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AT HOME IN THE ROCKIES INSPIRED BY THE ALPS

SPA TREATMENTS THAT HEAL YOU

BEHIND THE SCENES WITH Local designers AND THEIR world-class creations


The Best of the Best...

Vail’s Elite Ski-in / Ski-out Estates...

Having lived in the neighborhood and developed many of the homes over the past thirty years on Forest, Rockledge and Beaver Dam roads, this location offers the best of the best. Ski in DQG RXW RI WKHVH PDJQLÀFHQW HVWDWHV ZKHWKHU European elegance, authentic Austrian charm RU PRXQWDLQ FRQWHPSRUDU\ LQ VW\OH HDFK ZLOO UHZDUG\RXZLWKVSHFWDFXODUYLHZVHDV\DFFHVV WR9DLO9LOODJH DQG ZRUOGFODVV FUDIWVPDQVKLS to create your memories. – Ron Byrne

97 Rockledge Road


424 Forest Road

446 Forest Road

285 Bridge Street Vail, Colorado 81657 970/476.1987 www.ronbyrne.com


A surgeon who does beautiful work. Having practiced in Santa Monica, California for over two decades, Dr. Jeffrey Resnick is a master at face, breast and body contouring. And now his artistic talents are available full-time right here in the Vail Valley. So you can take your looks to the next level and recover in this serene alpine setting. A very beautiful combination indeed. ( 970 ) 5 69 -76 5 6

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See Forever – Americo Makk

24x30, Oil

Fine Art of the American West Native American Antiques ~ Western Americana 227 Bridge St • Vail, Colorado 81657 (970) 476-0100 • www.sheltonsmith.com LOCATED ON THE BANKS OF GORE CREEK AT THE COVERED BRIDGE IN VAIL VILLAGE


DINE SPAGO Complement a day of skiing world-class terrain at the flagship restaurant of master chef Wolfgang Puck serving Seasonal American cuisine with Asian accents

UNWIND THE BACHELOR GULCH SPA Discover the ultimate in pampering and personal service at The Bachelor Gulch Spa. Located on Beaver Creek Mountain, the spa provides the ideal location to slip into serenity after a day of play in the mountains.

T H E R I T Z -C A RL T O N | B A C H E L O R G U L C H (970) 748-6200 |

W W W. R I T Z C A RL T O N . C O M / B A C H E L O R G U L C H

W W W . F A C E B O O K . C O M /R I T Z C A R L T O N B A C H E L O R G U L C H


Peace, Back by popular demand


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MOVIEM AK ER — ROGER COTTON BROWN Vail’s original filmmaker has been capturing the valley’s progression from wild farmland to epic ski resort for 50 years. He’s been tasked with creating a made-for-television movie that tells the whole story. By Lauren Glendenning 70

A R ARE CR AFT

90

75

Beer isn’t simply a quaff made for summer days, drunk by the six-pack. Artisan and craft brewers have taken their bubbly to the next level and aged it, making it the sort of bottle you open for a nice dinner. These exclusive brews are difficult to find. By Krista Driscoll 75

EY ES ON FASHION Vail has an international appeal, and its clientele comes from the world over to ski, eat… and shop. Three local designers dish on their process when creating the goods that fill their boutiques’ shelves. By Kim Nicoletti 82

INNER HAR MONIES 82

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Facials and massages are the backbone of any spa. But at some of the valley’s finest outposts of rest and relaxation, the menu extends beyond the expected. From balancing chakras to barefoot massage, there are plenty of opportunities to delve into alternative wellness treatments. By Wren Wertin 90


T  D R E

VAIL GOLF COURSE 1119 Ptarmigan Road Main House – 5 Bedroom Guest House w/ caretaker unit – 4 Bedroom $19,500,000

BACHELOR GULCH 228 Tall Timber Road 6 Bed/ 7.5 Bath $6,995,000

LAKE CREEK

875 Pilgrim Downs 10 Bed/ 11 Bath $7,900,000

Barney Dill

Barney@tayloranddill.com

Bearpaw D-5 4 Bed/ 4.5 Bath $2,500,000

Joni Taylor

partner/broker

M: 970.390.7018 F: 888.608.5670

BACHELOR GULCH CONDO

& Co. Real Estate

www.TaylorAndDill.com

M: 970.390.1402 M: 970.390.7018

Joni@tayloranddill.com


10 from the editor 12 contributors 96 parting shot the vault

M AGNUM OPUS Five artistic masterpieces from around the world, found in local galleries. By Caramie Schnell 17

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ESCAPE W HILE YOU WA IT When you’re between engagements, check out these peaceful places to stop and relax. By Rosanna Turner 38

SHOPPING BLOCK Gore Creek Drive is packed with shopping finds. By Wren Wertin 20 WAR M & FUZZY Winter fashions that keep out the cold. By Rosanna Turner 22

FANCY FACES Vail celebrates the visual and culinary arts. 40 PART Y PLACES Mark and Kate Dean share their alpine wedding. By Shauna Farnell 44

CHERRY PICK ING THE PERFECT MEA L A progressive dinner of sorts, culled from some of the best restaurants in the valley. By Wren Wertin 26

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cachet

GORSUCH: 50 AND MORE TH AN GOLDEN David and Renie Gorsuch created an empire when they began selling hats 50 years ago. By Shauna Farnell 31

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COZY UP W ITH ROOM SERV ICE This unit in the Four Seasons includes housekeepers, a concierge staff and 24-hour room service. By John LaConte 35

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31

daybook

CA LENDAR Must see. Must hear. Must go. Must do. 53


C A T C H

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RESERVE YOUR HYDRA EXPERIENCE TODAY 970-479-5404 | www.sonnenalpspa.com | 20 Vail Road Vail, CO 81657 massage & skin treatments | manicures & pedicures | heated indoor/outdoor tranquility pools & whirlpools | Turkish steam rooms & Finnish sauna with cold plunge | grand fireplace with relaxation cove & spa café | fitness room with floor-to-ceiling windows | gift certificates & spa memberships available

TRAVIS AARON WADE – Actor “It is absolutely the best facial I have ever had in 10 years of L.A. living! I can’t wait to get my next HydraFacial and I’d recommend it to everybody!”


Editor’s Letter

EVEN IN A PLACE LIKE VAIL, it’s easy to take your hometown for granted. We attack our to-do lists, we snatch a powder day, we take in a concert, we find a new favorite dish. We do all of these things that we’ve done for years, and don’t think much of it… until we stumble upon an anniversary or a milestone. Something big that makes us stop and pause — something like Vail’s 50th birthday celebration. And all of a sudden, we stop taking things for granted. Sure, Vail’s reputation as the preeminent North American ski resort is pretty much de rigueur these days, but it’s a state of being that was hard won for the resort’s visionaries and founders. From the 10th Mountain Division ski troopers who brought their passion to the Rockies, to the first influx of ski bums who flocked to Vail’s enormous mountain and beautiful conditions, everyone worked their tails off in the pursuit of the dream. And now we’re living in it. Check out the story on Roger Cotton Brown, Vail’s original filmmaker, to see some vintage photos from back in the day (p.74). Then contrast that with the fashionable creations of three designers who sell their clothes (and shoes) in their own shops locally (p.84). From stunning artwork (p.17) to alternative spa treatments (p.90) to a quick-hits shopping spree for all things warm and cuddly (p.23), this issue of VAIL Luxury spans the scope of what Vail is now: a place where you can live the good life, one week at a time.

Cheers,

Wren Wertin

editor

AT HOME IN THE ROCKIES INSPIRED BY THE ALPS

SPA TREATMENTS THAT HEAL YOU

BEHIND THE SCENES WITH LoCaL DESIgNErS aND THEIr WorLD-CLaSS CrEaTIoNS

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ROCK Y MOUNTA IN GORGEOUS

Malu Bears parka by Bogner, $1,798. Franka khaki warm-up pant by Bogner, $899. Chantal T-neck sweater by Repeat, $698.

Photo Courtesy of Gorsuch

P H OTO BY D O M I N I Q U E TAY LO R


Contributors

An emerging photographer quickly amassing a large and varied body of work, Justin McCarty bought his first camera to capture the pristine snowy peaks he surfed every day. Since then, he’s traveled wide and far with his camera, chasing photos and following his dreams. Most days he can be found outside on his board — skate or snow — enjoying the mountains and his need for speed.

As a fly-by-the-seat-of-her-pants type of person, Dominique Taylor loves the spontaneity and variety of her job as Photo Editor for the Vail Daily and Vail Luxury magazine. The excitement of getting up each day knowing that she could be shooting anything from fancy food to breaking news has kept Dominique right where she loves to be: on the edge of her seat, eagerly anticipating the next adventure behind each story. Lauren Glendenning is a Colorado transplant from Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. She lived in New York City, Boulder and Washington, D.C. before landing in Vail five years ago as a writer for the Vail Trail. She is now Assistant Managing Editor at the Vail Daily. She loves to snowboard and travel, and is also fond of both cinema and history, which is what took her into the studio with Vail filmmaker Roger Cotton Brown.

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Kimberly Nicoletti worked as the the Managing Editor of magazines such as High Country House & Home before becoming a freelance writer and editor. She moved from Chicago to the Rocky Mountains in 1989, then went to school in Boulder. When she returned to the mountains, she vowed not to wear fleece and jeans every day, and writing about fashion reinforced that vow. For her story “Magnum Opus,” Caramie Schnell did what she likes to do best in local galleries. She wandered around and searched for the paintings and sculptures that lured her closer, the handful she’d like to spend a lifetime watching. As the Vail Daily High Life Editor, Caramie writes about art, food, books, music, people and the other pieces of life that make it beautiful.

Krista Driscoll is the Copy Chief at the Vail Daily and writes a weekly beer column for the Vail Daily Weekly under the alias of Hophead. Aside from drinking all of the crazy beers she can get her hands on, you can find her shredding corduroy and rafting whitewater all over the West. Writing for this issue of Vail Luxury was rough for Rosanna Turner, burdened as she was with the tasks of shopping for pretty things and finding peaceful places to kick back and relax. When she’s not shopping and relaxing, Rosanna enjoys reading, playing the ukulele, and pondering the elegance of sentence structure. A fan of most things soft and white — specifically 2,000 vertical feet of untouched powder — Shauna Farnell will probably never don a wedding dress herself, but enjoys writing about such things all the same. Going far beyond the ceremonial details, she finds Renie and Dave Gorsuch to be one of the most inspiring couples ever to walk the earth. Amazing ski mountain aside, she names the Gorsuches possibly the best thing to come to Vail and one of the most enjoyable interviews she’s ever had.


Independent investment advice for sophisticated investors

Mark A. Ballenger II Ballenger Asset Management & Research 110 East Beaver Creek Boulevard, Suite 201 Avon, Colorado 81620 | 970-471-9962 www.ballengerassetmgmt.com Registered Representative, Securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a Broker/Dealer, Member FINRA & SIPC Investment Advisor Representative, Cambridge Investment Research Advisors, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor. Cambridge and Ballenger Asset Management & Research are not affiliated.


Where do you like to hang out in Vail?

Publisher

CATHY ETHINGTON cethington@vaildaily.com Editor

I love the roaring fire and cozy chairs at the Vail Library.

WREN WERTIN wren@vaildaily.com

The Los Amigos deck when it’s sunny.

Creative & Design Direction

ALI & AARON CREATIVE sayhowdy@aliandaaron.com Photo Editor

DOMINIQUE TAYLOR dtaylor@vaildaily.com

Garfinkel’s deck.

Marketing Director

MARK BRICKLIN mbricklin@vaildaily.com Contributing Writers

KRISTA DRISCOLL SHAUNA FARNELL LAUREN GLENDENNING

La Bottega.

KIM NICOLETTI CARAMIE SCHNELL ROSANNA TURNER

The Gorsuch bench, watching people come down Bridge Street.

Contributing Photographers

KRISTIN ANDERSON JUSTIN MCCARTY JENNY NELSON Copy Editors

KRISTA DRISCOLL ROSS LEONHART CATHERINE SUM Contributing Graphic Artists

LOUIE ATENCIO CARRIE CALVIN

AFTON GROEPPER CARLY HOOVER

Account Managers

CAROLE BUKOVICH

CHRIS JACOBSON

HEIDI SCHMITT

cbukovich@vaildaily.com

cjacobson@vaildaily.com

hschmitt@vaildaily.com

PATRICK CONNOLLY

BETH MCKENZIE

TINA SCHWAB

pconnolly@vaildaily.com

bmckenzie@vaildaily.com

tschwab@vaildaily.com

Cat Herder

KIP TINGLE ktingle@vaildaily.com Circulation Manager

JARED STABER

On the mountain. Anywhere. My least favorite? The hospital or Howard Head.

jstaber@vaildaily.com

Windows Deck on the mountain.

Chief Financial Officer

DON ROGERS drogers@vaildaily.com Printing & Prepress American Web, INC. Denver, Colorado USA 303.321.2422

Colorado Mountain News Media sets high standards to ensure forestry is practiced in an environmentally responsible, socially beneficial and economically viable manner. Printed in Denver, Colorado by American Web on recycled fibers containing 10% post consumer waste, with inks containing a blend of soy base. Our printer is a certified member of the Forestry Stewardship Council, the Sustainable Forestry Initiative, and additionally meets or exceeds all federal Resource Conservation Recovery Act standards. When you are finished with this issue, please pass it on to a friend or recycle it. We can have a better world if we choose it together. The Vail Daily is a wholly owned subsidiary of Colorado Mountain News Media 200 Lindbergh Drive | P.O. Box 1500 Gypsum, Colorado 81637 p. 970.328.6333 f. 970.328.6409 Copyright ©2013 Colorado Mountain News Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited.

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Your Perfect Colorado Mountain Retreat

A gorgeous log-style home with walk-outs from most every room overlooking streams and ponds, manicured lawns, as well as patios with a spa-like pool, hot tub and fire pits. Over 10 acres of fabulous Colorado playground complete with a five-bedroom main house and a stunning two-bedroom guest cottage. Located within the prestigious gates of Pilgrim Downs, a short 15-30 minutes to Beaver Creek and Vail Ski Resorts.

Donna Caynoski & Ellyn Courtois 970.390.4324 or 970.331.8232 dcaynoski@slifer.net or ecourtois@slifer.net


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QUICK HITS ON GORE CREEK DRIVE 20 // COZY UP 22 // PROGRESSIVE DINNER 26

T H I N G S

O F

V A L U E

G

O B J E C T S

O F

D E S I R E

MAGNUM OPUS T

HE TERM MASTERPIECE

is surely overused, but in the case of some of the paintings and sculptures on display in local galleries, it’s perhaps the only befitting description. Each artist profiled here hails from a different country, and they all have a very distinct style, very different from the next. But they all have this in common: Each piece is undoubtedly the work of a master.

