prepping my tiny boy for his first surgery. That’s about when I lost it, crying on the shoulder of a stranger, feeling the enormity of being alone in a foreign country, navigating alien

Jupiter has all the nurses gentle attention during intake medical and insurance systems; no adult to make the big decisions but me. I credit the kind nurses, skilled on-call doctors, and my bilingual Patient Services rep Carmen Herrera for getting us all through the night gracefully. My son emerged from surgery at 1:00am, and yet the plastic surgeon and the anesthesiologist still made time to come up to our room to report directly on the extent of his wounds and his diagnosis for a full, if slightly scarred, recovery. In the early morning light, I found some hot coffee and a stellar view of the ocean from the break room. I thanked my lucky stars for affordable health insurance and top-notch medical care right around the corner. If Bucerias wasn’t already a prime destination for young families like us, and retirees like my parents, the new CMQ hospital adds a touch of class, customized care and, more important, lifesaving services to our town. Jupiter had the nurses happily running for “more green Jell-O”

the following morning, while the on-call nutritionist cooked his favorite breakfast to order! The surgeon returned to check on us mid-day and explained in great detail how to care for his sutures once we returned home. Instead of focusing on my waning social options this week, I was immediately reminded of the indispensable services always available to us in Bucerias. Even if we hadn’t had insurance, the total bill would have been around USD $3,000, which is a hefty sum but not medical bankruptcy inducing, as healthcare has become in my home country north of the border…yet another reason to feel immensely grateful for this life along the Bay of Banderas. I hope you and your loved ones don’t have to find out first-hand how impressive the new CMQ Riviera Nayarit is, but if you do, rest assured you’ll be in the best hands possible. The Emergency Room is open 24 hrs. /day, 7 days/week and can be reached by calling 329-298-0717. And if you ever need emergency police, fire or ambulance services, you can now dial 911 from any phone in Mexico. Next week I’ll talk about where to cool down in Bucerias when the crowds disperse and the temperatures heat up but for now, hug your loved ones tight and never bother a grumpy ol’ dog while she’s eating.

A coffee break room with a view

The stunning architecture continues on the inside

Happier in the morning with bottomless Jell-O.

May 17 - 23, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Busing Banderas Bay Bruce Howells

busbanderasbay@gmail.com

Bruce is a retired Canadian, who along with his wife Velma, took a “mulligan” on life and escaped the cold of Canada and settled in the Vallarta area. Fulfilling a retirement dream of not driving anymore, Bruce will use public transportation to tour the bay and tell his tales here. Tips and itineraries welcome. Email: busbanderasbay@gmail.com

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reviously, my keys were locked in my vehicle and I had to take a cab home. Leaving my vehicle outside the bar, I was up at the crack of dawn (8:30 ish), and headed out along the beach, past the deserted market (except for the fishermen repairing nets), checked out the fish market, cut down the path at the waterworks, came out at Ana Bananas and spied my vehicle down the street. A lovely twenty minute morning walk. My spare key worked but my keys were hanging in the ignition in the ON position! Battery dead! How do you say “Booster Cables” in Spanish? While I was standing in the hot, broiling sun wondering what to do, Barry (former RCMP) from Ana Bananas came around the corner in his vehicle. He stopped and after chatting he asked how things were going. That was my cue! “Being a Canadian, you wouldn’t happen to have booster cables would you?” He sure did! He had groceries to drop at the restaurant but he would be right back. And he was. The cables were not in the car. They must be at home, he’ll go get them; back in a few minutes. While Barry was gone, Leon the local legend walked by on his way for breakfast, stopped, chatted and assured me I was in good hands as the Mounties were coming. Within minutes another friend walked by with his dog, was brought up to date on my situation and as he left mentioned not to worry, “the Mounties were on the way!” At this point I was a little stressed, worrying that I was a newcomer in a Mexican town, with limited knowledge of Spanish, and now I could add the whole town knowing about me locking the keys in the van. That’s right; the vehicle I was driving was a mom’s minivan. My previous car was a six speed

