Page 1

 

The following  text is focused on the role of  growth faults in trapping hydrocarbons. Various  kinds of traps involving growth faults have been  discussed along with a brief case study of Niger  Delta and a detailed study and interpretation of  a block in Mumbai offshore‐Shelf Margin.   

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime With case study on Mumbai Offshore and Niger Delta Vaibhav Singhal


Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  Under Mr. S.N. Mohanty 

              Vaibhav Singhal  Summer Trainee, EEPIL  3rd Year, Int. M.Sc. Applied Geology  IIT Kharagpur   

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 1


Acknowkowledgement   I  take  this  opportunity  to  express  my  gratitude  towards  my  mentor  Mr.  S.N.  Mohanty,  Vice  President,  EOL‐E&P,  Mumbai  for  his  consistent  guidance  and  support.  I  am  grateful  to  Ms.  Urmi  Surve  and  all  the  members  of  ESSAR  Mumbai  for  their  constant motivation to work positively and for extending a helping hand whenever  in need.  Special  thanks  to  Mr.  Saurabh  Goyal,  Dy.  Manager‐EOL,  for  his  kind  support,  guidance and encouragement throughout the project work  I  would  also  like  to  thank  all  those  who  are  knowingly  or  unknowingly  involved  in  completion of my project.   

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 2


Table of Contents   

1. Hydrocarbon Formation And Accumulation 1.1. Formation………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 1.2. Accumulation……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..  1.3. Migration………………………..………………………………………………………………………………………….  1.4. Entrapment……………………………..…………………………………………………………………………………. 

2. Petroleum System 2.1. Introduction……………………….………………………………………………………………………………… 2.2. Reservoir……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..  2.3. Seal……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..  2.4. Traps……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………  2.4.1. Stratigraphic Traps……………………………………………………………………………………  2.4.2. Structural Traps………………………………………………………………………………………..  2.5. Trap Evaluation…………………………………………………………………………………………………… 

3. Growth Faults 3.1. Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3.2. Formation And Structure……………………………………………………………………………………..  3.3. Geological Settings For Growth Faults….………………………………………………………………  3.4. Importance Of Growth Faults…………….…………………………………………………………………  3.5. Limitations………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 

4. Interpretation   4.1. Data Loading……………………………………………………………………………………………………….  4.2. The Process…………………………………………………………………………………………………………  4.2.1. Data Loading ……………………………..………………………………………………………….  4.2.2. Fault Picking…………………………….….…………………………………………………………  4.2.3. Horizon Picking………………………………………………………………………………………  4.2.4. Fault Polygon………………………….…….……………………………………………………….  4.2.5. Contouring……………………………………….……………………………………………………  4.3. Interpretation of Growth Faults…………………………………………………………………………..  4.4. Geometry of Growth Faults………………………………………………………………………………… 

5. Mumbai Offshore 5.1. Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5.2. Tectonic Setup………………………….…………………………………………………………………………  5.3. Stratigraphy………………………………………………………………………………………………………..  5.4. Petroleum System………………………………………………………………………………………………  5.5. Data Interpretation……………….……………………………………………………………………………  5.5.1. Seismic Data Interpretation…………………………………………………………………  5.5.2. Horizons and Faults ……………………………………………………………………………  Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

Page 3


5.5.3. Time Structure Maps…………………….……………………………………………………  5.5.4. Isochronopach Map………………………………………………………  5.6. Prospect Analysis……………………………………………………………………………………….. 

6. Nigeria Delta 6.1. Introduction…………………………..…………………………………………………………………… 6.2. Geology……………..………………………………….……………………………………………………  6.2.1. Tectonics…………..………………………………………  6.2.2. Stratigraphy………………………………………………    6.3. Petroleum System……………………………………………………………………………………  6.3.1. Location……..………………………………………………  6.3.2. Reservoir……………………………………………………  6.3.3. Entrapment….……………………………………………  6.3.4. Cap Rock……………………………………………………  6.4. Conclusion…………………………….……………………………………………………………… 

7. Conclusion      

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 4


INTRODUCTION       There has been a lot of study on growth faults w.r.t. subsurface exploration of hydrocarbons. The  main  reason  for  special  recognition  of  growth  faults  in  this  field  is  their  excellent  hydrocarbon  trapping capabilities. A schematic diagram of a growth fault has been shown in figure 1.        

Fig. 1:  Diagram of a common Growth Fault    Growth Faults are mostly Listric Normal faults generally found in extensional sedimentary regime.  Their dip decreases with depth and fault ends in the decollment zone. The thickness of the  hanging wall (which is the down thrown block) is increased resulting in thickening of both  reservoir and cap making conditions more favorable for industries.   Ample numbers of Growth faults have been found in both Niger Delta and Mumbai Offshore  (discussed in a case study of this report later).  The traps involving growth faults are structural  traps of both Fault dominated (Fault block) and fold dominated (Rollover anticline).   

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 5


CHAPTER 1:

HYDROCARBON FORMATION   AND ACCUMULATION                              

1.1 FORMATION   

Oil is formed from diatoms, extremely small sized marine organisms. Diatoms float in the  top  few  meters  of  the oceans  and also  happen  to  be  a  major  source  of  food  for  many  forms  of  ocean  swimmers.  Their  skeletons  are  chemically  very  similar  to  sand  and  are  also  made  of  the  silica. Diatoms produce a kind of oil by themselves to store chemical energy from photosynthesis  and  to  increase  their  ability  to  float.  But  this  small  amount  of  oil  still  needs  to  become  concentrated and mature before it can be taken from the ground and used as fuel.  Almost  all  oil  comes  from  rocks  that  were  formed  underwater,  floating  ocean  life  (tiny  creatures  known  as  diatoms,  foraminifera,  and  radiolarian)  that  settle  to  the  bottom  of  the  sea  eventually  turns  into  oil.  It  takes  many  millions  of  years  to  form  thick  deposits  of  organic‐rich  sludge at the bottom of the ocean. This sludge afterwards undergoes Sediment Maturation. Given  many thousands of years, a stack of mud and organic remains, many kilometers thick may pile up  on  the  sea  floor,  especially  in  nutrient‐rich  waters.  Given  enough  time,  the  overlying  sediments  that are constantly being deposited will bury these organic remains and mud deeply so that they  eventually are turned into solid rock. High heat and intense pressure help along various chemical  reactions, transforming the soft parts of ancient organisms found in the deep‐sea sludge into oil  and natural gas. This ooze at the bottom of the ocean turns into Source Rock. 