“SEATED WITH A COFFER” B Y R O B E R T VA N D E R E Y C K E N BRONZE, 10”x7”x6”, EDITION 4/5, 1996, $9,000. ON DISPLAY AT VAIL INTERNATIONAL GALLERY

Light and shadows dance over this mysterious, mournful bronze sculpture titled “Seated With a Coffer,” by Robert Vandereycken, a Belgian artist who draws, paints, illustrates and sculpts. The stylized human figure feels both historic and modern — like it exists in two time periods at once. As with most of Vandereycken’s work, there are whispers of cubism, surrealism and other modern movements of the early 20th century. Vandereycken is linked to the Belgian surrealists through his mentor and friend, Paul Delvaux, who, with Magritte, formed the heart of the group. “In Robert’s art there exists the same pensive sense of expectancy and mystery found in so much of the best modernist work,” says Vail International Gallery co-owner Marc LeVarn. “His subjects are ancient yet modern — revealing the mystery of life in every age.”

P H OTO BY D O M I N I Q U E TAY LO R

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ART

“MODELOS DEL PINTOR” B Y A LVA R 29”x36”, OIL ON CANVAS, 2010, $45,000. ON DISPLAY AT GALERIE ZUGER

“MAIL TIME IN UTAH COUNTY” BY ROBERT LOUGHEED 20”x30”, OIL ON BOARD, 1973, $45,000. ON DISPLAY AT CLAGGETT/REY GALLERY

Western artist Robert Lougheed grew up on a farm in Ontario, Canada, with the reins of a horse in one hand and a sketchbook and pencil in the other. Throughout his life, Lougheed sought out these horses in each place he visited. His life — be it as a young illustrator and fine artist living in New York City or later, when he moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico, at age 60 — revolved around horses. Without being sentimental, his work resonates with that great love. In the 1950s, National Geographic sent Lougheed out west, where horses were a part of people’s daily lives and where he likely saw mail still being delivered and collected via horses, as he depicts in “Mail Time in Utah County.” During his lifetime, Lougheed did thousands of studies from real life, which no doubt influenced his studio paintings, pieces that authentically capture cowboys, horses and the very essence of the Western landscape. “There is a truth in his work that is evident, that transcends culture,” said gallery owner Bill Rey. In 2005, 23 years after Lougheed died, Rey began acquiring a large body of Lougheed’s artwork and other materials. Within the gallery, one can stand in front of Lougheed’s easel. Next to the old wooden stool, aluminum coffee cans chock full of brushes and pencils sit nearby, along with his glasses, as if the man just stepped outside for a quick break.

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The same images are found over and over again in the textured, heavily symbolic paintings and lithographs by Alvar Suñol Muñoz-Ramos. Known by collectors around the world simply as Alvar, he is a Spanish artist with a well-earned place among the regions other 20th century greats like Picasso, Dali and Miro. Look for clocks, flowers and doves in his paintings. Musical instruments like flutes and mandolins speckle his pieces, as well as fruits like apples and watermelons — to Alvar, all pieces of the Mediterranean good life. Likewise, Alvar’s faces all have a similar look. As in “Modelos Del Pintor” (which translates to Artist’s Models), Alvar paints figures that are generally feminine or androgynous, and which always have an ethereal-yetstill-solid quality about them. Alvar began painting when he was 13 years old to help contribute to his family’s income. Now nearly 80 years old, Alvar lives in an ancient Catalan village on the coast of Spain, overlooking the Mediterranean Sea.


by CA R A MIE SCHNELL

“NOTRE DAME IN STORM” BY STOK ELY W EBSTER OIL ON CANVAS, 24”x30”, 1993, $38,000. ON DISPLAY AT C. ANTHONY GALLERY

“CONSTRUCTION WORKER” B Y VA L E N T I N S T U P I N OIL ON CANVAS, 1968, 39.5”x27.5”, $38,500. ON DISPLAY AT VAIL FINE ART

There are no shortage of Russian masterpieces hanging at Vail Fine Art, but it’s worth searching out Valentin Stupin’s “Construction Worker,” a dramatic postimpressionist painting of a proud, pretty woman in a heavy jacket and pink head scarf. She’s framed by a brilliant blue sky rife with clouds, and in her surely calloused right hand, she holds what looks like a long tool. The painting is one of several portraits the Soviet Union commissioned, all of which honored “The Worker,” the laborers who expanded Russia in the 1950s and ’60s. Gallery owner Jim Tylich acquired this piece directly from Stupin’s family, so he was privy to details about it. The family believes the girl, a construction worker, was laying hot tar or asphalt. Stupin likely sketched this resolute woman’s portrait on site, then finished it in the studio using the quick, deft brushstrokes you see here, a mark of Post-Impressionists who were more concerned with conveying emotion than perfection.

P H OTO S BY D O M I N I Q U E TAY LO R

As a young child, American Impressionist painter Stokely Webster traveled with his family to Paris. During the year he spent in France, the then 10-yearold Webster watched intently as Monet painted in his freewheeling, unmanicured Giverny garden, and he looked up in awe at the Impressionist master’s work hanging at the Luxembourg Palace. That’s when the impressionable lad decided to become a painter. Webster is perhaps best known for his plein-air cityscapes, like this one of the Notre Dame, framed by foreboding storm clouds gathering in the sky above and reflecting in the water below. Painted in 1993, when Webster was 81 years young, this painting is an example of his later, more mature style. Webster’s work hangs in myriad notable museums and buildings around the country, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the White House and more. Five paintings by Webster are on display at C. Anthony Gallery in Beaver Creek, the only gallery in the country that sells his work.

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by WREN WERTIN

THE GOODS

SHOPPING BLOCK GORE CREEK DRIVE: Many of Vail’s most unique shops are mere steps from one another

3 COS BAR Stocked to the brim with national skincare, makeup and fragrance brands, Cos Bar’s staff is both knowledgeable and professional. They offer advice on the latest colors, trends and technologies in the beauty industry, as well as personalized beauty regimens. cosbar.com

5

1

4 SQUASH BLOSSOM In business for 40 years, Squash Blossom is a glittering, gleaming jewelry store. Representing such international names as Alex Sepkus, Irene Neuwirth, Gurhan, Me and Ro and Konstantino, the shop is also known for its Storywheels line. Meant to commemorate special events in life, each Storywheels necklace is custom designed. squashblossom.com

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3

1 ZOE AND GUIDO 4

T

HERE WAS A TIME

VAIL LUXURY G W I N T E R 2 013

6 2 1 5

3 4

Wall St.

W S

N E

Bridge St.

The newest shop on the block, Zoe and Guido is jam packed with everything a fashionable pet could need. From sweaters to collars to bowls to treats, dogs and cats are celebrated at the colorful boutique. zoeandguidos.com

2 GOLDEN BEAR

ek Drive

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B

Gore Cre

when Bridge Street saw all the action in Vail Village, but that was a long time ago. Running perpendicular to Bridge Street, the heart and soul of Gore Creek Drive is bookended by Checkpoint Charlie to the west and Mill Creek to the east. The cobblestone street offers boutiques, restaurants and one of Vail’s most quintessential views.

Willow

Checkpoint Charlie

d. ridge R

Known as Vail’s unofficial symbol, the Golden Bear’s Papa, Mama and Baby Bears have long been popular keepsakes for visitors and locals alike. Recently moved from Bridge Street to Gore Creek Drive, the shop offers a wide selection of jewelry as well as clothing and home décor items. thegoldenbear.com

5 SWEET BASIL In the height of the season, Sweet Basil can be a difficult table to get — but as longtime fans attest, it’s worth the effort. Serving beautifully prepared New American cuisine with an emphasis on local products, the restaurant is warm and bustling. Even those who aren’t ready for a meal should stop by for a cocktail. sweetbasil-vail.com

6 ROXY The perfect place for mothers and daughters to shop, Roxy sells hip, fashionable clothes. From jeans to sweaters to dresses, the clothing boutique has more clothes per square inch than any other store in Vail. roxyvail.com

P H OTO S BY D O M I N I Q U E TAY LO R


ADVENTURE RIDGE

Tubing and more at the top of Vail Mountain. vail.com | (970) SKI-VAIL (754-8245)

CELEBRATING OUR FIRST 50 YEARS –TOASTING TO MANY MORE!

VAIL.COM


by ROSA N NA TUR NER

WAR M ST YLE

KINROS RUANA Made from Scottish cashmere, this shawl can be styled up or down. One feel of this soft fabric, and you might never want to take it off. Available in gray, black and bison.

MUKLUKS Slip into these mukluks to keep your toes toasty. Handmade and designed by a Native American family in North Dakota, these slippers are not just an accessory, but also a pair of “wearable art.”

ALPINE TREASURES $498

VAIL BOOT AND SHOE $220–$225

WARM & FUZZY Cold weather makes it easy to go for practicality and comfort over style. But these fun, fuzzy and warm winter wares solve the function-over-fashion conundrum.

SWEATER MITTENS BY RO CK Y MOU N TA I N M I T TENS

Made from recycled sweaters, these mittens help extend the comfort of warm clothing all the way down to your fingers. ALPINE TREASURES // $54

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IVKO KNIT LEG AND HAND WARMERS  The colorful designs on these hand and leg warmers are a way to make a statement while still protecting your extremities. VALBRUNA $84

P H OTO S BY J U S T I N M C C A R T Y


a n u r b l a V Est. 1998 ver Vail . Bea

Creek

Parajumpers P Napapijri P Alp-n-Rock P Hell is for Heroes P Montura VIST P Dolomite P Zero rh+ P Mountain Force P SCARPA VAIL - 100 E. Meadow Dr. - 970.476.3444 . BEAVER CREEK - 26 Avondale Ln., Beaver Creek Lodge - 970.688.5942


WAR M ST YLE

BOGNER LADY LANEA DOWN JACKETS  In addition to providing the heat you need while skiing, these fashionable jackets are reversible, giving you two style options in one.

SISTERS SWEATER

PEPI’S SPORTS AND GORSUCH $1,898

With a sweater this temptingly touchable, you’re sure to be the one others want to snuggle up to. Available in burnt orange and black. VALLEYGIRL BOUTIQUE $98

EISBÄR HAIR HAT   Check out any ski race podium and one of the pros is probably wearing an Eisbär hair hat, the hat of the season. GORSUCH $82–$128

RAJ INFINITY SCARF WITH MULTIPLE DESIGNS These infinity wraps have no end, leaving you with limitless ways to wear them around your neck, shoulders or head.   ROXY // $67

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P H OTO S BY J U S T I N M C C A R T Y


0275 Main Street • C108 • Garnet Building Riverwalk, Edwards, CO

Clothing for Men & Women • 970.926.9182

www.brushcreekdrygoods.com

“Not Your Daughter’s Jeans”, “NYDJ” and its icon logo are registered trademarks of NYDJ Apparel, LLC. All rights reserved. Copyright 2012.


by WREN WERTIN

D E L E C TA B L E S

CHERRY PICKING THE PERFECT MEAL

D

If we could stay put and have restaurants come to us a course at a time, here’s what dinner might look like Oysters two ways at La Tour.

URING THE WINTER

season, the Vail Valley’s dining scene is jazzed with hungry patrons all clamoring for something delightful and fulfilling after a day spent on the slopes. Though there are dozens of excellent options, here is a progressive dinner of sorts that will please most foodies. Though cruising from Vail, to Beaver Creek, to Avon and back to Vail isn’t actually recommended, the idea should get your taste buds going.

THE STARTER O Y S T E R S T W O WA Y S LA TOUR

La Tour has been a Vail mainstay for 48 years. Cozily chic, the warm ambience comes from the staff’s innate hospitality and the cuisine’s scrumptious soul. Chef-proprietor Paul Ferzacca believes that oysters are always the perfect place to begin a meal: They bring the sea to the table, whether or not you’re landlocked, and at La Tour, you can experience them two ways. There’s always a raw option, small and perfectly chilled, quivering in their little scalloped shell. Take a bite with what is arguably the valley’s best sauce mignonette, thanks to the aged sherry vinegar. The acid cuts through the briny flavor beautifully. Paired with a glass of 2009 Ladoucette Pouilly Fume, it’s heaven. But for those who want a mightier, meatier oyster, order the barbecued oysters, which arrive bubbling in butter and embellished with bacon atop a smoking hibachi. Down those little nuggets of decadence with a 2007 Chateau de Puligny Montrachet Meursault and you’re on your way to fulfillment.

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P H OTO BY J U S T I N M C C A R T Y


AT MANOR VAIL LODGE

Distinctive C U I S I N E , F I R E S I D E D I N I N G & Mouthwatering V I E W S O F G O L D E N PEAK

5 9 5 E A S T VA I L VA L L E Y D R I V E | VA I L , C O LO R A D O 816 5 7 p 9 7 0 . 4 76 . 4 9 5 9 l o r d g o r e v a i l . c o m | R E S E R VAT I O N S R E C O M M E N D E D | P R I VAT E PA R T I E S

creekside cocktails & après fare at the base of golden peak

live music colorado drafts sunny deck the fitz at manor vail lodge | 970.476.4959 | thefitzlounge.com


D E L E C TA B L E S

Yellowtail jalapeño sashimi at Osaki’s.

THE RESTAURANTS LA TOUR 122 E. Meadow Drive, Vail latour-vail.com | 970.476.4403

THE APPETIZER

THE FISH COURSE

Y E L L O W TA I L JA L A PEÑO SPIC Y SA SHI M I OSAKI’S SUSHI & J A PA N E S E C U I S I N E

DOV ER SOLE SPLEN DIDO AT THE CHATEAU

Vail’s original sushi restaurant, Osaki’s lays claim to the smallest kitchen in the valley. But with only a handful of tables, as well as a petite sushi bar, chef-owner Takeshi Osaki has exactly as much space as it takes to turn out pristine sushi as well as some cooked items. Chef Osaki’s grandfather opened a sushi restaurant in 1943, so sushi is in his blood. One of the restaurant’s most popular dishes is the hamachi sashimi with jalapeño slivers. Glazed with house-made ponzu sauce, the tender slices of yellowtail get the merest zing from the chile. The understated treatment shows off the fish at its best, while still delivering a little kick to keep it interesting.