Miata convertible. Oh my! Barry returned but the cables weren’t at home. Kids must have borrowed them he said. (WTF, I thought only my kids did that.) Barry returned to the restaurant to see if anyone had cables. Great, let’s tell more people what Bruce did! He was back shortly with a brand new pair of booster cables. (Thanks Al) I’d like to say it was easy to boost the van but there were challenges. First it didn’t start; we rechecked all our connections and tried again. It worked! We disconnected the cables, and the van stalled. We reconnected, started the van, disconnected, and the van stalled. This time we decided I would stay in the van with my foot on the gas. Barry did all the disconnecting, closed the hoods and drove off into the sun as I sat there revving the engine. Returning home, Velma (who was finally up) asked how I could lock the keys in the van. It was then that I remembered the SCREAMS for HELP; and dashing to help my damsel in distress, not taking time to remove the keys from the ignition. But why I locked the doors? Just a big city habit I’m trying to break. But I will always rush to save my damsel in distress. And there really are no bad days in Mexico.


BANDERAS BAY SHOPPING AND SERVICES

Marsol Friday Market by the Pier

T LOCAL FOOD. LOCAL PLACES. LOCAL PEOPLE Enjoy a Culinary & Cultural Journey though Old Town, Pitillal & Downtown Neighborhoods of Puerto Vallarta! MX: 322-222-6117 US: 1888-360-9847

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NEX T TOU R DEPARTS SOO N!

vallartafoodtours.com

Tel. (322) 222 2675, (322) 222 5402, w Celular: 322 175 0412 mundodeazulejos@hotmail.com www.talavera-tile.com

here’s nothing better than the aroma of barbequed sausages, served on a freshly made bun, piled high with condiments! Join us this Friday at the Marsol Market for just that and more! Smoked marlin and smoked cheese (fabulous!). You can eat in and also take some goodies home like pickled beets and dills and frozen home-made sausages for your barbeque. The Oaxacan salsas handcrafted by Agne and Kristian are beautifully packaged (Father’s Day is coming!). An assortment that runs from fruity to fiery is a great idea. You can certainly try before you buy. (Remember the grilled sausages!) Organic Select is offering an array of baked goods with everything made from scratch. Really from scratch; Krystal has a farm in El

Tuito and grows everything she serves including wheat. There are gluten-free options as well. Dawn Nichol, our Registered Massage Therapist, was kept busy last week, easing the aches and pains of a few of our customers. Every one of them left Market smiling and relaxed and ready for a siesta. Remember to shop first and see Dawn second! For aches and pains at home try some of Ricardo’s topical pain gel. It has helped many Vallartenses manage arthritic and rheumatic pain. And, load up on “Maz Mix” a tasty way to ensure your body is getting all the nutrients you need and is an excellent aid for those who want to lose weight. The Marsol Friday Market by the Pier is open from 9:30 am to 1:30 pm year-round.


www.vallartatribune.com

Three Hens & A Rooster Market News

FABFABRICFELLOWS Aprons - Pillows Masks - Cooling Ties On Facebook contact: William Bill Scott Kelly Delivery Arranged Email: unonumerobomb@gmail.com

MURPHY’S irish pub Located on the Historic Malecon across from the lighthouse statue (El Faro) beautiful sunset views every night!

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he excitement continued all last Saturday as more of our regulars looked for us and a host of new people that read about us in the Tribune and online, showed up at Aquiles Serdan 518 to browse, meet our vendors and leave laden with purchases. It was a blast! Mark Hughes returned with his delicious pies and quiches and his wonderful British humour. We are so

happy to have him and Peter Hardy, the Bagel King, back for the summertime. Peter’s cinnamon rolls sold like crazy, and the cheese bagels should be called “lunch”! Head Hen Jeanine, sold out again. Not surprising; she’s an inspired cook and baker. Every week she creates new dishes precisely knowing what folks want to eat. Gloria Sue’s fried chicken is always a hit, and her various salads are

fresh and packed to go to the beach. Coffee flowed like water at the bar! You must try Ausel’s pure organically grown Chiapas coffee. The plantation has been in his family for generations, and the only place you can buy it is at Three Hens Market. It won’t be long until the world discovers ‘La Fortuna’ brand coffee, but until then they belong to us! Ground and whole bean

available in medium, dark roast or espresso. The jewelry at Three Hens runs from beach shells to outrageous Mixto earrings to fine silver and semi-precious stones. All of it is handmade and different; like Carol-lynn’s wall hangings and her super dolls. Three Hens & A Rooster Market is open from 9 am to 1 pm at Aquiles Serdan 518 in Old Town Vallarta.

