Page 1

expats

Importing your car Page 12

entertainment

Duende and Bohemia Together Page 20

El Parque de los Azulejos Fundraiser Page 27

March 15 - 21, 2018 Year 20 Free Issue 1093

FR EE

GU ID E

VallartaTribune.com

events

Riviera Farmers Market every Tuesday from 9 am - 2 pm Page 11

CROSSWORD paGE 45

VALLARTA SHOPPING paGES 42-43

EVENTS CALENDAR PAGE 21


The Historic Zone - Vallarta ArtWalk

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one can start anywhere, including in the middle. Many participants visit every gallery, others may only go to only one or a few, but the evening is a must for residents and visitors alike who enjoy art along

at www.VallartaArtWalk.com  and most of the member galleries have their own websites. The member galleries are listed on the edge of the adjacent map and numbered from north (1) to south (13,) but

with meeting new people and seeing old friends while combining the experience with a great meal or entertainment in the most exciting part of this beautiful city, the Historic Zone.

The Wednesday Art Walks will continue through the last week of May, and although some galleries close or reduce their hours during the summer months, several maintain their regular schedule.

Mapa/Map - Visita sin guías / Self guided tour 13

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Centro, Hidalgo 424 01 (322) 223 5476 Ro’Wo Interiores • Marina Vallarta Plaza Neptuno No. A-1 01 (322) 22 122 58 arterowo@hotmail.com www.rowogaleria.com

Historic Center

CORONA 176 1

LOFT

THE

Wednesdays • Miércoles 6 - 10 pm GUADALUPE SÁNCHEZ 858

MIR 4

www.galeriapetraluna.com galeriapetraluna@gmail.com

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12 11 10 9

6 7

HIDA

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+52322.1589914 sales@lod.com.mx www.lod.com.mx

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Main Square

ESTACIONAMIENTO

MALECÓ

Origen y Destino

Nostalgia

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Come Piedras

5

Unicornio

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Neptuno y Nereida

Rotonda del mar

6

En busca de la razón

Caballito

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Arte Contemporáneo de México

CENTRO Leona Vicario 230 Col. Centro • +52 322 222 1198 ROMANTIC ZONE Venustiano Carranza 307 Col. Emiliano Zapata +52 322 688 2127 Puerto Vallarta • México

Aldama No. 174 • Centro 2nd Floor / Piso Tel.: (322) 222 1982 Fax: (322) 222 5502 www.galeriapacifico.com galeriapacifico@gmail.com

FINE ART GALERIA

ZARAGOZA

T. 322 2233 490

M

AMO

ITURBIDE

Guadalupe Sánchez 803-A Puerto Vallarta Jal. Centro

INTERNATIONAL

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MAT

MINA

RIO LEONA VICA

Contemporary ceramics

CORONA 176 - A

galería (322) 222 6353

CORONA

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PÍPILA

Galería

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2

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MÍNGUEZ

petra luna

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ABASOLO

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E-MAIL: PEYOTEPEOPLE@YAHOO.COM

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CENTRO · PUERTO VALLARTA, JAL.

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very Wednesday, from October through May, the thirteen member galleries of the Vallarta Artwalk will have evening cocktail receptions from 6:00 to 10:00 pm  for the highly talented Mexican and international artists that they represent. The Historic Zone is where the city was founded in 1851 and includes the original stretch of the Malecon (ocean promenade) with its monumental bronze sculptures, as well as the famous Virgin de Guadalupe church with its spectacular crown, with the townsquare and city hall in front. It is also home to some of the most popular and highly rated restaurants in Vallarta, including Mexican, Italian, Indian, Mediterranean, Cuban and French. The perennial favourite, Cafe des Artistes, offers a special Art Walk Menu from 6:00 to 11:00 pm on Wednesdays.  Several live music venues and discos reflect a similar diversity and the area is also the home of the Naval Historical Museum, the Anthropological Museum and the Office of Cultural Projects, OPC.  The historic zone is quite compact, stretching from the Cuale River in the south to the northern end of the Malecon at 31 October Street, significant as the date of Vallarta being officially recognized as a municipality. All of the galleries are within one to three blocks from the Malecon in a north to south stretch of only eight blocks, so it’s an easy walk and there are large public parking garages at either end. Eight of the galleries participated last season, and they are: Colectika, Corsica I, Corsica II, Galeria Pacifico, The Loft, Caballito del Mar, Galeria de Ollas and Galeria Nordsouth. They will be joined by a member of past years, Galeria Uno, as well as four new members, Galeria Ro’Wo, Petra Luna Galeria, LOD, and Galeria 108. The galleries range from small to large, new to established, traditional to contemporary, and have a wide range of offerings from highly specialized to multifaceted. One can expect to see a huge overview of artistic creations ranging from paintings, sculptures, photography, ceramics, tapestry and designer jewelry and furniture. The Art Walk brochure 20172018 gives details on each gallery with photos as well as a map of the Historic Zone that facilitates this self-guided tour. It can be found in many leading restaurants, hotels and stores in Puerto Vallarta and surrounding communities as well as in each member gallery. This information is also available online

A non-profit dedicated to contemporary art. Juárez 598 · Col. Centro Tel. (322).222.0541 opcvallarta@gmail.com

www.oficinacultural.org

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welcome

Welcome to Puerto Vallarta and Riviera Nayarit

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t the Tribune we want you to have the best experience possible while you explore Puerto Vallarta, the Bay of Banderas and Riviera Nayarit. Here are some helpful tips for traveling. TIME ZONE: The entire state of Jalisco is on Central Time, as is the southern part of the State of Nayarit starting from San Blas in the north. BUSES: A system of urban buses with different routes can bring you from one end of the bay to the other and all the spots in between. If you’re going further than San Pancho, head to the main bus terminal to catch a ‘Pacifico’ bus. Current fare is 7.50 pesos and passengers must purchase a new ticket every time they board another bus. There are no “transfers.” TAXIS: There are set rates within defined zones of town. Do not enter a taxi without agreeing on the price with the driver first. Make a note of the taxi number in case you leave something behind. Drivers typically do not carry change.

UBER: New in 2017 to Puerto Vallarta, Uber is still experiencing some growing pains particularly in the state of Nayarit. Uber is about 25-50% cheaper than a taxi, but this is subject to change. The benefits of using Uber are set fares and the ability to follow up directly with your driver if there is an incident or you leave an item behind. MONEY EXCHANGE: Typically a bank will give you a higher rate of exchange than the exchange booths (Caja de Cambio). You will need your passport. Better yet, use your bank card to withdraw funds from any ATM. Note that ATM’s in the banks are the safest to use and charge lower fees. DRINKING WATER: While Puerto Vallarta’s water has been

awarded a certification of purity for the past two decades, the quality of the water tested at the source varies greatly from what comes out of the tap at the other end. So do be careful. If you want to be doubly sure, you can pick up bottled water just about anywhere. EXPORTING PETS: Falling in love with the street dog outside your hotel is easy to do and it’s also easy to bring them home with you too. The process is inexpensive and only takes a day or two. You need a certificate of health from a local vet among other things. For the most up-to-date information contact the Puerto Vallarta SPCA at spcapv@ gmail.com. COMMON SENSE: Just as you wouldn’t walk around your hometown drunk and belligerent, it is not acceptable to do that here. While Mexico is a tolerant culture, basic politeness is appreciated. Don’t pee in the streets. Don’t flash your money or expensive gadgets. Pay attention to your surroundings. Know where you are going. Pay your bills (and don’t forget to tip). And have fun! DRINKING AND DRIVING: First off – just don’t. The consequences are not worth it. Taxis or Ubers are cheap and plentiful. Fines are as much as 12,000 pesos. You can be taken to jail and your vehicle impounded. There are many checkstops on the weekends, and you will be asked to blow if they suspect you have been drinking. LEGAL SYSTEM: Not knowing the law is not a valid excuse in Mexico, or anywhere. If you find yourself caught in a legal situation be aware that guilt is presumed until your innocence can be proven. This is a very difficult lesson to learn if you are visiting from the United States or Canada. Immediately contact your consulate for assistance.

Director Noemi Zamora noemizamorareynoso@gmail.com Editor Lic. Madeline Milne mmilne@Vallartatribune.com Sales Team editor@vallartatribune.com Designer Cynthia E. Andrade G. cysandra@gmail.com

March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Calling in Mexico Calling phones in Mexico can be tricky. There are different codes you need to use depending if you are calling landlines or cellular phones and if they are local or long distance. LONG-DISTANCE CALLS FROM WITHIN MEXICO For national long-distance calls (within Mexico) the code is 01 plus the area code and phone number. For international long-distance calls, first dial 00, then the country code (U.S. and Canada country code is 1), so you would dial 00 + 1 + area code + 7 digit number. CALLING CELL PHONES (FROM A LAND LINE) If you are calling from a landline within the area code of the Mexican cell phone number dial 044, the 10 digit number. Outside of the area code (but still within Mexico) dial 045 and then the 10 digit phone number. Cell phone to cell phone only requires the 10 digit number.  PHONE CARDS Phone cards (tarjetas telefonicas) for use in pay phones can be bought at newsstands and in pharmacies. Pay phones do not accept coins. When buying a phone card for pay phone use, specify that you would like a tarjeta LADA. CALLING TOLL-FREE NUMBERS Some toll free numbers work from Mexico to the US and Canada, but many do not.  Those that do work are often not toll-free. You need to dial a different prefix. To call the following toll free prefixes, dial as follows: 800 numbers Dial 001-880-then the number  866 numbers Dial 001-883-then the number  877 numbers Dial 001-882-then the number  888 numbers Dial 001-881-then the number

Emergencies: 911 Red Cross: 065 Fire Department: 322.223.9476 Ambulance: 322.222.1533

Ahoy Cruisers! NAME PASS DATE NORWEGIAN STAR 2,900 06/03/2018 RUBY PRINCESS 3,782 06/03/2018 CARNIVAL SPLENDOR 3,200 07/03/2018 OOSTERDAM 1,848 07/03/2018 CARNIVAL SPLENDOR 3,200 14/03/2018 NORWEGIAN STAR 2,900 14/03/2018 GRAND PRINCESS 2,600 17/03/2018 CARNIVAL SPLENDOR 3,200 20/03/2018 NORWEGIAN STAR 2,900 21/03/2018 MAASDAM 1,258 22/03/2018

Immigration: 322.224.7719 Consumer Protection: 01.800.468.8722 Tourism Offices Jalisco: 322.221.2676 Nayarit: 322.297.1006

Consulates American Consulate 24 hrs 01-332-268-2100 Canadian Consulate 322.293.0098 322.293.0099 24 hrs: 1.800.706.2900

In port this month

In the month of March Puerto Vallarta welcomes 36,970 passengers! NAME PASS DATE EMERALD PRINCESS 3,082 27/03/2018 CARNIVAL SPLENDOR 3,200 28/03/2018 NORWEGIAN STAR 2,900 28/03/2018

Vallarta Tribune is an activity and entertainment guide and publishes information as it is provided by the advertiser or event host. We do not assume responsibility in errors or omissions other than to correct them as they are made known to us regarding event schedules, locations and/or prices. In addition, we do not assume any responsibility for erroneous inclusion or exclusion of information except to take reasonable care to ensure accuracy, that permission has been obtained to use it, and to remove it as soon as is practical upon receiving your notification of error. We recommend you always confirm prior to attending or visiting an event or establishment. Weekly publication edited, printed and distributed by Ediciones y Publicaciones Siete Junio, SA de CV Grupo Editorial Tribuna Calle 21 de Marzo # 1174 Col. Lomas del Coapinole Del. El Pitillal, Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco México CP 48290 Tel. 226-0800 editor@ vallartatribune.com * www.vallartatribune.com * www.facebook.com/vallarta.tribune

Cut out and put near your phone for handy reference

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editorial

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Editor’s

March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

DO YOU REALLY NEED

Note

THAT STRAW?

editor@vallartatribune.com

Go shopping. Support local artisans.

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his week is practically a phone book. 48 pages and most of it is information about upcoming events. If you’re bored in Puerto Vallarta, you’re not doing it right! This weekend we have, St. Patrick’s Day at Murphy’s Pub. There is an Irish Buffet, live music and lots of beer. Don’t forget to wear green or you’ll be kissed by a leprechaun. If pots of gold aren’t your thing, what about shots of raicilla? In celebration of the upcoming Centennial, the city of Vallarta is promoting many events including this three-day festival exploring our local version of Tequila/Mescal called Raicilla. Head to the Cultural Centre on Isla Cuale from 5-9pm each evening for tastings, info, music and more. Pro Tip: Check out www.puertovallartaalcien.com for updated information on all (or at least some) of the events the city is planning. They even have a facebook page that is creating event postings and will respond to you if you message them. It’s a small miracle, but one I will embrace. Catch some sun and watch the country’s best athletes compete for upcoming international competitions at the National Stand-Up Paddle Board Championships being held on Playa Camaron? Or if you’re protecting your fair skin, check out the 18th Int’l Vallarta Film Festival

that runs through the weekend. All the films are screened for free at various venues around the city. The details are here: www.cuc.udc.mx If you’re in La Cruz or just part of the boating community, think about getting tickets for the last Amigos de la Cruz event – Sail Away at La Peska on Tuesday, March 20. Funds raised go to help support the efforts of Amigos. On the 21st we have the spring fundraiser for the El Parque de Los Azulejos beautifying project at Mantamar Beach Club. This will be a super fun event (maybe wear your bathing suit under your outfit, just in case) and its only 650 for VIP access. Splurge, and I’ll see you there. Last week I attended the SPCA Year of the Dog fundraising brunch, and it did not disappoint. Not only did I wreck the buffet, but I also won one of the enormous door prizes! I never win anything, so this shocked me and all the photos taken of me have crossed eyes. Absolutely nothing to do with the champagne. I now have a lovely new tote from Lisa Love, a beautiful dish from Joan at Red Gate Pottery, two

extravagant gift certificates to La Cappella and Iguana Restaurants and a gorgeous, decadent box of chocolates from XocoDiva. Plus, I sat at what was surely the most fun table. Awesome event! Put it on your radar for next year. One more ‘event’ to tell you about: On March 19 is the Artisan’s Day in Mexico, a day recognized by the National Fund for the Promotion of Fine Crats (FONART), since 2013. There are 12 million ‘artisans’ in this country, most of whom live below the poverty line, which is a much lower line than you and I are likely used to. Some of the indigenous art produced in this country has been stolen by major retailers and fashion designers with no recognition for the culture or artists themselves. (Pier One and Isabel Marant, to name two.) This weekend, support a local producer. Check out the many farmers and artisan markets around the Bay as well as the stands, shops and vendors who are working for subsistence wages. That’s it for me this week. Support local, tip generously and say no to that straw. Safe travels, Madeline

IF YOU DON’T NEED THAT STRAW, THEN THE NEXT TIME YOU ORDER A DRINK SAY -

Sin popote, por favor!

Where Is This? Sandra Cesca

Dear Editor:

S

alón Malecón & Team would like to sincerely thank all of our clients and the community of Puerto Vallarta. We are proud to call the Bay of Banderas our home. Three years ago we were new and people took a

chance on us and we really appreciate the trust. Thank you so much to all of our clients for the word of mouth to help us grow. We would also like to thank the rest of the salons and hairdressers in the Bay of Banderas. There are so many talented hairdressers in the bay and we have

learned so many things from them. We are committed to providing excellent service to our clients. We are currently working on new furniture for next season, as well as possible new location. Thanks again to all of our clients for all your support. Sincerely, Salón Malecón

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his renovated hotel was originally the home of a famous socialite from California who built it in 1974. Her parties were not to be missed! As a bed and breakfast located in a quiet section along the Rio Cuale, it is the choice of many who want a different experience.

Find this on a guided walk around historic Vallarta with Puerto Vallarta Walking Tours Stroll the cobblestone streets, typical of Spanish Colonial architecture, while absorbing the sights, smells and sounds of daily life. Visit markets, historic buildings, and workshops. Get immersed in the culture while exploring areas you might not find on your own. www.puer tovallar tawalkingtours.com


Next week at the Farmers’ Market you will find great things!

Karen Mical Designs

Karen Mical Karen Mical Designs

Designs

CHILEAN ARTISAN WHOLE GRAIN BREAD

Original

Handmade Original

Wearable Handmade

Original

Art

Wearable

Handmade

Art

Wearable

Love it when healthy meets delicious? Don’t miss out!

karenmicaldesigns@yahoo.com

Art

FB Karen karenmicaldesigns@yahoo.com

Mical Designs FB Karen Mical Designs

Narisa’s Thai Cuisine karenmicaldesigns@yahoo.com

FB Karen Mical Designs

By Narisa Doungsuwan Moros

I Try our more than fifty flavors in aguas frescas We cover events

mibarrarefresca@gmail.com cel. 3221274968

Follow us:

t seems that I have been involved in making and selling Thai Food since I was a little girl in Chiang Rai in Northern Thailand. My mom had a restaurant that also catered to School lunches and I remember helping her during my spare time from primary to the end of high school. It seemed like work at that time but I now realize how much she taught me during those formative

years, from preparing the intricate Thai sauces to the fine selection of spices and herbs to the final preparation of regional Thai dishes. Not only did she teach me how to cook but I also learned a lot about food management, food preparation and most important how to sell and serve the customers. It all served me well in later years. After high school I felt I had had enough of cooking

Long time family recipe all the way from Chile to your plate. Flax, sesame, and sunflower seeds are some of the ingredients that make for this healthy, nutritious, and delicious bread. facebook.com/TheChileanBread

so I attended the local Chiang Rai Teachers College for two years, graduated and got my first job teaching at a local school where I taught for several years. In 1986 I returned to the food industry by accepting a position as food & beverage manager at a new five star hotel in Chiang Rai. My responsibilities included managing and organizing banquets, weddings, business and social functions and overseeing the various restaurants in the hotel. After six years and an enjo-

El Taco Ranchero Tacos, burritos, quesadillas, huaraches y sopes lamancha90@hotmail.com

325 Basilio Badillo

322 222 0869 Marcelwordl1@hotmail.com

Cel. 449 198 4281

bluber1979@gmail.com

Cel: 322 143 3809

yable working experience I returned to school to further my teaching education at the Chiang Rai Rajabhat University graduating with a bachelor degree in special education. I returned to teaching physical education at a private school in Chiang Rai for several years. During this period I met my present husband Joseph, who was an English Professor at the university in Chiang Mai. We eventually got married and moved to Chiang Mai. While in Chiang Mai I registered at


NARISA’S THAI CUISINE Authentic Thai Dishes

Serving the Local Markets & Home Catering Home Delivery & Pick Up Service thaicuisinepv@gmail.com Tel: (332) 222-8331 Cell: (322) 888-9840

the Chiang Mai Polytechnic College to study and obtain various certificates in Food & Nutrition, Thai Cooking, International Foods, Painting & Dyeing Batik. In 2008 my Husband retired and decided to move permanently to Puerto Vallarta where my new venture in Thai Cuisine began. I noticed a total lack of Thai cuisine in PV so it was a natural decision for me to put all of my past culinary knowledge and experience to practical use by providing some authentic Thai dishes to the local residents and visitors under the name of Narisa’s Thai Cuisine. It all started by joining the Farmers Market at Paradise Community Center in Old Town eight years ago where Joe and I offered a limited range of authentic Thai dishes, expanding to a full

menu as time progressed. The introduction of Thai food to the local market was an instant success. When the Paradise Community Center closed we moved to the new location with Old Town Farmers Market subsequently renamed the Olas Altas Farmers Market. The secret in preparing authentic Thai food is the use of authentic ingredients specifically spices, herbs and sauces. This was my biggest challenge since most of the required ingredients were not available in PV or in Mexico. With lots of effort and research we managed to source the necessary ingredients as well as to grow some of the critical herbs ourselves. It was difficult but very rewarding as we can now provide a full range of dishes with a true

authentic Thai taste and flavor. The most rewarding part of my work are the many comments I receive from my customers praising the authentic taste of my Thai food and dishes For many years my cooking was limited to our small kitchen in our house. As my business grew my kitchen expanded into the living room and other areas. Two years ago I moved into a commercial unit that allowed me to set up a modern kitchen with plenty of space for cooking and food preparation and with sufficient additional space to open a permanent restaurant to serve my devoted customers all year around. The restaurant is scheduled to open in April 2018. It has been an enjoyable and gratifying experience to watch my dream grow

from a simple idea to the present capability where we can offer a full range of authentic Thai dishes from the traditional favorite Pad Thai and Cashew Chicken to the various Thai curries, Tom Kha Gai, green papaya salad, crispy egg rolls & fresh veggie rolls, special salads and desserts. It is even more gratifying to feel that I am producing a product that people really enjoy eating. Narisa´s Thai Cuisine is now serving at the Olas Altas Farmers Market on Saturday and the Marina Malecon Farmers Market on Thursday evenings as well as providing home delivery and pick up service from the permanent location at 1239 Columbia (near Honduras). You can reach Narisa at 322 888 9840 and 322 222 8331 and thaicuisinepv@gmail. com.