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For more than two decades, chefowner David Walford has been serving some of the best cuisine in the valley. He’s the kind of chef who won’t feature tomatoes when they’re out of season, and he works with local foragers and farmers in order to sustain local products. The epitome of fine dining, dinner at Splendido is a real treat. Whether it’s wood-oven-roasted rack of lamb (so tender they’re often called lamb-sicles) or a lemon-huckleberry soufflé, the restaurant has a core of menu favorites. Though it’s always fun to experience the new items that showcase the chef’s latest interests, there is nothing more perfect than the classic Dover sole. Deboned tableside by your server, it comes a la meuniere with green beans amandine, caper

eclectic (and deep) wine list and seasonal American fare. Though the menu is rife with favorites such as the revolving slider platter, braised goat and beef tartare, the braised pork cheeks reign supreme. Fork tender and meatily succulent, they crown a pile of pepper jack cheese grits that offer a kicky, creamy wallop. Guacamole, tortilla strips and an ancho-citrus sauce make this Southwestern dish over the top. Pair it with one of the restaurant’s 50+ wines by the glass. Wine director Eynon recommends a 2009 August West Rosealla’s Vineyard syrah to balance the bold flavors and lingering spice.

THE SWEET COURSE STICK Y BU N SU N DA E R E S TA U R A N T K EL LY L IK EN

Chef-owner Kelly Liken became a household name for hanging tough until the finals on Bravo’s Top Chef SPLENDIDO reality television series, but 17 Chateau Lane, Beaver Creek these days she does most of splendidobeavercreek.com 970.845.8808 her cooking in her restaurant’s kitchen instead of on VIN48 48 Beaver Creek Boulevard, Avon camera. Passionate about vin48.com | 970.748.WINE serving ingredients grown KELLY LIKEN close to home, she’s part of 2 Vail Road, Gateway Building, Vail a new wave of chefs that is kellyliken.com | 970.479.0175 helping to define Colorado cuisine. To this end, the elk carpaccio, rack of lamb and pommes fondants and parsley striped bass feature Colorado inbrown butter. There’s a reason it gredients and have become menu never goes out of style: perfection. mainstays, along with a bushel of veggies such as beets, greens and THE MEAT COURSE mushrooms. But tucked away BR A ISED PORK CHEEKS on the dessert course is another VIN48 Kelly Liken classic, the sticky bun Located smack in the middle of sundae. Infused with cinnamon, Avon, date night meets girls’ night the pastry comes drizzled with at wine bar and restaurant vin48. toffee sauce, and is embellished The collective creation of Collin with homemade ice cream, toasted Baugh, Greg Eynon and Charles pecans and a spun sugar cloud. Hays, the hotspot is known for an OSAKI’S 100 E. Meadow Drive, Vail osakivail.com | 970.476.0977

P H OTO S BY K R I S T I N A N D E R S O N & P R E S TO N U T L E Y


Vin48’s braised pork cheeks.

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GAME CREEK RESTAURANT LOCATED IN GAME CREEK BOWL ON VAIL MOUNTAIN

Contemporary cuisine in a charming European-style chalet. Serving Dinner Tuesday - Saturday. Reservations required, (970) 754 4275.


CONCIERGE SERVICE 35 // STOLEN MOMENTS 38 // CRÈME DE LA CRÈME 40 // A VAIL WEDDING 44

I N S I D E R ACC E S S TO T H E P EO P L E, P L AC E S & P E R K S T H AT M A K E VA I L E X T R AO R D I N A RY

COMMUNITY LEADERS

The Gorsuch name has become synonymous with luxurious, state-ofthe-art goods. But it all began with David and Renie Gorsuch, pictured at right.

GORSUCH: 50 AND MORE THAN GOLDEN FORMER OLYMPIANS TURNED VAIL BUSINESS PIONEERS PASS INTO A HALLMARK YEAR AND YET ANOTHER HALL OF FAME

F

OR DAVID AND RENIE

Gorsuch, some of the more memorable customer service experiences over the years have included Renie going from knitting her own merchandise to attending runway fashion shows around the world and David not only repairing skis and bindings but at one point fixing a guy’s false teeth and

S E L I N A PA R K A BY B O G N E R . P H OTO S C O U R T E S Y O F G O R S U C H

another guy’s wooden prosthetic leg. “The one guy came in and said, ‘I hear you can fix about anything. Can you fix my teeth?’” David recalls, laughing. “He’s Mr. Fix It,” Renie says of her husband. “When we started here, there was no bank, no dentist, not much of anything. People would always come in wanting him to fix things.”

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PEOPLE & PL ACES

And to this day, if you need something, Gorsuch delivers. “I always say this: We never outsmarted other people, but I think we outworked them,” Renie says. “We made every mistake we could make, but we got up every Monday morning and said, ‘Well, that didn’t work last week. Let’s try something new this week.’” “We’re still doing that!” David chimes in. Like the ski area, Gorsuch is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. But Renie and

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David Gorsuch was inducted into the Ski Hall of Fame in 2002, and Renie Gorsuch in 2007.

David can two up that, having already surpassed their golden wedding anniversary. Both grew up racing as top-level skiers, and then married in 1960 at age 21 shortly after competing in the Squaw Valley Winter Games. Starting out as a fledgling endeavor mostly “to just have fun,” Gorsuch Ltd made its debut in 1962 in a garage below the young couple’s apartment in Crested Butte. Renie herself was knitting a significant part of the inventory – 100

hats. Although she humbly dismisses it, David also credits his wife with “basically inventing the neck gator.” She made hundreds of those, too. Shortly after Vail was incorporated as a town in 1966,

Gorsuch moved its operations here and hasn’t moved since. But it has expanded. In a big way. Today, Gorsuch is a ski retail icon, with eight stores (in Beaver Creek, Keystone, Aspen and Snowmass) and a massive online catalogue. The legacy has recently earned Gorsuch the honor of being inducted into the Colorado Business Hall of Fame. This makes David and Renie the only couple to become both Business Hall of Famers and Ski Hall of Famers (Dave was inducted into the Colorado Ski Hall of Fame in 2002 and Renie in 2007). “I never thought about it like that,” David says, ruminating on his dual fame status. “I guess that is kind of special.” Preparing for yet another ski season in their flagship store in Vail Village – the one under the clock tower that has, like the Gorsuches themselves, become a beacon of the community – their commitment to making their customers happy hasn’t changed. David displays the top third of a broken bamboo ski pole with a note on it from its owner who had bought it from the Aspen Gorsuch store. The conjecture is that the pole likely had an ill encounter with the ground and a moving chairlift. The woman’s note doesn’t explain what happened to it, just that she would like it to be replaced. The pole is at least five years old. Still, Dave plans to call her personally to let her know that a brand

P H OTO C O U R T E S Y O F C O LO R A D O S K I & S N O W B OA R D H A L L O F FA M E & PA I N T I N G C O U R T E S Y O F G O R S U C H


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new pair of poles – which, like everything else sold in Gorsuch, are of the highest quality and state-of-the-art – will be sent to her promptly. “The thing that keeps us going as a business, we are so proud to turn the key in the door every day,” Renie says. “We want it to be beautiful.” “You always want to be proud of what you do,” Dave adds. “It’s been a good run for us.” Both Gorsuches are quick to hand off credit for their success to their sons and the Gorsuch staff – a few of whom have been with them for more than 40 years. As far as the store’s beauty, these days the merchandise speaks for itself: fur-lined ski parkas by European designers such as Bogner and Kjus, the sleekest, most dynamic alpine skis available on the market, ski boots featuring cutting-edge technology that has undergone exclusive scientific research, footwear made of the finest leather, hats, cashmere sweaters and every other item you can imagine having on the ski hill or wearing around town – all personally investigated and approved by the Gorsuches and their team during their annual multi-week buying trip in Europe. “My mom always said when I was young, ‘when you buy something, buy something nice,’” Renie says. “I’ve always believed we should sell something that has lasting value that is nice, something you can bring out year after year, not throw away items. We are not a trend store.”

P H OTO C O U R T E S Y O F G O R S U C H

David and Renie Gorsuch relax in Zürs, Austria, with the Olympic team in 1960.

The Vail store is equipped with a coffee bar. The stairs themselves are flagged by two beautiful barrels of fresh apples to munch on, and customers are regularly treated to hot cider and pastries. There are scented candles and ornate tapestries adorning every display. The special touches are impossible to count. When asked how many days over the last 50 years they have not worked, David and Renie say they take a spring vacation every year with their children and grandchildren. “But we sort of always keep our nose in it,” David admits, nodding to Renie. “Especially her. She’s the boss.” They are just in the middle of saying that they

“MY MOM ALWAYS SAID WHEN I WAS YOUNG, ‘WHEN YOU BUY SOMETHING, BUY SOMETHING NICE.’” are sometimes still inclined to disappear for a run or two during a powder day when a group of teenage ski racers files in and begins milling around the store. They are in town to train at Golden Peak before the mountain opens to the public. Both David and Renie take an immediate interest. “Is the snow hard

enough for you out there?” David asks them. “Which team are you kids with?” They are from Whistler, B.C. “What time do you guys go up in the morning?” Renie wants to know. “Does someone cook for you or do you eat out?” Appearing pleased with the attention, the kids say the snow is nice and hard when they start up the hill at 6:30 a.m. and that they’re on a meal plan at their hotel. After they make their purchases and turn to leave, both Gorsuches thank them for coming in. “Good luck to you,” David says. “If we can ever do anything for you, let us know,” Renie says, then somewhat sheepishly adds, “… we’re old ski racers.”

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C e l e b r a t i n g

Vail’s 50th Birthday! “Vail’s 50th”

by GreG MontGoMery 18” x 24” Proprietary Silk Finish

39.99

$

29.99 each iF you buy 2 or more tax and shipping not included

A v A i l A b l e

A t

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COZY UP WITH ROOM SERVICE LOCATED ON THE NINTH FLOOR OF THE FOUR SEASONS, THIS UNIT FEELS LIKE A HOME BUT INCLUDES ALL THE PERKS OF 24-HOUR SERVICE AT A LUXURY HOTEL.

DESIGN & DECOR

HOMEFRONT

Open-concept living, dining, family room and kitchen areas. The kitchen can be reached from both the north and south side of the home, and the living room seats 30.

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HOMEFRONT

HE FOUR SEASONS in Vail has a ninth-floor home available that will knock your ski boots off. And after they’re knocked off, a Four Seasons housekeeper will come clean up the snowy mess. “The service is at a level far exceeding any hotel out there,” says Dana Gumber with Slifer Smith and Frampton. That service includes access to the Four Seasons’ 14,000-square-foot spa, pool, exercise room, 24-hour room service and more. “It’s for somebody who wants the service, and wants the ease of not having to think about anything,” says Gumber. “They can drop their towel and walk out the door and know that they can come back three weeks later and that towel will have been taken away.” But while you have all the amenities of the Four Seasons available, the unit itself does not feel like a hotel residence. With 4,650 square feet, four bedrooms, four bathrooms and a living room that seats 30, the feel inside the unit is that of a true home. And like a home, the unit comes with a garage, where owners receive two parking spaces.

T

— DETAILS —

ONE VAIL ROAD, UNIT 9202 Interior design by Worth Home Interiors, which has been featured in Architectural Digest, Traditional Home and Western Interiors publications.

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FOUR SEASONS, VAIL VILLAGE DANA GUMBER AND LIZ LEEDS, SLIFER, SMITH AND FRAMPTON MORE INFO AT VAILREALESTATE.COM

(01) The ninth floor offers an unparalleled vista of Vail Mountain, including views of Golden Peak, Lindsey’s, Bear Tree, Born Free and both gondolas. (02) Several key entrance/exit points to reach Vail and Lionshead villages, including the east exit, which takes you right onto Vail Road across from the famous Restaurant Kelly Liken. (03) Stay fit with the Four Seasons’ 14,000-square-foot spa, 75-foot lap pool and exercise room. (04) In-house dining is hassle and mess free with Four Seasons housekeeping and 24-hour room service available. (05) The unit has hickory wood floors, granite countertops, Jacuzzi bathtubs and is wired for Lutron lighting. (06) Pets are more than welcome.

P H OTO S C O U R T E S Y O F S L I F E R , S M I T H A N D F R A M P TO N


by ROSA N NA TUR NER

ESCAPE WHILE YOU WAIT WHETHER IT’S THE AIRY LOBBY OF A CHIC HOTEL OR THE COZY WARMTH OF A RIVERSIDE LIBRARY, CHECK OUT THESE LOCALES WHEN YOU’RE BETWEEN ENGAGEMENTS

W

HETHER YOU’RE wait-

ing for your friends to meet up at après, or you’re waiting out a snowstorm before heading to the top of the mountain for fresh tracks, don’t think of it as a nuisance. Instead of heading back to the hotel, take your time in one of these tucked-away spots. BEAVER CREEK. In Beaver Creek, there’s one secluded art gallery that not everyone knows about. Located on the second floor of

VALLEY LIFEST YLE

PEOPLE & PL ACES

the Beaver Creek Lodge, the Grand Bohemian Gallery is a small circular lounge with an array of contemporary works on display. With leather couches and a fireplace, this cool room is a quiet place to relax and listen to the serene stream of the impressive waterfall sculpture. Gaze upward towards the skylight to see life-size bronze rock climbers attempt a descent from the ceiling. As a rotating exhibit for painters, photographers, and sculptors, you may be sur-

prised at what you find here. If you want to warm up during your downtime, the outdoor fireplace beside the Park Hyatt Beaver Creek Resort will keep you cozy while you mosey. Located next to the lobby and at the base of the Buckaroo Express Gondola, watching the flames dance from this roaring stone fire can be a delightful distraction. The café inside the Park Hyatt sells coffee and tea if you want to feel the heat both inside and out. For a nature nook, continue walking from the Park Hyatt towards the Chapel, where you can take a jaunt along the 5 Senses Trail to the Memorial Wall. Located a few short yards from the Chapel, the Memorial Wall is comprised of small stones that create a halfcircle. Some stones are etched with names of Beaver Creek residents who have passed on. Directly opposite the wall is a stone bench where you can see and hear the creek flowing.

above The lobby at the Westin Riverfront Resort & Spa

has a direct view of Beaver Creek and its snowy slopes.