ADORABLE DOG IN THE SPOTLIGHT...GEORGIA by Janice Gonzalez

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eorgia is one little girl who just loves to have fun! She is a Chihuahua mix, about two years old and weighing around 15 pounds. She is a very calm and well behaved little girl. She

has a medium/high energy level and is quite playful, enjoying fun times with other dogs. She is even okay with cats. But mostly Georgia likes getting cuddles from her humans. She just loves her people! Georgia has been

spayed, dewormed and vaccinated. She is now available for adoption and looking for that perfect home of her very own. If Georgia sounds like the perfect companion animal for you, contact us at spcapv@gmail.com for an application to adopt her.

Delicious traditional pub menu. Live Rock Music - Wed - Sat @10:30pm Watch all sports w 2 satellites. Pool Table.

484 Morelos - 2nd floor - Centro Vallarta Open daily 11 am

Sherry Vallarta HOME DE’COR

Personal Shopper

Buy & Sell ~ Anything & Everything

sherryvallarta@yahoo.com 044 322 137 7063

VOLUNTARIO / VOLUNTEERING VALLARTA THE JAY SADLER PROJECT MAKING A DIFFERENCE

www.jaysadlerproject.com

Murphys Puerto Vallarta

EL PROYECTO JAY SADLER HACIENDO LA DIFERENCIA

COMMUNITY SERVICE / SERVICIO A LA COMUNIDAD

Marsol Friday Market by the Pier Three Hens & A Rooster Market on Saturdays

mexicasupplement@gmail.com

www.thewitcherysalon.com


local

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Long Drive Series Tom Stickney

tom.stickney@puntamita.com

Tom F. Stickney II is the Director of Instruction and Business Development at Punta Mita, (www.puntamita.com) He is a Golf Magazine “Top 100 Teacher,” and has been honored as a Golf Digest Best Teacher and a Golf Tips Top-25 Instructor. Tom is also a Trackman University Master/Partner, a distinction held by less than 15 people in the world.

Wide Stance

https://youtu.be/DLSmMvsLVgE

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our body requires balance in every athletic motion you make, why should golf be any different? In fact, if you want to hit the ball further you must set yourself up in a manner that allows you to move at a higher rate of speed. When you have a stance that is too narrow you will find that it’s very easy to lose your balance and this causes you to swing slower. Your body has a mechanism called homeostasis which keeps you upright and helps you to maintain your balance under all condi-

tions. A wider base is part of this system in golf. Whenever you take a “rip” at the ball from the top you will lose your balance if you have a narrow stance. Couple this with homeostasis and you will find that your body is more concerned that you don’t fall down than hitting it further. Widen your stance and you will be able to make that John Daly type of swing much easier!

SPCA of Puerto Vallarta By Janice Gonzalez

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e opened our sanctuary in January of 2012 on the outskirts of Puerto Vallarta. We are a no-kill shelter and can house up to 130 animals at once. We rescue and find permanent homes for over 250 animals each year. The mission of SPCA de PV is to help fund and promote sterilization, adoption and healthcare efforts for companion animals in the Puerto Vallarta area, with the goal of eliminating the euthanasia of healthy and adoptable animals. Our main focus is to rescue the abused, homeless animals from Puerto Vallarta’s streets and place them in foster homes in both the United States and Canada until permanent homes are available. We are not supported by the government, corporations, foundations or businesses. We fully function on private donations. Animals are often found living on the streets after being discarded and/or extremely abused. We devote ourselves to their physical and emotional rehabilitation and invite everyone to join one of our escorted tours and interact with the animals at our private shelter.

We offer one tour per week during the summer months, either Tuesday or Thursday, and special arrangements are necessary. Contact us at spcapv@gmail.com. To see our animals available for adoption, visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/spcapv. There are photos as well as individual albums of our rescues which include a bit of their background. Please be aware that our adoption fee within Mexico is $2,000 pesos. Contact us at spcapv@ gmail.com to obtain an adoption application. To make donations via PayPal, select the “Donate” option on our Facebook page www.facebook. com/spcapv or on our website at http://spcapv.com/donate/. You can drop off any donations for the SPCA at Hacienda San Angel located at Calle Miramar 336, above Our Lady of Guadalupe Church in El Centro. Get involved…rescue, adopt, foster, volunteer, donate or educate. You can learn more about the SPCA Puerto Vallarta by checking us out at www.spcapv.com/ home or on Facebook.