Heriko Joyería Heriberto Saucedo Pérez Artista Diseñador Cel. 3222.190 56 32 Fb: Heriko Joyeria herikojoyeria@hotmail.com Puerto Vallarta, Mexico

Cell. 322 134 4162 MEXICO, (952) 583 0329 USA & CANADA info@muchococo.com www.muchococo.com

Basilio Badillo 326 Old Town, Puerto Vallarta 322.223.3889 www.banderassoapblends.com

Pruebe nuestra única y original paella y tortilla Española Try our unique and original paella and Spanish tortilla Tenemos servicio para eventos privados Contact us to cater your private events Tel:2254273 • Celular:3223038922 • Mail: nochipam@hotmail.com


news

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March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Uber-like helicopters operating in CDMX Voom offers on-demand helicopter taxi service

MX among 11 nations in new trading bloc

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ide-hailing services broke new ground in Mexico five years ago, but that was for ground transportation. Now, travelers can hail a helicopter. The on-demand helicopter booking platform called Voom launched its services yesterday in Mexico City, operating five aircraft from several locations including Montes Urales, Interlomas and the Mexico City and Toluca airports. A subsidiary of Airbus Helicopters, Voom said in a press release that Mexico City has substantial helicopter infrastructure already in place, with more than 200 helipads in the metropolitan area. It also has dedicated air traffic control for helicopters, allowing for more efficient air transportation. Most trips within the city are

Trans-Pacific Partnership ‘stands behind open markets and trade liberalization’ about 10 minutes long, the company said. A flight from Montes Urales to the city’s international airport, a route that Voom expects to be one of the most popular, takes eight minutes and costs 2,500 pesos (US $134). It said the trip would typically take two hours by road during rush hour. Bookings can be made up to seven days or just 60 minutes before a flight, and passengers must be at the helipad 15 minutes before boarding time. “Airbus is interested in urban airborne mobility,” said Voom CEO Uma Subramanian. “We saw that [Mexico City] was a large city where traffic is a problem but one that also has the infrastructure to develop helicopter use.” Original: Mexico News Daily

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exico was one of 11 Pacific Rim countries that formally entered into a revised trade pact in Chile yesterday that will slash tariffs between the participating nations. The signing of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP11, contrasted sharply with United States President Donald Trump’s formal announcement that the U.S. is introducing tariffs on steel and aluminum imports. Economy Secretary Ildefonso Guajardo represented Mexico in the signing ceremony in Santiago that was presided over by Chilean President Michelle Bachelet and attended by trade ministers from the member nations. “Despite rising protectionism trends, what you have collectively achieved today constitutes a clear message that we stand behind open markets and trade liberalization,” the Chilean leader said. Chilean Foreign Minister Heraldo Muñoz agreed, saying “we will be giving a very powerful signal against protectionist pressures, in favor of a world open to trade, without unilateral sanctions and without the threat of trade wars.” The new trade bloc includes Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam. The combined population of the countries exceeds 500 million

people and together their economies account for 13% of global gross domestic product (GDP). The agreement was originally conceived as a counterbalance to China’s increasing economic influence. But President Trump withdrew the United States from the original TPP deal on his first day in office, a move that many thought would kill off the agreement. But the remaining 11 countries decided to forge ahead regardless and there is a possibility that nations including the United Kingdom, South Korea, Taiwan and the Philippines could later join. If the United States had remained in the agreement, the TPP would have accounted for around 40% of global GDP. U.S. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin has said that he is in discussions to consider rejoining the agreement. The TPP11 will go into effect 60 days after six of the 11 member countries have ratified the agreement domestically. In Mexico’s case, the text of the treaty will be sent to the federal Senate for analysis and approval. The agreement creates the world’s third largest trade bloc after the European Union (EU) and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The latter is currently subject to a contentious — and slow  — renegotiation process. In a statement, the Economy

Secretariat said that “Mexican products will have access to six new markets: Australia, Brunei, Malaysia, New Zealand, Singapore and Vietnam” as a result of the TPP11. It also said that “it will enable Mexico to deepen its access to the agri-food market in Japan and consolidate preferential tariffs with Canada, Chile and Peru.” News website Quartz  said the TPP11 “creates more leverage for Mexico and Canada in trade negotiations with the U.S.” The signing of the pact comes as some analysts say the U.S. government is using the introduction of tariffs as a negotiating ploy in ongoing NAFTA talks Trump announced yesterday that Mexico and Canada will be  initially exempt from its metal tariffs  although the U.S. president appeared to indicate that getting a favorable outcome in an updated NAFTA deal was a condition of them being made permanent. Uncertainty surrounding NAFTA has spurred Mexico into seeking new trade agreements and export markets. It is currently negotiating an updated agreement with the EU that is reportedly close to conclusion.  Names of cheeses  and  jalapeño and chipotle chiles  have been among the obstacles that have held up the trade talks. Original: Mexico News Daily


news

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Mexico exempt from new tariffs—for now

Exemption on steel, aluminum tariffs hinges on ‘a fair NAFTA agreement’

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nited States President Donald Trump announced yesterday that Mexico and Canada will initially be exempt from new tariffs on steel and aluminum imports that will take effect in two weeks. Trump cited the close relationship between the three countries, including national security ties, as justification for the decision. But he also continued to frame the exemption as conditional on reaching an updated North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) that better favors the United States. “Due to the unique nature of our relationship with Canada and Mexico, we’re negotiating right now NAFTA, we’re going to hold off the tariffs on those two countries to see whether or not we’re able to make the deal on NAFTA . . .” he said. “I have a feeling we’re going to make a deal on NAFTA. I’ve been saying it for a long time,” Trump added. “If we do, there won’t be any tariffs on Canada or Mexico.”

The U.S. president first suggested in a Twitter post Monday that the two countries could be exemptfrom the 25% steel and 10% aluminum tariffs “if a new and fair NAFTA agreement is signed.” A White House official said Wednesday that a 30-day exemption may be applied to Mexico and Canada but Trump didn’t confirm any planned timeframe in relation to the exemption. Whether the exemptions become permanent remains to be seen. Following the announcement, United States Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross told CNBC that “there’s no question that the action the president took today is a further motivation to both Canada and Mexico to make a fair agreement with the United States.” However, Ross rejected that the tariffs were part of a “negotiating ploy” to update NAFTA. Nevertheless, during his announcement yesterday, Trump repeated his threat to pull out of the 24-year-old trade agreement if it cannot be

reworked to his liking. “If we don’t make the deal on NAFTA and if we terminate NAFTA because they’re unable to make a deal that’s fair for our workers and fair for our farmers . . . and fair for our manufacturers, then we’re going to terminate NAFTA and we’ll start all over again or we’ll just do it a different way,” the president remarked. United States Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said at the conclusion of the seventh round of renegotiation talks in Mexico City earlier this week that the U.S. could seek bilateral deals with Mexico and Canada separately if needed. Despite lingering uncertainty about how long the exemption will last, the Mexican peso rose against the US dollar after the president’s announcement and the Canadian dollar also regained ground it had lost against the greenback. In a statement in response to the exemption, Mexico’s Economy Secretariat said that Mexico recognizes the problem of global steel oversupply, adding that “the negotiation process for the modernization of NAFTA is running its normal course.” Economy Secretary Ildefonso Guajardo has previously said that NAFTA talks are “independent” of Trump’s tariff actions. Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland told reporters in Toronto that NAFTA is “a completely separate issue.” However, she welcomed news of the exemption, saying “today is a step forward.” She also said that Canada will push for a permanent exemption. Mexico, which is the fourth largest aluminum exporter to the U.S., is also expected to lobby strongly for a long-lasting exclusion. Original: Mexico News Daily

March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Aeromexico rolls out branded fares, including a budget option By Robert Silk

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eromexico has launched a new package of branded fare offerings, including a basic economy option. Meanwhile, joint venture partner Delta said it now offers basic economy on more than half of its flights to Mexico, including several new Mexico City and Guadalajara flights. Aeromexico’s new product offerings apply to domestic routes as well as the Mexican carrier’s flights to the U.S. and Canada. Fare options graduate upward from Basic at the low end to Aeromexico’s lie-flat product, Premier, at the high end. In between, Aeromexico is offering four progressively more service-oriented fare bundles that give passengers the option to choose items such as advanced seat assignments, extra

legroom, travel date flexibility and priority boarding. Aeromexico’s new Basic product mimics Delta’s Basic Economy. Fares are the lowest offered by the airline but fliers don’t get a seat assignment prior to check-in and tickets are nonrefundable and cannot be changed. One carry-on bag is allowed. Delta and Aeromexico entered into an antitrust-immune joint venture last May. Under the arrangement, the carriers are allowed to jointly schedule, market and operate flights between the U.S and Mexico. Along with Mexico City and Guadalajara, Delta sells basic economy fares to Cancun, Puerto Vallarta and Cozumel.

Original: Travelweekly.com

Country’s new campaign focuses on heritage tourism By Meagan Drillinger

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exico is calling its sons and daughters home. Last month, the Mexico Tourism Board debuted a new tourism initiative, “Let’s All Travel Across Mexico.” The integrated product and marketing initiative is designed to reach the more than 35 million Americans who identify as having Mexican heritage. “Our mission is to ensure that Mexico continues to sustain its track record of above-industry average growth for many years to come, and this includes seeking new ways to engage specific markets and audience segments that present opportunities for the

industry,” secretary of tourism Enrique de la Madrid said at the opening event in Los Angeles. “Mexico is known for being one of the friendliest places in the world for visitors, and as part of our ongoing efforts to invite everyone to visit Mexico in 2018, we extend this invitation to Mexican-Americans, a group who comprises the majority of the 11% of the U.S. population who identifies as Hispanic.” The new campaign is geared to celebrate the beauty of Mexico’s cities, nature, culture, gastronomy and more, reminding Mexican-Americans that these are part of their heritage, as well. With the new campaign, Mexico joins other countries that have

recently focused on heritage tourism, where the motherland calls its native sons and daughters home to reconnect with their roots. Scotland crowned 2014 the year of Homecoming, with a full year of festivals, events and tastings throughout the country celebrating all things Scottish. Israel’s focus on returning to the Holy Land targets the tens of millions of Americans who identify as having ties to

Jerusalem. And Ireland designated 2013 as the year of “The Gathering,” calling the 70 million people around the world who claim Irish ancestry to show off what their homeland has to offer. Mexico’s new tourism initiative comes on the heels of the 2016 national campaign “Viajemos Todos por Mexico,” encouraging Mexican citizens to explore more of

their own country. The attractiveness of the Mexican-American audience segment, who on average travels more than 2.5 times the average American, whether they are visiting family or friends in Mexico, provides a new well from which to draw. The new integrated program begins rolling out in March and will seek to further accelerate growth from the U.S. market to Mexico in 2018. The digital platform showcases more than 200 Mexican destinations through the “Mexican Routes” guides and offers more than 1,000 tourism packages to Mexico.

Original: www.travelweekly.com


Medical Matters Pam Thompson

pamela@healthcareresourcespv.com

Pamela Thompson operates HealthCare Resources Puerto Vallarta, a multi-faceted, independent, resource network that is here for your total health and well-being. We offer assistance to help find a physician, hospital and diagnostic service for any healthcare needs. www.healthcareresourcespv.com

Pelvic Rehab & a Couple of Other Things!

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hen one thinks of “rehab”, they think of physical therapy, drug addiction, alcohol problems. One does not usually think of “rehab for the pelvis”. The pelvic floor muscles run around the opening of the urethra, vagina (in women) and rectum. There are many reasons that these muscles might be weak and not work properly. Age, childbirth, pelvic organ prolapse, trauma to the pelvic area can be some. And it is not just related to urinary symptoms but also to fecal incontinence, meaning “not being able to control

your poop”. Many people are too embarrassed to discuss these issues with their physician, or even a friend or partner. They think that they are doomed to just wearing a Depends and hope that they do not laugh too hard, sneeze a lot or, heaven forbid, get up to dance and have an accident. This is called “pelvic floor dysfunction” and we have here in Puerto Vallarta the facility, equipment and specialists to deal with these dilemmas. First, one will have a consult with a urologist to obtain a complete history and perform an exam to determine the cause of the symptoms. Once this is done, he might order more specific studies (labs, ultrasound). Depending on the results and it is determined that the solution is not limited to only

a surgical one, the patient begins the actual rehab program with a specially trained physical therapist (physician) where they will learn specific exercises and treatment with a state of the art “machine” using electrostimulation and biofeedback. Called the “Phenix”, the folks at UroVallarta are the only ones in the area offering this unique treatment. Watch for an upcoming information session and demonstration of this advanced level treatment and explanation of the rehab program by our urologists and physical therapy physician in April! As many of our “snowbirds” prepare to leave for the summer months, there is suddenly a flurry of requests for assistance to prepare claims for insurance reimbursement. I am happy to assist


Come and enjoy a wonderful day

with this but please do not expect this to be done within a couple of days of your departure! Once again a reminder: It is your responsibility as the patient to obtain receipts/ reports at the time of the appointment/study (and of course I can assist you with this). Not 24 hours before you board the plane. If you bring me a big plastic bag of receipts and papers that include credit card receipts for restaurants and Wal-Mart mixed in with cocktail stained napkins and a grocery list from last December the chances are pretty slim that I will have everything prepared and in order

for you by the time you want it done. I have followed Paco Ojeda for years (and I still miss him doing Vallarta Lifestyles)! He is now doing some really cool interviews called “Paco Ojeda Live” and I would encourage you to have a watch! Here is the link: https://www. facebook.com/pacoojedalive/ You rock Paco, as always! As we head into Semana Santa (unbelievable it is almost here already!), have patience, don’t complain (what’s the point) and just enjoy the ride!

Fruits, vegetables, and seafood with the highest quality and freshness. Great variety of organic foods, bakery, traditional sweets, handmade items, crafts, jewelry and gourmet delicacies. All this in a pleasant outdoor setting with live music and an excellent location in the heart of the Bahía, at Centro Empresarial Nuevo Vallarta.

Here’s to an outstanding week!

From November 7th, 2017 to April 24th, 2018.

Tuesdays

Venecia 290 Col. Díaz Ordaz Fluent English Spoken Porcelain veneers, crowns and bridges. Dental implants, Dentures Go to www.pvsmile.com.mx for address and directions

from 9:00 am until 2:00 pm

Paseo de los Cocoteros # 55 at Centro Empresarial Nuevo Vallarta Back Parking Lot Nuevo Vallarta, Riviera Nayarit, Mexico.


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Two Expats in Mexico Paul Kurtzweil www.qroo.us

Paul Kurtzweil (Q-Roo Paul) is a former lieutenant from the Polk County Sheriff’s Office in Florida. During his 25-year career, he received numerous commendations to include two of the agency’s top honors: a Meritorious Service Medal and a Medal of Valor. In 2015, Paul retired and moved to Mexico with his wife. He now spends his day’s blogging from the beach.

Permanently Importing a Used Vehicle to Mexico

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eaders often ask me how they can permanently import their foreign plated vehicle to Mexico. When I say, “permanently import”, I’m talking about getting Mexican license plates for it. For the purpose of this article, I’ll be referring to the process as nationalizing  the vehicle. Hopefully, that will help to avoid any confusion between temporarily and permanently importing the vehicle. Just to be very clear…my first piece of advice to anyone who is thinking of making Mexico their permanent home is to leave their old vehicle behind. There is a very strict criteria for nationalizing vehicles in Mexico and there is a good chance that your old car — the one that you love so much because the driver’s seat is perfectly formed to your backside — won’t even be eligible. There is a lot of confusion when it comes to nationalizing vehicles because the requirements vary depending on geography. To keep this simple, I’m going to break the geographic regions down into two categories:

Northern Border Area of Mexico, Baja California, Baja California Sur and a Region of Sonora The requirements and the import tax is lower if you’re a resident of one of the above locations AND the vehicle is going to remain in that part of Mexico. Proof of residency is required. Types of Vehicles: Vehicles with capacity for up to 15 passengers (cars, SUV, pickup, van) manufactured in North America. The first digit of the vehicle identification number (VIN) indicates where the vehicle was manufactured, it must be 1,2,3,4, or 5. Age of Vehicles: 5-10 years old Fees/Taxes: If the vehicle is  5-9 years old, there will be a  1% import tax  (arancel)  on the value. If the vehicle is 10 years old, there will be a 10% import tax on the value. If you have a certificate of origin  (certificado de origen) the import tax is 0%. 16% value added tax (IVA) 0.8%  derecho de trámite aduanal (DTA) Agent’s fee (varies) The Rest of Mexico Once you leave the border area, the requirements get much stricter and the import tax goes up.

Types of Vehicles: Vehicles with capacity for up to 15 passengers (cars, SUV, pickup, van) manufactured in North America. The first digit of the vehicle identification number (VIN) indicates where the vehicle was manufactured, it must be 1,2,3,4, or 5. Age of Vehicles: 8-9 years old Fees/Taxes: If the vehicle is 8-9 years old, there will be a  10% import tax  (arancel)  on the value.  If you have a certificate of origin  (certificado de origen) the import tax is 0%. 16% value added tax (IVA) 0.8%  derecho de trámite aduanal (DTA) Agent’s fee (varies) Getting it Done This is not one of those types of tasks that you can do yourself. By law, you have to hire a custom’s agent (called an agente aduanal) to handle the whole process for you. You should contact the agent 7-15 days prior to the date that you want to import the vehicle. Just to be very clear: the only way that you can legally nationalize your car is through an  agente aduanal. If someone tells you that they have another way to get it done, make no mistake about it —  it’s illegal and you risking more than just losing your car. Let’s Wrap This Up The purpose of this article is only to give you an idea if your vehicle would be eligible to be nationalized in Mexico. Since you can’t do it on your own anyway, I didn’t get into the paperwork involved or the details of the importation process. If you have questions related to those or any other part of the process, you should direct them to a licensed agente aduanal.