1.2 ACCUMULATION   

Reservoirs are the rock in which the oil is actually stored. An effective Reservoir must be of  high porosity and permeability and must allow active exchange of fluids so that existing water in  the trap is exchanged with hydrocarbons. It is a place that oil migrates to and is held underground.  Sandstone has plenty of room inside itself to trap oil and acts just like a sponge. It is for this reason 

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 6


that sandstones are the most common reservoir rocks. Limestone and dolostones, some of which  are the skeletal remains of ancient coral reefs, are other examples of reservoir rocks.   

Figure: 1 Reservoir grade rock 

1.3 MIGRATION   

It’s the  process  when  oil  migrates  from  source  rock  to  reservoir  rock,  where  it  displaces  water that was originally present in the formation. If hydrocarbons hit a trap they get stored there  otherwise continue travelling upwards via different mechanisms e.g. Emulsification with water etc.   Migration is mainly of two types:  Primary  Migration  involves  release  of  petroleum  compounds  from  solid  organic  particles  (Kerogen) in source beds and their transport within and through the capillaries and narrow pores  of fine grained source bed.  Secondary migration, on the other hand, involves expulsion of the oil from source rock into  the reservoir, which has rocks with lager pore spaces and permeability through which it is passed  to traps 

1.4 ENTRAPMENT   

Hydrocarbons once formed, being lighter than surroundings have a strong tendency to rise  above until they reach the surface of the earth, after which they are lost in the environment. This  is what happens at oil seeps (once common in Pennsylvania, California, Texas and Louisiana).   Therefore,  it  is  mandatory  for  exploration  purposes  that  the  hydrocarbon  reserve  is  contained in some way in the subsurface so that it can be explored and exploited. The geological  structures that act as barriers are called Traps. Traps are geological settings that with the help of  low  porosity  and  permeable  rocks  trap  the  hydrocarbons.  Shale,  limestone  (with  low  permeability), etc. act as good seal. 

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 7


In Figure 2 the yellow particles are clay particles and pink areas are pore spaces. As we can  notice very clearly that clay particles are packed very tightly. Therefore, due to lack of pore spaces  the movement of oil through these rocks becomes extremely difficult.     

PORE SPACE   SAND GRAINS     

Figure: 2 Seal    Peculiar case of limestone:  Limestone can act as either a seal or a source rock depending  upon  the  pressure  temperature  conditions  it  has  faced.  The  limestone  which  has  undergone  higher pressures is likely to have a low permeability and is likely to end up as a Trap whereas the  one that has seen fewer pressures might act as a reservoir.                    

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 8


Chapter 2:

PETROLEUM SYSTEM   

2.1 INTRODUCTION   

Traps are the features that prevent oil from escaping from earth’s surface. To be a viable trap, a  subsurface  feature  must  be  capable  of  receiving  hydrocarbons  and  storing  them  for  some  significant  length  of  time.  This  requires  two  fundamental  components:  a  reservoir  in  which  to  store the hydrocarbons, and a seal (or set of seals) to keep the hydrocarbons from migrating out  of the trap. The presence of hydrocarbons is not a critical component of a trap, although this IS a  requirement for economic success. The absence of hydrocarbons may be the result of failure of  other play or prospect parameters, such as the lack of an active source rock or migration conduits,  and it may have nothing to do with the ability of an individual feature to act as a trap.    

2.2 RESERVOIR   

The reservoir  within  a  trap  provides  the  storage  space  for  the  hydrocarbons.  This  requires  adequate porosity within the reservoir interval. The reservoir must also be capable of transmitting  and exchanging fluids. This requires sufficient effective permeability within the reservoir interval  and also along the migration conduit that connects the reservoir with a source rock. Because most  traps  are  initially  water  filled,  the  reservoir  rock  must  be  capable  of  exchanging  fluids  as  the  original formation water has to be displaced by hydrocarbons. Trap with only one homogeneous  reservoir rock are rare. Individual reservoirs commonly include lateral and/or vertical variations in  porosity and permeability. Such variations may be caused either by primary depositional processes  or  by  secondary  diagenetic  or  deformational  effects  and  can  lead  to  hydrocarbon  saturated  but  nonproductive waste zones within a trap. Variations in porosity and permeability can also create  transitions  that  occur  over  some  distance  between  the  reservoirs  and the  major  seals  of  a  trap.  These  intervals  may  contain  a  significant  amount  of  hydrocarbons  that  are  difficult  to  produce  effectively. Such intervals are regarded as uneconomic parts of the reservoir and not part of the  seal,  or  otherwise,  trap  spill  points  may  be  mis‐identified.  Many  traps  contain  several  discrete  reservoir  rocks  with  interbedded  impermeable  units  that  form  internal  seals  and  segment  hydrocarbon accumulations into separate compartments with separate gas‐oil‐water contacts and  different pressure distributions. 

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 9


Figure 1   

2.3 SEAL   

The  seal  is  the  most  critical  component  of  a  trap.  Without  effective  seals,  hydrocarbons  will  migrate  out  of  the  reservoir  rock  with  time  and  the  trap  will  lack  viability.  Effective  seals  for  hydrocarbon accumulations are formed by relatively thick, laterally continuous, ductile rocks with  high capillary entry pressures, but other types of seals may be important parts of individual traps  (e.g., fault zone material, volcanic rock, asphalt, and permafrost). All traps require some form of  top  seal.  When  the  base  of  the  top  seal  is  convex  upward  in  three  dimensions,  no  other  seal  is  necessary to form an adequate trap. Many traps are more complicated and require other effective  seals. These are called the poly‐seal traps. Lateral seals impede hydrocarbon movement from the  sides of a trap and are a common element of successful stratigraphic traps. Fades changes from  porous and permeable rocks to rocks with higher capillary entry pressures can form lateral seals,  as can lateral diagenetic changes from reservoir to tight rocks. Other lateral seals are created by  the juxtaposition of dissimilar rock types across erosional or depositional boundaries. Stratigraphic  variability in lateral seals poses a risk of leakage and trap limitation. In thinly interbedded intervals  of porous and permeable rock in a potential lateral seal can destroy an otherwise viable trap. Base  seals are present in many traps and are most commonly stratigraphic in nature. The presence or  absence of an adequate base seal is not a general trap requirement, but it can play an important  role in deciding how a field will be developed. Faults can be important in providing seals for a trap,  and  fault  leak  is  a  common  trap  limitation.  Faults  can  create  or  modify  seals  by  juxtaposing  dissimilar rock types across the fault (Figure 1), by smearing or dragging less permeable material  into  the  fault  zone,  by  forming  a  less  permeable  gouge  because  of  differential  sorting  and/or  cataclasis,  or  by  preferential  diagenesis  along  the  fault.  Fault‐induced  leakage  may  result  from  juxtaposition  of  porous  and  permeable  rocks  across  the  fault  or  by  formation  of  a  fracture  network along the fault itself.   Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

Page 10


2.4 TRAPS   

Traps as discussed above are mainly of three types:    

Stratigraphic Traps  Structural Traps  Combination Traps 

These traps and there types are briefly discussed below.   

