Page 20

thickness. Also,  the  fault  leak  is  significantly  hampered  due  to  thinner  successions  on  the  other  side of the fault. Thus if the hydrocarbon reserve is followed by a reservoir grade rock across the  fault the migration of oil from reserve will be reduced significantly.   

Fig 3.3 Growth faults can effectively form excellent combination traps as shown     

3.5 LIMITATIONS   

First of all a trap may or may not have hydrocarbon trapped in it. One must know thoroughly the  geological and tectonic history of the block being explored, along with the migration history and  patterns of the hydrocarbon from source to reservoir. A trap has a positive chance only if the trap  formation pre‐dates the migration. Also a trap loses the viability if it is not in the migration path of  oil.  Also  fault  plane,  due  to  sliding  of  various  kinds  of  layers,  may  or  may  not  seal  the  reserve.  This  may lead to significant loss of oil to atmosphere if the fault trace extends to the surface.    Similarly,  if  the  rollover  anticline  is  not  capped  by  an  effective  seal  the  oil  will  not  be  trapped.  Nature of the rocks also plays dominant role. The reservoir rock must be permeable enough to let  active exchange of fluids and keep the hydrocarbons absorbed for long periods of time.          Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

Page 19

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

The following text is focused on the role of growth faults in trapping hydrocarbons. Various kinds of traps involving growth faults have be...

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

The following text is focused on the role of growth faults in trapping hydrocarbons. Various kinds of traps involving growth faults have be...

Advertisement