March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Que Paso at UDG CUC Michael Nolan

104.3wakeupshow@gmail.com

Michael Nolen is the host of ‘The Good Morning Wake Up Show,’ which is broadcast as part of the University of Guadalajara’s 104.3 FM radio station at the CUC campus in Puerto Vallarta. Every Saturday at 9 AM

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he 18th FICPV will run until March 23. It opened on the 12th to a sold out auditorium at the Cinemex theaters at the Galerias Mall. We are very sorry to the people we had to turn away. We will show over 40 movies, at 11 different venues. There are 9 different sections for you to choose from. For more information visit the UdG CUC web site for the official program. www.cuc.udc.mx All of the movies are FREE and open to the public. Also I encourage you to look at

the UDG CUC web site each week to get the latest news about all the events taking place on and through the campus. www.cuc.udg.mx And be sure to tune in to The Good Morning Wake Up Show every Saturday morning at 9 am. 104.3 FM or on the web at udgtv.com/radio-puerto-vallarta/ en-vivo And please remember: The length of a film should be directly related to the endurance of the human bladder. - Alfred Hitchcock


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Busing Banderas Bay Bruce Howells

busbanderasbay@gmail.com

Bruce is a retired Canadian, who along with his wife Velma, took a “mulligan” on life and escaped the cold of Canada and settled in the Vallarta area. Fulfilling a retirement dream of not driving anymore, Bruce will use public transportation to tour the bay and tell his tales here. Tips and itineraries welcome. Email: busbanderasbay@gmail.com turnoff at Boca and you are at the end of the line. Hard to miss this arrival point as there is a shelter selling pop and necessities for your enjoyment. The Experience: Heading into town. oca de Tomatlan, south of A cobblestoned hill down to PV, provides a glimpse into Vallarta, plus an excursion the town and the departure points to a village defined by the jungle for the popular hiking tours to Los and mountains on one side, while Animas (left) or to the beach and nestled on the shores of the bay restaurants, water taxis and other tropical delights. You will encounter where water taxis rule. We required three busses many “guides” willing to set you up and two plus hours to reach our with water taxis or you can walk to the beach and secure your own. It destination. Bus One Bucerias: Board is less expensive for a water taxi an “ATM” or “Compestela” bus to from here than in PV to the many Vallarta. Disembark anywhere past isolated beaches further south. My choice of activity was to the Walmart in Vallarta. I noticed a passenger with what secure shade at a beachfront looked like a speaker. Silly me, not only a speaker, it played music and had a microphone. He serenaded us with Spanish Rap music. My daughter and her husband enjoyed it and were able to capture and post the video. I took some photos and as soon as my role of film is finished I will send it away for processing. Return trip, arrive at the Walmart and catch any bus for Sayulita or Punta Mita. Bus Two: Board any bus that says “CENTRO”. Enjoy the view passing the Malecon, and using your Vallarta Tribune map, disembark and find your way to Bus three. Return trip board busses with “Walmart”, can be either a “Tunel” or “Centro” bus. Catch this bus around the corner from where you disembark from the Boca bus. On our return trip a women boarded the crowded bus and sang while playing her guitar, everyone providing her room, and many kindred souls rewarding her with “propinas”. Bus Three: Corner of Basilio Badillo / Constitucion Leaving Vallarta you embark on a winding narrow road into the Sierra Madre Mountains, with views of magnificent, luxurious hotels and properties overlooking the ocean. Arriving. The bus pulls into a small

Bucerias to Boca de Tomatlán

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restaurant and enjoy the scenery and camaraderie with family while observing the activities of animals and humans going about their daily routine. Oh, and a few cold beverages and some delicious seafood. Time to head home. Leaving the beach restaurant we meandered thru town, observing workers loading boats with flats of water and beverages to serve the towns and beaches only accessible by boats. Time to pay the piper and climb the hill to the highway. It is not an extremely difficult hill but anyone with mobility issues needs to be aware of it. Wait for the bus at the top, and buy your ticket on the bus. For best views of the bay on the way home sit on the left side of the bus. Another excellent day showing off “my” Mexico, this time to my family as I thought it important they appreciate where their inheritance is going. All accomplished using local transportation and no driving on my part. For detailed instructions on bus connections and photos, view the online article at www.vallartatribune.com/category/columns/ busing-banderas-bay/

March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com


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March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Vibes & Vices: BabelBar AJ Freeman

cosmiccapt@gmail.com

AJ Freeman is an adventurous spirit, serial friendmaker, and general enthusiast. He lives his everyday life hoping to demonstrate the nearly infinite potential for discovery and wonder on this small wet rock orbiting a dim yellow star in the backwoods of the Milky Way.

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have to say, my first thought upon breezing into BabelBar on my preliminary evaluation was “why isn’t this place packed?” Although this little oasis just off the Rio Cuale bridge in the heart of the city certainly isn’t bereft of business, the array of amenities on hand made this comfortable scene into a seemingly natural setting for a leisurely lunch or even pretending to get a little work done. I knew as soon as I arrived I’d be back, and that’s really all it takes to get 600 words out of me. The Vibes: On a typical Friday night, BabelBar is home to a functional tribute to its biblical namesake, a weekly language exchange that

invites locals and leisure linguists from around the world to hone their skills in Spanish, English, French, and other languages while enjoying

a fine beverage, or five. It’s a constructive and convenient community resource that also appreciates a good play on words, and I want to be more like it one day. On my official visit, the Friday in question was also BabelBar’s first anniversary celebration. After offe-

CHRIST CHURCH BY THE SEA

ring a guided tour of the premises from the main river deck to the bonfire of Babel Beach, directly on the shore, the eminently charming Arancha was kind enough to invite me back for the event’s live music and free raicilla shots. It was quite the jazzy evening, but you already knew that from the pictures.

 The Vices: Look, it’s right on the label...BabelBar is a bar, and as such, features a selection of standby spirits as well as a collection of cocktails and specialty drinks. It also has a full all day dining menu, and among the standouts are the Roquefort salad,

abundant with fresh greens and finished with an addictively tangy dressing I did manage to restrain myself from eating with a spoon because no, no, I get it, we are trying to run a society here. Humans have a love-hate relationship with fire...while we are all familiar with the ancient Earth idiom “fire bad,” none among us can admit to being immune to its seductively dancing flames, tantalizing thermal embrace, and allure of controlled danger...or maybe it’s just me that used to play with matches. In any event, there is certainly a market for a beach bonfire site in town and I am part of that market. For absolute full disclosure, I haven’t yet answered the consistent call of the hammocks that sang to me on that first day...however, to my expertly trained eye for relaxation, they appear to be regulation size and weight and I can personally testify that I have witnessed people thoroughly enjoying themselves in them, so you can lounge with peace of mind. I stake my reputation on it. The Verdict: This hidden gem of the Rio Cuale is located on the far east side of the island, and so it’s easy for Vallarta veterans and visitors alike to miss it on a brisk stroll between Centro and Old Town. Still, sometimes you have to make time for a great time, and this, my friends, is one of those times. BabelBar offers one of the most unique backdrops in the city and is also the unofficial meeting place of Vallarta Tribune staff as of last week or so...maybe I’ll catch you there.

Iglesia Cristo del Mar Anglican / Episcopalian Tradition

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Salón Malecón with Luis Angel Germany

Professional Hair Design Color Specialist Brazilian Blowout Hair Extensions Eyelash Extensions Manicure/Pedicure

#819 Morelos Centro Puerto Vallarta 322-222-7783 salonmalecon@gmail.com Open Tues-Sun 10-7 *Bilingual


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March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Sustainably Yours Emily Magewski

emilyannmajewski@gmail.com

A horticulturist and sustainability consultant for 18 years Emily runs a part time business in the Bay called Small World Probiotics, the region's largest fermented foods venture. Emily’s passion is ecology: whether it's our human micro biome or the greater ecology we are all fortunate to be a part of. She lives with her husband, daughter, two dogs, fourty chickens, ducks and plant collection outside of Lo de Marcos, Nayarit.

Blue Swimming Pools that are Green

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et’s talk about swimming pools. For some, the only sustainable pool is no pool, considering water scarcity issues. But for others, there are going to be pools so we might as well make them as righteous as possible. First, consider salt water pools and UV purification. The chlorine industry is incredibly toxic and with dubious exposure risks to both workers and end users. Others write

that these eco technologies may or may not pay for themselves, but in my opinion, if they prevent your exposure to pool related health risks and provide excellent pool exercise, they pay for themselves on many levels beyond cost. An excellent resource for salt water pool installation locally is Aquaviva, in Fluvial. Secondly, plant wind barriers around the pool to help prevent evaporation. Ideally the trees, bamboo and shrubbery are not so close as to generate excessive organic debris, but close enough to reroute drying winds. Otherwise, consider using pool covers to

prevent evaporation. Thirdly, consider creating a pool cooperative amongst neighbors, to reduce the need for individual pools. This arrangement can include “pooling” expenses. Fourth, position your pool where it can double as an emergency source of water for fires, if you are not confidant fire services could get to your home in time. Fifth, check for leaks regularly! Each drop of water lost per second equates to 8,000 liters per year. Enjoy the challenge of making a normally unsustainable home feature into something as green as it is delightful.

ST. PATRICK’S DAY

ow sh l ia ec p S

¡ I´m FRIDA, I'm FREE !

MARCH 17 - FROM 9:30AM TO 2:00AM

MONOLOGUE -MAPPING

March 17 - 19 20:00 hrs TERCERA LLAMADA PV Gonzalez Gallo 103 (FRENTE A MACROPLAZA ) ENGLISH SUBTITLES

322-115-1995

No Reservations. First come first serve!! Corned Beef N Cabbage, Guinness Stew, and other Irish fare available. Guinness, Jameson, Baileys, Irish Coffee, and more!

Live Entertainment: Clan Macnaughton Pipe Band (Edmonton, Alberta). Larry Foley (St. John’s, Newfoundland). La Trez Cuartoz Celtic Rock Band (Puerto Vallarta).

MURPHY´S IRISH PUB 484 MORELOS CENTRO - MALECON

LOCATED ACROSS FROM EL FARO


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Byron Recommends

March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Byron Ayanoglu

Sheryl Novak

Byron is a memoirist, travel columnist, cookbook author, restaurant reviewer and novelist. He is currently working on his sixth novel which is tellingly entitled Puerto Vallarta, Mexico

Sheryl Novak is an expat Canadian who has owned a home in Mexico for over ten years. She is the owner of SOLutions Mexico and The Furniture Store by SOLutions Mexico. She is an expert on sourcing all styles of furniture for all sizes of budgets, in Mexico.

sa.novak@solutionsmexico.com

byron.ayanoglu@gmail.com

Arty Lunch at Fonda Franchesco

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photo by Algis Kemezys

yron is a memoirist, travel columnist, cookbook author, restaurant reviewer and novelist. He is currently working on his sixth novel which is tellingly entitled Puerto Vallarta, Mexico Art is everywhere in this town, in the air, on the walls of countless galleries, deep in the hearts and souls of the citizens, even inside its name: VallARTa. One can eat or drink at quite a few art-galleries that double as restaurants/cafes, but my favorite is a tiny (seven tables) idiosyncratic place stashed away on an ordinary street just outside downtown, serving daily, inexpensive breakfasts and commida corrida (lunch specials) from meal-soups to a wide range of meat dishes. What makes Fonda Franchesco so attractive is the charm of its surround-paintings that cover every inch of its wall-space and which are indeed for sale, but most casually so: no one pushes it, it’s just there as part of the owner’s collection, as much for his own enjoyment as that of his clients’. That owner, the eponymous

Franchesco, spins around, serving all the meals and even doing dishes when he gets a moment, but he always seems to find time for a chat. It’s very much like visiting his home. Much of the art on the walls is by the very amusing David Chavez, who happens to be present when I check in for my lunch. He recounts stories about Vallarta (not all of them suitable in a family newspaper) and talks about how he chanced on art a dozen years ago, making it his passion and his profession; as well he should: his work wittily and colorfully portrays episodic vignettes of this very diverse, dynamically evolving, vibrant-alive city. The lunch, which I choose to have on a Friday, the traditional “fish-eating” day according to Catholic canon, kicks off with perky jamaica juice and a tasty lentil soup, on route to butter-tender nuggets of pargo-fish in a lively “Cuban” recipe of tomato, onion and peppers. Alternately, the pargo can be had breaded-fried with an even more melting texture, its delicate petals needing not much more than a single juicy chew. FONDA FRANCHESCO Calle Colombia #1220 5 de Diciembre, Puerto Vallarta

Franchesco and David

The Trick To Buying A Sofa That Lasts

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ver the past 10 years, I have helped hundreds of home owners in Vallarta Nayarit find comfortable sofas and sectionals. Most people want to jump right to the style and the color they prefer. To ensure you get a well-made sofa that will last you twenty years or more, don’t forget to select one with the right frame and support. The frame is the most important part of the sofa. If the wrong materials are used, or the manufacturing processes are not high quality, it is unlikely your sofa or sectional will last even a few short years. Well made frames use kiln dried hard wood and/ or high quality engineered wood. This assures quality, strength and durability. Be wary of any sofas or sectionals made with particle board. Well made items also have good interlocking joinery reinforced with glue and/or staples. You know you are buying from a

good manufacturer if they design and engineer their frames using an upholstered furniture test method developed by Purdue Universitys Wood Research Lab. This test ensures proper joint construction and materials so that your sofa is designed and built to last. Another test that good manufacturers use is called the drop test. This test is one prescribed by BIFMA (Business and Institutional Furniture Manufacturers Association). A 300 lb weight is dropped on the seating area from a specified height to ensure

the frame withstands impact. When it comes to suspension, most mid price range sofas use springs or webbing. If your sofa has springs, make sure they are a minimum of 8 gauge and that the springs are sinuous so that there is good seat suspension. Webbing is interwoven strips of synthetic material with rubber attached to the wood frame. Both springs and webbing ensure you will not fall through to the floor so another key piece of a good sofa. Almost all upholstered furniture uses foam. Good foam for seating should be at least 1.8 lb high resiliency. This foam gives improved comfort without loss of support. The seating will feel soft when you first sit. It will also give the feel of deep support without bottoming out as would happen with softer foams. Conventional foams lose their support over time and use. High resiliency foam is the way you ensure your upholstery will look and feel good for years to come. High resiliency foam is also environmentally-friendly. In addition to foam, a well made piece will also be padded. Padding takes the hard, sharp corners of the foam and helps give the sofa or sectional the rounded, smooth edges. There are different types of padding. Some have resins and hardeners so that they can be used on outdoor upholstered items. Others have the resins and hardeners removed so that they are softer and smoother but used mainly for indoor. Dacron, one type of padding, resists mold, mildew and parasites. This, along with a performance fabric for a cover will make the perfect sofa or sectional for your home in Vallarta Nayarit.


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From Here

Foreign corporations and the “GILTI” trip Marcia Blondin

Orlando Gotay, Tax Attorney

marciavallarta@gmail.com

tax@orlandogotay.com

Orlando Gotay is a California licensed tax attorney (with a Master of Laws in Taxation) admitted to practice before the IRS, the U.S. Tax Court and other taxing agencies. His love of things Mexican has led him to devote part of his practice to the federal and state tax matters of U.S. expats in Mexico. He can be reached at tax@orlandogotay.com or Facebook: GotayTaxLawyer. This is just a most general outline, and is of course, informational only and not meant as legal advice.

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ome readers may be shareholders in “foreign” (non U.S.) corporations that run businesses. Others use Mexican corporations to hold title to real property, especially where non-Mexicans must use fideicomisos (coasts and border zones) seeking savings on fees. The IRS knows that foreign corporations that stay away from the U.S. can’t be reached. If they have enough percentage of U.S. shareholders, the IRS gets very interested. Their profits could be “parked” indefinitely inside the corporation and not distributed as dividends. Congress got wise, putting in place “Subpart F” rules, imputing earnings to US shareholders of “Controlled Foreign Corporations”, as if those earnings were actually distributed. CFCs are controlled by vote or value, by US persons. More than fifty percent=control=CFC. If you are a 10% shareholder of a CFC, Subpart F applies to you. What? You are the sole shareholder? Well, you are in—all the way! Bait, hook, and sinker. This CFC thing is important because those U.S. shareholders may also be subject to the “repatriation tax” imposed on the earnings of CFCs. There may not be any earnings to pay tax but you, CFC-greater-than-10% shareholder, will have to go through the complex computations…well beyond most do it

March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

yourself tax programs. In an effort to bring more business ‘home’, Congress also just invented a new category of Subpart F income: Global Intangible Low-Taxed Income, or -you guessed it- “GILTI”. Tax writers do have a sense of humor, after all. GILTI assumes foreign corporations have some reasonable rate of return based on their fixed, depreciable assets—10%. If they exceed that return, it is generally treated as GILTI. As you learned earlier, Subpart F income (now with the new GILTI) is included (the year it is earned) in the greater-than-10%-CFC-shareholders’ federal income tax return. You get taxed on more. At a minimum, there’s more number crunching. Does the IRS not know you are a 10% shareholder? You are supposed to tell them annually. You may be supposed to as well if you are an officer or director of these corporations. If you contributed capital or cash to a foreign corporation, you may have additional, separate reporting requirements. These international rules were originally meant for “big” corporations. Expanded definitions now mean many provisions apply to smaller ‘fish’. Don’t run afoul of them; the consequences can be substantial. For a U.S. person, ownership of foreign corporations entails understanding complex U.S. tax rules that are in flux as this very moment….

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have been perusing “On Your Feet. A Dancer’s Handbook for Self-Care” written by Dawn Nichol, Registered Massage Therapist. Well-written and acknowledged by some significant folks involved in the professional dance business. Her specialty is dancers, athletes and musicians so if that’s you, email or call Dawn to make an appointment or to get a copy of this essential DIY guide. You’ll find her ad in this issue. The Vallarta Garden Club meets Thursday, the 15th, at Incanto at 5 pm. Special guest is Dr. Leslie Korn. Wednesday, the 21st is the Spring fundraiser at Mantamar to gather funds for the mosaic work at Parque Lazaro Cardenas. Please come and help in what could become the most significant piece of public art in Banderas Bay. The line-up of entertainment is as spectacular as the setting. See you there – come early for the VIP reception at 6:30.  The group casually called “Friends of Rodolfo” is growing weekly. For those of you just tuning in, Rodolfo is a blind tenor, who has  leapt into the hearts of many Vallartenses, tourists, and snowbirds who are helping him in many different ways. Jean-Guy Comeau, an entertainer/pianist/ singer/teacher, has come on board to train Rodolfo’s voice for the first time in his life. Lessons are paid for by a couple of group members and the improvement in Rodolfo’s voice is measurable on a weekly basis. How do I know? Rodolfo  performs at Coco Tropical, my favorite restaurant, every Sunday from 6 to 8:30 pm. Rodolfo sings in Spanish (of course), English (he wants to learn to speak it and sings without an accent!) and has added Italian. Audiences love him! Many of you have seen Rodolfo rolling a speaker, holding a microphone, strolling the Malecon, and singing for hours on end. Summer is coming and the rain makes it impossible for Rodolfo to earn a daily living. That’s why the group approached Heinz Reize at Coco Tropical

and urged him to hire Rodolfo for Sunday evenings. That, too, is coming to an end as Coco T. will close on Sundays beginning the first of April. So, this is to invite everyone to go and listen to Rodolfo on March 18 and the 25, and if any of you restaurateurs have openings in your entertainment schedules, please go and hear Rodolfo sing, then hire him. Or, if you are having a party at your villa or condo, you should go, too, and hire him. He can also pack a dance floor! Besides wanting to learn English, Rodolfo has always wanted to play the piano. Last week some of the Friends of Rodolfo gathered at Skip Everett’s condo for a small concert. A beautiful new portable, electric Yamaha piano was set up, Rodolfo and wife Julia (who is

also blind) were enjoying coffee, Jean-Guy arrived and the bunch of us fell silent as we sat through a mini-voice lesson with Jean-Guy giving instructions and Rodolfo complying. They sang a couple of verses of Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah, in beautiful harmony. We sat, knowing what was coming, that the piano would be gifted to Rodolfo. There was not a dry eye in the house. Teresa tried valiantly to hold back her tears while she translated Skip’s words into Spanish for Rodolfo and Julia. Then, Jean-Guy navigated Rodolfo onto the piano stool, placed his fingers on his new keyboard, and the piano lesson began. By the time I reached Skip’s front door, Rodolfo was playing his first scales. Last night at Coco Tropical, listening to Rodolfo fearlessly sing in English, I couldn’t stop the spark of tears. The setting was lovely sun setting over the water, people pausing and leaning on the wall looking in at the packed restaurant and listening to a voice that was good and is becoming exceptional thanks to a mix of people who care so deeply for this gifted man. And the kindness keeps on growing, From Here.


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rants and shopping in the popular south-end of PV, a few easy blocks walk from the beach. Views and relaxation abound on the rooftop terrace and lounge with city and ocean views. Saltwater, solar heated pool, multiple jacuzzis. Don’t miss this must-see condo. b o a r d w a l k r e a l t y p v. c o m / properties/v399-107


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Paradise and Parenting Leza Warkentin

mommyinmexico.wordpress.com

I am the preschool coordinator and nursery teacher at the American School of Puerto Vallarta. I am also both unsurprised and not a bit sorry that this list of my favorites is mostly about places to eat. If you can live in Vallarta without appreciating some of the good eatin’ around here, you have to be at least half Vulcan.