2.4.1 STRATIGRAPHIC TRAPS   

Stratigraphic traps are those in which the requisite and reservoir seal(s) combination were formed  by  any  variation  in  the  stratigraphy  that  is  independent  of  structural  deformation,  except  for  regional tilting  They are mainly of 2 types:   Primary Stratigraphic Traps    Secondary Stratigraphic Traps    2.4.1.1 PRIMARY STRATIGRAPHIC TRAPS    

They are formed by syn depositional processes by changes in contemporaneous deformation.  Theses  traps  are  generally  characterized  by  lateral  depositional  change  e.g.  depositional  pinchouts and facies change.    2.4.1.2 SECONDARY STRATIGRAPHIC TRAPS    

They are formed by post depositional pressure on the underlying strata due to deposition of  sediments.    

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 11


Figure 2: A primary stratigraphic trap   

  Figure 3: Secondary Stratigraphic trap: Trap formed by post depositional differential pressures on  the strata 

2.4.2 STRUCTURAL TRAPS   

Structural  traps  are  created  by  the  syn‐  to  post  depositional  deformation  of  strata  into  a  geometry  (a  structure)  that  permits  the  accumulation  of  hydrocarbons  in  the  subsurface.  The  Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

Page 12


resulting structures involving the reservoir, and usually the seal intervals, are dominated by either  folds, faults, piercements, or any combination. The most important types of structural traps are:   Fold Dominated    Fault Dominated   Piercement   Combination of Fault‐Fold   Subunconformity            Fold Dominated Structural traps are those in which are dominated by  folds at reservoir seal level.  

    Fault  dominated  traps  are  those  which  are  dominated  by  faults  at  reservoir  seal level 

Piercement traps are formed by introduction of salt body (or batholiths or  dykes) in the sedimentary strata resulting in formation of traps   

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 13


Combination traps  are  formed  when  both  fault  and  folding  have  important  role  in  formation  seal.  Most  successful  structural  traps  are  combination of both fold and fault 

 

        Subunconformity Traps are formed when the unconformity  surface acts as top seal of the trap  

2.5 TRAP EVALUATION   

Trap  evaluation  is  concentrated  on  placing  potential  traps  in  the  context  of  the  operating  petroleum system. Plate tectonic setting, basin type, and structural evolution (sedimentary basin  study)  is  used  to  predict  the  possible  styles  of  structural  and  stratigraphic  traps  that  should  be  expected in an area. Regional seals and their relation to potential traps are established early in the  evaluation. Timing of trap formation and its relation to the timing of generation, migration, and  accumulation  of  hydrocarbon  is  the  key  of  trap  evaluation.  Traps  that  form  after  hydrocarbon  migration has ceased are not attractive targets unless remigration out of earlier formed traps has  occurred. Trap is then mapped. Ideally, this would be the sealing surface of the trap. Identification  of the actual sealing surface requires that both seal and reservoir characterization. A common flaw  in  trap  evaluation  results  from  ignoring  the  transition  (or  waste)  zone,  if  present,  between  an  economic reservoir and its ultimate seal. Before drilling, reservoir and seal characteristics can be  predicted  by  combining  regional  and  local  paleogeographic  information,  sequence  stratigraphic  concepts, and detailed analyses of seismic fades and interval velocities. A detailed log analysis and  incorporation of pertinent drill‐stem test data is done for improved predictions. The absence of oil  or gas in a subsurface feature can be the result of failure or absence of other essential elements or  processes  of  a  petroleum  system  and  may  have  nothing  to  do  with  the  viability  of  the  trap.  Therefore,  although  we  use  the  geometric  arrangement  of  key  elements  to  define  a  trap,  trap  Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

Page 14


evaluation must  include  much  more  than  just  mapping  the  configuration  of  those  elements.  Reservoir and seal characteristics and their evaluation must be an integral part of any trap study.  Timing of trap formation is also critical. No trap should be viewed out of context but rather should  be  evaluated  in  concert  with  all  of  the  other  elements  of  a  petroleum  system.  Traps  can  be  classified  as  structural,  stratigraphic,  or  combination  traps.  In  addition,  hydrodynamic  flow  can  modify traps and perhaps lead to hydrocarbon accumulations where no conventional traps exist.   The trap classification discussed here is a useful way to consider traps during the early stages of  prospect evaluation. An understanding of end‐member trap types can help guide data acquisition  strategy  and  mapping  efforts,  but  there  is  an  almost  bewildering  array  of  documented  and  potential hydrocarbon traps, many of which may be subtle or unconventional. As more and more  of the world's hydrocarbon provinces reach mature stages of exploration, such traps may provide  some of the best opportunities for future discoveries.   

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 15


Chapter 3:  

 

GROWTH FAULTS   

3.1 INTRODUCTION   

Growth Faults are the type of faults in which there were displacements at the same time as the  sediments, on either side of the fault, were accumulating. Main distinguishing feature of a growth  fault  is  the  greater  thickness  of  horizons,  which  is  distinctly  visible,  in  the  downthrown  block  as  compared to upthrown block. Other important feature of growth fault is the formation of rollover  anticline  (not  always  seen)  on  the  hanging  wall  of  the  fault  system.  In  absence  of  a  rollover  anticline,  a  tabular  dip  section  is  seen  having  contrasting  horizon  thickness  in  upthrown  and  downthrown blocks.   They  are  important  class  of  syn  sedimentary  fault  which  have  been  widely  recognized  in  the  subsurface  studies  of  hydrocarbon‐bearing  clastic  basin  successions.  They  are  Listric  Normal  faults that affect only a discrete sedimentary interval in which they were active.   

