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architecture and design portfolio


The Portfolio

the architectural and design work of

Vadim N. Fedorishin 716-512-5694 vadimfed@buffalo.edu

the work was developed for

University at Buffalo Undergraduate School of Architecture Sky Construction GC LLC KJB Architect

1


table of contents

THE BODY AND THE EARTH

3-10

THE LIVING WALL

11-18

THE PAST AND THE PRESENT

19-26

VERTICALITY THROUGH HORIZONTALITY

27-34

AEGIS SUPERVISION FACILITY

35-42

WORK AND THE CITY

43-50

LOCAVORE: GROW. COOK. EAT. LIVE.

51-60

CONSTRUCTION DRAWING

61-62

SKY CONSTRUCTION

63-66

KJB ARCHITECT

67-68

DESIGN-BUILD

69-70

2


THE BODY AND THE EARTH


this project calls for a final resting place for three bodies to be located on the site. this site would then act as a public memorial ground, where visitors are encouraged to interact with the space.


The Body an the Earth

The project began with an analysis of the human body and how it can be geometrically constructed by developing a set of steps that would recreate a part of the body. A surveying tool was then developed that would be able to be used at the site and the measurements recorded by the tool would then be used throughout the project. The measurements obtained from the site visit were then analyzed and graphed to form the piece of land that is to manipulated to create the spaces needed.

5


preparing the site

6


The Body and the Earth

As an initial design move, the earth was manipulated by carving out a space using the surveying tool’s rotate, step and repeat method of surveying. The final design utilized another approach to cutting and displacing the land. Three sections of the site were cut into and flipped. Each moment within the space created was analyzed by creating a sectional model that pin-pointed every change within the project.

7


manipulating the earth

8


The Body and the Earth

The varying slopes of the surface of the ground act as openings into the underground space. These slopes create different experiences within the space. The space below the surface acts as a very enclosed, constricted and claustrophobic setting with different lighting and spacial characteristics. The surface, on the other hand, provides an open, uncluttered and free space. The purpose of the project was to provide for a variety of experiences with a single move made to the earth.

9


experiencing the space

10


THE LIVING WALL


This project was a combination of group projects sited together to create a temporary living space. Each team worked together to produce a design and a full scale construction of the project.


The Living Wall

The project started as a cube that had to be cut and manipulated with a simple action. The project should be able to be returned back into a cube. This module was called the ARK due to the various arcs making up the cut and their visibility in the conal nature of the final design. The Living Wall was sited in Griffis Sculpture Park and was there for two years before it was taken down. It was often times used as a playground by children and a resting place for adults.

13


massing and siting

14


The Living Wall

1. Axonometric of Structural Framing

The living wall was to be built entirely at the studio and then be made ready for transportation and final assembly on site. The ARK was broken up into three major modules; the left side, the right side, and the top. These were built separately and then bolted together. Each of the projects making up the living wall had to be able to comfortably fit a group of six people in a laying position.

15


The Ark

PROJECT:

ARC 102: Architectural Design Studio 2. State University of NY at Buffalo: Department of Architecture: Spring 2011. Instructors: Shadi Nazarian, Christopher Romano, Nicholas Brucia, Matthew Hume

Daniel Boyle, Vadim Fedorishin, David Heaton, Hanna Ihrke, Andrew Kim, Amanda Mumford

Patrick Connolly

structure and assembly

STRUCTURAL AXSONOMETRIC TITLE:

SCALE: 3/4”=1’-0” DRAWN BY: Daniel Boyle DATE: March 5, 2011

REVISION: 5 DATE: April 27, 2011

DWG.NO.

012

16


Christ zarian, adi Na Sh ctors:

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Stat

olly onn ick C Patr

ersity e Univ

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Heaton, n, David ford dorishi dim Fe , Amanda Mum Va e, yl m Bo Daniel rke, Andrew Ki Ih Hanna

ent of partm lo: De at Buffa

Ar

ring ure: Sp chitect

Instru 2011.