Happy Guera

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am one happy guera these days. There are several reasons for my joy, and if you are a resident of Vallarta right now, then you probably share at least a few of them: I live in Puerto Vallarta. The weather (the WEATHER!) is literally the best weather of all the great weather around the globe. Every night a chilly sixteen, every day mid to high twenties. And it’s MID-MARCH. Pinch me. Except only figuratively. All of the people all around are happy too for reasons 1) and 2). They are still not using their signal lights unfortunately, but they are happy. My husband bought me lawn furniture for Valentine’s Day, which is not at all the same as a husband ignorantly gifting a vacuum cleaner or a Vitamix for a romantic occasion. Because now I can sit outside in the beautiful garden he’s made instead of sitting at my kitchen table wishing I had lawn furniture. And thanks to 1) and 2), I can still be outside enjoying it. If I focused on only the negative parts of living in Vallarta, then I might be (a little) less happy. For one thing, the signal lights thing I mentioned can certainly be aggravating when I would like to advance in traffic but someone in front of me isn’t moving but is giving no indication as to why. Also, in another two months I am going to be sweating at 6:30am instead of wrapping up in a light, comfy cardigan. Plus, the bumpy, hole-ridden cobblestone streets might (probably) be shaving off about five years from the life of our two elderly vehicles. And since my husband and I make pesos, which haven’t exactly been one of the celebrated currencies of choice these days, it’s a bit of a concern. And, in one more week, Vallarta is going to transform into

a spring break megapolis and my street is going to transform into a camping ground of sorts. Semana Santa brings a large number of Mexican tourists to our town, and things can get crowded and noisy. This can sometimes be kind of fun and novel, but can also require earplugs at other times. So yeah, I guess if I thought about some of those things it could get me down. I could wonder if there are any studies about the length of car life in cities with post-winter potholes as big as a VW Vocho as opposed to those in cobblestoned towns.

I could ponder about whether there will ever be a crackdown on appropriate signal light usage. Or whether there will ever be new buses for every route in the city, which we may be using once our beleaguered vehicles finally give up. But I’m not going to do that. Or, if I do, I’ll probably pull up a lawn chair outside and think about it in this delicious sunshine. Maybe you are going through a hard time. You might have that dreaded flu that our whole family got (if so, we are very sorry). Perhaps your family was supposed to come and visit, but they backed out because they heard it’s too dangerous in Mexico. Or maybe they keep bugging you to come back home to Detroit where it’s secure. The news might be getting you down, because it all seems to be bad no matter WHERE it’s coming from. You may be hearing a lot of sadness out there, and you may be feeling a lot of sadness inside. I want you to do something for me. I want you to walk out the door of your home, or hotel, or rented condo. I want you to look

March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

up at the sun and breathe some of that clear air into your lungs. I’m doing it too, I promise. Read 1) and 2) out at least

three times (successively louder, your neighbors won’t mind). Here you are. In Mexico. In the sunshine. Here you are.


events

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March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

This Weekend the National Championship Stand Up Paddle and Paddleboard 2018

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ead to Barracuda’s for a prime seat as the 2018 Stand-Up Paddle and Paddleboard national championship will be held from March 14 – 18 at Playa Camaron and Quimixto. It is organized by Jalisco’s Surfing Association and endorsed by the Mexican Surfing Federation.

More events can be found at www.vallartatribune.com

Tournament winners will qualify for a place at national pre-selection toward the World Association Surfing Championship and the Pan American Games, both to be held at the end of 2018.

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For more information visit www. facebook.com/ASEJSURF

Puerto Vallarta Film Festival 2018

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he Puerto Vallarta International Film Festival will take place from March 12 - 23. In this 18th edition the guest of honor will be Cataluña. During the festival attendees will enjoy at no cost 40 films, divided into11 different categories. Each year the festival rewards those personalities whose careers have made significant contributions to the

world cinema. The event headquarters will be "Dr. Juan Luis Cifuentes" auditorium located at the Centro Universitario de la Costa, which will screen the films in 22 locations around the city. For information regarding venues, schedules and more please visit the festival's official web page at http://www.ficpv.cuc.udg.mx/ programa

Holy Guacamole! Guacamania is Coming to Casa Velas Your weekly schedule of

Artisan Markets & Events

inVallarta and Riviera Nayarit

There are regular markets called ‘tianguis’ that occur in many neighbourhoods throughout the week. You can usually buy fruits and veggies, clothing, household items. The markets and events here represent local producers, artisans and entrepreneurs. Unless noted (*) most run from the first week of November through April. FRIDAY *Marsol Friday Market by the Pier - 9:30 am -1:30 pm Open every Friday all year located on Francisca Rodriguez street Sayulita Mercado del Pueblo - 9am -2 pm SATURDAY Olas Altas Farmer’s Market - 9:30 am - 2 pm at Lazaro Cardenas Park *Three Hens & a Rooster Market 9 am - 1:00 pm Every Saturday all year, locate at Venustiano Carranza 466 SUNDAY Huanacaxtle Farmer’s Market - 9am -3pm - Located at La Cruz Marina TUESDAY Riviera Market 9am - 2 pm Located in Nuevo Vallarta in the parking lot behind the Casino. WEDNESDAY Bucerias Forever Spring Market - 9am - 1pm -Lazaro Cardenas / Javier Mina - Opposite La Vida condos *Vallarta ArtWalk - 6 pm - 10 pm See their map for locations. Bohemio Artisans Co op - 625 Lazaro Cardenas, Old Town Wednesday, Friday and Sunday 10 - 2 THURSDAY Bucerias ArtWalk - 7-9pm - along Lazaro Cardenas Marina Vallarta Night Market- 6 pm -10 pm - along the marina

Upcoming Events

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f ever you needed an excuse to stay at Casa Velas, here it is. Forget WrestleMania, it's time for Guacamania! With special avocado-focused menus, avocado-themed spa treatments, dedicated guacamologist and more, guests visiting Casa Velas, an adults-only boutique resort in Puerto Vallarta, in March will get to experience a tribute to the green fruit. At Emiliano, the resort's gourmet Mexican restaurant, a special menu highlighting avocados will be available. Highlights include avocado burritos, chocolate mousse made with avocado, waffles with avocado and walnut jam, avocado ceviche with mushrooms and jicama, avocado tiramisu, and more. Additionally, a guacamologist will prepare fresh guacamole for guests at the pool area and private ocean club. Guests can also participate in a cooking class to learn how to prepare different types of guacamole. To keep guests cool in Puerto Vallarta's temperate 85'F weather, avocado shaved ice will be offered in the pool area. At the spa, different treatments will be offered using avocado as the main ingredient, such as an exfoliation with avocado skin, avocado body wrap with natural yogurt and an avocado moisturizing hair treatment. To cap off the experience, the bar will have a menu of avocado drinks, such as cold avocado cream and an avocado and piña colada martini. The resort will also be offering the Guacamania experience in September in honor of Mexico's Independence Day.

f you have an event you’d like to include here, please email editor@vallartatribune.com. Non-profit/community events are listed free of charge. For a calendar of all events visit vallartatribune. com/eventos Tuesdays – Malecon Sculpture Tour from 9-11am  - Meet the artists, learn about the sculptures that line the Malecon and support the local library. Starts in front of the Millennium Sculpture (in front of MacDonalds)  Wednesdays – Vallarta Artwalk from 6-10pm through 13 galleries in Centro. See advertisement for more details. Thursdays – Evening Malecon Sculpture Tour. Starts at 6pm at Galeria Pacific on Aldama in Centro and ends at Demetro Galeria across from Lazaro Cardenas Park. Thursday, March 15 – 18  Chacala Festival of Art and Music is a FREE four day event with Art, Music and Food from 5pm every day. www.chacalaculturalfoundation.org/ March 16-18 Festival de Raicilla “DamaJuana 2018” Hosted by Centenario de Puerto Vallarta at the Instituto Vallartense de Cultura from 5-9pm each evening. Sunday, March 18 Riviera Sunsets – At the W Hotel Headlining: DJ Oliver Dollar 450 pesos includes transportation from Vallarta. 5-11pm https:// riviera-sunsets.boletia.com Sunday, March 18 Stars of Banderas Bay Benefit - $300 peso admission to the gorgeous Los Arroyo Verde in Bucerias. Live music, Food and drink available, Silent Auction, 50/50 – proceeds raised support the Vida Int’lChildren’s Centers, feeding and caring for more than 150 childrent in Mezcales and San Vicente. Tickets and info: wordhouse777@gmail.com March 20 – 24 XXVI International Bahía de Banderas Regatta This annual regatta will welcome participants from Mexico, the United States, and Canada who have their boats in the marinas at Nuevo Vallarta, La Cruz de Huanacaxtle, and Puerto Vallarta. banderasbayregatta.com/ Tuesday, March 20 TED Talk: Rhonda Zarate Finding your happiness Boutique Dinner theater from 10am-noon

Tuesday March 20 Sail Away @ La Peska Dinner, Music, Dancing, Auction, 50-50, Children’s Choir, Hugo’s Dance Troupe. www. amigoslacruz.org March 20 – 24 Circo de los Niños The San Pancho Circo de los Niños opens its doors for its annual fundraising event, which this year will be called Voilà! The show combines both circus and orchestra, presenting over 150 young artists under the direction of Gilles Ste-Croix, co-founder of the Cirque du Soleil. circodelosninosdesanpancho.mx/ Friday, March 23 Mariachis, Margaritas & More Dinner at the presidencia in support of the Amapas Neighbourhood Assoc. Doors and bar service open at 6pm, buffet service starts at 7, with entertainment to follow. 900 pesos. info@amapaspv.com Friday, March 23 Crystal Ball – An Evening Under the Stars 6th Annual Fundraiser for the Puerto Vallarta Gay Men’s Chorus 7:00 pm at Casa Karma Boutique Resort 1800 pesos. info@pvmenschorus.org Sunday, April 1 Easter Bonnet Brunch Taste at Casa Cupala $3000 pesos in prizes for each category: 1) Most original, 2) Most fabulous, 3) Best theme Brunch $429 peso Portion of proceeds to SETAC April 25-28 Cuisine Of The Sun 2018 Villa La Estancia – Third annual gourmet Food and Wine Festival will bring together some of the biggest names in food as well as top chefs from around the world. Toll Free: 1 800 831 1191 March 25 – 31 Holy Week Get ready for Holy Week and Easter! Plenty of sun, sea, and, sand with a lot of activities for everyone to have a wonderful vacation. Friday, March 30 Traditional Passover Seder at 6:30 PM at the River Café. Reservations with payments, are requested. Adults, 850 pesos or children 5 to 10, 425 pesos free for children 4 and under. Please make your reservations by March 20, 2018 with the River Cafe via Paypal. More info: helth1@ sbcglobal.net.


entertainment

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March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Dwight Blake Entertainment Presents ‘Heart and Soul’

R Duende and Bohemia Viva ‘Together’

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ocalists Extraordinaire Andrea and Luis of Bohemia Viva team up with the ‘Instrumental’ Magic of Geo, Luis and Lilly of DUENDE to bring you a one-of-akind Concert Experience at Incanto, one night only, March 23 at 6:30pm. Imagine what happens when soaring vocals are supported by beautiful instrumental performances and rhythms. That is what is in store for you during their special concert “Together”. It gives us goosebumps even

thinking about the amazing music that will be created spontaneously on stage when these two powerhouses put their talents together! The idea for this show came about after the two groups experimented with being guest artists at each other’s shows. The audience response was over the top whenever they did songs together. “We just felt that this was something that needed to be done... for the sake of the music and the art”

said Geo Uhrich of Duende. “It is about the joy of being part of something truly magical, a moment in time that is completely soulful, heartfelt and beautiful”. ”As Duende and Bohemia Viva joined in song, my first thought was, wow, these two groups need to do a worldwide tour!” Yes, they were that good! - Deb Jean. Vallarta Tribune Online tickets with no booking fees and more information IncantoVallarta.com

Michelle Johnson Presents:   ‘Spotlight:  The Music of Icons’

ecording Artist/Songwriter Dwight Blake Dwight returns to Incanto with ‘Heart and Soul’ for one show only, March 17 at 8pm. This show features many of Dwight’s favorite R&B/Soul and Pop singers. He will be accompanied by his world-renowned group of highly skilled musicians, The Groove Brothers Band, who have played for numerous famous artists, including Mexico’s iconic entertainer Juan Gabriel. Dwight Blake has performed all over the world, including the USA in Las Vegas and Florida, Europe, Asia, and several venues in Mexico. He has opened for The Canadian Tenors, and has shared stages with Barry Ivan White (The Platters), and many other great performers.

This is one you don’t want to miss! Reserve today with no online fees IncantoVallarta.com

“Kenny” Marty Edwards' Amazing Tribute To Kenny Rogers Merv Buchanan merv@uvs.com

W By Debbie White

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ichelle Johnson is a powerhouse of musical talent. Known as Las Vegas’ First Lady of Jazz she is coming to Puerto Vallarta for only four shows in March. Her immense talent as a singer/performer has given her amazing opportunities to share her gift with audiences worldwide. Michelle has had the privilege of singing with musical icons including Paul McCartney, Barbra Streisand, Elton John, Sheena Easton, Gladys Knight, David Cassidy, Rosalind Cash, Lesley Gore, Paul Rogers (Bad Company), the Platters, and many more! She performed with Sugarland at the AMC Awards on CBS and performs the National Anthem for NASCAR and other professional sporting events.

In her new show, ‘Spotlight: The Music of Icons’, Michelle Johnson will also share a few stories about working with celebrity artists around the world and her rise to fame as a Jazz headliner in Las Vegas. She goes far beyond singing a few songs and gives her audience a world-class performance! Michelle’s acclaimed Carol King tribute show, ‘Tapestry Unraveled,’ has been highly praised by critics and she is well known for her work as backup singer for some the world’s top musical artists. Michelle loves her audience, commenting, “I look out at an audience and I see different faces, but I see a similarity in the look in their eyes when a song hits them a certain way. I love watching that moment.” A regular at The Smith Center Cabaret Jazz Center in Las Vegas,

Michelle can sing a jazz tune like one of the greats! She is the performer that we hope for when we get that special night out! Michelle Johnson has been living an interesting life.   She grew up in Egypt, with her father was stationed as a Liberian diplomat.      A Yale graduate with a degree in law, this gal is both brilliant and musically gifted!   Eventually moving to Las Vegas to take advantage of the numerous performing opportunities, Johnson has thrived in a town of top competition and talent.    She’s become well known for her work in the Jazz genre. Michelle Johnson will perform ‘Spotlight:    The Music of Icons,’ on March 19, 20, 22 and 24 at 7:30 pm at Act II Entertainment, in Puerto Vallarta’s Old Town neighbourhood.  

alking through an airport, Marty Edwards often gets the feeling people are watching him. That's because they are. The Canadian entertainer looks so much like actor and recording star Kenny Rogers that other travelers often ask for an autograph, or a selfie, standing beside him. To the average person, this might be a bit unnerving, but for one of the world's most successful Kenny Rogers tribute artists, it means that without even opening his mouth, he's still “got it”. The “it” being the look, stature and bearing of one of the world's most recognizable music icons. And that's good news. Based in British Columbia's Okanagan valley, Marty Edwards has spend decades on planes, trains and ships, traveling to and from casinos, concert theatres and supper clubs around the world. His travels have taken him across Canada, the USA, the Caribbean, Europe and Australia, where he has developed a reputation as a world class entertainer who deli-

vers one of the most convincing interpretations of Kenny Rogers stage act in the business. He is also an affable, team player who enjoys working with his colleagues and entertaining any audience, any place, any time. This month, Marty brings his Kenny show to Mexico for the first time. He will appear at The Pina Colada, in Guayabitos, on March 20th, Incanto, in Puerto Vallarta, on March 21st, and at The Luna Lounge, in Bucerias, on March 22nd. *Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


entertainment

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March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Natalie Douglas sings Streisand, Duende & Bohemia Viva ‘Together’ and Dwight Blake’s ‘Heart and Soul’ at Incanto

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AC Award winner Natalie Douglas sings Barbra Streisand accompanied by longtime pianist/Music Director, Mark Hartman. Final show March 15 7pm. Geo Uhrich (Duende/Luna Rumba) and Lobo (Wolfgang Fink from Willie & Lobo fame) will play a final concert together known as ‘Arte Puro’. Flamenco, Rumba and more. March 16 7pm. Entertainer Dwight Blake presents ‘Heart and Soul’ with a full band featuring pop, R&B and soul music. One night only, March 17 8pm. Luis Lujan of Bohemia Viva will play a final solo concert, ‘And then, I fly’, featuring all original music in Spanish on March 18 7pm. Latcho & Andrea ‘The Blond Gypsies’ play authentic gypsy flamenco. Final show March 20 7pm. Kenny Rogers tribute artist Marty Edwards actually sounds just like Kenny himself! His tributes have become a huge hit! Two nights only March 21 & 24 9:30pm. Bohemia Viva’s ‘The Sound Garden’ plays on Wednesdays at 6:30pm, with varying theme nights

weekly though mid-April. Paco Ojeda On Music Presents his Risqué lecture, featuring Pianist Dennis Crow. A no holds barred survey of the bawdiest music spanning five centuries. Special surprise guests. March 22 4pm.

Classic stage comedy ‘Greater Tuna’, starring Ron Spencer and Tracy Parks is chock-full of eccentric characters with small minds and big hearts. Next performance Mar. 22 7pm. Hulda Hix presents Vibology, a creative blend of traditional reggae with popular American music. Mar. 22 at 9:30pm. DUENDE and Bohemia Viva play ‘Together’ for an evening of

soaring vocals, beautiful instrumental performances and rhythms. One night only, March 23 6:30pm. In the piano bar - Jean-Guy ‘JayGee’ Comeau plays piano Mon. and Thurs. at 5pm. Singer-songwriter Zoe Wood plays guitar in the piano bar on Mon. at 7:30pm. Tongo plays Latin/Cuban rhythms with his handmade flutes/drums on Tues. at 7:30pm.

Joby Hernandez plays pop/rock favorites on guitar Wed. at 5pm. The Red Suitcases band Sun. and Wed. at 7:30pm. Open Mic is Thurs. at 7:30pm. ‘The Joanie Show’ Fri. at 5pm. Loteria with Bev Sat. Mar. 17 4pm. Moruno Band plays Mediterranean, Arabic, Flamenco Sat. at 7:30pm. Pianist Dennis Crow plays standards and showtunes Sun. at 5pm, Mon. at 10pm, Tues. at 5pm and Fri. at 7pm with singer Luis Villanueva. Salsa dancing/lessons is held on Wed. & Sun. at 8pm on the upper terrace. Happy Hour daily 2-6pm. All-new, ‘The Zen Hour’, is 4-5pm daily. Quiet time in the piano bar to enjoy a conversation or hold a quick business meeting. 2x1 show tickets offered during that hour only. Entertainment starts at 5pm. For online tickets with no booking fees and more detailed information visit www.IncantoVallarta.com No cover in the piano bar. Box Office hours are 9am to 11:30pm daily. Casual dining is always available. Contact General Manager Gilberto Figueroa for group and special event bookings at Incantopv@gmail.com. Incanto is located at Insurgentes 109 (at the Rio Cuale). Call 322 223 9756 for reservations.

A registered Mexican charity providing a nurturing family environment for 45 at-risk children and youth of all ages supported entirely through private donations and self-sustaining initiatives. Attend an event and find out how YOU can make a difference!