3.2 FORMATION AND STRUCTURE   

Growth Faults are not directly related to basement tectonics rather are triggered by gravity sliding  within  the  sedimentary  pile.  Whilst  active,  faults  cause  the  thickness  of  the  successions  in  downthrown block to increase. The faults mostly dip towards basin. This is attributed to the fact  that  the  rate  of  deposition  increases  as  we  go  towards  basin.  Therefore,  the  increased  load  towards the basin side will have a tendency of going down so, more sediment is deposited there  and therefore we get thickened horizons in basinward direction.  Following factors may increase  the rate of the formation of growth faults   1. Ductility of underlying sediments  2. Overburden of new sediments 

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 16


Fig. 3.1  A Growth Fault, listric and normal in nature and having thicker horizons on the  downthrown block(right hand side) and relatively thinner horizons in the footwall wall     A  ductile  sediment  succession  flows  easily  and  thus  faulting  occurs  more  easily,  on  other  hand,  hard, consolidated sediments require much more pressure for faulting.  Figure 3.1 shows a typical growth fault. As we can see the fault is listric normal fault. Two horizons  are marked in the figure showing the increase in throw as we go deep.   The throw of growth fault increases as we go deep since the pre deposited successions undergo  faulting for a greater period of time as compared to the newly accumulated ones.    Sometimes  formation  on  an  anticline  is  observed  on  the  hanging  wall  of  the  fault  as  shown  in  figure 3.2. This roll over anticline also is caused due to gravity sliding of loose sediments in lower  parts of the fault    The  formation  of  growth  fault  leads  to  compaction  of  shale  present  in  the  footwall  due  to  the  overburden of the sediments in hanging wall side. Also, if there is salt dome intrusion below the  fault there is arching in the layers (concave downwards) due the uprising body. This arching breaks  when the salt body exceeds (or rises above) the layer       

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 17


3.3 GEOLOGICAL SETTINGS FOR GROWTH FAULTS   

Since growth faults are generally restricted to more recent sedimentary successions rather  than basement they are more common in extensional sedimentary basins, preferably  where the  sediments were loosely packed enabling there  decollment or sliding  at later stages e.g. in deltaic  environments where frequently, load of new sediments is laid over loose older sediments( Niger  Delta)   

3.4 IMPORTANCE OF GROWTH FAULTS   

Growth Faults  are  given  special  recognition  in  study  of  subsurface  exploration  of  hydrocarbons  because of unique kinds of conditions they form in trapping hydrocarbons.  The successions in hanging wall get thicker across a growth fault. Therefore, it is more likely that  we  will  get  larger  reserves  on  the  hanging  wall  rather  than  on  footwall.  This  thickening  is  important as it restricts more and more oil on one side of the fault making the extraction much  more economical. Apart from this, numerous kinds of traps are possible in growth faulted regime     

Fig 3.2 Formation of a rollover anticline in a growth fault      The  hanging  wall  of  the  growth  fault  often  forms  a  roll  over  anticline  can  efficiently  trap  the  hydrocarbons in presence of effective seal present on top. Also, the fault itself can act as a lateral  seal.  Second trap possible in growth fault is a fault block trap. Though this kind of trap might form in  any  kind  of  fault,  the  growth  fault  geometry  might  enhance  the  trap’s  capacity  by  virtue  of  its  Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

Page 18


thickness. Also,  the  fault  leak  is  significantly  hampered  due  to  thinner  successions  on  the  other  side of the fault. Thus if the hydrocarbon reserve is followed by a reservoir grade rock across the  fault the migration of oil from reserve will be reduced significantly.   

Fig 3.3 Growth faults can effectively form excellent combination traps as shown     

3.5 LIMITATIONS   

First of all a trap may or may not have hydrocarbon trapped in it. One must know thoroughly the  geological and tectonic history of the block being explored, along with the migration history and  patterns of the hydrocarbon from source to reservoir. A trap has a positive chance only if the trap  formation pre‐dates the migration. Also a trap loses the viability if it is not in the migration path of  oil.  Also  fault  plane,  due  to  sliding  of  various  kinds  of  layers,  may  or  may  not  seal  the  reserve.  This  may lead to significant loss of oil to atmosphere if the fault trace extends to the surface.    Similarly,  if  the  rollover  anticline  is  not  capped  by  an  effective  seal  the  oil  will  not  be  trapped.  Nature of the rocks also plays dominant role. The reservoir rock must be permeable enough to let  active exchange of fluids and keep the hydrocarbons absorbed for long periods of time.          Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

Page 19


CHAPTER 4: 

INTERPRETATION 4.1 INTRODUCTION    Interpretation refers to study of acquisition data and mapping of the subsurface geophysical data  by  studying  different  seismic  sections,  marking  the  faults  horizons  etc.  in  the  most  geologically  appropriate  way,  integrating  the  well  log  data  and  then  tying  the  features  to  get  a  reasonable  subsurface map.   

4.2 THE PROCESS   

4.2.1 DATA LOADING:   

First  of  all  the  seismic  lines  are  loaded  on  any  interpretation  software  (SMT,  Petrel,  OpenDtect  etc.).  Along  with  lines  well  log  data  can  also  be  included  at  this  step.  Also  a  Polygon  is  defined  which essentially marks the area in which we want to restrict our analysis   

4.2.2 FAULT PICKING:    

Faults are picked by noting the abrupt change in horizons which is more or less same throughout  the depth of the line (or atleast for a noticeable length). Though, in section fault trace may look  perturbed (may be due to multiples, noise or other technical limitations) but we must mark the  fault  trace  in  the  most  geologically  appropriate  way  (generally  it  is  preferred  to  have  smooth  fault). Faults are marked on every line available 

4.2.3 HORIZON PICKING:     To start horizon picking dip section is well suited as on a dip section faults are visible and we can  easily  take  care  of  the  throw  of  each  fault.  At  preferred  time  depth  level,  a  suitable  and  easily  recognizable  horizon  is  chosen  and  then  marked.  After  we  mark  one  horizon  on  one  section  a  point  is  obtained  on  all  the  lines  intersecting  the  marked  section.  This  helps  the  interpreter  to  Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

Page 20


avoid the  misties  that  might  occur.  Generally  2  or  more  horizons  are  marked  for  analysis  of  an  area    

4.2.4 FAULT POLYGON:   

The fault traces on seismic section appear as a point on the base map. The points corresponding  to  a  single  fault  are  enclosed  in  a  polygon.  The  thickness  of  polygon  at  a  particular  place  represents  the  throw  of  the  fault  at  that  place.  It  is  important  to  specify  type  of  fault  (whether  normal or reverse), so that it is shown correctly on the contoured ma 

4.2.5 CONTOURING:    

The Software interpolates the surface from the marked lines for a particular horizon, marked by  the interpreter, and prepares a contoured surface for the area.    