May 17 - 23, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Don’t Mess With Mexico! By John Warren

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alle Lazaro Cardenas is a relatively quiet street that runs east from the Malecon through Colonia Emiliano Zapata, past the Chilim Balem candy store and ends as a bridge over the Rio Cuale. The street itself is quiet, but the man who it is named after was a revolutionary in all senses of the word. Trump and his coterie would have hated him! Cardenas was born in 1895 in the small town of Jiquilpan, Michoacan, a few miles south of Lake Chapala, and had a tough start in life. He was born of mixed white and Tarascan Indian ancestry and had a grade four education and he must have been as tough as nails to become President of Mexico. In 1913, at age 18, Cárdenas joined a branch of the revolutionary army led by General Guillermo García Aragón, and within a year he had risen to the rank of captain. By 1920, at the ripe old age of twenty-five, Cárdenas was appointed general, the highest rank in the Mexican army, and continued to participate in military campaigns until 1929. In 1932 he married Amalia Solórzano and they had one son, Cuauhtémoc Cárdenas in 1934. When he became President in 1934 Cárdenas instituted his Six Year Plan that was based on the political ideals of the Revolution. He believed passionately in land reform and in improving the lives of the peasants so, when President, he confiscated  forty-five million acres of land and distributed them to the ejidos, or peasant communities and, to get better wages for railway workers, he nationalised the railways. But he is most remembered for what he did to the Mexican oilfields. The history behind the nationalization of the Mexican oil industry has been taught to every generation of Mexico’s school children since the 1930s and is a story of great national pride and liberation from American imperialism.  As such, the action has almost as admiration in today’s Mexican national psyche as the Mexican Revolution. Cardenas took action against American and British oil companies operating in Mexico when, in 1938, the companies defied a Mexican Supreme Court decision regarding increasing the wages of oilfield workers.  The government seized the oil companies’ assets,

Lázaro Cárdenas del Río - President 1934-1940

forced them to leave the country and offered compensation that the companies considered to be totally inadequate. At that moment Mexico became the first country in the world to nationalize its oil industry. In the USA this action resulted in an informal boycott of Mexican oil imports into the U.S., and a propaganda campaign discouraging U.S. citizens from visiting Mexico so that by 1940 the Mexican tourist industry had declined by almost a third. Meanwhile, the British government ruled the nationalization to be illegal, and Mexico formally broke relations with London in May 1938. Ultimately, the pressure from the U.S. and British governments resulted in agreement being signed in April 1942 under which Mexico paid the ousted companies $23.9 million dollars as compensation for their seized assets. Obviously, this entire episode was not the oil and gas industry’s finest hour, and even now, a recent poll of Mexicans found found that 65 percent of them are opposed to opening up Mexico’s oil and natural gas fields to foreign investment. After retirement, Cardenas remained a major figure in national politics. He became the symbol of

YUVIA NIEBLA Yuvia Niebla is a singer/guitarist with 20 years of experience performing both as soloist and as part of the Yuvia And Briza Duet. She has performed throughout Mexico in many different venues and cultural festivals. Her interpretive style is quite popular with audiences, and she is currently recording a CD to be released in July. Yuvia will perform on Sundays from 5-7pm in the piano bar.

the left in the government party, the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI). He remained the major supporter of the cooperative type of agrarian reform and was the chief opponent of U.S. economic and political influence in Mexico. During the Bay of Pigs fiasco, Cardenas, not surprisingly, was a strong supporter of Fidel Castro and his revolutionaries. Takes one to know one, I guess. He died of cancer in 1970, when he was 75. The street, Calle Lazaro Cardenas, has a number of local landmarks including Los Muertos Brewing Company, Farmacia Guadalajara and the market, Emiliano Zapata. For cheap streeteats try the taco stands of Taqueria Mendoza, La Hormiga, Las Jorachos or El Tuito Tacos y Hortas. East of the market, I found Lighthouse Specialty Foods, which has four different sausage recipes, pickled kraut (dill, beets and horseradish flavours) and smoked fish, including marlin, dorado, sierra and sail fish. I took home a jar of artichoke and spinach dip and am glad that I did. There are all sorts of treasures on Calle Lazaro Cardenas if you take the time to just browse!