CORAZON THRIFT STORE Now open in Marina Vallarta in front of Hotel Melia on the malecon. Hours: Mon- Sat. 12-8pm Marina Las Palmas 1 local 8

HUMANITARIAN TOUR & BRUNCH Every Tuesday at 10am Tour the home and enjoy a delicious brunch prepared by the Corazón Family. RSVP jean.jewell@hotmail.com

For more information please call Jean Jewell at 224 3558 Fundación Corazón de Niña A.C. Calle San Luis Potosi #355, Colonia Primero de Mayo, Puerto Vallarta FB Corazón de Niña www.fundacioncorazon.mx admin@corazondenina.mx For more information please call 322 888 1999


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FOUR SEASONS

SHERATON BUGAMBILLIAS

5 DE DECIMBRE

5 DE DECIMBRE

CENTRO

3

ISLAS MARIETAS

BY SEA

RESORTS MALECON SHOPPING/ARTWALK

PUERTO VALLAR

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2 LA CRUZ MARKET SHERATON BUGAMBILLIAS ST. REGIS PUNTA MITA every Sunday 9-2 La Cruz de Huanacaxtle Marina

VISIT THE NEW BOUTIQUE Basilio Badillo #325, PuertoVallarta Hours: M-F 10-7, Sat 10-3, Sun closed ISLAS MARIETAS 322.182.2144 Chantel_Mann@hotmail.com www.chantelvintagespoonjewelry.com

TOWNS & COLONIAS BEACHES

BUCERIAS 22 PUNTA ESMERALDA B NAYAR VILLA AMORE DEL MAR

PLAYA LA MANZANILLA Handcrafted in Puerto Vallarta, Agustin Flores Mexico using Contreras W PUNTA MITA antique silver Municipal Stadium and plate spoons to GRAND PALLADIUM VALLARTA create unique and beautiful HOTEL LA QUINTA DEL SOL FRANCISC O VILLA collectible pieces of jewelry and MESON DE MITA accessories. PUNTA MITA

OLAS ALTASPUNTA FARMERS ST. REGIS MITAMARKET every Saturday 9-2 Park Lazaro Cardenas

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1. MARINA RIVIERA NAYARIT 2. NUEVO RIVIERA NAYARIT 3. MARINA VALLARTA MARINA 4. CRUISE SHIP TERMINAL 5. LOS MUERTOS PIER/ WATER TAXIS

LAND

TOWNS & COLONIAS &BEACHES AIR

RESORTS 1. CENTRAL BUS STATION MALECON 2. VERSALLES BUS STATION SHOPPING/ARTWALK 3. OLD TOWN BUS STATION 4. BUCERIAS BUS STATION 5. INT’L AIRPORT - PVR

2

BY SEA

LAND & AIR

1. MARINA RIVIERA NAYARIT 2. NUEVO RIVIERA NAYARIT SHOPPING 3. MARINA VALLARTA MARINA 1. GALERIAS VALLARTA 4. CRUISE SHIP TERMINAL 5. LOS PIER/ WATER TAXIS 2.MUERTOS WALMART/SAMS CLUB

1. GALERIAS VALLARTA 1. CENTRAL BUS STATION 2 2. WALMART/SAMS CLUB 2. VERSALLES BUS STATION GOLFING 3. COSTCO 3. OLD TOWN BUS STATION 4. LACOURSE ISLA 1. PACIFICO GOLF 4. BUCERIAS BUS STATION 5. PLAZA CARACOL 5. INT’L AIRPORT - PVR 2. BAHIA GOLF COURSE 6. MEGA/ LA COMER BUCERIAS 3. LITIBU GOLF 7.COURSE WALMART NUEVO VALLARTA

3. COSTCO 4. LA ISLA 5. PLAZA CARACOL 6. MEGA/ LA COMER BUCERIAS 7. WALMART NUEVO VALLARTA

SHOPPING

4. FLAMINGOS GOLF COURSE 5. EL TIGRE GOLF COURSE 6. & 7 VIDANTA 8. MARINA VALLARTA 9. VISTA VALLARTA

GOLF

1. PACI 2. BAHI POINT 3. LITIB 1. TURTL 4. FLAM 5. EL TI 2. WHAL 6. & 7 V 3. PLAYA 8. MAR 4. KISSIN 9. VISTA

5. EL CO 6. PUER 7. ESTER 8. PITILL


¿ Do you need glasses now ?

¡ STATE OF JALISCO

BUENAS ARIES

10

RTO VALLARTA

GRINGO GULTCH CASA KIMBERLY HACIENDA SAN ANGEL

CIMBRE 11

CENTRO

HOT

EL R

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Steel Guitar • Psychedelic Blues Saturday, March 24 • 4 pm • No Cover! elriobbq • www.elriobbqbar.com

322-225-2202

AMAPAS Optica Oci Vallarta

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9

10

CASA CUPOLA RESORTS BY PINNACLE

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Derek Fairchild

EL NOGALITO

STATE OF JALISCO

BUENAS ARIES

CONCHAS CHINAS

5 DE DECIMBRE

PLA YA L O SAN S ARC VILL P A M LAYA EMP MAR OS ERC LO ERA INO EDE S M DOR S P UER A PLA T E T YA L R O O PIC TIT HO OS A SAN S ARC L A VILL P VAL MAR N H TEL A M LAYA EMP MAPRLAOS LAR RE OTE ERC HLO ERA INOYA EDE YSATM DOR T S L UER A CON S T LIN A SHO ORT P TRO ETI ZIVTO C H PI T H AS A DO R VALALMARGCAN H OCTEL PUE CA S CH MA ES PLA S LAR RREA OTE O R IN R YA C HYA A T TT Z ONC LI TA SH SONRDT L STA O VA KAR AS NDO POR FIE S IVA H M L U A L GRA CO PUERT CASAGSACHIN MARLAEYS STA R RE ART A AME SO A ND STA O VA KARRZAAS A P F S U M L I NTA RIC RT GAR PLAY ESTA UR RE LART A BLA A ZA B A PU AME SOR A H NC A R NEGR N O LAN NTA RICA T T N N E E A HOT CA R EGR L M SOR EL M ESO A OUS T OUS RT AII AII

PUERTO VALLARTA

12 13

AMAPAS

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EL R HOT

NES MARO AND R G A CA PLAY VENTURA E A S BUEN PREMIER AMBILLIA VILLA ATON BUG SHER S ET SECR AMBER NOW SOL O DEL CANT LAZA S ET P SUNS PELICANO A PLAZ ULES RTA

CENTRO

OSIT A

11

GRINGO GULTCH CASA KIMBERLY HACIENDA SAN ANGEL

CASA CUPOLA RESORTS BY PINNACLE

15

EL NOGALITO

CONCHAS CHINAS

MISMALOYA

30

TO EL TUITO

BARCELO

LOS ARCOS

MISMALOYA

30

BARCELO

LOS ARCOS

20

RTA

BOCA DE TOMATLAN

BOCA DE TOMATLAN LAS ANIMAS COLOMITOS LA TROVA XINALANI RETREAT CASITAS MARAIKA HOTELITO MIO QUIMIXTO

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3

21

TO EL TUITO COLOMITOS LA TROVA CASITAS MARAIKA HOTELITO MIO

20

LAS ANIMAS

QUIMIXTO

HOTEL LAGUNITA

MAJAHUITAS MAJAHUITAS RESORT

3

21

MAJAHUITAS

MAJAHUITAS RESORT XINALANI RETREAT

17

HOTEL LAGUNITA

16 11

PALAPA MARACUYA

12

1219

13

O

FING

IFICO GOLF COURSE IA GOLF TS OFCOURSE INTEREST BU GOLF COURSE LE RESCUE CAMP MINGOS GOLF COURSE IGREOF GOLF COURSEHOLE LE A TALE VIDANTA A ESCONDIDO RINA VALLARTA NG BRIDGE A VALLARTA

PALAPA MARACUYA 19

15

15

13

CENTRO

18 18

‘OLD TOWN’ ‘OLD TOWN’

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5

POINTS OF INTEREST 9. 5 DE DEC. CEMETARY 16. HIDALGO PARK 1. TURTLE RESCUE CAMP 10. MIRADOR CERRO DE LA CRUZ 17. THREE HENS MARKET 2. WHALE OF A TALE HOLE 11. MALECON 18. MARSOL MARKET 3. PLAYA ESCONDIDO 9. BRIDGE 5 DE DEC. CEMETARY HIDALGO PARK MARKET 12. VIRGIN DE LA GUADALUPE16. CHURCH 19. MUNICIPAL 4. KISSING 13. LOS EMILIANO ZAPATA MARKET 5. EL CORA SANCTUARY 10.CROCODILE MIRADOR CERRO DE LA ARCOS CRUZAMPITHEATRE17. THREE20.HENS MARKET 14. ISLA CUALE 21. CUALE CULTRAL CENTER 6. PUERTO VALLARTA SIGN 11. MALECON 18. MARSOL MARKET 15. LAZARO CARDENAS PARK 22. 5 DE DEC MARKET 7. ESTERO EL SALADO 12.PLAZA VIRGIN DE LA GUADALUPE CHURCH 19. MUNICIPAL MARKET 15. OLAS ALTAS FARMERS MARKET 23. HUANACAXLE MERCADO 8. PITILLAL

ORA CROCODILE SANCTUARY RTO VALLARTA SIGN RO EL SALADO LAL PLAZA

13. LOS ARCOS AMPITHEATRE 14. ISLA CUALE 15. LAZARO CARDENAS PARK 15. OLAS ALTAS FARMERS MARKET

20. EMILIANO ZAPATA MARKET 21. CUALE CULTRAL CENTER 22. 5 DE DEC MARKET 23. HUANACAXLE MERCADO

24. FOREVER SPRING MARKET 25. BUCERIAS ARTWALK 26. RIVIERA FARMERS MARKET 27.24. MARINA ARTISAN SPRING MARKET MARKET FOREVER 28.25. MOVIE + PICNIC ARTWALK BUCERIAS 29. RED CROSS 26. RIVIERA FARMERS MARKET 30. LOS ARCOS NATIONAL PARK

27. MARINA ARTISAN MARKET 28. MOVIE + PICNIC 29. RED CROSS 30. LOS ARCOS NATIONAL PARK


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“Kenny Rogers” Seven Decades In Show Business Merv Buchanan merv@uvs.com

K

enny Rogers was born in Houston, Texas in 1938. He has been active as a musician, singer, song-writer, producer, actor and businessman, beginning in the mid fifties. Over the years, he has had over 100 singles on the pop and country charts and his albums have spent more than 200 weeks on Billboard’s “Hot 100” album chart, the most popular being “The Gambler”. For seven decades, he has been one of the most durable, successful and widely known entertainers in show business. Like his personal life (he was married 5 times), Rogers’ career path took many twists and turns. His early professional life was spent singing harmonies in the doo-wop group” The Scholars”, followed by a stint as bassist in Bobby Doyle’s jazz trio. During this period he also honed his skills as a studio musician, backup singer,

writer and producer, for artists like Mickey Gilley and Eddy Arnold, before joining “The New Christy Minstrels” on bass and vocals. Although “The New Christy Minstrels” were successful in their own right, Rogers felt they weren’t taking him where he wanted to go musically, so in 1967, he and 3 other members of the group left to form “The First Edition”. Over the

next 10 years, they produced a stream of hits, like “Reuben James”, “Ruby, Don’t Take Your Love To Town”, “Something’s Burning” and “Just Dropped In”. When the group disbanded in 1976, Kenny went solo. In 1977, his solo career was kick-started by the #1 hit single “Lucille”, followed a short time later by the equally successful “Coward Of The County”. The hit albums “The

March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Gambler” (reportedly his favourite) and “Kenny”, from this period, may be 2 of the most Influential country albums of his generation. For decades, there seemed to be no limit for Rogers, as massive record sales, sold out concerts, TV specials and movie roles kept pouring in. In addition to his solo work, he enjoyed tremendous success, in a series of duets, first with Dottie West, producing three hit albums, as well as the top hit singles “Every Time Two Fools Collide”, “Anyone Who Isn’t Me Tonight” and “what Are We Doin’ In Love”. His next duet hit was “Don’t Fall In Love With A Dreamer”, with Kim Carnes, followed by a cover of Bob Seger’s “We’ve Got Tonight”, with Sheena Easton; “My World Is Over”, with Whitney Duncan; “Calling Me”, with The Eagles’ Don Henley and “Kenny Rogers”, with Wyclef Jean. But his biggest duet success of all has been “Islands In The Stream”, with Dolly Parton. Written and produced by The Bee Gees, the song became an international standard, covered by a host of other artists. Besides working with many other recording stars, Rogers has tapped the talents of a series of “star” record producers.

Among these are Larry Butler, producer of his first six solo albums; Lionel Ritchie, who wrote and produced the hit single “Lady” and the album “Share Your Love”; David Foster, producer of “We’ve Got Tonight”; famous Beatles producer and mentor George Martin, who produced the #1 hit album “What About Me?” and Barry Gibb of The Bee Gees, who produced the album “Eyes That See In The Dark”. In 2,000, his single “Buy Me A Rose” reached #1 on the Billboard country chart. At 61 years of age, it made him the oldest performer to reach #1 on that chart since Hank Snow, at the time just under 60, did it in 1959, with “Hello Love”. However the distinction was shattered in 2003 by 70 year-old Willie Nelson’s “Beer For My Horses” duet with Toby Keith. To date, Kenny Rogers has recorded 65 albums, sold almost 200 million records, appeared in numerous movies and television shows, toured North America and Europe repeatedly, owned a restaurant chain, a concert theatre and won too many awards to count. Truly a consummate entertainer. Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


El Parque de los Azulejos Gala Shines with the Stars By Emily Murray

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he art scene in Vallarta is vibrant and thriving, and this is your chance to be a part of it! Local artists Natasha Moraga and her brother Daniel are lending their creative talents in Lazaro Cardenas Park in Old Town… completely reimagining, transforming, and breathing new life into it. Natasha is the talent behind the famous “PUERTO VALLARTA” letters, visible on the roadside driving in from Nayarit. She also did the stunning Marina Wall, and that sparkly, colorful school wall on Pino Suarez in Old Town. The benches on the Pier Street are yet another example of her inspired work. Thanks to her huge following, Natasha’s projects tend to get a lot of attention, and it’s a safe bet that the project El Parque de los Azulejos in Lazaro Cardenas Park will be no different. But this project involves no funding from the city or the government. It is a completely selffunded community art installation, and that’s where you come in.

This is where you can take part in the creation of Vallarta’s newest shining jewel. Here are some ways you can get involved: 3-Day Workshops: A completely hands-on approach! Spend 3 full days with Natasha and Daniel. You’ll be literally immersed in your work… tiling, grouting, imagining and creating something brand new for us all to enjoy for years to come. Tile Sponsorships: Is there a celebration you’d love to commemorate? The memory of a pet or family member? Perhaps your name, or your family name, on a tile in the Park is the perfect way for you to be a part of the action. Tile sizes and prices are located on our website at www.tileparkpv.com Donations: Your donation is a gift we will treasure, and we sincerely thank you for your desire to help. Please contact info@tileparkpv.com for more information. And there’s one more big way you can be a part of this historic

project: join us at Club Mantamar, March 21st at 6:30pm, for the EVENT OF THE SEASON! Donations have been pouring in for the Live auction, Silent Auction, Raffle and Door Prize! Look forward to gift certificates at Cassandra Shaw Jewelry, La Palapa, Vista Grill, Coco’s Kitchen, Archie’s Wok, Salud Super Food, and so much more. Paintings by Francine Peters, Jean-Gabriel Lambert and Jade Peyton. A tour of the Bay on a private plane. This is going to be a party like no other! Reserve your tickets now! 500 pesos for General Admission, VIP Reception at 6:30pm just 650 pesos. All proceeds from this event will go directly to funding El Parque de los Azulejos. Beautifying our city and rejuvenating her soul, one tile at a time. SAVE THE DATE! March 21st, 2018 VIP Reception 6:30pm General Admission 7:30pm Mantamar Beach Club


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March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Lorena Herrera confirms her participation in Vallarta Pride 2018

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nder the theme “100 Reasons to Celebrate”, from May 20 to 27, Vallarta Pride will take place in Puerto Vallarta, where it will celebrate the vibrant Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transvestite, Transgender, Intersexual and Queer (LGBTTIQ) community through a series of cultural activities, concerts, parties, parades and lots of fun. One of the first celebrities to confirm their participation in Vallarta Pride 2018, is the famous Mexican actress and singer, Lorena Herrera, this year’s Grand Marshal, a place of honor within the festival, and who will also be the star of the free concert offered by Vallarta Pride on Friday, May 25th at Teatro Vallarta.   Lorena Herrera began her career as a model and was an actress in a total of 56 films, including ‘Cocaína’, ‘El Arrecife de los Alacranes’, ‘La Fichera más Rápida del Oeste’, and ‘Traición’; and telenovelas such as ‘Muchachitas’, ‘Dos mujeres, un camino’’ ‘El premio mayor’, ‘María Isabel’ and

Crystal Ball

‘Amy, La niña de la mochila azul’. In 1996 Lorena debuted as a singer with her self-titled album of which the single “Soy” was highlighted. In 2015, she independently published the single “Masoquista.   In 2016 she published the video for “Plastik”, the third single released from her new musical stage. All the money raised through digital platforms with this song was donated to children living in

extreme poverty in Mexico. Vallarta Pride is an event held annually in May that has been created to celebrate the diverse and vibrant LGBTQI community that lives and visits Puerto Vallarta and that over the years has influenced and integrated its culture, heritage and history.  For more information and ticket sales, visit the website http://www. vallartapride.com

ADORABLE DOG IN THE SPOTLIGHT... RUSTY

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usty is a gorgeous Vizsla mix with the most intriguing face. He is about 1.5 years old and weighs a bit over 48 pounds. He is a high energy dog and very social, enjo-

ying playtime with other dogs. He’s not so good around felines, however, and will give chase. But best of all he loves his humans and would make a good family dog.

Rusty has been neutered, dewormed and vaccinated. If you are looking for a wonderful family dog, get an application to adopt Rusty by contacting us at spcapv@gmail.com.

An Evening Under The Stars 6th Annual Fundraiser for the Puerto Vallarta Gay Men’s Chorus

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he Puerto Vallarta Gay Men’s Chorus (PVGMC) is proud to present its 6th annual fundraising gala on Friday, March 23, 2018, at 7:00 pm at the beautiful Casa Karma Boutique Resort! This is the PVGMC’S major fundraising effort, which will help fund their many musical projects throughout the rest of the year. The evening will include a delicious buffet dinner designed and prepared by Casa Karma’s own International Chef: Elvira Prado Robles, cocktails and libations by Nationally Acclaimed Mixologist: Orlando Cano, PVGMC’s Spring Concert featuring Broadway and show tunes, and dancing under the stars in this opulent seaside setting, as well as many other surprises. The PVGMC is a diverse, community-based performing arts organization that develops and shares the vocal skills of gay men from Mexico, the United States, Canada and around the world. Directed by Artistic Director: Alfonso Lopez, our music blends traditional choral music with musical theater, jazz and pop. Our goal is to entertain, enlighten and unify our audiences, while building bridges

of greater understanding, acceptance and love between communities, cultures, families, and friends. We invite you to support the chorus even more by becoming a Crystal Ball event sponsor, sponsoring a table for eight or ten guests, or donating an auction item. For more information email us at info@pvmenschorus.org. Buy your tickets now at Timothy Real Estate Group – Calle Ignacio L. Vallarta 130, Local 7, Col. Emiliano Zapata.