4.2.5 THICKNESS MAP:  Thickness map is prepared by subtracting higher horizon contour map from lower horizon contour  map. It essentially reflects the thickness of the strata between the selected two layers, throughout  the area.   

4.3 INTERPRETATION OF GROWTH FAULTS  Distinguishing  features  of  a  growth  fault  include  varying  thickness  of  horizon  across  a  fault,  roll  over  anticline  etc.  They  are  listric  normal  fault  and  dip  towards  the  basin  though  we  often  see  opposite dipping antithetic faults which are consequence of growth faulting itself. While marking  growth faults it must be kept in mind that the fault must dip in basin ward direction. Also, throw  increases  as  we  do  deep  inside  the  section.  Also  commonly  observed  feature  in  growth  fault  is  rotation of the hanging wall if there is some kind of geological barrier e.g. a ridge etc.   

4.4 GEOMETRY OF GROWTH FAULTS   The dip of growth fault decreases with depth, therefore fault surface map of a growth fault must  show  denser  contours  as  we  go  in  the  direction  opposite  to  the  dip  of  the  fault.  Amount  of  thickening in the horizon is a matter of the rate of sedimentation of the succession at the time of  faulting, but a continuous increase in throw must be seen in growth faulting.    

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 21


CASE STUDY ON GROWTH FAULTS 

 Mumbai Offshore  Niger Delta

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 22


Chapter 5: 

MUMBAI OFFSHORE    

5.1 INTRODUCTION   

Mumbai offshore is located on the western continental shelf of India between Saurashtra basin in  NNW  and  Kerela  Konkan  in  the  south. The  basin  has  been  proven  for  commercial  production  of  petroleum and hence falls under category I. It is approx. 116000 Km2 in area from coast to 200m  isobath. The age of the basin ranges from late Cretaceous to Holocene with thick sedimentary fill  ranging from 1100‐5000 meters though possibility of occurrence of Mesozoic synrift sequences in  the  deep‐water  basin  have  been  indicated  by  the  recently  acquired  seismic  data. The  first  oil  discovery  in  this  basin  was  made  in  the  Miocene  limestone  reservoir  of  Mumbai  High  field  in  February 1974. Subsequent intensification in exploration and development activities in this basin  have  resulted  in  several  significant  discoveries  including  oil  and  gas  fields  like  Heera,Panna,  Bassein, Neelam,Mukta, Ratna,Soth tapti, Mid Tapti etc.    

5.2 TECTONIC SETUP   

Mumbai offshore  is  a  pericratonic  rift  basin  situated  on  western  continental  margin  of  India.  Towards  NNE  it  continues  into  the  onland  Cambay  basin.  It  is  bounded  in  the  northwest  by  Saurashtra  peninsula,  north  by  Diu  Arch.  Its  southern  limit  is  marked  by  east  west  trending  Vengurla  Arch,  located  at  south  of  Ratnagiri,  and  to  the  easten  boundary  is  marked  by  Indian  craton. The Mumbai Offshore Basin is divided into 5 different tectonic zones (Figure 2)      

Surat Depression (Tapti‐Daman Block) in the north  Panna‐Bassein‐Heera Block in the east central part  Ratnagiri in the southern part  Mumbai High‐/Platform‐Deep Continental Shelf (DCS) in the mid‐western side   Shelf Margin adjoing DCS and the Ratnagiri    

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 23


Figure 2: Different tectonic zones in Mumbai Offshore  

5.3 STRATIGRAPHY    

Within the  Bombay  geologic  province,  the  stratigraphic  record  is  incomplete.  In  the  subsurface,  Mesozoic  rocks  are  known  from  drilling  only  in  the  Kutch  area.  In  the  Depressions  (Panna  Formation) were filled with trap wash overlain by carbonates, shales, and interbedded siltstones  from fluvial to transitional environments. In the Kutch area, marine sedimentation occurred only  in the western part until the end of the Paleogene. Lower to middle Eocene rocks are absent from  most of the offshore area, and an erosional unconformity that extends over most of the offshore  area  truncates  the  Panna  Formation.  Eocene  marine  carbonates  and  shales  of  the  Belapur,  Bassien, and Dui Formations extend over much of the present‐day offshore and Eocene‐Oligocene  sandstones,  siltstones  and  shales  reflect  shallow  marine  to  alluvial  environments  in  the  south  Cambay Graben. Middle to late Eocene time in the shelf margin or outer shelf, Bombay High, and  Panna‐Bassein areas is represented by shallow‐marine shales and shelf carbonates of the Belapur  and  Bassein  Formations.  Shoreward,  and  to  the  northeast,  shallow‐  marine  to  lagoonal  Dui  Formation  shales  dominate.  Still  farther  to  the  north,  in  the  south  Cambay  Graben,  deltaic  and  alluvial  sediments  of  the  Ankleswar  Formation  dominate  late  Eocene‐Oligocene  environments.  Today,  the  shelf  area  continues  to  receive  terrestrial  sediments,  and  the  Cambay  and  Narmada  Deltas  continue  to  expand.  The  Stratigraphic  chart  of  different  zones  of  Mumbai  offshore  are  shown in Figure 3  Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

Page 24


Figure 3: Stratigraphy of Mumbai offshore area        Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

Page 25


5.4 PETROLEUM SYSTEM   

5.4.1 SOURCE   

The main  source  in  the  Mumbai  offshore  region  is  the  thick  Panna  shale  facies  deposits  and  Belapur Shale facies deposited between Paleocene and Lower to Mid Eocene     

5.4.2 RESERVOIR   

Mumbai Offshore has both carbonate and clastic reservoir facies everywhere between Paleocene  and middle Miocene. Reservoir grade rocks are frequently found interlayered between shales in  lower Miocene and Mid Miocene level. Main reservoir successions include Mukta, Ratnagii etc.    Reservoir  Age 

Lithology/Location

Middle Miocene 

Carbonate sections  (Ratnagiri  &  The uppermost part has been found to be  Bandra formations)  hydrocarbon  bearing  at  a  few  places  A  sheet  like  sand  deposited  over  Mumbai  High  is  also  proved  to  be  gas  bearing  in  commercial quantity in Mumbai High 

Lower Miocene 

Represented by  a  thick  pile  of  Deposited under cyclic sedimentation with  carbonates  hosting  huge  each  cycle  represented  by  lagoonal,  algal  quantity of oil and gas  mound,  foraminiferal  mound  and  coastal  marsh  facies  The  porosity  is  mainly  intergranular,  intragranular,  moldic,  vuggy  and  micro‐ fissures  and  the  solution  cavities  interconnected  by  micro‐fissures  provided  excellent permeability. 