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AVON. The scene from both the lobby and the deck of the Westin Riverfront Resort & Spa is always majestic, even if you only have mere minutes to enjoy it. Located outside of Cima, this balcony provides a picturesque perch to see the sun set behind the mountains. You can also walk down to the river and soothe your stress with the sounds of Gore Creek. VAIL. Eaton Plaza is a secret square with slumbering sculptures, including a snoring ram, a hibernating bear, and a cloud that comes with its own set of wind chimes. Located behind Vendetta’s Italian Restaurant, this petite plaza is Vail’s soft spot, literally. The cushion-like turf under the sculptures gives your tired toes a respite from all those cobblestones. LIONSHEAD. For those at Vail Valley Medical Center — or anyone cruising around Lionshead — the nearest nook in which to linger is the Vail Public Library. Remodeled this summer, this hangout has a sleek, yet friendly atmosphere. A large fireplace burns brightly in the reading area, creating a warm mood that will make you want to peruse a magazine or leaf through the latest best seller. Wide windows look out to clusters of trees along Gore Creek, which during the winter always appear to be covered in snow. Whether you want to read or spend your idle time pondering nature’s wonders, the library allows you to do both.

P H OTO C O U R T E S Y O F C H R I S M C L E N N A N


LOCATED AT THE VAIL GOLF COURSE Open Daily 9-5 (970)476-8366 vailnordiccenter.com


S O C I A L S TAT U S

CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE: Kathy Langenwalter, Susan Mackin Dolan and Nancy Sweeney. Carl Colby, Dick Cleveland and Alan Kosloff. Kerry Donovan, Stacy Sadler and Margaret Rogers. General Consul Andrés Chao from the Mexican Consulate in Denver, his wife, Begoña, artist Jesús Moroles and Bettan Laughlin. Bill Pierce, Susan Rodgers Kurz and Ludwig Kurz. Doe Browning and Martha Brassel.

‘Granite Landscape’ Unveiling RANITE LANDSCAPE,” by National Medal of Arts award recipient Jesús Moroles was celebrated by local art supporters and patrons after being moved to its new location in Ford Park. Moroles’ work is found around the country in both museums and galleries. Acquired by the Town of Vail in 1998, “Granite Landscape” was originally found at the top of Bridge Street.

“ G

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P H OTO S BY L E S L I E C OT H R A N


S O C I A L S TAT U S

Chaine des Rotisseurs dinner at Splendio at the Chateau HE VAIL CHAPTER of the international gastronomic society, Chaine des Rotisseurs, held a Chefs of Chaine Summertime in Piemonte dinner. It was the result of an extensive collaboration between David Walford, Brian Ackerman, Quintin Wicks and Alex Daly, of Splendido at the Chateau; Steve Topple, of The Sonnenalp; Daniel Joly, of Mirabelle; Justin Hugill, of QUINNtessential (in Denver); Steve Lewis, of Giuliana Imports; and Suzanne and Dan Hoffmann, officers of the Chaine des Rotisseurs, Bailliage de Vail.

T

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: Todd Rymer and a Splendido server. Carl Colby, Doe Browning, Irmy and Chuck Lipcon and Debbie and Fred Tresca are joined by fellow Chaine friends. Suzy Price, Jane Shriner, chef David Walford, Stephanie Regan and Shirley Day. Alexandra O’Neill. Wren Wertin, Lauren Glendenning and Caramie Schnell. Ian Sacks, Shirley Day, Jim Haeffner, Geoffrey and Linda Smith.

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P H OTO S BY J U S T I N M C C A R T Y


LEDYARD Luxury

GARDNER

“Thank you for your interest in these distinctive, one-of-a-kind properties. I look forward to the opportunity to be of service to you and your family.”

Led Gardner

Real Estate

Trust. Knowledge. Hard Work. Results.

VAIL GORE CREEK PLACE 13 & 14 Rarely available. Always in demand. Gore Creek Place is one of the most desirable luxury offerings in Vail, bar none. Beautiful, spacious four bedroom residences overlooking Gore Creek and up to the ski mountain. A quick stroll to the ski lifts. Oversized private garages. Two of the most unique and highly acclaimed residences currently on the market. $5,850,000 and $6,495,000, furnished

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b y S H A U N A FA R N E L L

S O C I A L S TAT U S

Alpine Wedding F

ALL COLORS, COWBOY BOOTS and a

glowing bride all make for a perfect way to say, “I do.” As far as choosing Vail as the place for their wedding, it was a no-brainer for Mark and Kate Dean. The couple met in Vail, got to know each other here and fell in love during the process. “Our courtship was picturesque,” recalls Kate. “Long dinners in the village, hiking beautiful mountains with our dogs, floating the Colorado and Mark trying his hardest to teach me to ski. It is our favorite place to be together, and once engaged, we knew we wanted to share this special place with our family and friends.” Both Kate and Mark (originally from Kansas) can often be found in cowboy boots — their big day not withstanding — and a little Western flair was an essential component to the proceedings. This became clear when using the table numbers cut from an old birch tree on Kate’s grandparents’ farm, selecting native wildflowers for the bouquets and kicking things off with the rehearsal dinner at Lazy J Ranch.

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THE PHOTOS: Jenny Nelson of JNelson Photography ran with a rare opportunity to work with a couple willing to walk up the mountain a little ways in their finery to blend into the scene… the cowboy boots, were helpful with this. “The aspens just up the service road on Vail Mountain were really full and beautiful and when I told them to walk ahead and interact with each other, we got what we wanted,” Nelson says. “Not that anyone will totally forget about you — you’re holding a big camera and they’re walking around in fancy clothes — but I used the environment as much as I could. I like symmetry — the lines of the trees, the road, the mountain — so we took some where they were smaller in the frame, some portraits from behind branches, and some more traditional shots for their family.


Robin Proctor Photography

www.pettitphotography.com

Michael Rawlings Photography

Your Wedding Vail With towering arched beam ceilings, etched glass windows, creekside fire pit, breathtaking scenery and flexible indoor and outdoor function space, it’s easy to see why Donovan Pavilion is one of Vail’s most sought after wedding venues. Host up to 200 guests inside, with 100 guests comfortably accommodated on the outdoor terrace. For smaller, more intimate functions, consider the brand new Grand View at the Lionshead Welcome Center. Contact the professional staff today.

970-477-3699 | donovanpavilion.com | pavilion@vailgov.com


S O C I A L S TAT U S

“Shotguns with cowboys and roasted s’mores by the fire,” Kate says. “We wanted our guests to enjoy every aspect of Vail, from its over-the-top decadence to its rustic elegance.” Although late September in the high country is famous for questionable weather and even snowstorms, the Deans lucked out with a cloudless blue sky ensconcing a forest bursting with every shade of yellow and orange. Frequenting St. Patrick’s Church during their courtship when Mark lived in Vail and Kate in Denver, the couple already knew it to be cozy and intimate. They chose DJ Jeffrey D’Amico for his highly touted variety (“everything from Widespread Panic to Lady Gaga”) and because their first dances (Elton John’s “Mona Lisas and Mad Hatters” and The Beatles’ “All You Need is Love”) “couldn’t be replicated by a band.” All details considered, there is absolutely nothing they would have done differently. “It was amazingly perfect,” Kate says. “There was no way we could have picked a more beautiful backdrop to kick off the rest of our lives.”

REHEARSAL DINNER: THE LAZY J RANCH (WOLCOTT, CO) CEREMONY: ST PATRICK’S CHURCH AT THE VAIL INTERFAITH CHAPEL RECEPTION: CUCINA RUSTICA (COCKTAIL HOUR), THE INTERNATIONAL BALLROOM (RECEPTION) AT THE LODGE AT VAIL WEDDING PLANNER: ALLISON FARRAR, AS YOU WISH EVENT PLANNING (DENVER, CO) HAIR: MEREDITH BOLES, MATTHEW MORRIS SALON & SPA (DENVER, CO) MAKEUP: BRE ORTOLO, ALCHEMY MINERAL BLENDS (BOULDER, CO) DJ: JEFFERY D’AMICO, A GREAT TIME DJ (AVON, CO) PHOTOGRAPHY: JENNY NELSON, JNELSON PHOTO (DENVER/VAIL, CO) FLOWERS: SUSAN RAPSOM, A SECRET GARDEN (VAIL, CO) DRESS: LIANCARLO, LITTLE WHITE DRESS (DENVER, CO) VEIL: LOVE ACCESSORIES, LITTLE WHITE DRESS (DENVER, CO) HEADPIECE: MARIA ELENA, LITTLE WHITE DRESS (DENVER, CO) BOOTS: LANE BOOTS, CRY BABY RANCH (DENVER, CO)

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VAIL’S HOME OF CREATIVE CUISINE AND

CRAFT BEER Take your taste buds on a sensory journey as you savor ĐƌĞĂƟǀĞŵĞƌŝĐĂŶĐƵŝƐŝŶĞƉĂŝƌĞĚ ǁŝƚŚĂŶĞĐůĞĐƟĐůŝƐƚŽĨĐƌĂŌďĞĞƌƐ ĂƚƚǁĂƚĞƌŽŶ'ŽƌĞƌĞĞŬ͕ sĂŝůĂƐĐĂĚĞ͛ƐƐŝŐŶĂƚƵƌĞ ĐƌĞĞŬͲƐŝĚĞƌĞƐƚĂƵƌĂŶƚ͘

CRAFT BEER, CREATIVE CUISINE BREWMASTER WEEKENDS džƉůŽƌĞƚŚĞǁŽƌůĚŽĨĐƌĂŌďĞĞƌǁŝƚŚ ŽƵƌĞĚƵĐĂƟŽŶĂůƐĞƌŝĞƐƐŚŽǁĐĂƐŝŶŐĂ ĚŝīĞƌĞŶƚďƌĞǁŵĂƐƚĞƌĞĂĐŚŵŽŶƚŚ͘ ^ŝƉ͕ƐĂǀŽƌ͕ĂŶĚƐĂŵƉůĞƐŽŵĞŽĨ ŽůŽƌĂĚŽ͛ƐďĞƐƚĐƌĂŌďĞĞƌ ĂŶĚĐƵŝƐŝŶĞ͘

FRIDAY NIGHT FLIGHTS

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THE WORLD’S BIGGEST SKI DAY FOR BREAST CANCER

MARCH 9, 2013

l Sign up solo or form a team l Incredible prizes! Costume

contest, checkpoint challenge and scavenger hunt

l Celebration Ski Down and free concert in Arrabelle Square

l All proceeds benefit our

“Spirit of Survival” program at Shaw Regional Cancer Center. This new program offers Shaw patients: • • • •

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Shaw Regional Cancer Center is a service of Vail Valley Medical Center, a nonprofit 501(c)(3).


november

16, 2012 –

april

14, 2013 MUST SEE // MUST HEAR // MUST GO // MUST DO

JAN

13 JONAS KAUFMANN Jonas Kaufmann doesn’t just sound like a romantic hero — he looks like one, too. The German-born opera star with smoldering good looks has, as described by one observer, a “finely chiseled, and deftly modulated lyric-dramatic voice capped by a secure, ringing top.” The international star performs at the Vilar Center, an acoustically perfect venue. More info at vilarpac.org

P H OTO BY M AT H I A S B OT H E R / D E C C A , C O U R T E S Y O F V I L A R P E R F O R M I N G A R T S C E N T E R

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NOVEMBER NOV 16 VAIL SKI RESORT OPENS WITH GONDOLA DEDICATION Be one of the first riders on Vail’s new heated-seat, Wi-Fi access gondola; the dedication begins with a ribbon cutting and short speeches. 8:30 a.m. Vail Mountain Village, 970.754.8245, vail.com NOV 21 BEAVER CREEK MOUNTAIN OPENING DAY AND COOKIE COMPETITION The aroma of chocolate chip cookies fills Beaver Creek as five finalists compete to have their recipe earn “the official cookie of Beaver Creek” status. 2 p.m. public judging begins, Beaver Creek Plaza, 970.754.4636, beavercreek.com NOV 23 HOLIDAY TREE LIGHTING AND GINGERBREAD HOUSE This 32nd annual celebration includes carolers, a reading by the winner of the children’s poetry contest, an ice-skating show, village lighting, fireworks and Santa riding in on a Zamboni. The festivities begin at 5 p.m. in Beaver Creek Plaza, but doors open for guests to view the 10th annual Gingerbread Competition at 4 p.m., in the Gerald R. Ford Hall. 970.754.4636, beavercreek.com NOV 23 & 24 WARREN MILLER’S “FLOW STATE” Warren Miller knows how to rev up an audience for the season; check out his latest film. 8 p.m. (23rd); 6 and 9 p.m. (24th). Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org NOV 30 - DEC 2 AUDI BIRDS OF PREY WORLD CUP Don’t miss the excitement of previewing World Cup championship contenders, complete with swag and free viewing from bleachers. The Men’s Downhill Race starts at 11 a.m. Nov. 30, followed by the Men’s Super G at 11 a.m. Dec. 1. On Dec. 2 at 9:45 p.m., racers take their first run in Giant Slalom and their second run at 12:45 p.m. Red Tail Camp, Beaver Creek. 970.754.4636, beavercreek.com NOV 30 2012 BLACK DIAMOND BALL

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Come dressed to the nines for this signature Vail Valley event, with dinner, dancing and live and silent auctions. This is the Vail Valley Foundation’s largest fundraising event of the year. 6 p.m. Westin Riverfront Resort and Spa at Beaver Creek 970.777-2015, vvf.org

DECEMBER DEC 10-16 VAIL 50TH ANNIVERSARY SNOW DAZE Vail celebrates its half-century with concerts, après and after-dark parties and a movie premiere. The Shins play Dec. 13, with openers Divine Falls at 6:30 p.m. On Dec. 14, demo skis and boards for free at the base of Gondola One, followed by a movie about Vail’s history at both 5:30 and 7:30 p.m. at Vail Marriott Mountain Resort. That night, Michael Franti & Spearhead perform with openers Nic Cowan & The Remedy at Ford Park at 6:30 p.m. Demo days continue Dec. 15 and Wilco plays at Ford Park with opener Nathaniel Rateliff at 6:30 p.m. 970.754.8245, vail.com DEC 14 VAIL ACADEMY — AN EVENING TO REMEMBER 6 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org DEC 15 ICING ON THE LAKE The ice-skating D EC season starts at 2 p.m. at Nottingham Park with $1 skate rentals, kids’ GOLDEN DRAGON crafts and entertainment ACROBATS and hot cocoa. 2 p.m. For 25 centuries, the art of Chinese Nottingham Park, vailvalleypartnership.com acrobatics has been practiced. The DEC 15 VAIL’S Golden Dragon Acrobats incorporate 50TH BIRTHDAY traditional dance, spectacular CELEBRATION As part of costumes, ancient and contemporary Snow Daze, Vail Resorts celebrates its 50th music and theatrical techniques into birthday with fireworks the gravity-defying routines. and a mound of sweets. More info at vilarpac.org 5:30 p.m. Mountain Plaza at Vail Village. 970.754.8245, vail.com DEC 15 HANDEL’S “MESSIAH” This revered oratorio, performed by the Colorado Symphony

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Though confirmed for publication, listed events, dates and times are subject to change. Please contact the presenting organizations to confirm details.