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March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Join Los Bambinos for Vidanta to Host Important Vallarta’s best concerts! Golf Tournament By Christina Larson his season Los Bambinos present four weekly Rock n' Roll shows and two Latin shows at Bambinos Trattoria, the new place for Dinner & Show in Puerto Vallarta. Beatlemania, Salute the Beatles, and Big Girls Don't Cry featuring Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons are their highly anticipated two-hour Rock shows. Fiesta Latina on Fridays and Saturdays are perennial favorites, as the group captures the heart of Latin music with their own flair and finesse. For twelve consecutive years, Los Bambinos musical productions capture audience delight. The group of four brothers loves to perform; "Rock n' Roll" is an excellent sound for Los Bambinos. They bring the favored sounds of the Rolling Stones, the Doors, Elvis, and the Bee Gees to the stage right here in Puerto Vallarta! They always add their unique spin to the music, setting the well-loved songs into the Mexican musical landscape… true to the group's upbringing in classical Latin guitar. They set the show off with tight harmonies and sweet banter, giving audiences a taste of their brotherly love and charisma. Los Bambino's six weekly, 8-10 PM shows: • Monday & Tuesday Beatle Mania: Tribute to the Beatles

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• Wednesday & Thursday Big Girls Don't Cry featuring Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons • Friday & Saturday Fiesta Latina | Latin Party Get on your dancing shoes and bring friends for a good time with Los Bambinos at Bambinos Trattoria. Look online for special Dinner & Show pricing. Be sure to reserve your table early for the best seat in the house. Whether planning a private event or wanting a fun night out while in town, Los Bambinos music delivers the heart of Puerto Vallarta to you, at Bambinos Trattoria. The group brings choice entertainment to every event and show, melding disciplined vocal study and natural musical talent with over ten years of International production experience. Los Bambinos memorable performance bring the party to life! Los Bambinos present their shows at Bambinos Trattoria located at Aguacate #314, at the corner of Carranza street in Old Town Puerto Vallarta, just before Mundo de Azulejos. Dinner seating begins at 6:30 PM, music starts at 8:00 PM. Find show and ticket Information online at www.bambinostrattoria. com or (322) 222-4357, English is spoken. See you at Bambinos Trattoria for a truly memorable night in Puerto Vallarta!

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he GNGA Copa Vidanta and the ProAm Tournament will be held at the Vidanta Nuevo Vallarta complex from March 15-18 with the participation of amateur golfers from Mexico and professionals from several countries. Free public access. The Riviera Nayarit will host the final stage of the Greg Norman Golf Academy Tour (GNGA) at the Vidanta Nuevo Vallarta complex from March 16-18, with the participation of the top 30 professionals ranked during the tour. The ProAm Vidanta Cup will take place on Thursday, March 15. During last week’s press conference the organizers announced a purse of 3 million pesos, with an additional 1 million pesos for the winner of each stage.

 Amateur players from Mexico and professionals from other countries will participate. 

Jesús Torres, Golf Director for Vidanta Nueva Vallarta, said both the ProAm and the Tournament will be open to the general public, free of charge. “The doors will be open for all the locals as it’s a great opportunity for them to get to know the best players on this golf tour.”

 The first day will be dedicated to the ProAm, while the professional tournament will take place during the three subsequent days. The

Mariachis, Margaritas and More!

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elebrate the authentic sights, sounds and tastes of our Vallarta! The beautiful colonnaded interior courtyard of the Presidencia – Puerto Vallarta’s historic Town Hall, on the zocalo in the heart of the Zona Romantica – will be the site of a fabulous Mexican Fiesta, including dinner and traditional entertainment, on the evening of Friday, March 23. The event, showcasing the sights, sounds and tastes of authentic historical Vallarta, will include a gourmet ‘tasting’ buffet provided by 25 top local chefs and restaurants, folkloric dancers, and mariachi entertainment. Seating in the historic fountain courtyard is limited – only 200 guests – but acoustics and sightlines for the evening’s entertainment will be excellent! Doors and bar service open at 6pm, buffet service starts at 7, with entertainment to follow.

¨Mariachis, Margaritas and More¨ is sponsored by Viejo Vallarta and the Amapas Neighborhood Association, in association with Puerto Vallarta’s Department of Tourism. Proceeds will go to the paving of the new Highway 200 Sidewalk. Reserved seats are available for a contribution of $50 USD = $900 pesos, at the Amapas Niei-

ghborhood Association office in the Hotel San Marino, 111/3 Calle Rodolfo Gomez, phone 322-2448501, online at info@amapaspv. com. Reserved seats also available through Viejo Vallarta, A.C., online at asociacionviejovallarta@gmail. com. *Price of drinks not included in the contribution.

day starts at 11:30 a.m. through 1:00 p.m. the first hole on the Greg Norman course. 

 Jerome Valentin, Vidanta’s Tournament Director, informed the final stage of the tournament will include the participation of 30 professional golfers, 25 of whom are Mexican, 2 from the United States, 1 from Peru, 1 from Colombia, and 1 from Brazil.

 The top 30 ranking professionals in the Greg Norman Golf Academy Tour, with a special

mention for Carlos Ortiz and Ken Duke as players sponsored by Grupo Vidanta, will be present. 

 Each team is made up of three amateur players and one professional, and the format will be low ball for the three amateurs plus the professional’s score. There will be trophies for the first three places, a new Chevrolet, plus a Club Car golf cart and golf products from O’Yes. For more details about the Greg Norman tour: 
mexprotour.plus.golf


March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Cuisine of the Sun Announces 3rd Festival Ballenarte Celebrates 3rd Conservation Festival The Puerto Vallarta-Riviera Nayarit region is an important whale-watching destination raising awareness for their conservation and protection

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he 3rd Ballenarte Conservation Festival will be held from March 20-23, 2018, with activities in the Riviera Nayarit and Puerto Vallarta to raise awareness regarding the importance of protecting the humpback whale and the natural riches of Bahía de Banderas.

 The Ballenarte Conservation Festival, the only one of its kind in the region, offers a series of ecological, cultural, and recreational activities to engage the local community, domestic and foreign tourists, and, of course, the children from both tourism destinations so as to inform them of the importance of learning more about these marine giants and their safeguarding.

 According to biologist Astrid Frisch Jordán, Director at ECOBAC, every winter some 500 humpback whales arrive in Bahía de Banderas in order to mate, and

about 40 calves are born in these waters every year. The cetaceans remain in the area for four months from December through March. 
Activities:

 Tuesday 20 | Sonic Sea Documentary| Jardín de la Luna in Puerto Vallarta | 8:00 p.m.
 Wednesday 21 | Yuba and the ball| Marina Riviera Nayarit 4:00 p.m. and Punta de Mita Community Center 6:00 p.m.


Thursday 22 | Storytelling | Los Mangos Puerto Vallarta Library | 4:00 p.m.
 Friday 23 | Whales and Friends Environmental Fair | Bucerías Plaza | 4:00 p.m.

 The event is led by the National Commission of Natural Protected Areas (CONANP by its acronym in Spanish) via the Islas Marietas National Park administration, in coordination with Whale Ecology and Conservation (ECOBAC by its acronym in English). Environmental Fair 
 - March 23 Meanwhile, the administration of the Islas Marietas National Park is extending an invitation to all to participate in the “Whales and their friends” environmental fair, which takes place on Friday, March 23, in the main plaza at Bucerías.

 For more information about the Environmental Fair:
 biol.espinoza@ gmail.com or call (322) 22 13549.

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uisine of the Sun International Food and Wine Festival 2018, a culinary event that combines the exquisite talents of various celebrity chefs with the sublime ambiance of world-class resorts and destinations celebrates its third year this April 24-27. The Cuisine of the Sun Festival promises to be an exciting endeavor as The Villa Group’s collection of luxury  resorts in Riviera Nayarit  and  Los Cabos  will host not one, but two spectacular renditions in two of the most popular destinations in  Mexico. Celebrity chef and Sysco Foods Culinary Sales Consultant, Penny Davidi  has taken the lead once again as the Cuisine of the Sun Curator, ensuring that both locations are a complete success. For the third year in a row, Villa La Estancia Riviera Nayarit  will be the venue for yet another fantastic Cuisine of the Sun celebration. The AAA Four-Diamond resort, which sits on the

shores of Banderas Bay in the exclusive residential neighborhood of Nuevo Vallarta, will host the talents and personalities of celebrity chefs from  April 25-28, 2018  during a four-day festival that will include talk shows, chef dinners, Chopped Challenges and a grandiose opening and closing ceremony. Participating chefs include the talents of Riviera Nayarit›s Gastronomic Ambassador  Betty Vazquez, Chef  Eddie Jackson,  Benjamin Udave,  Nick Liberato,  Katsuji Tanabe, and Michele Ragussis. Without a doubt, visitors and guests to Riviera Nayarit and  Cabo San Lucas  can relish in a divine culinary experience, alongside celebrity chefs and other VIPs, in a series of events that will span four spectacular days and nights. Those in attendance will have more than a few culinary secrets and great memories to take back with them from their Mexico vacation at The Villa Group Resorts.


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March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Celebrate Passover Seder on March 30 Democrats Abroad Costa Banderas Annual P Meeting uerto Vallarta Jewish Community invites you to our annual Passover Seder on Friday, March 30, 2018, at 6:30 PM at the River Cafe located on the River Cuale. Our traditional Seder will include dinner consisting of gefilte fish, matza ball soup, brisket, roast chicken, roasted herb potatoes, steamed mixed vegetables, dessert, coffee, tea, and kosher wine. Reservations, accompanied with payments, are requested. For group seating, reservations should be made for everyone in the party at the same time. The cost for the Seder is: Adults, 850 pesos or $48 USD, children 5 to 10, 425 pesos or $25 USD and free for children 4 and under. Please make your reservations by March 20, 2018 with the River Cafe via Paypal. Volunteers are needed to hand

March 26 at Nacho Daddy’s, Basilio Badillo 287, Emilano Zapata, from 5:00pm to 7:00pm

D out and collect the Haggadahs kippas, song sheets, to perform the candle lighting ceremony, and to help children with the four ques-

tions. For general information, special needs, and to volunteer, please contact Donna at helth1@ sbcglobal.net.

emocrats Abroad is holding its annual membership meeting at Nacho Daddy’s upstairs. Nacho Daddy’s is offering a 10% discount on food and drink for the event. In addition, Democrats Abroad will pay 100 pesos on each member’s bill. Come for a good deal and some fun in evaluating this last year and planning for the next several months before the election. At this meeting new board members will be elected and

there will be prizes for best performance on a public affairs quiz. Also a reminder: our third forum of the year, “North America: The Independent Continent”, will be on March 19 from 1pm to 3pm at Act II Red Room,  Calle Insurgentes 330, Emiliano Zapata, Puerto Vallarta. For more info:  https://www.facebook.com/ events/354366631746482/ Hope to see you at both events, Democrats Abroad Costa Banderas

San Pancho’s Circo de los Niños Presents Voilá! From March 21-24 the school will be transformed into an elaborate, fabulous stage for their annual fundraiser

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t’s here! San Pancho’s Circo de los Niños (Children’s Circus) is opening its doors for its annual fundraising event. This year it will be called Voilá! and will combine circus, the Puerto Vallarta Orchestra School, and the presentation of more than 150 young artists. 

 The Circo de los Niños was created in 2011 by Gilles Ste-Croix, co-founder of the Cirque du Soleil, and designed by Monique Voyer. What started as an introduction to the circus arts has become a one-of-a-kind school with a professional team of instructors and an ever-growing number of students looking to experiment with the magic of the circus and other performing arts.

 The children chosen to participate in the show live in San Pancho and Sayulita, and many of them have been with the program

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since its inception. They work hard five days a week from one to five hours a day, depending on their age, interest, and level of instruction.

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Voilá! will be held at the Bodega Circo, an ideal space to practice the circus arts that was created especially for the project participants. It’s located on one side of the Bodega 3 on Tercer Mundo Avenue. The show kicks off at 7:30 p.m. 

All proceeds from the event will be funneled to the youth program for San Pancho’s Circo de los Niños. The seats are all general admission, with the exception of a special area designated for the donors to the Dreamcatchers fund.

 Presale tickets via Paypal are already available online on their webpage http:// circodelosninosdesanpancho.mx/ events.

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In Puerto Vallarta the Vallarta Tribune is available for pick up at the tourist offices in the main plaza as well as in Park Lazaro Cardenas. You can shop and pick up a copy of the Tribune at the Friday Marsol Market, the Olas Altas Farmer’s

Market and the ‘Three Hens and a Rooster Market, on Saturdays and at the Amigo’s de La Cruz table at the La Cruz Sunday Market. In addition to all of our advertisers, look for the Vallarta Tribune in restaurants, resorts, galleries and salons around

the Bay of Banderas and north into Sayulita. We distribute 10,000 copies in high season every Thursday. Marina Vallarta: Benittos, The Coffee Cup, Re/Max, San Javier Hospital, Marriot Resort Nuevo Vallarta: Eddies, Barra-

cuda’s, Nopalitos, US Consulate, Chasers Sports Bar. Bucerias: The Furniture Store, Yo-Yo Mo’s, Luna Lounge, Esquina 22, The Lateral Cafe La Cruz: Oso’s Oyster Bar, Octopus Garden, Britannia Pub


Kathleen Carrillo Gallery Visit the Kathleen Carrillo Gallery to view her new works that delve into the balance that individuals carry

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e sure to take a stroll on along Basilio Badillo and around the corner down Calle Constitucion. You will find some of the best boutiques and galleries in the area.   One in particular is the Kathleen Carrillo Gallery, which has become an institution in Old Town over the years.   If you are looking for art for your home away from home or to bring back home this gallery is the place to shop.   Kathleen has over eight different collections to choose from, one more interesting than the next.   Currently she is working on the most popular collection and has just completed the latest “How Does Your Garden Grow” piece.  It is the second male figure in this collection, which is all about being in balance in an individuals energies; their Yin and Yang, both strong and intuitive, graceful yet powerful, balancing the male and female energies in all of us.   This collection has hit a nerve in our tumultuous time of unrest and many of the original works have

“Splendorous Love” “How Does Your Garden Grow” Collection 58x58” Acrylic on Canvas sold. Over half of the collection is also available as Hand Remarked Giclee prints in a limited edition as well a smaller version that is an open edition.   The gallery is open daily from 10-6 and Saturdays from 10-2.  To contact the gallery you can call 322 222 9879 or Kathleen’s cell phone 858 261 8129.   Her newly revised

website is very comprehensive with her paintings and prints now sold online and shipped.   Calle Constitucion 325, north of Basilio Badillo Located next door to the Banderas Bay Trading Company www.KathleenCarrilloGalleries. com  10-6 Mon-Friday and Saturday 11-2.


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March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Luna Lounge Brings More Original Shows to The North Shore in March By Debbie White

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ith only a few weeks left to the entertainment season, Luna Lounge has saved some of the best musical shows for March. This season, the level of musical talent has been phenomenal, with show after show selling out!    And just when we thought the performances couldn’t get any better, we see yet another incredible show!  More great shows are slated for this month, so don’t miss out on any of the fun!  ‘The Crazy Bitches’ continue performing every Tuesday and Wednesday  with fantastic music,  gorgeous costumes and some side-splitting humor.   After your yummy meal from the grill, Miss Diva Divine and her gals will entertain you with musical parodies and adult comedy starring celebrities like, Beyoncé, Celine Dion, Cher, Madonna, Tina Turner, and more!     Get ready for the sensational return of the ‘Rod Stewart’ show on Thursday, March 15.  British rocker, Rod Stewart has had staying power in the music industry from

the 60’s to now, with mega hits like, ‘Do Ya Think I’m Sexy,”  “Forever Young,”  Maggie May,”  “Hot Legs,”  “Baby Jane” and the favorite, “Tonight’s The Night.”  Doug Varty nails

this tribute performance, with the look and voice of this musical super star! The annual ‘St. Patrick’s Day Show’ takes place on Friday and

Saturday, March 16 & 17, with your ‘genuine’ Irish hosts Hugh and Alice Gaffney. There will be live music featuring the Shag Harbour Band with fantastic Irish tunes. The meal will feature delicious Corned Beef and Cabbage along with Beef and Guiness Stew.  Dress yourself in your finest greens and get ready for the party!  The 17th is sold out, but there are still tickets available for the 16th.   And back by popular demand, ‘Bohemia Viva’ will once again grace the Luna Lounge stage on Monday, March 19. They’ll debut more incredible songs and harmonies that the audience will love.  With gorgeous harmonizing and a breathtaking delivery of both popular English and Spanish songs,  this outstanding duo from Argentina gave one of the best performances of the season last month at Luna Lounge.  We are absolutely thrilled to welcome them back for an encore!   Get ready for another celebration of music and song, ‘performed to perfection’ by this favorite musical duo! 

And coming up on Thursday, March 22 is the debut of The ‘Kenny Rogers’ tribute.   Marty Edwards looks so much like the real Kenny Rogers that you’ll do a double take!  And he knows just how to sing and perform like the real deal!  You’ll love hearing the hits like, “Lady,”  “Lucille,” “The Gambler,”  “She believes in Me” and “You Decorated My Life.”  And wrapping up the entertainment season will be Dwight Blake and The Groove Band on Saturday, March 24, presenting a classy, new show!  Dwight and his band will present an evening of  R&B and Pop music, with hits from Barry White, Bill Withers, Grover Washington, Sam Smith, John Legend and more!    For tickets and information about Luna Lounge shows, go to www.lunaloungebucerias.com  . And don’t forget to bring your friends and  guests along with you for an evening of fine dining and fabulous entertainment at the North Shore’s premiere entertainment venue!


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March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

What to See and Do: Chacala, Nayarit

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hacala, is a very friendly, community-oriented place. Families, friends, and couples will all enjoy the calm ambiance of this micro-destination, located in the municipality of Compostela, Nayarit. It has been called a ‘Sayuita of 20 years ago,’ framed by a perfectly seashell-shaped bay, nearly virgin beaches with excellent surf, and surrounded by lush vegetation that entices the senses. For others it’s a kind of paradise thanks to the fabulous diversity of flora and fauna that flourish there, especially the colorful flocks of birds, including crows, pelicans, seagulls, and herons. A legendary port According to historical documents, the port of Chacala was discovered in 1524 by Captain Francisco de Cortés de San Buenaventura. The place is full of stories and anecdotes, including one that says its coast has been visited by everyone from Dutch pirates to Father Kino, the evangelist who used it as a starting point for several of his missions. Its beaches This beautiful Pacific region in Nayarit has several beaches that can be easily accessed during most of the year. The main ones are Las Cuevas, Chacalilla, and Caleta, though the first is the most popular thanks to its nearly one kilometer in length and 40 meters in width. It has moderate waves, and fine, golden sand. It’s not unusual to see visitors laying out in the sun or enjoying a delicious pescado zarandeado (grilled fish) in one of the palapas at the water’s edge. Chacalilla is a private beach with calm waters, ideal for scuba diving or kayaking, and Caleta is perfect for surfing—it’s very popular with surfers from all of Mexico. According to the experts, this beach offers waves that are as long as a football field! Not only that, they’re high enough to accommodate any size board. Another surfing beach

is Colorine, some 400 meters from Caleta, with fast waves over a shallow bottom. Where to stay In Chacala you can stay in charming boutique eco-hotels with spectacular views of the water and spa services, or even in a home rented especially for tourists, as this town is one of the first adepts of the project “Techos de México,” or “Mexican Roofs,” which consists is building an additional room in a home, so it can be rented out to guests. “This project seeks to encourage local sustainable economic development,” said José Enrique del Valle, engineer and project coordinator. Valle adds that Techos de México persuades people to stay in town and brings in additional

revenue with the guest room. Owners receive hotel training, so they can better manage their rooms. Mar de Jade is another option very close to town: this is a yoga center, and a wellness and relaxation retreat, which offers guests and groups an authentic atmosphere of peace and renewal. What to do The community of Chacala is very united and entrepreneurial. Its citizens are kind and always interested in sharing their culture and experiences. Five years ago, a group of volunteers from different countries with different professions and origins came together to create the Music and Arts Festival, which takes place March 15-18 this year. The

festival has evolved year after year, not only in the music it presents but also in the participation of volunteers, to the point the Chacala Cultural Foundation was created to better organize the event. Besides the yearly event, the foundation works throughout the year to provide workshops for kids and adults featuring drawing, etching, cinema, photography, music and other arts. Another of Chacala’s attractions is its Cultural Market, which opens at the end of November through March, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Visitors can start their day out in this market located in

the town’s small plaza, where they will find food, art, handicrafts, traditional candies, organic products, and fresh vegetables. A visit to the town at noon is always a good idea, as it’s very quiet, or likewise a trip to the beach, walk to Caleta, or practice a watersport like kayak, paddleboard, surf, or sport fishing. Several sporting events have been added to the tourist and cultural offer of the town, including the Surf Fishing Tournament, organized by the Tepic Surf Fishing Club, which welcomes the fishing community from several states around Mexico and even other countries.