Oligo– Early  Sands ( Panvel formation ) Miocene 

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Comments

Deposited under  conditions    

prograding

delta

Page 26


Proved to be excellent reservoirs  Eocene  and  E.Oligocene  clastics  (Mahuva  Early  Formation)   Oligocene  Deposition  of  thicker  carbonate  facies  over  the  horst  blocks  (Bassein,  Mukta  &  Heera  formations). 

Paleocene

Proven hydrocarbon  bearing  reservoirs  in  Tapti  area.  Gradual  increase  of  sea  level,  shielding  from  the  clastic  onslaught  from  the  northern  part  of  the  basin.  The  intervening  regressive  phases  have  aided in developing good porosity in these  rocks  making  them  excellent  reservoir  levels in the basin. 

Coarser clastic  facies  developed  The clastics of Panna formation are proved  within  the  upper  marine  shale  to be excellent reservoirs.  (Panna Formation) 

 

5.4.3 CAP ROCKS    

Main successions acting as cap are also shales deposited later in Pleistocene, also named Chinchini  Shales. It is a thick shale succession that sits over other clastic and carbonate layers.  

5.4.4 ENTRAPMENT   

Mumbai Offshore  has  various  tectonic  settings  that  show  a  range  of  traps  for  example  in  Structural traps like tilted fault block type, fault closures. Fold dominated traps include anticlines  and also roll over anticlines formed due to growth faulting. A large number of growth faults also  have  enhanced  the  probability  of  striking  economic  prospects,  especially  in  the  basinward  direction  of  the  zone.  This  study  deals  with  the  growth  fault  regime  located  within  the  shelf  margin tectonic block of Mumbai Offshore basin     

5.5 DATA INTERPRETATION   

Interpretation of  the  study  area  located  within  the  Shelf‐Margin  tectonic  block  of  Mumbai  offshore was done on SMT KINGDOM on Mid Miocene and Lower Miocene level. The seismic time  section of 21 lines was used to interpret these levels and prepare time structure maps and a mid‐ Miocene isochronopach.  Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

Page 27


5.5.1 SEISMIC DATA INTERPRETATION     

Figure 4: Base map showing the study area        

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 28


5.5.2 INTERPRETED HORIZONS AND FAULTS  

Figure 5: Seismic section of line as marked in the figure 

Figure 6: Seismic section of line as marked in the figure  Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

Page 29


Figure 7: Seismic section of line as marked in the figure   

Figure 8: Seismic section of line as marked in the figure      Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

Page 30


Numerous listric normal faults are seen on the section. This is because large sediment deposition  in  the  basin  has  led  to  formation  of  growth  faults.  Especially  to  be  noted  is  the  central  main  growth fault marked in red in the above sections. A roll over anticline is seen on the east of this  fault which has been faulted by antithetic faults (Figure 8). The Green horizon represents Middle  Miocene level and the yellow horizon denotes Lower Miocene level.    

5.5.3 TIME STRUCTURE MAPS      

  Figure 9:  Mid Miocene two way time structure map       

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 31


Figure 10:  Lower Miocene two way time structure map    The  faults  trend  NNW‐SSE  on  the  map.  A  persistent  rise  is  observed  in  the  western  part  of  the  study  area.  This  is  because  of  Laxmi‐Laccadive  Ridge  which  is  present  along  the  shelf  margin  in  Mumbai offshore. Due to this ridge the horizons have been raised on the western part of study  area. Eastern half of the area has homoclinal slope. Main basinal slope is towards west because of  the presence of growth fault pockets. Sediment depocenters are observed in the eastern half of  tha study area.   

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 32


5.5.4 ISOCHRONOPACH MAP 

Figure 11:  Isochronopach of Mid Miocene succession      The thickness is reduced sharply from center to west. As shown in (Fig 5‐8) the Middle Miocene  level doesn’t vary much whereas there is a sudden rise in Lower Miocene Level after main fault  (Marked in Red in respective figures).       

5.6 PROSPECT ANALYSIS    

Interpretation of the area shows that there is rollover anticline on the hanging wall of the main  fault forming an excellent trap (Figure 12).  The  anticline  marked  in  figure  12  corresponds  to  ‘1’  in  figure  13.  Along  with  this,  similar  but  smaller anticlines are also seen in the area e.g. those marked in figure 13.  The prospect ‘3’ lies on  the same fault as ‘1’. ‘2’ is another anticline, but the main problem with this region is that it lies on  Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

Page 33


footwall of  the fault in  further east decreasing the thickness considerably which might not yield  economic quantities of oil. 

Figure 12: Prospect analysis of the area (line view)       

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 34


Figure 13: Prospect analysis of the study area (Plan view‐ Mid Miocene TWT map)     

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 35


CHAPTER 6  

NIGER DELTA        

6.1 INTRODUCTION   

Figure 1: The changing coastline of the Niger delta (35 Ma History)    The Niger Delta is situated in the Gulf of Guinea (fig. 2) and extends throughout the Niger Delta  Province.  The  coastal  sedimentary  basin  of  Nigeria  has  been  the  scene  of  three  depositional  cycles.   The first began with a marine incursion in the  middle Cretaceous and was terminated by a mild  folding phase in Santonian time. The second included the growth of a proto‐Niger delta during the  late  Cretaceous  and  ended  in  a  major  Paleocene  marine  transgression.  The  third  cycle,  from  Eocene  to  Recent,  marked  the  continuous  growth  of  the  main  Niger  delta.  A  new  threefold  lithostratigraphic  subdivision  is  introduced  for  the  Niger  delta  subsurface,  comprising  an  upper  sandy Benin formation, an intervening unit of alternating sandstone and shale named the Agbada  Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

Page 36


formation, and  a  lower  shaly  Akata  formation.  These  three  units  extend  across  the  whole  delta  and each ranges in age from early Tertiary to Recent. From the Eocene to the present, the delta  has shifted southwestward, forming deposition belts that represent the most active portion of the  delta at each stage of its development). These depositional belts form a regressive delta an area of  some 300,000 km2, a sediment volume of 500,000 km3, and a sediment thickness of over 10 km in  the  basin  deposition  center.  The  Niger  Delta  Province  contains  only  one  identified  petroleum  system, the Tertiary Niger Delta (Akata –Agbada) Petroleum System.     