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Orchestra, sells out every year, so buy your tickets early. $35/adults; $15/ students. 6:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org DEC 16-25 & 31 VAIL FAMILY HOLIDAZE Free events fill Vail’s holiday fun. Annual tree lighting at 5:30 p.m. Dec. 17 at the Slifer Plaza in Vail Village; a Jingle Bellz Snowshoe at 8 a.m. at Golden Peak; ice skating shows with world champions Dec. 21-23 at Solaris Plaza and Arrabelle Square; and the New Year’s Eve Torchlight Ski Down and fireworks. On New Year’s Eve, the Dobson Ice Arena hosts a headlining artist, yet to be announced. 970.754.8245, visitvailvalley.com DEC 18 CLAY AIKEN First discovered nationwide in 2003 on “American Idol,” Clay Aiken has become a diverse talent, singing in recording and television studios, the Broadway stage and beyond. $78. 7:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org DEC 21 MICHAEL BOLTON The legendary singer-songwriter performs favorites. $120-$150. 7:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org DEC 21-31 BEAVER CREEK LOVES KIDS! Kids rule at a festival centered around fun mountain events, from disco ice skating and rail jams to glow-stick skiing and experientials about avalanches and safety. Beaver Creek Mountain, 970.754.4636, beavercreek.com DEC 21-31 WINTERFEST Based on a story about characters coming up from WinterLund, this holiday festival appeals to “kids” of all ages, with events ranging from disco ice skating and glow-stick skiing, to skating shows, theatrical storytelling and the Beaver Creek’s Got Talent competition. Beaver Creek Resort, 970.754.4636, beavercreek.com DEC 22 RAIL JAM PLAYGROUND Beaver Creek’s ski and snowboard instructors supervise this rail session for intermediates, level 5 and up. 4 p.m., on the snow in front of McCoy’s, Beaver Creek Mountain, 970.754.4636, beavercreek.com DEC 25 GOLDEN DRAGON ACROBATS The ancient art of Chinese Acrobatics is an old and long-running tradition that

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Michael Bolton performs December 21 at the Vilar Performing Arts Center.

Though confirmed for publication, listed events, dates and times are subject to change. Please contact the presenting organizations to confirm details.


began in China well over two thousand years ago. The Golden Dragon Acrobats are proud to represent the very best of this time-honored tradition. $32-$42. 2:30 and 6 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org DEC 27&28 POPOVICH PET THEATER An amazing cast of dogs and cats rescued from animal shelters and transformed into stars, Gregory Popovich and his sensational Comedy Pet Theater are a blend of unique comedy, worldchampionship juggling and the extraordinary talents of performing pets. $34-$42. 6:30 p.m. (27th) and 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. (28th). Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org DEC 29 THE BEACH BOYS The warm sounds of California ride into Beaver Creek with The Beach Boy’s feel-good music. $135-$175. 7:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org DEC 30 LINDA EDER This singer and actress debuted on Broadway in the musical “Jekyll & Hyde,” earning her a 1997 Drama Desk and Outer Critics Circle Nominations, as well as a Theatre World Award as best actress in a musical. $78. 7:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org

JANUARY JAN 2 WHO’S BAD — THE MICHAEL JACKSON TRIBUTE Dressed in Jackson’s garb, from red leather to black glitz, these musicians and singers dance and sing almost just like the king of pop. $48. 7:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org JAN 3 1964: THE TRIBUTE From the Beatles’ pop music days to its psychedelic journeys, this tribute band performs the best of the Fab Four. $58. 7:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org JAN 5 EPICMIX SCAVENGER HUNT This themed EpicMix scavenger hunt involves solving riddles to gather virtual pins hidden throughout Beaver Creek. Each pin contains points, and the top three snow scavengers

I M AG E C O U R T E S Y O F V I L A R P E R F O R M I N G A R T S C E N T E R

Juan Eduardo GomEz ThE GaThErinG / oriGinal oil on canvas / 72” x 48”

(970) 476 2525 www.vailgallery.com

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win prizes. Beaver Creek Mountain, 970.754.4636, beavercreek.com JAN 6 SNOWSHOE SERIES Anyone from firsttime snowshoers to world-class athletes on snowshoes can compete in the 10K, the Fun 5K or the Kids’ 1K runs throughout the season. Beaver Creek Mountain, 970.754.4636, beavercreek.com JAN 9 DAR WILLIAMS This American singer-songwriter brings pop folk to life. $25. 7:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org JAN 13 JONAS KAUFMANN Tenor Jonas Kaufmann has earned the highest praise in opera houses worldwide. This gala benefits the Vilar Performing Arts Center. $150. 6:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org JAN 16 MARC COHN Perhaps best known for his hit, “Walking in Memphis,” this singer-songwriter warms up Beaver Creek with an intimate evening. $45. 7:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org JAN 20 LEWIS BLACK Get ready for a night of laughs with this critically acclaimed stand-up comedian, author and actor as he tells it like it is: no politically correct jargon here. $88. 7:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org JAN 24 SHOOK TWINS Identical twins deliver quirky folk music from Portland, Ore. $20. 7:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org JAN 29 RIVER NORTH DANCE CHICAGO This dance company features jazz-based contemporary choreography for kids at 12:30 p.m. ($14/adults; $11/kids) and for adults at 7:30 p.m. ($58), Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org JAN 24-27 BEAVER CREEK FOOD & WINE WEEKEND Last year, this event debuted big, and it’s back again with celebrity chefs John Besh, Anthony Giglio, Tim Love, Alex Seidel, Gail Simmons and Sam Talbot cooking up culinary extravaganzas at exclusive dinners and the grand tasting. Various restaurants in Beaver Creek, 970.754.4636, beavercreek.com JAN 31 DELTA RAE & ZZ WARD A full-throated Alt-Pop-Americana band with four lead singers, Delta

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Though confirmed for publication, listed events, dates and times are subject to change. Please contact the presenting organizations to confirm details.


BEGINNING

JAN

24 BEAVER CREEK FOOD & WINE WEEKEND At the Food & Wine Weekend, celebrity and local chefs join forces to present a four-day food, wine and snow extravaganza. From cocktail parties and snowshoe luncheons to a chef ski race and gourmet tastings, the event is packed with savory fun. John Besh, Sam Talbot, Alex Seidel, Tim Love and Spike Mendelsohn are featured chefs. More info at beavercreek.com

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Ward delivers contemporary harmonies and an electrifying live experience. $32. 7:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org

FEBRUARY FEB 3 SNOWSHOE SERIES Anyone from first-time snowshoers to world-class athletes on snowshoes can compete in the 10K, the Fun 5K or the Kids’ 1K runs throughout the season. Beaver Creek Resort, 970.754.4636, beavercreek.com FEB 6 GREAT MOMENTS IN OPERA The acclaimed European opera company Teatro Lirico D-Europa performs classic operatic arias, duets and ensembles. $50/adults; $25/students. 6:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. The company also performs a special kids’ show at 12:30 p.m. ($14/adults; $11/ kids). 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org FEB 7 PUCCINI’S “MADAMA BUTTERFLY” Teatro Lirico D-Europa performs a traditionally staged rendition of “Madama Butterfly.” $75. 6:30 p.m., Vilar Performing Arts Center. The company also performs a special kids’ show at 12:30 p.m. ($14/adults; $11/ kids). 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org FEB 8-10 WINTER TEVA MOUNTAIN GAMES The popularity of the Summer Teva Games led to the winter games’ debut last year. This year, events include ice climbing, on-snow biking, telemark skiing, Nordic competitions, running races and special activities for dogs. The event also features fine art, ice sculpture contests, live music, films and parties. On-site venues: Golden Peak, Vail Ski Resort, Vail Nordic Center, Lionshead Village, Town of Vail and Eagles Nest. 970.777.2015, tevamountaingames.com FEB 13 THE 5 BROWNS Five Juilliard School pianists combine their talents as 10 hands play five pianos. They present a kids’ show at 12:30 p.m. ($14/adults; $11/kids) and an evening show at 6:30 p.m. at the Vilar Performing Arts Center. $68/adults; $35/ students. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org FEB 15-18 PREZFEST American characters, parades, ice sculptures and performances

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Russian Soprano Anna Netrebko performs March 25 in Beaver Creek.

Though confirmed for publication, listed events, dates and times are subject to change. Please contact the presenting organizations to confirm details.


lend a hand to celebrate the nation’s history. Kids under 15 can go to the “Beaver Creek Loves Kids PrezFest” Facebook competition; the winner receives a day of “presidential perks” on Feb. 18 with his or her chosen “vice president.” Beaver Creek Village Plaza, 970.754.4636, beavercreek.com FEB 19 ASPEN SANTA FE BALLET This dance company is based both in Aspen and Santa Fe, N.M. It showcases its most recent, cutting-edge dances. $58. 7:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org FEB 20 CYRILLE AIMEE This winner of the Sarah Vaughan International Jazz Vocal Competition delivers a jazzy voice to Vail. $32. 7:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org FEB 21 DOGS GONE WILD Todd Oliver, a comedian and ventriloquist, enlivens the stage with his “pet dogs.” $26-$38. 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org FEB 23 LASER SPECTACULAR: PINK FLOYD This psychedelic laser show features the music of Pink Floyd. $34. 7:30 p.m. Vilar Center for the Performing Arts, 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org FEB 23 RAIL JAM PLAYGROUND Beaver Creek’s ski and snowboard instructors supervise this rail session for intermediates, level 5 and up. 4 p.m., on the snow in front of McCoy’s, Beaver Creek Resort, 970.754.4636, beavercreek.com FEB 24 BRAHMS’ “A GERMAN REQUIEM” The Boulder Philharmonic Orchestra and Boulder Chorale join together to perform “A German Requiem.” $55. 6:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org FEB 25 – MARCH 2 BURTON US OPEN The Burton U.S. Snowboarding Championships debut in Vail, after years of being in Vermont. Golden Peak. 970.754.8245, vail.com or opensnowboarding.com FEB 27 MONTY PYTHON’S SPAMALOT British humor comes alive as Monty Python shares his spoofy-take on “Camelot.” $78-$98. 7:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org

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MARCH

Lionshead Village 970-476-3600 vailsports.com

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Beaver Creek Village 970-754-5400 Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor Gulch 970-748-6880 beavercreeksports.com

MAR 1-3 VAIL GLOBAL ENERGY FORUM The Vail Valley Foundation, along with Stanford University’s Precourt Institute for Energy, partner with other foundations to discuss the world’s energy challenges and solutions with leading experts. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org MAR 2 TALON’S CHALLENGE Competitors ski or ride nearly 24,000 vertical feet in Beaver Creek’s Talon’s Challenge. Last year, the event sold out at 1,500, so register early. Red Tail Camp hosts an après party. Beaver Creek Resort, 970.754.4636, beavercreek.com MAR 3 SNOWSHOE SERIES Anyone from first-time snowshoers to world-class athletes on snowshoes can compete in the 10K, the Fun 5K or the Kids’ 1K runs throughout the season. Beaver Creek Resort, 970.754.4636, beavercreek.com MAR 5 HAYDN C MAJOR CELLO CONCERTO & MOZART NO. 40, “THE GREAT” The Colorado Symphony Orchestra performs Haydn and Mozart classics. $55. 6:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org MAR 7 CIRQUE MECHANICS For more than eight years, Cirque Mechanics has been spinning ageless stories in mid air with their original mechanical wonders. This uniquely American circus company brings its storytelling to the symphony, with a new spectacle inspired by the world’s most popular classics. $45/student; $65/adult. 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org MAR 8 STEEP CANYON RANGERS These musicians put the art of pickin’ banjo back into country music. $28. 7:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org MAR 11 “THE LITTLE ENGINE THAT COULD” Watty Piper’s enchanting tale about an engine that chugs along for determination and friendship comes to life through the ArtsPower National Touring Theatre. $14/adults; $11/kids. 10 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts

Though confirmed for publication, listed events, dates and times are subject to change. Please contact the presenting organizations to confirm details.


Aspen Sante Fe Ballet is in town February 19 at the Vilar Performing Arts Center.

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featured on

5

celebrating

THROUGH

MAR

27

years

THURSDAY NIGHT LIGHTS

2007-2012

VAIL’S

o ri g i na l cu p ca ke

battercupcakes.com 970.445.7651 64

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Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org MAR 12 100 YEARS OF BROADWAY Performers belt out the most popular tunes from the last century of Broadway productions. $65. 7:30 p.m. Vilar Center for the Performing Arts. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org MAR 15 “PLAY AND PLAY: AN EVENING OF MOVEMENT AND MUSIC” The Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company presents a night of modern dance choreographed to classic music. The company’s repertory is varied in its subject matter, visual imagery and stylistic approach. 7:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. $65. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org MAR 16 RAIL JAM PLAYGROUND Beaver Creek’s ski and snowboard instructors supervise this rail session

Every Thursday night beginning December 27, 2012, Beaver Creek Ski Resort lights up as intermediate skiers and riders ski down holding glow sticks. The evening ends with fireworks. Dusk, Beaver Creek Mountain, 970.754.4636, beavercreek.com

for intermediates, level 5 and up. 4 p.m., on the snow in front of McCoy’s, Beaver Creek Resort, 970.754.4636, beavercreek.com MAR 16 – APRIL 6 SPRINGFEST This family-friendly festival celebrates the arrival of spring with themed characters, kids’ events, an Easter egg

Though confirmed for publication, listed events, dates and times are subject to change. Please contact the presenting organizations to confirm details.


hunt and more. Beaver Creek Resort, 970.754.4636, beavercreek.com MAR 19 JASON BISHOP SHOW As “America’s Hottest Illusionist,” Jason Bishop might have a person passing through his body one moment or make goldfish appear from nowhere the next. $32-$42. 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org MAR 20 ORPHEUS CHAMBER ORCHESTRA: FINE, SCHUMANN AND MENDELSSOHN This Grammy Award winning classical music chamber orchestra performs some of the best pieces from Fine, Schumann and Mendelssohn. 6:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org MAR 20-23 2013 KORBEL AMERICAN CLASSIC On March 20, the fourth annual community race with 40 four-person teams, the Conway Cup, begins at 11:30 a.m. at Golden Peak at Vail. March 21, former Olympic, World Cup and World Champion skiers compete in the Volvo Legends Giant Slalom Race at Vail’s Golden Peak racecourse. March 22, the Korbel Ford Cup Race starts at 9 a.m. (and continues March 23) as ski legends coach teams of celebrities and professionals at Golden Peak. On March 22, The Future Legends Race features the kids of celebrities, legends and sponsors (2:30 p.m. at Golden Peak). Vail Mountain, 970.777-2015, vvf.org MAR 21 THE DUNWELLS English rock and Americana roots music come together in an original, eclectic mix. Vilar Center for the Performing Arts. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org MAR 22 HOLD ’EM FOR HOPE A little bit of Vegas comes to Vail in this sixth-annual fundraiser, which benefits the Vail Valley Foundation. Cocktails, a buffet dinner, a live auction and casino games all come into play on this special evening. 7:30 p.m. Vail Village. 970.777.2015, vvf.org MAR 22 “FIDDLER ON THE ROOF” Tevye, a Russian with a Jewish background, tries to arrange marriages for his three oldest daughters, but when one of his daughters refuses and Russians begin to revolt against Jewish people, the family leaves and starts a new life. $78-$98.