All the details about the Chacala Festival of Art and Music

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he schedule is out! The Chacala Music & Arts Festival  is a FREE four day event (March 15-18) created to spread joy and cultural exchange among visitors and local people.

This year they will have Art Exhibitions, Printmaking, a Children’s Tent with workshops & theater plus a delicious Gastronomic Pavilion (Food stands), which will be available to visit from 5pm every day.

Musical performances will start at 5.30pm each day from Thursday till Sunday. For all the details visit: www. chacalaculturalfoundation.org/ music-art-festival-schedule


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The Bucerias Beat By Kiri Westby

kiri.westby@gmail.com

Kiri Westby is an international activist and a writer, whose unique blogs have been featured on HuffPost and Good Morning America, and translated into multiple languages. Kiri is a mother of two and a practicing Buddhist, who was born in Boulder, Colorado, but has lived all over the globe. She recently relocated with her family to Bucerias. Nayarit.

Poco a Poco Con Amor

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oday more than half the population of Mexico lives in poverty, with at least ten percent in “extreme poverty,” and those numbers have risen steadily since 2006. So what does it take actually to break cycles of generational poverty? A couple of weeks ago, I took a look at Manos De Amor, Bucerias’ Casa Hogar, and touched on the subject of effective ways to donate to our community’s poor. This week, I was invited to take that discussion further with two courageous and intelligent women, Martha Medina and Julieta Jeffrey, founders of “Tierra de Niños, Talleres Formativos Para La Vida” (which translates roughly as “Land of Children, Training Workshops For Life”). We began our discussion with their inception four years ago, when these two trained Montessori teachers saw a desperate need for a specific type of community service; something deeper than providing clothes and a hot meal; something that would target the roots of systemic poverty. They started Tierra de Niños with the aim of using playful crafting workshops as a vehicle for teaching essential skills for overcoming poverty. Martha explained, “Many of our kids have never been asked to create something from their imaginations, nor given the opportunity to express themselves safely. When they first arrive, most will say they are unable to paint, or sew, or build; they think so little of themselves. It’s heartbreaking to see children who have accepted their inabilities, their mental poverty, at such a young age. So we start there. We help them see that, yes, actually they can make something beautiful and unique…and then, slowly, they begin to dream of other ways they can achieve something different with their lives.”

Dr. Maria Montessori founded their methodology a century ago, using a “constructivist” approach to education wherein students learn important life concepts through hands-on materials, rather than by direct instruction. Julieta tells me that “once we give children the freedom to express themselves through creative media, we discover a whole range of things about their lives and how best to support them holistically.” Often such support extends to parents and grandparents. It has taken years for Tierra de Niños to build the trust needed for some families to send kids to their weekly workshops in Bucerias, Ixtapa, and Higuera Blanca. Martha adds, “too many children in Mexico begin working in the home at a young age. Their parents worked as children, and often can’t see how putting kids in charge of younger siblings, or selling goods, deprives them of their own childhoods.” So Martha, her husband Alejandro, and Julieta go houseto-house building relationships with families first and keeping close tabs on kids at risk. Longtime supporter and Fundraising Diva, Jamie Jones, lent Tierra de Niños their motto, “Poco a Poco Con Amor,” reminding them that breaking cycles of generational poverty takes time, dedication and

Nicolás displays his art proudly!

a whole lotta love! Recently, Tierra de Niños did a workshop with a group of teen moms who came with their babies to make art and play games and ended up receiving crucial mothering skills at the same time. Valuable lessons around hygiene, manners, emotional intelligence, and attainable life goals are passed down through paint, clay, and laughter. That’s Julieta and Martha’s custom method for transforming the poverty that still pervades Mexico. Tierra de Niños held their annual fundraiser at La Postal restaurant in Bucerias this past week, an all-day event with a silent auction, a line up of talented musicians, and a menu of delicious food to order (La Postal donated 50% of their daily revenue!). They raised significantly more funds than last year, and much of that was due to a generous donation from Manos De Amor, whose kids attend their workshops. It was touching to see the two organizations share their resources to support families fully! Scholars refer to Tierra de Niños work as “the two-generation approach,” which has been found to be one of the best bets in helping escape poverty. But in speaking with Martha and Julieta, it’s clear their workshops are not born from fancy academic research, but rather from seeing potential in every Mexican child and simply providing the space and resources to help those unique gifts flourish. As Martha profoundly reminded me, “once a child discovers what they are innately capable of, their future changes and, in turn, so does the future of our entire nation.” Check out www.tallerestierradeninos.org to learn more, get involved, and donate; they are always looking for donations of crafting supplies. And give La Postal some love this week for proving to be a Mexican-owned restaurant in Bucerias that supports poverty alleviation!

March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Martha and Julieta share their passion for Tierra de Niños at their annual fundraiser.

Martha uses Popsicle sticks, glue, and markers to help kids better identify their emotions.


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March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Traditions Carried On; Remembering Jacinto

By Kevin Simpson ‘It doesn’t matter if my clothes are torn and my hat is old, if my heart is good and pure, then I will be converted into the mirror reflection of the God’s’Wixarika proverb author unknown.

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s I walked out of my apartment something caught my attention, it was an elder native getting off the bus in full regalia. From what he was wearing I could tell he was a Wixarika native, but he didn’t have the super fine embroidered suit and or any feathers in his hat like the kids wore. There was something about this particular man, an aura that made me stop and do a double take. He was carrying a huge hand woven bag and a wooden bow and deerskin quiver. I thought to myself, wow if he’s carrying a deerskin quiver in his hand, I’ve got to see what’s in the bag. He started walking away at a brisk pace, like a man on a mission. Before I knew what I was doing, I was chasing after him. It took me a couple of blocks to catch up to him.

Out of breath and panting, I tried to explain in my broken Spanish that although I didn’t know who he was and he obviously didn’t know who I was, he looked like he had a story to tell. I didn’t want to offend him, but if he were interested, I would make dinner and buy all the art that he had brought to town if he told me his story. With no real plans or place to stay, my new friend Jacinto Lopez Ramirez decided to take me up on my offer. That night, and for many nights after, we would hang out until the wee hours of the morning with

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Jacinto telling me stories of how Kayumarie, the blue deer, taught the Wixarika how to make offerings and he described what it was like to partake in the three hundred mile pilgrimage to Wirikuta by foot. I ended up working with Jacinto for almost ten years, marketing the bead art and yarn paintings his family made up in the Sierra. The highlights of our friendship, besides listening to his stories, were our trips up into the Sierra to visit his family. We would fly up into San Andres Cohamiata the ancient ceremonial center at least twice a year. Sometimes we would do ceremonies or rituals and other times we were busy planting corn or attending one of his grandkids graduations from school. I fondly remember one of the first times we flew up. We took the midnight bus from Puerto Vallarta to Ixtlan del Rio. There was a small airport there and the night watchman was kind enough to open the hanger so we could sleep on the floor. At daybreak, they woke us up, weighed our equipment and threw us into a small four-seat Cessna. The flight was spectacular, taking off in the foothills of the Sierra Madres we passed the hydroelectric damn Agua Milpa, and it appeared as if the ground fell out; rolling hills turned into jagged peaks as we entered the Wixarika territory. When we arrived in San Andres, we went straight to the harvest cere-

I thought to myself, wow if he’s carrying a deerskin quiver in his hand, I’ve got to see what’s in the bag mony on one of Jacinto’s relative’s ranches. Believe it or not, it wasn’t until this past spring, nineteen years later, that Jacinto’s son Florencio told me that the traditional government at the time wanted to throw me in the jail for not signing in upon arrival. Apparently, there was a heated discussion, but it was decided that because I was with Jacinto, I would be spared the embarrassment of being locked

up in a Wixarika jail for a day. Whenever we were hiking in the Sierra, Jacinto would point to a part on his body and then to a plant and say “if this hurts eat this flower,” or “dig down a couple of inches and you’ll find a bulb that will cure stomach ailments.” While his knowledge of plant medicine was exceptional, unfortunately, it was dealing with Western norms that Jacinto stru-


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ggled with at times. I asked him once if he wanted me to teach him the alphabet. I naively thought that it might help his mobility if he could read a street sign or knew what bus to take. Jacinto stared blankly at me, scratched his head and motioned with his hand for me to come closer. As I leaned in Jacinto berated me by saying “I am a shaman, I can talk to God, why do you think he would want me to write him?” and stormed off. It was these types of interactions that reminded me that I was dealing with someone who was very special and just didn’t think like the rest of us. Jacinto was born in 1931 in the municipality of Mezquitic, Jalisco, Mexico. Very little was known about the Wixarika at that time. One of the first accounts was written in 1900 by Norwegian Explorer Carl Lumholtz: “In spite of the missionary work of the past, today there is no priest among them, the churches are in ruins, and the Huichol are in the same state of barbarism as when Cortes first put foot on Mexican soil.” In 1934 Robert M. Zingg made his historic trek into the Huichol Sierra, he was only the fourth outsider to study the tribe. Zingg spent just over a year in Tuxpan de Bolanos, Jalisco. Using Lumholtz’s work as a reference in 1938, Zingg wrote “Huichol art has changed so little in the forty years that my collection of this material for the Laboratory of Anthropology in Santa Fe, NM is practically identical with Lumholtz material.” At age twenty, Jacinto married fifteen-year-old Angelita Carrillo from Mesa del Venado. They lived for a few years near the ceremonial center of San Jose before moving to another ranch in the state of Durango, Mexico. Jacinto always liked living in Durango, he said it was the solitude but the three-day hike to San Andres for tribal meetings was overbearing, so they moved back to Jalisco in 1954 and settled between San Jose and San Andres on a ranch they called ‘Rosas de San Juan.’ In 1968 Jacinto was chosen to be Governor of San Andres Cohamiata by a council of elders known as the

Jacinto always liked living in Durango, he said it was the solitude but the three-day hike to San Andres for tribal meetings was overbearing, so they moved back to Jalisco Kawiteros. It was Jacinto acting as Governor of the tribe who successfully petitioned the Mexican Federal Government to put a road into the Sierra connecting San Andres with the rest of the world. There was an airstrip that the government used, but it was too expensive for the Wixaritari to fly out of the Sierra. Before the road was completed in the early 70s, it was a five-day hike out of the Sierra to the first Meztizo town. Jacinto was extraordinarily proud of his accomplishment with the road; although he never had a license or a truck himself, he would say that everyone driving up in the Sierra owed him a ride into town. Jacinto’s influence on the art that the Huichol create began in 1968 while on a pilgrimage to Mexico City. According to Jacinto’s family, he was with friends leaving offerings in the Basilica. Representatives from the Museum of Anthropology approached them and asked if they would recreate their offerings for them. Although low land Wixaritari had already begun to sell yarn paintings in places like the Basilica de Zapopan, the Wixaritari in the highlands hadn’t made the distinction between their ceremonial offerings and their ‘art’ like they do today. One of the notable things about the artifacts that the Huichol use in ritual today is that they are identical to the pieces collected at the turn of the century. Jacinto and I would spend hours studying the artifacts that Lumholtz and Zingg collected; there wasn’t a single piece in either collection that he couldn’t explain in

great detail or recreate. Jacinto spent most of his life serving his community. His abilities as a Singing Shaman and healer were legendary. An interesting document written by his son when he was the Municipal Delegate back in 2000, explains that ‘Jacinto was someone whose profession was shamanism and thanks to the power of God, he could sing in relation to God and at the same time could retire bad spirits and has had favorable results’. Holding many esteemed positions, Jacinto was the Cantador or Singing Shaman in the temple of San Jose, Cantador in the temple of Cohamiata and Cantador in the temple of Las Guayabas. He has been Aguacil or Judge of San Andres, as well as Commissario or Sheriff as

March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

becoming to make the pilgrimage by foot Peter thought that if Jacinto and his family would fill their gourd bowls and other offerings out with beads, he could take them to town to sell them. The original idea was to use the money they made from selling their art to pay for the bus to take them on the pilgrimage, and the traditions would continue. This was undoubtedly the beginning of what has become known as Huichol bead art. At the beginning Peter was instrumental not only in getting the Wixarika the supply of beads they needed to create their art but also in the marketing of it in the city. They worked well together for a few years but one day, Alejandro Carrillo, one of Jacinto’s son in laws, physically followed Peter to Puerto Vallarta. Alejandro figured out where Peter sold their art and eventually cut Peter out of the picture by marketing their art directly to the galleries. In the late 70s, Jacinto was one of the most photographed Wixaritari thanks to Peter Collings. One day we were looking at the book “Art of the Huichol,” and Jacinto pointed to a photo saying jokingly “man that is one ugly Wixarika.” I didn’t get the joke at first, but then I realized it was him, he was in the book and not just in one picture, but several photos of

As they took my blindfold off I was stunned by the sheer beauty of the place, and it was an oasis in the middle of the desert; just as Jacinto had described it in his stories wellas serving as Governor. In the mid-70s Jacinto befriended Peter Collings, a foreigner who was living in San Andres. Jacinto at that time was the Cantador in Las Guayabas and invited Peter to go with him on the pilgrimage to Wirikuta for the peyote. It was a grueling three hundred mile trek that took forty days to get there and back on foot. New fences and private property were making the original route that the Wixarika walked almost impossible. Recognizing how difficult it was

Jacinto from the pilgrimage he did with Peter appear in the book and in many other books over the years. In early November of 2007, I got a phone call from Jacinto’s son Florencio, his father had passed away and would I come? The funeral would be that weekend. I was in shock; I had just done the harvest ceremony with Jacinto and his family a few weeks before. Completely numb I dropped everything and headed to the airport the next day to fly up to San Andres to be with his family during their diffi-

cult time. I vividly remember when they were about to start the funeral Florencio came over and asked me to get my video camera out. “Video camera?” I asked, “I didn’t bring my video camera,” I had no idea that they wanted me to film the funeral or take photos of them with the dearly departed. We obviously had very different cultural norms when it came to funerals. Florencio was not impressed “You filmed my father’s ceremonies, why wouldn’t you film his funeral?” he denounced, shaking his head as he walked away. Jacinto and Angelita had six daughters and one son. Maria, Cecilia, Leonarda, Ramona, Yolanda, Teresa, and Florencio have all taken on valuable roles in the community over the last ten years. Some have served in the Wixarika Traditional Government while others have taken on leadership roles as Singing Shaman and Healers in the community. The art also seems to be in their blood as his kids and grandkids have become involved in significant projects over the years. Grandson, Octaviano Villa Lopez is working on a monumental project together with Dutch artist Vincent Mock. Vincent acquired a 20,000-year-old deer fossil Megaloceros Giganteus, commonly known as Irish elk, considered to be the largest deer that walked the earth. Oactaviano is going to bring it back to life by beading it. The finished piece, almost 12’ wide will be shown in Holland and hopefully other parts of Europe to educate people about the plight of Wirikuta the sacred land where the peyote grows. Sadly it is being threatened by a Canadian mining company despite being designated as a world heritage site. You can see this art work at Galeria Colectika through March. (858 Guadalupe Sanchez and the corner of Allende, Centro. 322 222 1007) In the ten years since Jacinto’s passing, his family’s greatest accomplishment has undoubtedly been the election of his son Florencio as continued on page 46


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March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Scorpion Stings and Math Teachers By John Warren

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anada –zero, USA – 4 in 11 years, Mexico 1,000 each year. Those are the numbers for death by scorpion sting. Here’s another one – Less than 1% of stings from Centruroides  scorpions are lethal to adults but 25% of children younger than 5 years who are stung die if not treated. A friend of mine, who lives a couple of hours south of Puerto Vallarta in a small village on the beach, told me last week ,“Yesterday I met with our local nurse to gather information. She was very emotional about the possibility of getting funding because her granddaughter nearly died of a scorpion sting this past week, and had to be rushed to the clinic an hour away for lack of anti-venom availability here locally.”   Why was no anti-venom available? Lack of funding from medical authorities. What can be done about it? Send money! $1,100 pesos buy a shot of scorpion anti-venom that can save a child’s life. That’s the price of a meal and wine at a nice restaurant for two people in Puerto Vallarta. A cheque for $10,000 pesos ($500 USD) would buy enough vaccine for almost three months. This is the time of year when the International Friendship Club (IFC) considers requests for funding from other organizations that want to make life better for Mexicans, whether that means fewer deaths from scorpions or more math teachers in the classroom. The Volcanes Kids Education Project is looking for future funding

of a math teacher and their need is small but critical. Volcanes‘s Rotary scholarship program requires the children receiving scholarships to maintain an average of 85% but twenty of the kids are having serious trouble with mathematics and their poor results in this subject are pulling down their average grades. They need a remedial math program at Volcanes, one of the poorer areas in Puerto Vallarta, to keep them eligible for their scholarships, which, in turn, make the difference between the kids staying in school or dropping out. With individual help in math, the program expects to keep more students in secondary and post-secondary education. The cost for a math teacher working 6 hours a week is about $4,000 pesos a month…$200 USD. Can/will you help? The Salty Paws Jazz Orchestra teaches music to underprivileged kids and the results are mindblowing. They make good music and they learn teamwork, discipline, concentration, punctuality and how to blow horns of every description. As their numbers increase so does the need for instruments. They’re looking

for two alto saxes and a double bass with an amp. Total cost is $12,500 pesos. For $600 USD you can help train a generation of jazz musicians! Clinica Santa Barbara needs towels compresses, Velcro bands, gel for ultrasound so they can treat more low income people. CANICA, the kids with cancer organization, needs computers. The British-American school has a community project at a home for the elderly and it needs large print books, plastic tables and a floor washer. The American School wants to start a recycling program and needs a shredder and a machine to manufacture plates and bowls form the plastic. The list is almost endless and you can help. The IFC Home Tours had a great season last year and another one this season. As a result of the tours’ profits and other club activities, the club will be able to continue to support many charities, its free cleft palate program and its dental program in Boca De Tomatlan. However, requests for funding are exceeding the cash in the bank so if you feel inclined to help IFC help the neighbourhood please go to www.ifcvallarta.com and click on the “What We Do/Donate” button.

You Snooze, You Loooooze!

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ver 33 years of raising money for Mexican kids! Over 2,800 seats sold since November. Over 500 reviews on Trip Advisor. It’s almost done! This is your last week to participate in the famous IFC Home Tours. The last tours of the season will take place on Tuesday 20th and Wednesday 21st. The tours leave the Sea Monkey restaurant (on the beach at the foot of Aquiles Serdan) at 10:30, so there’s plenty of time from 9:00 to buy your ticket and have wonderful breakfast on the beach. However, if you’re smart, you’ll pay your $600 pesos to PayPal online at www. toursforvallarta.com before the date of the tour so that you are assured of a seat. You will enjoy visiting three or four lovely homes that are located

in or close to Puerto Vallarta. They might be in a secluded part of town, perched on a rocky outcrop overlooking the ocean or high in the hills of Conchas Chinas. One thing is for sure: if you’re not on the IFC Home Tour then you won’t be invited in. Our homeowners who allow us to share their homes with you support the objectives of the IFC and that is to give back to the community. The tours require good mobility as you’ll be expected to walk on cobblestones and climb flights of stairs, so leave those high heels at home and wear “sensible shoes”. Our air-conditioned buses and our kind, well-informed docents will ensure you travel safely. Enjoy the last IFC Home Tour of the season on this Tuesday or Wednesday.

they truly appreciate it. Those items we ALWAYS need include: collars and leashes; toys and more toys! both stuffed and hard plastic (no soft plastic as they can chew off pieces and swallow); large towels; blankets; sweaters and coats; post-surgical cones (both the cone shaped and donut inflatable ones). Our rescues are now fed a total raw diet so please refrain from bringing any dog food or treats, but we do have healthy homemade treats available (at cost) for the dogs when you visit the sanctuary. To see our animals available for adoption, visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/spcapv. There are photos and also individual albums of our rescues as well as a bit of their history. Please be

aware that our adoption fee within Mexico is $2,000 pesos. Contact us at spcapv@gmail.com to obtain an adoption application. To make donations via PayPal, select the “Donate” option on our Facebook page www.facebook.com/ spcapv or on our website at http:// spcapv.com/donate/. You can drop off any donations for the SPCA at the Olas Altas Farmers Market, the Marina Art & Market or at Hacienda San Angel located at Calle Miramar 336, above Our Lady of Guadalupe Church in El Centro. Get involved… rescue, adopt, foster, volunteer, donate or educate. You can learn more about the SPCA Puerto Vallarta by checking us out at www.spcapv. com/home or on Facebook.