Figure 2: Index map of Nigeria and Cameroon   

6.2 GEOLOGY      The onshore portion of the Niger Delta Province is lined by the geology of southern Nigeria and  southwestern  Cameroon  (fig.  1).  The  northern  boundary  is  the  Benin  flank‐‐an  east‐northeast  trending  hinge  line  south  of  the  West  Africa  basement  massif.  The  northeastern  boundary  is  defined  by  outcrops  of  the  Cretaceous  on  the  Abakaliki  High  and  further  east‐south‐east  by  the  Calabar  flank‐‐a  hinge  line  bordering  the  adjacent  Precambrian.  The  offshore  boundary  of  the  province  is  defined  by  the  Cameroon  volcanic  line  to  the  east,  the  eastern  boundary  of  the  Dahomey basin (the eastern‐most West African transform‐fault passive margin) to the west, and  the  two  kilometer  sediment  thickness  contour  or  the  4000‐meter  bathymetric  contour  in  areas  where  sediment  thickness  is  greater  than  two  kilometers  to  the  south  and  southwest.  The  province covers 300,000 km2 and includes the geologic extent of the Tertiary Niger Delta (Akata‐ Agbada) Petroleum System.   Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

Page 37


6.2.1 TECTONICS     The tectonic framework of the continental margin along the Niger coast is controlled by  Cretaceous fracture zones expressed as trenches and ridges in the deep Atlantic.  

Figure 2: Seismic section from the Niger Delta continental slope/rise showing the results of internal  gravity tectonics on sediments at the distal portion of the depobelt.    The  ridges  in  the  fracture  zone  divide  the  margin  into  different  basins  and,  in  Nigeria,  form  the  boundary  faults  of  the  Cretaceous  Benue‐Abakaliki  trough,  which  cuts  far  into  the  West  African  shield. The trough represents a failed arm of a rift triple junction associated with the opening of  the South Atlantic. In this region, rifting started in the Late Jurassic and persisted into the Middle  Cretaceous. In the region of the Niger Delta, rifting diminished altogether in the Late Cretaceous.  After rifting ceased, gravity tectonics became the primary deformational process.   Shale  mobility  induced  internal  deformation  and  occurred  in  response  to  two  processes.  First, shale diapirs formed from loading of poorly compacted, over‐pressured, prodelta and delta‐ slope  clays  (Akata  Fm.)  by  the  higher  density  delta‐front  sands  (Agbada  Fm.).  Second,  slope  instability  occurred  due  to  a  lack  of  lateral,  basinward,  and  support  for  the  under‐compacted  delta‐slope clays (Akata Fm.) (Fig. 2). Shale mobility induced internal deformation and occurred in  response  to  two  processes.  First,  shale  diapirs  formed  from  loading  of  poorly  compacted,  over‐ pressured,  prodelta  and  delta‐slope  clays  by  the  higher  density  delta‐front  sands  (Agbada  Fm.).  Second, slope instability occurred due to a lack of lateral, basinward, and support for the under‐ Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

Page 38


compacted delta‐slope  clays  (Akata  Fm.)  (Fig.  2).  For  any  given  depobelt,  gravity  tectonics  were  completed  before  deposition  of  the  Benin  Formation  and  are  expressed  in  complex  structures,  including  shale  diapirs,  roll‐over  anticlines,  collapsed  growth  fault  crests,  back‐to‐back  features,  and  steeply  dipping,  closely  spaced  flank  faults.  These  faults  mostly  offset  different  parts  of  the  Agbada Formation and flatten into detachment planes near the top of the Akata Formation.    

6.2.2 STRATIGRAPHY     The  Cretaceous  section  has  not  been  explored  beneath  Niger  Delta  Basin,  the  youngest  and  southernmost sub‐basin in the Benue‐Abakaliki trough.  Lithology of Cretaceous rocks deposited in  the Niger Delta basin can only be extrapolated from the exposed Cretaceous section in the next  basin  to  the  northeast‐‐the  Anambra  basin.  From  the  Campanian  through  the  Paleocene,  the  shoreline was concave into the Anambra basin 

Figure 3: Stratigraphic section of Anammbra basin   resulting in convergent longshore drift cells that produced tide‐dominated deltaic sedimentation  during  transgressions  and  river‐dominated  sedimentation  during  regressions.  Shallow  marine  clastics were deposited farther offshore and, in the Anambra basin, are represented by the Albian‐ Cenomanian  Asu  River  shale,  Cenomanian‐Santonian  Eze‐Uku  and  Awgu  shales,  and  Campanian/Maastrichtian  Nkporo  shale,  among  others  (figs.  3  and  6)  .  The  distribution  of  Late  Cretaceous  shale  beneath  the  Niger  Delta  is  unknown  in  the  Paleocene,  a  major  transgression  (referred  to  as  the  Sokoto  transgression  by  Reijers  and  others,  1997)  began  with  the  Imo  shale  Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

Page 39


being deposited  in  the  Anambra  Basin  to  the  northeast  and  the  Akata  shale  in  the  Niger  Delta  Basin  area  to  the  southwest  (fig.  5).  In  the  Eocene,  the  coastline  shape  became  convexly  curvilinear,  the  longshore  drift  cells  switched  to  divergent,  and  sedimentation  changed  to  being  wave‐dominated (Reijers and others, 1997). At this time, deposition of paralic sediments began in  the  Niger  Delta  Basin  proper  and,  as  the  sediments  prograded  south,  the  coastline  became  progressively  more  convex  seaward.  Today,  delta  sedimentation  is  still  wave‐dominated  and  longshore drift cells divergent   Tertiary  section  of  the  Niger  Delta  is  divided  into  three  formations,  representing  prograding  depositional  facies  that  are  distinguished  mostly  on  the  basis  of  sand‐shale  ratios.  The  Akata  Formation at the base of the delta is of marine origin and is composed of thick shale sequences  (potential source rock), turbidite sand (potential reservoirs in deep water), and minor amounts of  clay and silt (figs. 3, 4, 5 and 6). The Akata Formation formed during lowstands when terrestrial  organic  matter  and  clays  were  transported  to  deep  water  areas  in  low  energy  conditions  and  oxygen  deficiency.  The  formation  underlies  the  entire  delta,  and  is  typically  over  pressured.  Turbidity  currents  likely  deposited  deep  sea  fan  sands  within  the  upper  Akata  Formation  during  development  of  the  delta.  Deposition  of  the  overlying  Agbada  Formation,  the  major  petroleum‐ bearing unit, began in the Eocene and continues into the Recent (figs. 3, 4 and 5). The formation  consists of paralic siliciclastics over 3700 meters thick and represents the actual deltaic portion of  the  sequence.  The  clastics  accumulated  in  delta‐front,  delta‐topset,  and  fluvio‐deltaic  environments. In the lower Agbada Formation, shale and sandstone beds were deposited in equal  proportions,  however,  the  upper  portion  is  mostly  sand  with  only  minor  shale  interbeds.  The  Agbada  Formation  is  overlain  by  the  third  formation,  the  Benin  Formation,  a  continental  latest  Eocene  to  Recent  deposit  of  alluvial  and  upper  coastal  plain  sands  that  are  up  to  2000  m  thick  (Avbovbo, 1978).      