PROJE

CT:

The Living Wall

TITLE:

DED EXPLO OR B NEIGH TRIC OME N O X A ALE: 1/2”:1’

Kim SC Andrew N BY: DRAW 1, 2011 :March DATE ON: 1 11 REVISI 26, 20 :April DATE

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The projects were designed to be long-lasting. Sloped roofs, floors, and sleeping areas were a necessity for proper drainage. The project was structured using standard lumber sizes; 2x3, 2x4, 2x12 and clad using 1/2” plywood that was coated with polyurethane. The material usage was planned and executed very carefully in order to prevent any waste or left-over material.

17


cladding and weather-proofing

18


THE PAST AND THE PRESENT


This project started by analyzing a precedent house. A certain concept of the house was further developed and then manipulated in order to create a new architecture from the existing idealogies.


The Past and the Present

The project started with an analysis of a residence, the Schroder House by Gerrit Rietveld. Its design was heavily influenced by De Stijl. The corner became the focal point for the project. The Schroder House contained unique corner conditions; corners that moved past one another, crisscrossed, and disappeared. Many of these corners were located within the house, analyzed and used further in the project.

21


corner studies

original corner

rotation of the corner

dissolution of the corner

new corner

22


The Past and the Present

The rotated planes allow for segmentation. Some segments ay be left open and others closed off.

The dissolution of the corner can provide opportunities to expand a space.

The planes can be used as partitions or for structural reasons.

A corner condition on the exterior begins to alter the interior.

The original corner becomes completely dissolved; the corner may act as a threshold between two spaces.

The corners found within the Schroder House were used to create a new space. By rotating the planes that make up the corner around its axis, a new space is created. This new space is essentially, the anti-corner. The rotation about that corner causes the corner to completely disappear. The space that the plane has taken up in the rotation, becomes a new volume of space added to the original house.

23

The dissolution of the corner allows for the creation of an open space between th


creating the anti-corner

he interior and exterior.

24


The Past and the Present section A

section B

section C

N

section D

plan A

plan C

plan B

plan D

The newly created volumes of various sizes and locations serve as a new program or an extension of the existing program of the house. upper living area

Some of the volumes are broken up by the planes during the rotation process to create openings, solids and voids, and partitions.

bathroom

bathroom

bedroom

living room

The primary colors used in De Stijl are applied to the new design to distinguish between programs and manipulated corners.

entry

bedroom

reading room kitchen elevator

dining closed balcony

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bedroom

open balcony


the new space

plan A

plan B

plan C plan D

section A

section B

section C

section D

26


VERTICALITY THROUGH HORIZONTALITY


This project started by creating a bundle of assorted objects. The purpose was to reassess these objects spatially and develop a welcome center and theatre for the Fort Niagara site.


Verticality Through Horizontality

To start, an assortment of objects were collected and taped together into a bundle. The bundle was then cut in half in order to reveal its section. Several studies were made using the bundle. Its properties were explored through solid, linear, and planar modeling. Both, hand and digital renderings were made using the section of the bundle to further study the spatial qualities that these objects have.

29


the bundle

30


Verticality Through Horizontality

The bundle contained objects that were supporting and objects that were supported. The object loads, along with gravity, force the spaces to become more and more dense towards the bottom. Thickness and density used together show the increasing weight moving towards the bottom. The chosen site for the project was Fort Niagara. The project was sited outside of the fort wall as to not disturb the historic significance of the site and so the fort acts as a background for theatrical performances.

31


the site

32


Verticality Through Horizontality

The center of the theater passes over a valley of one of the man-made land fortification zones. The entrances are on either side of this valley. The welcome center itself is used seasonally, during the warmer months of the year. The crisscross stacking creates openings to the exterior. The building is as much solid as it is void. A standard unit of wood is used to build up spaces. The units are stacked one on top of the other in order to give an increasing thickness to the spacing from bottom to top.

33


the welcome center

34


AEGIS SUPERVISION FACILITY


This project focused on the design of a minimum to maximum security correctional facility that would house 100 inmates. The design includes an aspect of a public interface with the inmates.