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY K E N R E D D I N G, C O U R T E S Y O F VA I L R E S O R T S

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vail

Monday–Saturday 10am–9pm Sunday 10am–7pm 122 e. Meadow Drive, Vail phone 970.688.5947 www.perchvail.com

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the 10th – modern. alpine. inspired. The 10Th is open for lunch, dinner and Vail’s only on-mountain après. Ski, ride or take the gondola to The 10Th, situated at the heart of Vail mountain, where the ambiance and cuisine are superlative interpretations of Modern Alpine Inspiration. Advance reservations highly recommended.

Call (970) 754 1010 or Visit Vail.Com/the10th

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7:30 p.m. Vilar Center for the Performing Arts. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org MAR 24 SAN FRANCISCO JAZZ COLLECTIVE This eclectic collective showcases musicians from Puerto Rico, New York, Venezuela, New Zealand and Israel in a multicultural jazz-fusion. $58. 7:30 p.m. Vilar Center for the Performing Arts. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org MAR 25 ANNA NETREBKO This Russian soprano captivates audiences with her charismatic stage presence and distinct voice. 6:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. $150. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org MAR 27 MICHAEL FLATLEY’S LORD OF THE DANCE This international dance lifts spirits with its precision steps, lighting and music. $85. 7:30 p.m. Vilar Center for the Performing Arts. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org MAR 28 DARK STAR ORCHESTRA This tribute band has been recreating Grateful Dead shows for decades. $46. 7:30 p.m. Vilar Center for the Performing Arts. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org MAR 28-31 VAIL FILM FESTIVAL Independent films dominate the screen at this ninth annual festival, which includes evening parties, live music from Grammy-Award winners, filmmaker panels and more. Various venues in Vail, 970.476.1092, vailfilmfestival.com

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APR 1-7 SOL Y SKI Vail debuts its international celebration, which pairs skiing with a Latin flair. The Gypsy Kings heat up the Dobson Arena, and special parties prevail. 970.754.8245, vail.com APR 3 LOS LONELY BOYS The Grammy Award-winning rock trio performs what they call Texican rock â&#x20AC;&#x2122;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; roll. $53. 7:30 p.m. Vilar Center for the Performing Arts. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org APR 4-6 TASTE OF VAIL Vailâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finest cuisine, international wines, seminars, auctions, a Colorado lamb cook-off and a mountaintop picnic atop Vail Mountain fill this 23rd annual festival. Gore Creek Drive, Vail Marriott Mountain Resort,

Though confirmed for publication, listed events, dates and times are subject to change. Please contact the presenting organizations to confirm details.


Emerging jazz vocalist Cyrille Aimee makes her way to the Vilar Performing Arts Center February 20.

Eagle’s Nest and other venues around town. 970.754.8245, tasteofvail.com APR 5 MUSIC OF ABBA The ’70s shine with this Swedish pop group, known for hits like “Dancing Queen” and “Voulez-Vous.” $58. 7:30 p.m. Vilar Center for the Performing Arts. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org APR 7-14 SKI HERITAGE WEEK Vail continues to celebrate its 50th anniversary by partnering with the International Skiing History Association and the U.S. Ski & Snowboard Hall of Fame to present activities, in remembrance of how skiing has grown. 970.754.8245, vail.com APR 8-14 SPRING BACK TO VAIL The annual party returns with costumed riders, the famous World Pond Skimming Championships and live music. Last year’s musicians included Thievery Thievery Corporation, Grace Potter and the Nocturnals, JJ Grey & Mofro. Vail Ski Resort. 970.754.8245, vail.com APR 10 THE MAYHEM POETS These theatrical poets entertain kids at 10 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. with hip-hop, improv and stand-up comedy. Vilar Performing Arts Center. $14/adults; $11/kids. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org APR 11 “THE JOURNAL OF ABBY MUNSON” Imagination Makers Theatre Company captivates kids with the story of fourthgrader Abby Munson. When Abby takes another trip to the principal’s office, she’s forced to write about her frustrations. Only then does she discover her passion for writing — especially when it has to do with how her mom left the family and how Abby lives with her dad in a home overrun by mice. $14/adults; $11/kids. 10 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Vilar Performing Arts Center. 888.920.2787, vilarpac.org APR 14 BEAVER CREEK MOUNTAIN CLOSSING DAY 970.754.4636, beavercreek.com APR 14 VAIL MOUNTAIN CLOSING DAY 970.754.8245, vail.com ALL EVENTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. PLEASE CONTACT THE PRESENTING ORGANIZATIONS FOR MORE INFORMATION.

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Roger Cotton Brown V A I L’ S O R I G I N A L F I L M M A K E R W R A P S U P A S T O R Y H E B E G A N T E L L I N G I N 1 9 6 2 , O N T H E S I LV E R S C R E E N BY L AU R EN G L EN D EN N I N G

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THERE ARE MANY EARLY VAILITES who have Vail’s history ingrained in their memories, but nobody has the kind of inventory of photographs and video footage that Roger Cotton Brown has amassed in his Gypsum home. ¶ The footage comes in all forms — film reels, videotapes, slides, and of course, Brown’s own memory. ¶ Brown, an Emmy Award-winning filmmaker, has been in Vail since its earliest days. He was always making films and documenting life in Vail, and it’s his footage and his filmmaking expertise behind the 50th anniversary film set to premiere sometime around the anniversary date of Dec. 15. ¶ That’s the day Vail opened in 1962 following a long summer in which the resort’s founders and investors made it all happen. Brown has footage from that summer of ’62, showing a valley that was once ranch land being transformed into a ski resort. That was the summer that made Vail. ¶ Brown is creating the 50th anniversary film along with partners Garrett Edquist and Vail Resorts videographer Satchele Burns, with some help from Brown’s Emmy Award-winning son, Nick Brown, a movie producer and director.

PHOTO BY DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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THE EARLY DAYS || In a 1981 clip showing Bob Parker, one of Vail’s pioneers and the resort’s first marketing guru, he remembers the attitude of those building the resort — an attitude that kept the dream alive when so many other developers might have otherwise quit. MADE FOR TV || The magic is mostly occurring at “(The pioneers) had adopted a point of view that anyRoger Brown’s home, just off Cottonwood Pass Road in thing was possible — that they could handle anything,” Gypsum — that’s where the men put in long hours starParker says. “We’ll do it, there’s a way to do it, and went ing at an Apple computer screen editing 50 years’ worth ahead and did it and got it done, and that’s why Vail got of footage on film editing software Final Cut Pro. It’s built and that’s why it turned out the way it did.” where hundreds of hours of video footage shot over Roger Brown came through Vail before the resort conthe course of 50 years is being condensed into a madestruction began on his way to Aspen. He remembers a for-TV movie that weighs in at less than an hour. pristine ranching valley — a place so beautiful that you just The project is incredibly personal for Roger Brown. He wanted to “stop and get out and go trout fishknows all of the people involved in creating Vail ing,” he says in a clip Burns filmed that may because he was there. He remembers what it was or may not make it into the movie. like to walk down Bridge Street long before That interview with Roger Brown it was a heated cobblestone street aligned IT WAS ABOUT reveals not only his deep relationwith posh retail stores and restaurants. A LIFESTYLE THAT ship with Vail’s history, but also It was merely a dirt road in those his love for the sport of skidays, with a few structures planned NOBODY WAS ing and for mountain life. or already under construction. WILLING TO GIVE UP Brown remembers Burns Roger Brown also knows that turning on his camera and trying to turn roughly 750 hours of — A LIFESTYLE THEY filming him, unscripted, talkfootage into one hour is inevitably WERE PREPARED TO ing about his memories of going to leave some people out — he Vail’s early days. It was casual, just hopes they’ll forgive him for it. FIGHT FOR IF THEY Brown says — “Satchele just sat me “The mandate we have is to HAD TO. down and I just started talking.” make a film that will get on televi“Pete and Earl had their mountain, sion,” he says. “That means it has to be and they had a really beautiful valley, but they less than an hour long and it has to have a didn’t have a town, or lifts or trails, and they only had good story, so automatically that puts out a lot of a summer to put it together — the summer of 1962,” Brown much loved people in Vail. … I think there’s going to be a says. “They knew what they were up against, and they were wanted poster on telephone polls around here for me.” incredibly optimistic. Anybody in his right mind would That’s been the hardest task for Roger Brown as he creates have said, ‘No way, you can’t do this, you can’t build a whole this film — trying to get the story right so that it includes resort in five months,’ — but they did, and it worked.” all of the essential pieces of Vail’s history — the 10th MounRoger Brown also remembers what it was they were tain Division, Earl Eaton, Pete Seibert, among other imporall there to build and why it was so important. It was tant pieces — for a TV movie. The good news is that Roger about a lifestyle that nobody was willing to give up — a Brown is also creating a longer film that will get him back lifestyle they were prepared to fight for if they had to. on the good sides of those who might feel excluded from the “Fun permeated the entire place — if you weren’t havhour-long version — hopefully. That film is shaping up to ing fun, you weren’t gonna stay. People that came to Vail be about 2 ½ hours and will be shown around the valley. really liked to ski, and the skiing was fantastic, it “That one is for the is fantastic — deep powder, wide open slopes. locals — to give them their The joy of skiing never goes away. It hasn’t gone history,” he says.


Roger Brown is Vail’s original filmmaker. He has more than 750 hours of footage depicting Vail’s creation and growth, filmed over the past 50 years. From trail cutting to exhibition skiing, he’s chronicled Vail from the very beginning.

away now; it’s still there. It’s just exciting, you know, harnessing gravity, flying down the mountain, and somehow staying in control while you’re at it. You know, you strap a couple of boards on your feet and head down and you get going — and the faster you go, the easier it is to turn, mostly, until you get too fast. Yeah, it’s a wonderful experience. That hasn’t changed a bit. That’s why Vail is still successful. No matter what happens you can’t take that experience away.”

PH OTO S CO UR TESY OF RO GER COTTON BROWN

‘THIS IS IT’ || Whether those clips make it into the

shorter film or the longer film, watching him remember the early days of Vail and articulate those experiences — the clips of which can be viewed at vail.com — reveals why there’s no better filmmaker to tackle the storytelling of Vail’s first 50 years. Roger Brown created the first promotional film about Vail in 1963, using footage he shot in 1962, both in the summer as the resort was taking shape and during its first winter season operating as a ski resort. He also created the 25th anniversary film, “Vail, the First 25 Years,” in addition to other works featuring the region. He also wants to make sure the film’s narrator, who as of press time is Matt Lauer, portrays the right emotion in telling the story. Roger Brown says he wouldn’t simply send Lauer the script so he could complete the narration elsewhere — that aspect of the film truly needs direction, he said.

Brown needs to ensure that everything sounds just right. On the simplest level of direction, Brown says the names have to be pronounced correctly. “On the more complex level of direction, you have to get the spirit of the (story) — I think he’ll be OK there because he likes Vail and he’s obviously a professional,” Brown says. With the so-called rough cut of the film pretty close to completion as of late October, Roger Brown feels good about the product and expects it to be finished a few weeks before that Dec. 15 anniversary date. Roger Brown recognizes that while he might be Vail’s original filmmaker, he likely won’t be making another film about the ski resort after this one. For him, this film is the end of a story he’s been telling for 50 years. That’s part of the reason he’s creating two films — in order to tell the story right. And that’s why the story feels complete, even in the madefor-TV version. All of the critical times in Vail’s 50-year history are wrapped into the narrative, but it never feels rushed or forced. That’s how Roger Brown and his crew came to name the film, “Vail: The Rise of America’s Iconic Ski Resort.” He said no other title conveyed what the film was all about, and to those who might see it listed on their TV guides at home, this is the title that lets viewers know what they’re about to see. This is the title that should compel them to watch. The story of Vail will go on, sure, but this film is where it ends for Roger Brown. “Fifty years later, I’m kind of wrapping it all up,” he says. “This is it.”

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DISCOVER BREWS COMPLEX ENOUGH TO TRUMP EVEN THE FINEST VINTAGE WINES by Krista Driscoll

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eyond the realm of mass-produced, easily quaffed light lagers, beyond the reaches of mere craft-beer standards, some heroes of hops have taken the first tentative steps into

the wort wilderness to find what lies in the dark recesses at the edges of experimental brewing. They have emerged victorious, bringing with them some of the biggest, boldest beers ever to pass the lips of their enraptured mob of draft disciples. Beer drinking, like many other culinary escapades before it, has become an adventure. Âś To fully understand this new family of froth takes time and patience and a willingness to wander outside your comfort zone. We invite you to trek to the outer edges of the kingdom of brew. Time to grab a glass and choose your own adventure.