charities

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May 17 - 23, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Non - Profit and Charitable Organizations

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or visitors to Puerto Vallarta who wish to support the less privileged in our paradise, this is a list of some of the many organizations that could benefit from such kind gestures. Alano Club of Puerto Vallarta to provide resources to keep you in touch with your recovery program while you are visiting Puerto Vallarta and the surrounding area RecoverPV.com Amigos De Bucerias - to help make Bucerias a better place to live, work and visit. Projects include community improvements, food drives and help for the needy. AmigosDeBucerias.com Los Amigos de Jaltemba several community efforts to improve and enhance the lives of the people who live in the Jaltemba Bay area. LosAmigosDeJaltemba.com Amigos de La Cruz de Huanacaxtle: Contributing to the quality of life in La Cruz through cultural, educational, environmental and charitable assistance programs. Tax Deductible. www.amigosdelacruz.org American Legion Post 14: Raises resources and manpower to improve facilities needing building maintenance americanlegion14.org Amigos del Magisterio - Food delivery to workers at the PV dump, their families and schools in Magisterio and Volcanes. Also, food to New Beginnings, Pasitos de Luz. amigosdelmagisterio.com Asilo San Juan Diego Home for the Elderly - Housing and care facilities for senior citizens www.asilosanjuandiego.com.mx Banderas Bay Women’s Shelter - Safe shelter for women & children victims of domestic violence. compassionforthefamily.org Becas Vallarta, A.C. – Provides scholarships to high school and university students. Tax-deductible in Mexico and USA. becasvallarta.com CANICA - Centre for Children with Cancer. Provides aid for treatment and services including transportation to GDL. canicapv.org.mx Casa Hogar - A shelter for orphaned, abandoned, disadvantaged or vulnerable children. maximocornejo.org Cheryl’s Shoebox - increase the quality of education in disadvantaged schools throughout the Banderas Bay region by providing shoes, and school materials to students as well as educational supplies to teachers. cherylsshoebox.org

Clinica de Rehabilitación Vallarta- Santa Barbara AC Therapy for physical and speak rehabilitation, for childrena and adults. rehabilitacionfisicapv.com COLINA Spay and Neuter Clinic - Free and by-donation sterilization clinic in Old Town. Only open Sundays. FB/@ColinaSpayAndNeuterClinic CompassionNet Impact Canada – Changing the lives of people living in chronic poverty. Job creation, education & more. compassionetimpact.ca Corazon de Niña - A safe, loving, home-environment for 50+ children and youth rescued from high-risk situations. Donations & volunteers always welcome! Totally self-funded. fundacioncorazon.mx Cruz Roja (Red Cross) Handles hospital and emergency service in Vallarta. It is the only facility that is authorized to offer assistance to injured people on the street. Desayunos para los Niños de Vallarta A.C. Feeding programs, education programs, day care centers for single mothers. FB/@desayunosvallarta Ecology and Conservation of Whales, AC. - research, protection and conservation of Mexico`s natural resources, specially the Humpback Whale in Banderas Bay. www.ecobac.org entreamigos Centro Comunitario Educativo - Focus is to increase educational opportunities for the children of San Pancho in Nayarit Mexico. entreamigos.org.mx. Families At The Dump: Supporting families living in the landfill or garbage dump thru education and sustainable opportunities. familiesatthedump.org Food Bank of Puerto Vallarta - collects and distributes 30 tons of food each month to approximately 800 families. BancoDeAlimentosPV.org.mx Fundacion Punta de Mita Promote sustainable community development in Punta de Mita and around the Banderas Bay in the areas of community development, education, environment and health. fundacionpuntademita.org Friends of PV Animals - Volunteers working to enhance the lives of shelter animals. friendsofpvanimals.com Grupo Ecológico de Puerto Vallarta: To protect the ecology of Banderas Bay. grupoecologico.com Grupo Pro Sayulita - to bring together the Sayulita community