Aegis Supervision Facility

The project began by studying conditions at the Auburn Correctional facility. Studies of human and camera vision were also conductd. Most prisoner crimes and fatalities happened in blind spots to guards and security cameras. The Aegis Facilities would be designed to eliminate as much blindspots as possible. The studies conducted on the Auburn Prison and blindspots would then be applied to a residential neighborhood in Lovejoy, Buffalo.

37


blind spots

38


Aegis Supervision Facility

FOOD

Dining Room Kitchen Food Storage Staff Break Room

HOUSING

Inmate Cells

MEDICAL

Examination Rooms Clinic Dentist Pharmacy X-ray Lab

INMATE USE

Sales Area Storage Laundry Room Linens and Clothing Storage Mailroom Barber

ADMINISTRATION

The Aegis Supervision Facility is a medium security prison which attempts to provide as many amenities as possible that the inmates would be missing from the outside world.

Staff Offices

EDUCATION Classrooms Library

The public interaction happens within the learning facilities of the prison. The inmates have a chance to learn from and interact with visitors in the recreational, classroom, and workshop spaces.

PARKING

The workshops teach inmates different skills by calling on local proffesionals from the automotive, textile, wood and metal working fields to come in and teach these skills to inmates for possible careers upon release.

Staff Parking Visitor Parking

WORK

Workshops Delivery Area Mechanical Room Warehouse

LEISURE

Indoor Rec Area Outdoor Rec Area Gym/ Fitness Area

39


program analysis

40


Aegis Supervision Facility

The program was broken into four separate buildings; inmate use, workshop and classroom, medical, and recreational buildings. Three guard towers were placed in each corner on the site. The buildings were manipulated so that there would be no blind spots from these towers. The most secure program, the workshop, was placed in an area that can be seen by all towers. The building section shows a jog at the lower end of the building. This is for cameras to be placed without having any blindspots.

41


the facilities

key points of view from the guard towers

primary area to secure

blind spot

secondary area to secure

unclear vision

tertiary area to secure

clear vision

fenced area

truck unloading zone

guard

prisoner circulation

visitor circulation

administrator/ staff circulation

emergency exit routes

guard circulation parking/ roadway

spaces manipulated to fit the guard tower views

view from guard tower view from passerby

42


WORK AND THE CITY


This project is an office building for an architectural firm located in downtown Buffalo. A public program was included to draw visitors to the building and raise awareness for the architectural work.


Work and the City

Carmina Wood Morris PC Architecture and Engineering

Main (ST)UDIOS

City Lights Studio Photography

Stievater Associates

C&S Companies

Western New York Book Arts Center Downtown Photo and Studio

The site is surrounded by an design community, a gem that remains hidden within the city. This project will attempt to bring light to the surrounding design community.

mechanical room

The firm contains engineering and consultant workspaces on the 2nd floor, an architects’ workspaces on the 3rd, and the mechanical room on the 4th.

outdoor break/ work area

4th Floor Plan

outdoor break/ work area private office

outdoor break/ work area private office

private office

private office

model building shop

The office spaces include indoor and outdoor conference spaces and presentation areas.

women’s w.c.

men’s w.c. conference room

conference room

architect’s workspaces

architect’s workspaces

3rd Floor Plan

library

support staff workspaces

support staff workspaces

library

model display

2nd Floor Plan

45

conference room

women’s w.c.

men’s w.c.

conference room

model display


the office

Main

cafe/ break seating

cafe/ break seating

reception

cafe

outdoor eating/ break area

men’s w.c.

women’s w.c.

large model display

gallery

gallery

metro bus stop

46

dumpster area

architecture bookshop

architecture bookshop

outdoor presentation area

East Mohawk

Washington


Work and the City

The front of the building contains an outdoor gallery area that is open for work publicized by the firm located in the building and surrounding design businesses, which can be enclosed by insultarp for year-round use. The back of the building contains a coffee shop and an architectural bookstore, the latter being a service that is lacking within the city. The workspaces are placed at the perimeter of the building in order to make use of the daylight entering the space.