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WHISKEY WOW

BARRELED OVER WITH CHARACTER WELL BUILT ESB | BRECKENRIDGE BREWERY | DENVER

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barrels, so that’s the one that popped right into my head. They tasted some of the beer, and they loved it, and that’s kind of how it was born… it’s a fun, neighborhood collaboration.” Breckenridge snags the Stranahan’s barrels the day the whiskey is bottled and has its ESB brewed and ready to fill them. The barrels arrive still really wet and fresh, which creates a great balance with the ESB, Usry says. “There’s something about that bready, biscuity malt character — when you get the vanilla from the oak and the trace whiskey flavors, they really work well together,” he says. After some leisure time soaking in the barrels, Well Built is ready to be bottled, corked and caged. The beer comes out about four times per year and is available at the brewery and select retailers. Usry says the demand for more flavorful, interesting beer has driven the market for Well Built. “It’s a collaborative effort, these two pieces — one being a beer and one being a whiskey barrel — two crafty Colorado companies coming together to make a product,” he says.

efore there was Well Built ESB, there was Breckenridge’s small-batch Extra ESB. “I wanted to make an ESB that was genuinely traditional from an ingredient standpoint but beef it up in alcohol content, so it’s 7.8 percent,” says Todd Usry, brewer at Breckenridge. “So that’s why it’s an extra.” To find the right ingredients, Usry went all the way to Pauls Malts in Suffolk, United Kingdom. Pauls has been around since the early 1800s and still floor malts all of its barley. Usry says it was worth it to spend the money to bring those malts across the pond. “I use four different varieties of Pauls malts,” Usry says. “It gives it that bready, biscuity malt flavor that you don’t find in Canadian- or U.S.-grown malts. That’s what really sets that beer apart. It’s English hops, as well, with a good amount of Fuggle, which is a traditional English hop.” Usry had been playing around with barreling this ESB when Proximo, the parent company of Stranahan’s Colorado Whiskey, approached the brewery and suggested a collaboration. “We were flattered and honored,” Usry says. “We’d already aged the ESB in their

COMPLEXLY LAYERED.

“For us to be able to carry something rare is ideal for our cellar list. We hung onto it in our cellar until it was almost gone everywhere else in the state before releasing it. It’s one of a few that are barrel aged, and the difference in flavor you get from the whiskey barrel — it has that unique complexity to it.” — LAURA LODGE, CRAFT BEER PROGRAM DIRECTOR, VAIL CASCADE

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BEAUTIFUL BROWN

PIONEERING THE SIGNATURE SOUR LA FOLIE SOUR BROWN ALE | NEW BELGIUM BREWING CO. | FORT COLLINS

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he barrel program at New Belgium Brewing Co. is a point of pride for Lauren Salazar, wood cellar manager and master blender. Where most craft breweries are starting their first foray into barrel aging beers and dabbling in sours, New Belgium has been producing sour beer since 1997. A member of the Lips of Faith series and the brewery’s crown jewel of sour, La Folie starts as a dark lager base beer called Oscar that is filtered and put into oak barrels. “It’s not unlike the same process of friendship bread or a sourdough starter, where you have these microbiological elements — souring bacteria and wild yeast — already in the barrel,” Salazar says. “So when we empty a barrel, we add more base beer to the barrel and the barrel is fed with this alcohol, this beer. It starts acidifying, making all these fun flavors from the wild yeast.” Each barrel, or one of its larger cousins, called a foeder, has a unique flavor signature, and the barrel herders at New Belgium are constantly tasting barrels and finding different key notes

in them, such as a cherry pit or a cola flavor, Salazar says. There is an understanding between the brewers and their barrels, and this intimate relationship is the key to blending a brew as special as La Folie, a beer Salazar describes as an homage to Flanders Red Ale. “Some barrels I’ll note as blenders, ones that are becoming really sour and have some fun, interesting notes to them,” Salazar says. “I denote some of them as signature of that blend — very sour and have something really special. Then I pull some of the stars up and some of the blending barrels and make different blend ratios. And when I feel like I’ve found something I really like — something that’s sour, this thing that I call La Folie in my head — when I kind of have that, it’ll have some signature of it’s own blend.” With La Folie, as with any barrel-aged blend, you never get the exact same beer twice, and for Salazar, that’s the fun of it. “This is our folly, this thing that we’re really passionate about,” Salazar says. “We’ll keep buying barrels and making beer that we want to drink.”

THE BREWMASTER’S BREW.

“The cool thing about sours, in general, is they are very expensive to make. They take a long time; they have to be made with a little different equipment. La Folie Sour Brown is a premium product you can’t get everywhere by any means. We like to carry the limited stuff, so our visitors can find something unique that they can’t get at home.” — CLAY WILLIAMS, ASSISTANT MANAGER, ALPINE WINE & SPIRITS, VAIL

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BONUS

FOR MORE CUTTING EDGE CRAFT BEERS SEE THE WINTER 2013 EDITION OF EAT MAGAZINE BLENDED BLISS

BREWED BIG, FLAVORED BIGGER UTOPIAS | SAMUEL ADAMS | BOSTON

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ounder and brewer Jim Koch and his team at Samuel Adams are completely changing consumers’ perception of beer with the 10th anniversary edition of Utopias. Utopias is brewed using traditional methods, but every other characteristic typically associated with beer is thrown out the window. The uncarbonated liquid pours like a cognac, weighs in at a whopping 29 percent alcohol by volume and is best enjoyed in 2-ounce pours at room temperature. “Brewing Utopias is one of my favorite things, and a very exciting part of my job is working with Jim Koch on this beer,” says Jennifer Glanville, brewer with Samuel Adams “I did a lot of research on barrels, and we were able to handselect specific barrels based on the characteristics we wanted them to contribute to Utopias.” Koch began pushing the boundaries of brewing more than 20 years ago by experimenting with heavier beers, Glanville says, and each batch of Utopias is special because it constantly represents that dedication to innovation.

“Every Utopias batch is different because we blend with all of the past vintages to create the best beer possible and use a variety of barrels for character,” Glanville says. “Some of the liquids used in this year’s batch have been aged for 20 years and spent time in finishing barrels sourced from all over the world.” This year’s Utopias spent most of its time aging in single-use bourbon casks from Buffalo Trace Distillery to enhance the beer’s distinct vanilla and maple notes, Glanville says. Barrels also were collected from a rum distillery in Nicaragua to add some additional complexity and flavors, such as fig, chocolate and raisin. And the first taste is only the tip of the iceberg — this complex brew gets better with time. “In many ways, the growing appreciation for American craft beer parallels the development of appreciation for American wine 30 years ago,” Glanville says. “Beer drinkers appreciate craft beer in the same way they would a fine wine — smelling, tasting and pouring properly. … People are genuinely excited about all kinds of craft beer, including extreme beers like Utopias. They are also interested in where their beer gets its flavors or how it is made, which, as a brewer, is very exciting.”

UNRIVALED FLAVOR & WEIGHT.

“Utopias is always an amazing (experience) because it’s so difficult to source. It’s very hard to get and such a treat because it’s one of those beers that set the standard for what a big beer is. ... Utopias is where Boston Beer kept raising the bar. It’s so cool to go back and see how people have explored the limitations and how they have circumvented them to keep moving the bar higher.” — LAURA LODGE, CRAFT BEER PROGRAM DIRECTOR, VAIL CASCADE

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SUPER STOUT

KICKING YOURSELF IN THE MOUTH MEPHISTOPHELES’ STOUT | AVERY BREWING CO. | BOULDER

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of tobacco and leather and smoke and lovely, deep, rich flavors to balance out the sweetness of that alcohol.” Mephistopheles is made in small batches, 18 barrels at a time, and aged in steel. Like the other denizens of hell in this series, creating Meph is a time-consuming art. “We spent years doing small batches of these and trying to figure out how to make our yeast strains work on them,” Parker says. “Demons are the product of a lot of experimentation, a lot of trial and error and a lot of beer that went down the drain because it wasn’t good enough to be called Meph.” Mephistopheles wasn’t made for crushing on a hot summer day. Parker recommends splitting a bottle and serving it in whiskey glasses along with a nice dinner, particularly the dessert course. Only about 15 cases of this hellfire make it into the mountains, and each 12-ounce bottle is tagged for individual sale. “It’s aimed at connoisseurs of beer, people who pair beer with food,” Parker says. “It’s such a big, rich beverage. … I can’t count the number of people who say, ‘I didn’t know beer could taste like that; that’s incredible.’”

hen Avery Brewing Co. set out to make its Demons of Ale trilogy, there was no pussyfooting around with flavor and alcohol content. The result was three frighteningly big beers from the depths of hell: Samael’s Oak Aged Ale, The Beast Grand Cru Ale and Mephistopheles’ Stout. Any of the three would be a hedonistic jaunt through sippers’ paradise, but the snowy days and cold nights of a mountain winter throw Mephistopheles to the top of the list. “When people think stouts, they think of things like Guinness: light, thin, little beer,” says Andy Parker, brewer and barrel herder for Avery. “When we designed this beer, we designed it to be an assault on the senses. Meph is not an example of the subtle art of brewing.” The goal when creating the beer was to make the biggest, baddest imperial stout possible, and this year’s iteration of Mephistopheles weighs in at around 16 percent alcohol by volume. “We wanted it to be a little overwhelming because it would be fun, and high alcohol in beer can come off as very sweet,” Parker says. “To balance it out, we needed some astringency from all these crazy black malts, flavors

MADE FOR THE TABLE.

“It’s a full-bodied stout, heavy on the chocolate and black cherry flavors with the roasty, malty mouth feel. I like that full mouth feeling to it. With the little higher alcohol content to it, it’s one of those beers that you really only need one. ... It goes really well with food. You can pair it with those heavy meats because it’s full-bodied — it’s a great combination for the wintertime.” — PATRICK LINN, SOMMELIER AND BEER BUYER, BEAVER LIQUORS, AVON

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Haute Joaillerie, place Vend么me since 1906

141 East Meadow Drive, Solaris , Vail, Colorado 970-790-6560 www.vancleefarpels.com


Desirable PerlĂŠe Collection Rings, pink gold, white gold and diamonds.


Eyes

on

Fashion Despite Coloradoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s laid-back, mountain style, the fashion conscious still have opportunities to shine. From reimagined town jackets that dispel the snow and cold to fancy boots with aggressive soles, local designers are creating for the Rocky Mountain lifestyle. BY K I M BER LY N ICOL ET TI

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The Authier line is designed by Lee Keating and her husband, Tom Bowers, both pictured on the next page in their “studio” — also known as their kitchen.

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Racing into Retail For Tom Bowers, owning a retail store “wasn’t that natural because I hardly ever shopped, let alone walked into stores,” he explains. But as a World Cup racer and U.S. Ski Team member for seven years, Bowers knew plenty about hard and soft goods when it came to skiing. So when a fellow pro racer asked him to start Performance Ski in Aspen just when Bowers was moving out of racing, he figured it would be a good fit. Within a year, his partner left, “because it didn’t take him long to figure out it wasn’t easy,” Bowers says. Though they had racing contacts, they needed to develop relationships with manufacturers from scratch. “What I learned is that it takes decades to go from starting with zero — no money, no contacts on the retail side — to saying, ‘OK, we can take a salary that’s more than just food money,’” he says. It took almost a decade to feel successful, but persistence and his competitive drive kept him going. And it didn’t hurt that he met Lee Keating the same season he opened Performance Ski (at the shop) in 1987. By 1995, she had become his wife and ultimate business partner, after a career on Wall Street. “I was a good shopper,” Keating says. “I liked to buy beautiful things for myself, so as a result, I wanted to put beautiful things in the store.” Keating has been the driving force toward expansion and evolution. Eleven years ago, Bowers thought he was going to Vail for a relatively simple knee operation. Keating drove him, figuring she’d shop while she waited. “The shopping experience took me about three minutes, and I went to pick him up and said, ‘We’re doing a store in Vail,’” she says. “The store is exactly the same as Aspen, but it doesn’t have hard goods because Vail has a great selection of hard goods.” Keating’s sense of style and Bowers’ critical eye for quality fabrics and designs that hold up to harsh elements result in a winning formula. It’s a team talent customers have come to trust and rely upon. So, a couple of years ago, Keating took the business to the next level. Over dinner with Gustavo Sangiorgi, a skiwear designer, she proposed they collaborate to launch their own line, called Authier. At first, Bowers thought she was a little crazy, but as he mulled it over, it all made sense. “Lee is always trying to change manu84

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facturers’ (products), saying, ‘If you make this change, they’d sell more,’ so the opportunity to have that much input in design countered ‘the crazy,’” he says. Now in its third season, Authier, named after an Italian ski manufacturer founded in 1910, offers jackets, pants, turtlenecks, sweaters and flannel quilted shirts. They design items at the kitchen table, and then manufacture them in Italy with the best fabrics, zippers and nylon. “I was tired of broken zippers and cheap fabric,” Keating says about other products. “With ours, everything is perfect.” In fact, it takes 52 hours for Italian women to handknit one Authier cashmere sweater, she says. In addition to the highest technical quality, Keating designs her jackets “so you’d wear it on your ski holiday and take it back to Chicago, and it would look beautiful with jeans,” she says. Her fashion crosses age barriers and appeals to both skiers and snowboarders. “A 45-year-old woman would buy it, and her 18-yearold daughter would steal it from her closet,” Keating says. “Aspen and Vail are much like New York — people are sophisticated and want to have incredible things. They see the basic stuff in the cities, but they want things they can’t get everywhere.” Part of their secret to success also lies in how much they love skiing; they pass their passion for the sport onto customers. “It’s about having a good time,” Keating says. “We do this because we love the sport. It’s not about creating some kind of empire.”

An Italian Flair Luca Bruno brings an authentic Italian flair to his two stores in Vail, Luca Bruno and Due — each of which offers different brands because Luca believes people come from all over the world to shop in Vail, and “they have to see something different because they are very sophisticated.” Luca Bruno moved from Torino, Italy, to the U.S. to learn English and earn a degree in textiles from Notre Dame. He moved to Vail and worked for Polo Ralph Lauren in 1993, then met his wife, Jenn, in 1995. They married in 1997, and by 2002, they opened their first store in Vail because Polo Ralph Lauren had closed. He offers “full-on urban fashion,” as opposed to the mountain look —designers such as M Missoni, Les Copains and Alberta Ferretti.


Luca Bruno designs his shirts by crouching on the floor, sifting and pairing fabric swatches.

Though he says he has “no idea” how he made it through the economic downturn (other than buying about 30 percent less than usual), in his next breath, he talks passionately about how he buys original, quality clothing. “You can’t find anything like that, except in Vail,” he says. More importantly, he and his wife understand the community and know how “crazy” they can get with fashion and what “fun styles” they can introduce into Vail. “We buy what we love,” Jenn Bruno says. “Sometimes we make crazy choices that work out. I always tell people we specialize in casual chic.” Luca believes fashion makes you feel good about yourself, and Jenn has noticed that people in Vail are embracing that concept much more than they did a decade ago. “In the past, people were afraid to take fashion chances, but now, fashion is fine,” she says. “It’s a great way to express yourself and to show your mood. People are realizing it’s not a bad thing to be the best-dressed person in the room.” To augment the styles the Brunos purchase from their close relationships with brand-name designers, they also launched their own line — all made in Italy, including the cotton. “Italy has the best factories for fashion because we love detail on anything we do, and we have a lot of patience,” Luca explains. Their men’s shirts offer “one way a man can have fun with fashion,” Jenn says. “Not every man is going to wear skinny jeans, but you can get him into a fitted shirt.” They spent a lot of time designing the perfect shirt, which was not too classically American loose, but not the slim cut “that might terrify Americans,” Jenn says. “They’re very flattering on a man’s body, but not intimidating.” W I N T E R 2 013 G VAIL LUXURY

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Authier outerwear is meant to keep skiers warm on the hill, and well dressed during après ski around town.