Figure 4: AA’ Section (refer Figure 1)      Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

Page 40


Figure 5: BB’ Section (Refer Figure 1)                   

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 41


Figure 6: Stratigraphic column showing the 3 formations of Niger delta   

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 42


6.3 PETROLEUM SYSTEM   

6.3.1 LOCATION   

Hydrocarbons are present throughout the Agbada Formation of the Niger Delta (Figure 1). Though,  oil rich trends have been found having the lowest gas to oil ratio as shown in Fig. 7   

Figure 7: The oil rich trend line in the Niger delta province  As shown above, the oil rich trend runs close to the shore and roughly corresponds to transition  between continental and oceanic crust, and within the axis of maximum thickness.  Source Rocks  Marine  Akata  shales  and  interbedded  shales  cretaceous  shale  of  Agbada  along  with  Cretaceous  shales  have  been  identified.  Also  Agbada  Formation  has  intervals  that  contain  organic  carbon  contains  in  sufficiently  high  quantities  but  the  thickness  of  those  layers  is  not  thick  enough  to  produce a world class oil province. Also they are immature in various parts of the deltas. The thick  Akata shales, below Agbada, are however are of large volume and produce oil in large quantities.          Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

Page 43


6.3.2 RESERVOIR    

The main reservoirs are sandstone and unconsolidated sands in Agbada formation. The reservoirs  are often stacked and are show a large variation in thickness ranging from 15 mts to 10% having  thickness of 45 mts.       

6.3.3 ENTRAPMENT   

Figure 8: Various traps found in the Niger delta province  The  traps  in  the  Niger  delta  region  are  mostly  structural  mostly  involving  syn  sedimentary  deformations,  mostly  growth  faults  and  rollover  structures.  The  shales,  acting  as  a  seal  trap  typically  either  form  clay  smears  along  the  faults  or  provide  interbedded  sealing  units  against  which reservoir sands are juxtaposed due to faulting or set a vertical seal and act like lateral seals  to  prevent  horizontal  migration  of  oil.  On  the  flanks  of  delta  (offshore)  the  clay  filled  canyons  provide top seal and form excellent traps.    Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

Page 44


6.3.4 CAP ROCK  The  primary  seal  rock  in  Niger  delta  is  the  interbedded  shale  within  the  Agbada  formation.  As  discussed  earlier  the  shale  provides  three  types  of  seals—clay  smears  along  faults,  interbedded  sealing units against which reservoir sands are juxtaposed due to faulting, and vertical seals   

6.4 CONCLUSION    It’s clear from above discussion that the main traps in the Niger Delta province are based on syn  sedimentary structures. The abundance of such traps is increased mainly due to the uncompacted  layers of sand stones being overpressured by the heavy sediment loads of the delta. This has result  in gravity sliding and fracturing of subsurface on a large scale. Thickness of reservoir is selectively  increased at places by growth faults making exploration and extraction very profitable.   

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 45


CONCLUSION From the study done till now following important points have been concluded:     Oil  occurrence  in  the  trap  depends  on  the  time  of  formation  of  trap  and  the  time  of  migration. The Trap should have formed before migration otherwise the oil will escape.   If  the  underlying  sediments  are  not  compact  enough  their  ductility  increases  and  hence  their tendency of undergoing gravity sliding eventually leading to growth faulting (As seen  in the case of Niger Delta)   Interpretation shows that, in the studied area of Shelf Margin of Mumbai Offshore, there is  a  possibility  of  good  quantities  of  hydrocarbons  due  to  existing  rollover  structures  and  highly faulted strata.   

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 46


Works Cited    Shelton,  J.W.,  July  1984,  Listric  Normal  Faults:  An  Illustrated  Summary,  AAPG  Bulletin,  v.68,  p.801‐15, 32  Brown,L. Frank Jr,Loucks, Robert G., Trevino, Ramon H.,Hammes, Ursula, 2004, Understanding  Growth  faulted,intraslope  subbasins  by  applying  sequence  stratigraphic  principles:  Examples  from the south Texas Oligocene formation, AAPG Bulletin, v. 88, no. 11 ,pp. 1501 –1522  Brown,L. Frank Jr,Loucks, Robert G., Trevino, Ramon H.,Hammes, Ursula, 2004, Understanding  growth‐faulted,  intraslope  subbasins  by  applying  sequence‐stratigraphic  principles:  Examples  from the south Texas Oligocene Frio Formation: Reply, AAPG Bulletin, v. 90, no. 5 (May 2006),  pp. 799–805  Cazes,  c.A.,  December  2004,  Overlap  zones,  growth  faults,  and  sedimentation:  using  high  Resolution gravity data, Livingston Parish, LA, Phd. Theisis, Louisiana State University  Wandrey,  C.J  ,  May  2004,  Bombay  Geologic  Province  Eocene  to  Miocene  Composite  Total  Petroleum System, India, Petroleum Systems and Related Geologic Studies in Region 8, South  Asia, U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 2208‐F, v.1  Jackson, M.P.A,  Vendeville, B.C., July 1991, The rise of diapirs during thin‐skinned extension,  Catuneau, Octavian, 2005, Principles of Sequence and Stratigraphy  Tearpock, D.J., BischkeR.E., 1991, Applied Subsurface Geological Mapping    www.wikipedia.com  www.britannica.com  www.banglapedia.com  www. sciencedirect.com  www.dghindia.org   

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime

Page 47

Hydrocarbon Habitat in Growth Fault Regime  

The following text is focused on the role of growth faults in trapping hydrocarbons. Various kinds of traps involving growth faults have be...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you