Page 7

        CHAPTER 1:

HYDROCARBON FORMATION   AND ACCUMULATION                              

1.1 FORMATION   

Oil is formed from diatoms, extremely small sized marine organisms. Diatoms float in the  top  few  meters  of  the oceans  and also  happen  to  be  a  major  source  of  food  for  many  forms  of  ocean  swimmers.  Their  skeletons  are  chemically  very  similar  to  sand  and  are  also  made  of  the  silica. Diatoms produce a kind of oil by themselves to store chemical energy from photosynthesis  and  to  increase  their  ability  to  float.  But  this  small  amount  of  oil  still  needs  to  become  concentrated and mature before it can be taken from the ground and used as fuel.  Almost  all  oil  comes  from  rocks  that  were  formed  underwater,  floating  ocean  life  (tiny  creatures  known  as  diatoms,  foraminifera,  and  radiolarian)  that  settle  to  the  bottom  of  the  sea  eventually  turns  into  oil.  It  takes  many  millions  of  years  to  form  thick  deposits  of  organic‐rich  sludge at the bottom of the ocean. This sludge afterwards undergoes Sediment Maturation. Given  many thousands of years, a stack of mud and organic remains, many kilometers thick may pile up  on  the  sea  floor,  especially  in  nutrient‐rich  waters.  Given  enough  time,  the  overlying  sediments  that are constantly being deposited will bury these organic remains and mud deeply so that they  eventually are turned into solid rock. High heat and intense pressure help along various chemical  reactions, transforming the soft parts of ancient organisms found in the deep‐sea sludge into oil  and natural gas. This ooze at the bottom of the ocean turns into Source Rock. 

1.2 ACCUMULATION   

Reservoirs are the rock in which the oil is actually stored. An effective Reservoir must be of  high porosity and permeability and must allow active exchange of fluids so that existing water in  the trap is exchanged with hydrocarbons. It is a place that oil migrates to and is held underground.  Sandstone has plenty of room inside itself to trap oil and acts just like a sponge. It is for this reason 

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 6

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

The following text is focused on the role of growth faults in trapping hydrocarbons. Various kinds of traps involving growth faults have be...

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

The following text is focused on the role of growth faults in trapping hydrocarbons. Various kinds of traps involving growth faults have be...

Advertisement