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Luca has garnered a reputation for his knowledge — and honesty — in fashion. He tells customers what works and what doesn’t with different body types and isn’t afraid to let people walk out empty handed because he knows people will return when he has something perfectly befitting. “Fashion is part of their culture,” Jenn says about the Italians. “It’s in their blood — kind of like wine.”

A Step Ahead Steve Rosenthal has worked in the shoe industry for 50 years, so he understands what it takes to stay a step ahead. He faces a unique situation at his store, Colorado Footwear, and it works both for and against him. Because spring and summer begin in Vail much later than they do in the nation’s cities, he can watch what’s hot and what’s not in terms of shoe design: Department stores tend to flaunt their spring fashion in February. Meanwhile, Vail’s season doesn’t start until mid-June. While Rosenthal can purchase shoes that have been hot in cities nationwide — which gives him a leg up — he faces a different challenge; just as he’s debuting his spring and summer line, department stores begin to discount their brand names to make room for early fall and winter inventory. As a result, he needs to present shoes few other stores carry, or generally match department store discounts. The good news for consumers: Shoe shopping isn’t a rip off at Colorado Footwear. “Despite what people think about Vail prices being up, we’re not,” Steve says. “We’re right in the suggested retail prices on branded shoes.” For the winter season, he works with manufacturers, adding beefy traction and warm lining to shoes and boots companies normally produce without such features. When it comes to Colorado Footwear’s winter line, “no one else has it,” he says. His special relationship with manufacturers — who literally do extra favors for him, such as producing boots with serious treads and cozy linings — stems from building relationships the old-fashioned way. Steve began selling shoes in St. Louis at age 16. After college, he moved to Los Angeles and worked his way up the ladder with Edison Brothers Stores Inc., until he became a vice president and opened

the first Wild Pair store in Houston in 1972. His roles took him to Europe, Brazil and China more than 300 times collectively. He was even the first buyer to go into the Iron Curtain countries. “It was fun to be on the leading edge of fashion and decide what colors were going to be popular,” he said. In fact, he had such a good time, he came out of “retirement” with Edison Brothers and bought Colorado Footwear in Vail in 2005. He jokes that “Vail’s expensive to live in, and I needed a job,” but his true passion for footwear becomes apparent the minute a customer walks into his store. His wife, Sally Rosenthal, left her corporate job as general sales manager for five radio stations to enter the venture with him. They went from “a corporate couple,” flying off to separate destinations and hiring a nanny to help raise their kids, to a family that sat down regularly at dinnertime (and didn’t need a live-in nanny). “It became the best thing that ever happened,” Sally says. “We bonded as a family, and we bonded as a couple.” They did, however, have to learn to leave work at work. “You have to be careful,” Steve says. “You can bring business home, and it can consume you. You have to drop it at dinnertime.” Sally also had to adjust to retail sales. At first, she wasn’t as passionate about it as her husband was. “He was a buyer, and I was a seller,” she said. “But I became pretty passionate about retail (as) I watched his skill in it. I thought, ‘Oh my god, he’s really good at this — he has a great eye for style and a great eye for detail, and he’s really good with customers.’” Despite his wife’s rave reviews, Steve admits that about a quarter of the inventory he buys doesn’t quite hit the mark — while 75 percent sells like crazy, leaving him wishing he had purchased more. “Every year’s a new season,” he said. “You can’t fall in love with your inventory; your customers will tell you what your best things are.” When locals think of Colorado Footwear, one particular shoe comes to mind: a boot inspired by old Nordic styles with buckle clasps and sturdy soles. Over the years it’s been released in a variety of colors and textures, from bright pink to black patent leather. And customer service is at the top of the Rosenthals’ list. They understand their clientele is spending precious vacation time at their store, so visitors should “feel loved,” Sally says. W I N T E R 2 013 G VAIL LUXURY

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When administering a barefoot massage, Allegria therapists, such as Rhiannon Barton, use the overhead bars to adjust their weight and pressure.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;When health is absent, wisdom cannot reveal itself, art cannot manifest, strength cannot fight, wealth becomes useless, and intelligence cannot be applied.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;herophilus


Though local spas offer a full menu of traditional services, many are branching out into alternative treatments that bring a new perspective to massage, relaxation and bodywork.

INNER

Harmonies BY W R EN W ER T I N PH OTO G R A PH Y BY D O M I N I Q U E TAY LO R

At the Sonnenalp Spa, tuning forks calibrated to specific celestial bodies are used in Acutonics treatments.

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Good Vibrations Some people approach life with energy — a la gusto — and some approach life energetically — a la woo-woo. John Breslin, director of the Sonnenalp Spa, does it both ways. He knows his business — rest, relaxation and rejuvenation — but he incorporates energy work and awareness into much of the spa. A look at the spa menu shows that the usual suspects (Swedish massage, facials, body masks) are easy to come by. But look further and you’ll discover treatments outside the norm: facial soundscapes, Rejuvalight therapy, ion foot treatments and Acutonics. At the Sonnenalp, Acutonics is a type of massage that is integrated with tuning forks, meridians and chakras. Though it seems otherwordly and exotic the first time you experience Acutonics, it is actually one of the most intuitive — even grounded — treatments you’ll find. “Acutonics is familiar,” says Susanne Waibel, hitting a tuning fork against a rubber mallet to make it sing. “Your body recognizes this sound.” She’s referring to the specific tone emitted by the tuning fork, one she says is calibrated to the sound Earth makes when it’s rotating on its axis. On some level, it’s a sound our bodies have heard every day since birth. Each tuning fork is calibrated to the orbital properties of the moon, the sun, the planets — and even other planets’ moons. Acutonics practitioners place different tuning forks on acupressure points that coincide with the body’s meridian and chakra energy systems. Sound waves are simply vibrations, and so when those vibrations reach into the body, they affect it. Muscles loosen, circulation increases, systems ignite. But that’s not all; after touching the body with the tuning fork, the therapist then massages the area. “I’m able to go much deeper much faster with the forks,” 92

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Waibel explains. “And I can feel the muscle loosen and give.” Harnessing the power of vibrations makes sense, but how does she decide which vibrations are key? “Each planetary tuning fork represents an archetype,” she says. Saturn represents stability, structure, perseverance and wisdom, while Jupiter intimates expansion, abundance and optimism. By applying these to the various chakras, Waibel is able to bring an element of internal awareness to the session that is both uncommon and healing. It’s like having the body and the spirit massaged, soothed and relaxed. Lying on the table, hearing the occasional hum of a fork followed by the forthright strokes of her hands, it feels a little bit like a miracle. At the very least, it’s a simply awesome massage. Acutonics has been used to treat chronic pain and surgery recovery, both of which Waibel has firsthand knowledge of. In fact, the results she got from her own treatment are what caused her to study it. She is a believer. So, too, is Breslin. “Vibrationally speaking, we’re at a certain frequency,” he says. “And that’s how the body heals itself. The tuning forks are calibrated to a particular frequency so the body can return to the level it’s supposed to be at.” He illustrates his point by talking about a car. If the fuel line is pinched, it won’t go. In the same way, if a nerve is pinched, you don’t get your flow. By opening up those lines, your energy can flow and move and grow. You feel more alive. “One of our mantras is internal and external health,” he explains. “I think it’s a big component of the spa industry, or at least it should be.” He points to a quote on his wall by Herophilus, Alexander the Great’s physician: “When health is absent, wisdom cannot reveal itself, art cannot manifest, strength cannot fight, wealth becomes useless, and intelligence cannot be applied.” It makes sense that the spa Breslin helms focuses on the health of a body inside and out. But whether or not you buy into the internal benefits of Acutonics, one thing is certain: It’s an awfully wonderful experience.

Well Balanced Every time I lie down on a treatment table at Allegria Spa, the world whooshes out and away from me. It’s as though they command a special gravitational force at the spa that’s specifically designed to help you sink into a more relaxed state. Whatever the reason, and whether I’m there for a facial or a massage, I’m at ease before the therapist tells me to take a deep breath. Allegria has many alternative treatments on its spa I was menu, either as add-ons or standalones. They’re completely called restorative therapies, without gravity, and include such items as and my mind craniosacral, reiki, shiatsu empty of and other therapies that deal anything save with energy flow, pressure the realization points and internal rhythms. The idea of incorporating that I was unusual treatments feels warm, safe natural at the spa, which is and happy. built around an Aqua Sanitas water sanctuary. Warm pools,


Ariaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hydratherapy float table offers a feeling of warm suspension.

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Ariaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s detoxifying treatment with red clay helps draw out impurities from the skin.

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a rain shower, a solarium and a sauna make up the area, and people are invited to “take the waters” in European fashion. I recently went to the spa for an ashiatsu session with Nanci Bealieu, one of the first therapists locally who became trained in the method. Though relatively new in the United States, ashiatsu, or barefoot massage, has been practiced in Asia for centuries. Using deep, soothing strokes, practicioners deliver an epic massage with their feet as well as their hands. In Asia, massage therapists are, as a rule, more petite than their Caucasian counterparts. To make a gross generalization, having a small Thai woman walking on your back is different than having an American woman doing so. “And so we have the bars,” says general manager Gaye Steinke. The parallel bars are mounted above the massage table and enable the therapist to use her feet without putting her full weight on the body. For those who opt for the 80-minute treatment, the session includes warm stones, which, when used on localized areas of the body, help the muscles become more pliable and supple. Bealieu held the volcanic stones on my skin, warming her hands in the process. After the muscles began to relax with the heat, she’d then massage that area. In a natural rhythm and flow, the massage became increasingly deeper, though never painful. She quietly moved from standing next to the table to being atop it. It wasn’t obvious to me that Bealieu was massaging me with her feet. It’s not just that her feet were supple and smooth, the way you expect a well-moisturized hand to be — there was a dexterity in her feet and toes that I normally associate with hands and fingers. She laughs when I mention this. “You shouldn’t be able to tell I’m using my feet, except the strokes are longer.” I think about this and realize she’s right. The surface area she’s able to press on, knead and otherwise manipulate is a couple of inches longer than a normal hand massage is. And so you actually get “more massage” during a session. But the great benefit is how deep the therapist can go without stressing out the surrounding tissue. With some gentle post-massage stretching, the effects of ashiatsu seem to linger for several days — a perfect scenario for anyone looking to prolong the relaxed state.

Floating Cocoon Tucked into one of Vail’s great creek-

side resorts — the Vail Cascade Resort, complete with spacious suites, a great restaurant and a view that just doesn’t quit — Aria Spa is a quiet haven dedicated to peace, beauty and relaxation. Upstairs from the athletic club, the spa includes an outdoor saline pool, well-appointed men’s and women’s locker rooms and a spacious coed lounge (the Sanctuary) with a variety of comfy lounge chairs, a cozy fire and an away-from-it-all vibe that is probably the best preparation for a treatment you can find. Aria Spa’s menu is full of massage, facial and body treatment options. The Mystic sunless tanning is popular — it delivers a nice glow to the skin without subjecting it to the sun’s brash rays. There is a couple’s treatment room, as well as many experienced massage therapists from which to choose. And though all of this combines to make Aria truly special, there is one other detail that puts it over the top: the float table. “It’s hard to describe the float table,” says veteran therapist Judy Askelson, a longtime local. “It’s like floating in a cocoon. Really, you just need to experience it.”

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She’s right, and more on that later. At the recommendation of the spa director, I opted for the Volcanic Sand Scrub and Red Detox Body Wrap, a treatment that contributes to beauty, wellness and overall relaxation. In addition to the float table, the treatment room had a spacious shower and a massage table. I went back and forth between the stations. First, the scrub, which Askelson rubbed into my skin to exfoliate and smooth it. After I’d washed it off in the shower, I went back to the table, where Askelson painted me with red clay, meant to draw out impurities. She then led me to the float table. Body-shaped, it has a platform that raises and lowers to facilitate entry and exit. I lay myself down and Askelson engulfed me in a wrap. And then she layered me up with sheath after sheath, each increasing the weight on top of me, like a pile of blankets on a cold winter night. Once I was wrapped to her satisfaction, she lowered the platform and I sank into the (it must be said) womb. Warm water surrounded me, though it never touched my skin because of the layers. I was completely without gravity, and my mind empty of anything save the realization that I was warm, safe and happy. I could have stayed there for hours, but eventually it was time to get out and wash off the clay. After that, it was back to the table, where Askelson massaged ginger-infused lotion into my skin, which drank it up. Having been so well relaxed (and warmed) before the massage, my muscles did whatever her hands told them to do. That is, they opened up and relaxed. The treatment was a bit like a mini-vacation from life, and I got to keep the glow for days. But whether or not you go for the float table (and really, you should), all of Aria seems to be like that: a break from the hustle and “You shouldn’t bustle, where you can kick back be able to tell and become a more relaxed I’m using my version of yourself. And there’s feet, except no need to rush back to real life the strokes — head back to the Sanctuary are longer.” and order lunch from the spa menu, or simply spend some time reading by the fire. W I N T E R 2 013 G VAIL LUXURY

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ALPENGLOW The full moon rises above the Gore Range and dominates the sky on a clear winter night. Photography by Dominique Taylor

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Liz Leeds Sharp, witty, focused and always thinking of ways to maximize clients’ time and money.

Ready to discuss your needs over coffee or on the lifts.

Stays on top of the luxury real estate market, trends and top action in the Vail Valley.

Knows what to do, where to go, what to buy and how to sell — making Liz the best Realtor (and tour guide) on the slopes and in the Vail Valley.

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The number ONE reason to work with Realtor Liz Leeds: She lowers your risk. When you are represented by a Realtor, it helps assure that you are buying a home that is safe, sound and priced fairly. When you work with Liz Leeds, you’ll get the best strategies and proposals to land you the right property at the best price and terms. Read Liz’s Top Ten Reasons to Work With a Realtor at LizLeeds.com. Then call Liz.

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