and to recognize and preserve the benefits of its cultural and ecological diversity while improving the quality of life in Sayulita. ProSayulita.org International Friendship Club - Provides medical, educational and social services to those in need in Puerto Vallarta and area. www.ifcvallarta.com Jay Sadler Project AC Provide necessary resources to improve various institutions in the Puerto Vallarta & Banderas Bay area. jaysadlerproject.com 322-138-8891 Manos de Amor por Bahia - A home for 15-30 children that provide these children with food, clothing and shelter, ensure that they attend school and church, and give them a safe haven for as long as necessary. www.manosdeamor.com Lions Club Puerto Vallarta offering medical services for the blind, disaster relief and building elementary schools LionsClubs.org Mexico Ministries & Mission, Inc. raises funds to support the poor in Vallarta. christchurchbythesea.com

Puerto Vallarta Garden Club - striving to improve and beautify Vallarta through planting trees and flowers in public areas. VallartaGardenClub.com Puerto Vallarta Navy League AC – Constructs playgrounds, organizes work groups to do painting and light repair work for other charities, schools and government facilities. New Life Mexico - Focusing on social, health and education programmes both in Mexico and Guatemala matching donors to projects. www.newlifemexico.com Paraíso Felino AC - Refuge and Adoption Centre for cats and kittens in the Bay of Banderas. www.paraisofelino.com Pasitos de Luz - Substitute home for low income children with any type of handicap, offers rehabilitation services and more. pasitosdeluz.org PuRR Project – no-kill feline rescue providing homeless cats and kittens a recuperative stay with the ultimate goal of adopting them out to loving homes, sterilized, vaccinated and disease free. www.purrproject.com

PEACEAnimals - Free mobile spay/neuter clinic operating 48 weeks a year, primarily in Puerto Vallarta. Tax-deductible. peaceanimals.org Pro Biblioteca de Vallarta raises funds for Los Mangos Public Library. bibliotecalosmangos.com Refugio Infantil Santa Esperanza (RISE) - Provides a home, education, and healthcare for children rescued from high risk situations. Donations are tax deductible and volunteers are welcome. For more information see our website: www.risepv.com Roma’s Kids - educate the children of the Volcanes and surrounding area. Math, English and computer programs a priority. 100% goes to the kids. www.kids.romamexico.com SETAC - Effectively reduce the incidence of HIV / AIDS in Puerto Vallarta and ​promoting respect for human rights of people living with HIV / AIDS. setac.com.mx SPCA PV – Provides shelter and vet services to rescued animals. www.spcapv.com

Anglican Church Puerto Vallarta Formerly Christ Church by the Sea Worldwide Anglican Communion

“Celebrating conservative family values” Services Sunday 10:00 a.m. English-Traditional Holy Communion All faiths welcome-Casual Dress

How cool it is! Yes, we are now celebrating in our air-conditioned Chapel. Come join us! Fr. Jack continues to welcome people from all walks of life and denominations. Across from airport, northbound service road next to Sixt and Thrifty Car Rental Blvd Fco. Medina 7936, Puerto Vallarta Father Jack Wehrs/Lay-minister Fer Sandoval e mail: jackandshirley1@att.net Text 1 619 300 7377 Tel 044 322 138 5873

Web site: www.anglicanchurchpuertovallarta.org Complimentary parking at Sixt Rental Car


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May 17 - 23, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com


local

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May 17 - 23, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Vibes & Vices: Pirate Ship Vallarta AJ Freeman

cosmiccapt@gmail.com

AJ Freeman is an adventurous spirit, serial friendmaker, and general enthusiast. He lives his everyday life hoping to demonstrate the nearly infinite potential for discovery and wonder on this small wet rock orbiting a dim yellow star in the backwoods of the Milky Way.