47


public and work spaces

48


Work and the City

The building is constructed with a column and beam system, a concrete core, and a structural brick wall at the back of the building. The services are run directly from the mechanical room to the workshop and down behind the egress stairs to be distributed into the office spaces. The facade is clad completely in glass with a horizontal louver system implemented to stop direct sunlight, but to maximize the amount of daylight penetrating the space.

49


building systems

50


LOCAVORE: GROW. COOK. EAT. LIVE.


This project is a housing complex with 18 units. A program is also to be introduced that would serve not only those living on-site, but also the public. The units must relate to the public program.


Locavore: GROW. COOK. EAT. LIVE.

Family Dining

Terrace Garden

Prolong Growing Season

Roof Garden

Prominent Kitchen

Culinary School

Cooking/Recreation Fireplace

Gourmet Grocery Store

Residential Car-Share System

Public Bike-Share System

Restaurant

Locavore attempts to bring the culinary aspect to a higher level. It provides the residential units and public area with a garden space so that the food can be grown and consumed locally with this urban setting. It provides kitchens, various dining arrangements, and a grocery store for its residents and the public. Locavore utilizes a bicycle and car share program in order to minimize the amount of space and resources needed for parking and travel.

53

Cafe


concept and iterations

54


Locavore: GROW. COOK. EAT. LIVE.

The ground floor contains the grocery store, kitchen, and dining areas. Visitors receive instructions from their chef and gather the needed ingredients from the roof garden and grocery store. They cook their own meals and can enjoy the meal in an adjacent courtyard, fireplace seating, or a more intimate setting. The restaurant is used to raise awareness of the possibility of urban gardening and also teaches visitors skills that can be applied at their own homes.

55


the restaurant

56


Locavore: GROW. COOK. EAT. LIVE

The entire building’s south facade is covered by a glass skin. This skin acts as a greenhouse and prolongs the growing season of the public roof garden and the residents’ gardens. The roof garden supports a variety of different vegetables that are planted and harvested at different times. The courtyard spaces contain fruit trees. The skin has an operable perimeter and glass panels so that is can be used to retain heat in the winter and allow for cross ventilation in the summer.

57


the garden

turnip onion brocolli beets kale asparagus peas carrots lettuce chard leek celery spinach radish tomato chives eggplant green pepper red pepper mustard cucumber artichoke lima bean green bean calendula parsnip okra brussel sprouts cabbage cauliflower garlic pansies

January

first annual planting and growing time

February

March

April

May

June

second annual planting and growing time

July

August

planting

September

harvest

GREENHOUSE SKIN STACK-VENTILATION CROSS-VENTILATION WATER COLLECTION ROOF GARDEN CULINARY SCHOOL COURTYARD DINING CAR SHARE PROGRAM MECHANICAL PLANT ROOM FIREPLACE 2 BEDROOM UNIT 2 BEDROOM PENTHOUSE UNIT HYDRONIC FLOOR HEATING

58

October

November December

peak planting periods


Locavore: GROW. COOK. EAT. LIVE

The units contain the bedrooms towards the north elevation; the kitchen and living spaces are placed towards the south facade facing the private garden. The units are accessed primarily through the elevator that links directly to each unit’s vestibule. The circulation through the complex is based on point entry. An indoor/ outdoor fireplace is placed at the southern end of the units. There are also fireplaces in the restaurant below. These are used for cooking, heating, and recreational purposes.