SPCA of Puerto Vallarta By Janice Gonzalez

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n Wednesday, March 7, we had a champagne brunch fundraiser at The Iguana Restaurant in Casa Kimberly. It was a wonderful afternoon, and everyone had a great time celebrating the “Year of the Dog”. This was our most successful spring fundraiser to-date, with over 120 in attendance. Lovely photos were taken by our friend Kay Nash. Check them out on our Facebook page www.facebook. com/spcapv. Guests were treated to fashion shows but different designers: Fashions by Maracuya, jewelry from Cassandra Shaw Jewelry and fashions/jewelry from Tanina Croche. Thanks Cassandra Shaw for the gift certificates to our guests. We love

all our friends and are so grateful for your continued support. Thanks to Janice Gonzalez for all her work on the fundraiser and to our terrific MC, Corinne Eastham. Also want to thank those volunteers who assisted with the raffle: Bonnie Cretzman, Cairo Gregor, Amy Howard, Wendy Urban and Luz Wong. Well done everyone! Visitors kept our volunteers hopping this past Saturday at the Olas Altas Farmers Market. Thanks so much to Pat Parr and David Thompson. Be sure and come by to visit us. You can find us there each Saturday from 9:00 am until closing at 2:00 pm. The market is located in Lázaro Cárdenas Park. This is in addition to our presence at the Marina Art & Market each Thursday

from 6:00 pm until 10:00 pm. Be sure to come by and say hello. You can pick up one of our special “Kiss my Mutt” t-shirts or a special bag made locally by our friend Lisa Love. All these items and a few other goodies can be yours for a small donation which helps support our rescue efforts. Your donations are always welcome and needed! We have scheduled tours to our sanctuary, by reservation only, on Tuesdays and Thursdays. If you have your own transportation, please let us know. To reserve a spot on a tour, contact us at spcapv@gmail. com. We appreciate any donations you can bring for our rescues and if going to the sanctuary, please feel free to bring treats for the staff as


charities

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March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Good Shoes Take You Good Places Courtesy: Pasitos de Luz

by Victor Aguirre Director of Volcanes Kids Education Program

Riverfest Success!

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he 7th annual Riverfest fundraiser was an overwhelming success! We once again broke previous records making $363,140 pesos for the children of Pasitos de Luz. Thanks go to so many who helped make it such a success: The musicians - Los Imposibles, Bob & Gilberto, Stolie, The Jamaican Brothers, Cat Daddy, Soul Trip,The Zippers, La Trez Cuartoz, Media Luna, Mariachi Real America and Los Bambinos.  Sponsors - Vallarta Tribune who provided a cover page and articles; Mario Jimenez at Print PV who donated time and service; El Rio BBQ Bar, Barcelona Tapas and Pasta Fresca who provided food & beverage at cost or provided a percent of sales. Donors - Alex Daoud who donated his proceeds for Saturday; and artisan vendors, massage and face painter who donated some of their proceeds. Kurt Sinner, the vision behind

Riverfest who also donates a percent of proceeds, we can never thank you enough for your support and for believing in Pasitos De Luz! Every person and every business that contributed to the auction, you made a HUGE difference in the lives of the Pasitos children and their families. We made $133,000 pesos on the auction - just one donation can turn into SO MUCH! (For the first time, the silent auction ran not only on Saturday but also on Sunday).  Volunteers - The approximately 70 volunteers and the 1000 attendees over the three days. We are humbled by the generosity of Puerto Vallarta and Banderas Bay!  To everyone who was involved in any way, please know that your generosity really does help make dreams come true - mil gracias!  We hope to see you for our 8th Annual Riverfest March 2nd and 3rd in 2019!

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f you want to be like Micaela Hurtuk you have some big shoes to fill, literally. She is the chief sponsor of Children’s Shelter of Hope Foundation’s Shoe Fairy and has helped to raise thousands of dollars to buy shoes for needy children in Puerto Vallarta. The amazing thing is that she is only 19 years old and has been doing this for years! She is proof positive that our youth, with the right intention, can make a difference in people’s lives this year. On February 19, 2018 we were blessed to have Micaela come to the Volcanes Kids Education Project where some of our students received free shoes from a company called Shoe That Grows. These shoes are made with high quality materials which allow them to expand to different sizes, and are very durable - perfect for the impoverished conditions in which our students live. It was a very festive atmosphere. Rosie Emery, an internationally famous songwriter, singer and author entertained everyone with her music and uplifting messages before the giveaway. This event was made possible due to a joint effort between Micaela, Georgia Darehshori, owner of Casa Karma Boutique Resort here in Vallarta, and Children’s Shelter of Hope Foundation. Georgia met Micaela last year and loved the idea of The Shoe That Grows so began collecting donations for the project. A lot of us who know Georgia refer to Casa Karma as the “Prophet of the Non-Profits” because of all the events held there to support different charities around town. If you work with the needy, the disadvantaged, or the voiceless here in Puerto Vallarta, chances are you know Georgia and she is helping you in some capacity. In this case, she helped Micaela provide free shoes to some very needy children from our project. Some of these shoes were also given to Pasitos de Luz, and Corazon de Niña. Plans are developing to bring some more of these amazing shoes next year. The Volcanes Kids Education Program (www.volcanesproject. com) is an educational program that aims to help ALL students in the impoverished Volcanes neighborhood to finish high school and attend university. We provide free English, computer, music,

and reading/writing intervention classes; scholarships; and many other things. Approximately 400 students benefit from our program daily. Our motto is: Go to School, Stay in School, and Dream Big. We believe that education is the key to progress and strive to help our students reach their highest poten-

tial. With these new shoes, who knows, they may be able to jump higher and touch the stars. To help support the Volcanes Kids Eduction Project and/or Children’s Shelter of Hope’s Shoe Fairy please send a donation right away or contribute using PayPal on our website – www.cshf-us.org


BANDERAS BAY SHOPPING AND SERVICES Three Hens & A Rooster Market on Saturdays

MARSOL FRIDAY MARKET BY THE PIER

7

CADA VIERNES 9:30 am - 1:30 pm

LOCAL FOOD. LOCAL PLACES. LOCAL PEOPLE Enjoy a Culinary & Cultural Journey though Old Town, Pitillal & Downtown Neighborhoods of Puerto Vallarta!

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ART ARTE JEWELRY JOYERÍA CRAFTS ARTESANÍA CLOTHING ROPA PASTRY PASTELES HOME DECOR MUEBLES HERBALIST HERBALISTA FOOD COMIDA MUSIC MÚSICA HOTEL MARSOL 103 FRANCISCA RODRIGUEZ OLAS ALTAS

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ou never know who you’ll bump into at the Marsol Friday Market! Artist Sam Botkin strolled in looking for a few extra copies of the Vallarta Tribune; one of his paintings was on the cover of last week’s issue! See Sam’s colorful oils at Javier Nino’s gallery on Lazaro Cardenas. The Marsol Market has an exciting selection of men’s and women’s leather sandals; fashionable yet practical for our cobblestone streets at a fair market price. Talk to Julio Glez about his different styles and designs. It’s still fresh enough in the mornings to join one of Sandra Cesca’s Walking Tours. What do you want to learn about Vallarta: history, architecture, flowers and gardens? How about visiting Artisan workshops that include chocolate making? You can’t miss her smiling face at the entrance of our Market. Right next to her is Guillermo who makes lovely leather bracelets suitable for men or women. Guillermo uses sturdy clasps that are

NEX T TOU R DEPARTS SOO N!

vallartafoodtours.com

Tel. (322) 222 2675, (322) 222 5402, w Celular: 322 175 0412 mundodeazulejos@hotmail.com www.talavera-tile.com

Pandamonia Boutique Wine Bags ANY THREE FOR $100 PESOS!

Three Hens & A Rooster Market V. Carranza 466 Saturdays 9 to 1 Contact Pat Thunherst Wagner at ptwagner@comcast.net

Marsol Friday Market by the Pier

www.vallartatribune.com

easy to work with your other hand! You may also find one or two of his delicate handpainted hearts on his table. Alan and Ausel have introduced two new coffee blends: their “Signature Riviera” mixes dark and espresso for an intense, robust flavor. The “Signature Bucerias Blend” is a medium and dark roast mix. One more Signature Blend is in the making. Stay tuned! The Marsol Friday Market by the Pier is open year-round from 9:30 am to 1:30 pm. 


www.vallartatribune.com FABFABRICFELLOWS

MURPHY’S irish pub Located on the Historic Malecon across from the lighthouse statue (El Faro) beautiful sunset views every night!

Aprons - Pillows Masks - Cooling Ties

Delicious traditional pub menu. Live Rock Music - Wed - Sat @10:30pm Watch all sports w 2 satellites. Pool Table.

Three Hens & A Rooster Market V. Carranza 466 Saturdays 9 to 1 Contact Bill Kelly at

484 Morelos - 2nd floor - Centro Vallarta Open daily 11 am

unonumerobomb@gmail.com www.thewitcherysalon.com

Murphys Puerto Vallarta

Three Hens & A Rooster Market

Sherry Vallarta

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here’s a reason angel food cake is called what it is; straight from heaven to Kim’s table at Three Hens! Humidity in the tropics will stop production in its tracks so there will only be a few more chances to enjoy this childhood-memory dream of a cake. Served with freshly-made lemon curd on the side.

Often Alex Duarte has samples of his sausages. Over a dozen varieties to choose from and Alex has not forgotten vegans! Frozen, ready to take home or Alex will deliver free. Pat is continuing her sale on women’s shoes and clothes at the Pandemonia Boutique. She’s clearing out everything so come early!

Wine bags – lovely hostess gifts – are still on sale as well. Besides aprons, throw pillows and cooling ties, Bill Kelly often has vintage yardage for sale. Gorgeous, embroidered fabrics. Drop into Fab Fabric Fellows Boutique and see what’s new. Marcia has new scarves in her Boutique to go with Mixtos and her vintage silk collars. Our massage therapist, Marvie, worked out a few kinks for herbalist Ricardo Mazcal. Ricardo’s hair therapies are helping

many people with hair/ scalp issues His all-natural creams and extracts are keeping Vallarta’s men and women beautiful. Three Hens is laden with food – see Jeanine and Barbara for entrees and desserts to take home. Gloria Sue for Jewish Comfort Food, La Dulce Vida for carrot cake, glutenfree bread and more. Three Hens & A Rooster Market is open Saturdays from 9 am to 1 pm at Venustiano Carranza 466 in Old Town Vallarta.

Marsol Friday Market by the Pier Three Hens & A Rooster Market on Saturdays

mexicasupplement@gmail.com

HOME DE’COR

Personal Shopper

Buy & Sell ~ Anything & Everything

sherryvallarta@yahoo.com 044 322 137 7063


charities

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March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

Non - Profit and Charitable Organizations

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or visitors to Puerto Vallarta who wish to support the less privileged in our paradise, this is a list of some of the many organizations that could benefit from such kind gestures. Alano Club of Puerto Vallarta - to provide resources to keep you in touch with your recovery program while you are visiting Puerto Vallarta and the surrounding area RecoverPV.com Amigos De Bucerias - to help make Bucerias a better place to live, work and visit. Projects include community improvements, food drives and help for the needy. AmigosDeBucerias.com Los Amigos de Jaltemba several community efforts to improve and enhance the lives of the people who live in the Jaltemba Bay area. LosAmigosDeJaltemba.com Amigos de La Cruz de Huanacaxtle: Contributing to the quality of life in La Cruz through cultural, educational, environmental and charitable assistance programs. Tax Deductible. www.amigosdelacruz.org

American Legion Post 14: Raises resources and manpower to improve facilities needing building maintenance americanlegion14.org Amigos del Magisterio - Food delivery to workers at the PV dump, their families and schools in Magisterio and Volcanes. Also, food to New Beginnings, Pasitos de Luz. amigosdelmagisterio.com Asilo San Juan Diego Home for the Elderly - Housing and care facilities for senior citizens www.asilosanjuandiego.com.mx Banderas Bay Women’s Shelter - Safe shelter for women & children victims of domestic violence. compassionforthefamily.org Becas Vallarta, A.C. – Provides scholarships to high school and university students. Tax-deductible in Mexico and USA. becasvallarta. com CANICA - Centre for Children with Cancer. Provides aid for treatment and services including transportation to GDL. canicapv.org.mx Casa Hogar - A shelter for

orphaned, abandoned, disadvantaged or vulnerable children. maximocornejo.org Cheryl’s Shoebox - increase the quality of education in disadvantaged schools throughout the Banderas Bay region by providing shoes, and school materials to students as well as educational supplies to teachers. cherylsshoebox.org Clinica de Rehabilitación Vallarta- Santa Barbara AC Therapy for physical and speak rehabilitation, for childrena and adults. rehabilitacionfisicapv.com COLINA Spay and Neuter Clinic - Free and by-donation sterilization clinic in Old Town. Only open Sundays. FB/@ColinaSpayAndNeuterClinic CompassionNet Impact Canada – Changing the lives of people living in chronic poverty. Job creation, education & more. compassionetimpact.ca Corazon de Niña - A safe, loving, home-environment for 50+ children and youth rescued from

high-risk situations. Donations & volunteers always welcome! Totally self-funded. fundacioncorazon.mx Cruz Roja (Red Cross) Handles hospital and emergency service in Vallarta. It is the only facility that is authorized to offer assistance to injured people on the street. Desayunos para los Niños de Vallarta A.C. Feeding programs, education programs, day care centers for single mothers. FB/@desayunosvallarta Ecology and Conservation of Whales, AC. - research, protection and conservation of Mexico`s natural resources, specially the Humpback Whale in Banderas Bay. www.ecobac.org entreamigos Centro Comunitario Educativo - Focus is to increase educational opportunities for the children of San Pancho in Nayarit Mexico. entreamigos.org.mx. Families At The Dump: Supporting families living in the landfill or garbage dump thru education and sustainable opportunities. familiesatthedump.org Food Bank of Puerto Vallarta - collects and distributes 30 tons of food each month to approximately 800 families. BancoDeAlimentosPV.org.mx Fundacion Punta de Mita - Promote sustainable community development in Punta de Mita and around the Banderas Bay in the areas of community development, education, environment and health. fundacionpuntademita.org Friends of PV Animals - Volunteers working to enhance the lives of shelter animals. friendsofpvanimals.com Grupo Ecológico de Puerto Vallarta: To protect the ecology of Banderas Bay. grupoecologico.com Grupo Pro Sayulita - to bring together the Sayulita community and to recognize and preserve the benefits of its cultural and ecological diversity while improving the quality of life in Sayulita. ProSayulita.org International Friendship Club - Provides medical, educational and social services to those in need in Puerto Vallarta and area. www.ifcvallarta.com Manos de Amor por Bahia - A home for 15-30 children that provide these children with food, clothing and shelter, ensure that they attend school and church, and give them a safe haven for as long as necessary. www.manosdeamor.com

Lions Club Puerto Vallarta offering medical services for the blind, disaster relief and building elementary schools LionsClubs.org Mexico Ministries & Mission, Inc. raises funds to support the poor in Vallarta. christchurchbythesea.org Puerto Vallarta Garden Club - striving to improve and beautify Vallarta through planting trees and flowers in public areas. VallartaGardenClub.com Puerto Vallarta Navy League AC – Constructs playgrounds, organizes work groups to do painting and light repair work for other charities, schools and government facilities. New Life Mexico - Focusing on social, health and education programmes both in Mexico and Guatemala matching donors to projects. www.newlifemexico.com Paraíso Felino AC - Refuge and Adoption Centre for cats and kittens in the Bay of Banderas. www.paraisofelino.com Pasitos de Luz - Substitute home for low income children with any type of handicap, offers rehabilitation services and more. pasitosdeluz.org PuRR Project – no-kill feline rescue providing homeless cats and kittens a recuperative stay with the ultimate goal of adopting them out to loving homes, sterilized, vaccinated and disease free. www.purrproject.com PEACEAnimals - Free mobile spay/neuter clinic operating 48 weeks a year, primarily in Puerto Vallarta. Tax-deductible. peaceanimals.org Pro Biblioteca de Vallarta raises funds for Los Mangos Public Library. bibliotecalosmangos.com Refugio Infantil Santa Esperanza Orphanage for children. www.ccshf.ca Roma’s Kids - educate the children of the Volcanes and surrounding area. Math, English and computer programs a priority. 100% goes to the kids. www.kids.romamexico.com SETAC - Effectively reduce the incidence of HIV / AIDS in Puerto Vallarta and p ​ romoting respect for human rights of people living with HIV / AIDS.setac.com.mx SPCA PV – Provides shelter and vet services to rescued animals. www.spcapv.com


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March 15 - 21, 2018 www.vallartatribune.com

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continued from page 39

“You filmed my father’s ceremonies, why wouldn’t you film his funeral?” he denounced, shaking his head as he walked away. Governor of San Andres Cohamiata. Florencio was always a bit of a politician; when I first met him almost twenty years ago, he was the local delegate to the federal government. Later he served as Commissario or Sheriff from 2004-2007; it is one of the most important positions in the Traditional Government as it involves the tribes land claims. To serve as Governor of the tribe notwithstanding is one of the most significant accomplishments that can be bestowed on one and it is even more special given the fact that it was almost fifty years ago that his father served as Governor. Last March, Florencio invited me to go on the pilgrimage to Wirikuta with him. I was always saddened by the fact that I never had the opportunity to go with Jacinto so when Florencio invited me I knew that this was my opportunity to catch up with his family and reminisce about my old friend. On the way to the desert, Florencio and I spoke at great length about what it was like to travel to Wirikuta to get the peyote with his father. He explained to me that the first time he went on the pilgrimage he was very young, it was in the mid-70s and they did the trek by foot. A lot has changed in the world since then, and even though the Wixarika make the pilgrimage today with buses and trucks, the spirit is still there. Just like the accounts of Barbara Myerhoff in her book “The Peyote Hunt” I was blindfolded before I stepped out of the truck and was led by the hand to the first sacred waterhole Tatei Matinieri. As they took my blindfold off I was stunned by the

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sheer beauty of the place, and it was an oasis in the middle of the desert; just as Jacinto had described it in his stories. The next day at the gates of Wirikuta we stopped to thank the God’s for guiding us, and then the hunt began. Under the blazing sun of the desert, we searched in several spots for the sacred peyote plant with no luck. I remembered Jacinto saying that peyote was a funny thing, it only shows itself to those who have a good heart. While we were driving to another spot the truck ahead of us blew a tire. As we were waiting for the tire to be changed we were talking when all of a sudden Florencio jumped up and pointed “look, there it is” and just like that it was everywhere, like the stars in the sky coming out after dusk. We spent several hours carefully cutting the cacti like his father had taught him so it would grow back. “No those are too small” or “No, that one is too old, it’s our grandfather, leave it” words of wisdom that I knew Florencio could only have learned from his father. As we danced into the night and Jacinto’s granddaughter Mikaela sang her heart out to Great Grandfather fire I thought of Jacinto. It’s been ten years since his passing, his grandkids have grown into the leaders of the community, two of his granddaughters are Shaman and others have become great artists. His son is the Governor, and together we just completed the sacred pilgrimage to Wirikuta; he might be gone, but the customs and traditions that he left us are still going strong.


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Issue 1093, March 15 - 21, 2018  

Puerto Vallarta, Mexico The Vallarta Tribune is the longest running free English language newspaper in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. We publish...

Issue 1093, March 15 - 21, 2018  

Puerto Vallarta, Mexico The Vallarta Tribune is the longest running free English language newspaper in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. We publish...

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