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n many major cities, there are attractions that the locals fancy themselves far too good for. I spent some time in New York and never once made time for the Statue of Liberty. The Walk of Fame didn’t really appeal to me during my stint in LA. I spent summers in Atlanta as a child and still don’t much care for Coca-Cola, definitely not enough to tour the factory. It’s that same blasé attitude that has kept me off the infamous pirate ship that lights up Vallarta evenings with a nightly invasion of pyrotechnics. We’ve all witnessed it at some point: the shadowy silhouette that slinks silently into view from the Malecon before firing off a fusillade of fireworks. That’s pretty much how you know it’s 9:30 around here, right? I had never had a burning desire to set sail with randoms on a 3 hour tour--I’ve seen that end badly--but when the generally amazing Carol Ann invited me to join a group of visiting friends in doing the tourist thing, it was an easy decision...I wanna be a pirate. The Vibes: El barco in question is the Marigalante, a 700-ton tribute to the Santa Maria, the ship that brought Columbus and his lot to the new world after they went through all the proper immigration channels. The vessel made an impressive sight on the horizon as we were processed through the search and security area to make our way to the docking point.

and was indeed given another. They didn’t even take the original away, so there I sat on the upper deck of a Spanish galleon, multicolored hair fluttering in the wind as I sipped on my stereo cocktails and watched the shores of Vallarta roll by. Truly I was a god among men.

Drink 7/8 (glass of beer served alongside a glass of red wine, sailor style): The next sips came alongside dinner, and you know what, it actually wasn’t bad. Certainly not the worst food I’ve had on a cruise. If I had it to do again, I’d choose the steak & lobster meal. Not that the chicken Cordon Bleu was disappointing, I just figured it would be the most difficult dish to Cap’n Charlotte led her scurvy crew and the assembled landlubbers through the open water adventure, bantering with her drunken second mate the whole time. A friend of mine won a contest by popping a balloon with her buttocks and was also placed in the brig for a time in an unrelated incident, and I believe that serves as a handy encapsulation of the evening. The Vices: Due to my fuzzy recollection of the festivities, this section functions best as a timeline. I didn’t check my watch much, but have devised an alternate tracking system.

Drink 1 (rum x Coke): Our standing drink orders were taken on the way to the ship, and while I did just endanger any potential CocaCola sponsorship earlier in this piece, I can honestly say it’s much more enjoyable when diluted with booze. *bigsmile, thumbs up* The drinks were handed to us almost immediately after taking our seats for the show, setting the tone for some high times on the high seas. Drink 4 (Captain Morgan shot): It was here when I discovered the crew’s resident borracho was so committed to his method acting that the bottle he was carrying around was actually full of liquor. I asked for a swig o’ the swill and was enthusiastically obliged. 
Drink 5 (rum x Coke): Sampling my drink and finding far too much cola for my taste, I asked for another

make terrible. I’m happy to report that bunch of pirates earned a bit of my trust here.

Drink 9 (rum x Coke): After dinner in the galley we all headed back up top to take in the sunset, which is beautiful from the beach but spectacular from the ship’s deck. I also took in another drink, and this is about where things got a bit hazy. Drink ? (probably rum x Coke): I believe this is when the mutiny took place. One of the crew’s saltiest sea dogs was apparently tired of Cap’n Charlotte’s ship, and resolved to make it his own by taking command. He swung in on her with a rope, which is an entrance I have to use one day.

Drink ?? (unknown tequila): Like I said, my memories of this evening aren’t the best, but they are the greatest. More shanties, more swashbuckling, more shots. Also, fireworks, remember? Drink ??? (probably rum x Coke): The rebellion was quashed, and the traitor made to walk the plank. The sea is a cruel mistress, and so is Cap’n Charlotte...First Mate Judas was tossed overboard with a graceful dive, where I assume he drowned. After a few hours on the bay and what had to have been the better part of a 750mL bottle, we pulled back into the marina and were officially christened pirates by our captain. Cheesy? Yeah, sure...but there’s nothing wrong with cheese unless you are cursed with lactose intolerance, in which case, poor you. The Verdict: Obviously consuming eleventeen adult beverages in less than one-eighth of a day is not an equation that’s going to work out for you very often, but my lack of self-control is hardly the fault of the attraction itself. If a night of nautical nonsense is what you’re after, there’s hardly a better place to find it than with these Banderas Bay buccaneers. Maybe I’ll catch you there... drinking responsibly, of course.


iSSUE 1102, May 17 - 23, 2018  

Puerto Vallarta, Mexico The Vallarta Tribune is the longest running free English language newspaper in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. We publish w...

iSSUE 1102, May 17 - 23, 2018  

Puerto Vallarta, Mexico The Vallarta Tribune is the longest running free English language newspaper in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. We publish w...

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