59


residential units

60


Construction Drawing

SPECIFICATION OUTLINE 1 Foundation for Perimeter Wall 36 inch wide by 12 inch deep continuous footer 3 #5 horizontal long steel reinforcement equally spaced with 3 inch clearance on bottom and sides 2 Concrete Wall Continuos concrete wall from the foundation Uses #5 vertical steel reinforcement evenly spaced #5 horizontal steel reinforcement wrapped around vertical reinforcement 3 External Wall Below Grade 12x16x8 CMU inch inner wythe 3 #5 vertical steel reinforcement in fully grouted cells at corners 8x16x8 CMU inch outer wythe 4 External Wall Above Grade 12x16x8 CMU inch inner wythe with 3 #5 vertical steel reinforcement in fully grouted cells at corners Vapor barrier 2” rigid insulation 2” air gap Horizontal joint reinforcement 16 inch O.C. vertically 4x16x8 inch CMU outer wythe

6

12

11

5 External Wall on Upper Floors 8x16x8 CMU inch inner wythe with 3 #5 vertical steel reinforcement in fully grouted cells at corners Vapor barrier 2” rigid insulation 2” air gap Horizontal joint reinforcement 16 inch O.C. vertically 4x16x8 inch CMU outer wythe 6 External Glass Block Window Wall 12x12x4 inch glass block with horizontal reinforcement alternating courses

10

7

Interior Wall

8x16x8 inch CMU end condition

5

8 Ground Floor Vapor Barrier ment ¾ bottom, 1 inch side, and ¾ inch top clearance

2

9 2x4 inch ceiling joists 16 inch O.C. with 1x3 inch bridging at mid span

10 Kitchen Floor 4 inch ceramic tile on ¾ inch mortar backer board ¾ inch plywood sheeting with staggered joints

4 7

span 11 Glass Block Window 8x4x8 inch glass block with horizontal reinforcement alternating courses Site cast concrete sill 16 inch high bond beam lintel with 2 #5 horizontal steel reinforcement grouted solid

9

3

1

8

61

12 Stairs Site cast concrete 7 inch rise and 10-1/2 inch run steps 8 inch thick site cast concrete landings 5 #5 steel reinforcements equally spaced ¾ inch bottom, 1 inch side, and ¾ inch top clearance ½ inch steel railing


Croffead House by Clarke and Menefee Architects Pierce County Environmental Services Office Building by The Miller Hull Partnership

SPECIFICATION OUTLINE Substructure 1 Foundation 12” x 32” concrete footing 8” Stem wall at footing #5 rebar @ 16” o.c. 2 First Floor Foundation 4” crushed gravel 2” R-10 ridgid insulation vapor barrier 4” concrete slab on grade 2” concrete topping with fiber mesh reinforcement 3 Column Foundation 5’ x 1’-6” deep concrete footing 8” deep concrete slab around footing slab changes to 4” after edge of footing Superstructure

11

4 First Floor 1’-4” raised floor system 18” interior columns w/ 8 #8 vertical rebar and #4 spiral ties

7

5 Concrete Frame for First Floor 1’-6”x2’-8” concrete beams supports raised floor system 1’-6”x4’ concrete beam connects to concrete access floor 6 First Floor Wall 3/4” chamfer on top of stem wall Sealant Aluminum curtain wall system

10

9

7 Concrete Frame for Second Floor 2’-9”x3’ concrete beam on interior 2’-10”x3’ concrete beam on exterior 8 Second Floor Connection to Exterior Wall roller shade aluminum angle connection spandrel panel sealant and backer rod 2”x2” aluminum angle to finish curtain wall system

8

5

13

9 Second Floor Assembly 2.5” concrete topping slab 8” hollow-core concrete slab 1’-4” raised floor system

12

7 4

10 Second Floor Wall curtain wall roller shade aluminum curtain wall system compensation channel

2

6

1

11 Roof Assembly single ply vented roofing membrane 4” R-30 ridgid insulation 2.5” concrete topping slab precast concrete planks 12 Roof Edge continuous roofing membrane sheet metal gutter 7.5” curb metal fascia system on curb 1” ridgid insulation flashing membrane P.T. wood edge metal edge flashing drip edge on underside

13 Curtain Wall mullions placed 5’ apart mullions extrude 1.5” from either side of the glass mullions are an aluminum storefront system attached to the mullion is a 1/4” flush ss pan head self-tapping fastner 1/2” wide extruded aluminum section is 9” high with fasteners 1.5” from either end

3

62


Sky Construction

FLOWERS by JOHNNY

Sky Construction is a general contracting company serving the greater Buffalo area. A segment of its specialties is working with EIFS, GFRC, and cast stone. There is a variety of work involved with this company; including interior and exterior design and detailing. Customers are provided with a detailed drawing and design proposal before the project is started. Columns, decorative brackets, cast stone trim and moldings, chimney caps, are just some of the custom designs that are offered to transform any residential or commercial space.

63


interior and exterior design work

or

1'1-3/4"

10" 1-3/4" 2-1/2"

1/2" 1-1/2"

10" 1-3/4"

4"

1/2"

2-1/2"

1-1/2"

1-1/2"

1-1/2"

3'3"

3"

3'0-1/2"

2" 0-3/4"

1'0-1/2" 4" 1-1/2" 1-1/2"

3'2"

1-1/4"

3'3"

3'0-1/2"

3'2"

2-1/4" 2-1/2"

2-1/2" 0-3/4"

4-1/2"

Left Bracket

4-3/4"

Right Bracket

64


Sky Construction

5'11-3/8" 1'4-1/2"

*9”

3'5"

4'9-1/8" 3'7"

*11”

Hearth 3/4”

1-1/2”

1”

A significant feature of any home can be the fireplace. Sky Construction offers custom designs to it customers to fit any style or preference. Design sketches and final proposals are carefully prepared and delivered to the customers before the final mold is built and the fireplace cast. Multiple options were developed for a client’s choosing; there are many mantel, leg and hearth options that can be combined, manipulated, or created to produce a customized design.

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Hardwood Floor


fireplace mantel, leg, and hearth

mirror

Crook

Cantilever

Valley

Straight

Tapered

Curved

Landscape

Stepswing

Curve

Flutes

Grooves

Large Panel

Small Panel

Trim

Double-Step

Triple-Step

Flat Plate

Bottle-Nose

66


KJB Architect

W/D BEDROOM

DN 6"

3

BATH

DN 6"

R

3

DINING

W6X20 TIE BM.

BTTM. OF STEEL 97.70 a.f.f.

W6X20 TIE BM.

BTTM. OF STEEL 97.70 a.f.f.

KITCHEN

1

W6X16 TIE BM.

BTTM. OF STEEL 97.75 a.f.f.

UP

W6X16 TIE BM.

BTTM. OF STEEL 97.75 a.f.f.

1

29'-5 1/4" (VIF) CENTER TO CENTER

S12x50 CONTINUOUS (BOTTOM OF STEEL 97.75 a.f.f.)

S12x50 CONTINUOUS (BOTTOM OF STEEL 97.75 a.f.f.)

1

LIVING W6X16 TIE BM.

BTTM. OF STEEL 97.75 a.f.f.

W6X16 TIE BM.

BTTM. OF STEEL 97.75 a.f.f.

1

2

2

21'-5 3/8" (VIF) CENTER TO CENTER

KJB Architect has a focus on residential interior and exterior design, additions, renovations, and historical restoration. The work involved is showing clients a progress on the design components for their home; from drawings to modeling and rendering. A complete comprehensive model is developed in full detail to assist in quick progress rendering and construction.

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modeling and drawing

2 3

4

8

9

9

8

11

ALIGN ALL 3 JAMBS

1

REAR FENCE NOT SHOWN

REAR FENCE NOT SHOWN

7 1

3 8

3 8

3 8

8

8

8

6 EQUAL

EQUAL

EXISTING PORCH NOT SHOWN

12

1

7

12

EXISTING PORCH NOT SHOWN

68


Design-Build

4-1/2"

1'2-1/2"

9-3/4"

69


shelving

23-1/4”

29-1/4”

22-1/2”

22-1/2”

11-1/4”

24”

12” 24-3/4” 11-1/4”

23-1/4”

5-1/4”

18-3/4”

4”

70

Architecture and Design Portfolio  

Includes educational work and research along with professional work

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