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GLOBAL RISK IDENTIFICATION PROGRAMME better risk information for sound decision making S e r v i c e

GRIP GLOBAL RISK IDENTIFICATION PROGRAMME

p a c k a g e


INTRODUCTION


Global Risk Identification Programme - Service Package

GRIP is

GRIP is a multi-stakeholder initiative that directly aligns with the Hyogo Framework for Action (HFA)’s Priority Area 2: risk identification, assessment and monitoring. Although hosted by the United Nations Development Programme, UNDP, GRIP’s structure, is inherently multi-stakeholder, as it is a set of harmonized activities contributing to commonly-agreed-upon objectives. Dozens of organizations have been involved in its preparation, design and implementation. GRIP’s programme design reflects the information and support needs identified by the risk identification community. As one of the key thematic platforms for the implementation of the HFA by the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction (ISDR) system, the programme was officially launched in 2007 at the 1st session of the Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction and has been adopted by the ISDR system to support worldwide activities to identify and monitor disaster risk.

Goals and objectives

GRIP aims to promote sustainable development by reducing the impact of natural hazards in high-risk areas. Its specific objectives are to improve disaster risk information and understanding and to increase their use in decision-making processes. With the mission of providing “better risk information for sound decision making”, GRIP coordinates the generation of evidence-based risk information and facilitates its applications to improve the quality of policies, regulations and investments at all levels.

What GRIP does In the design, selection and implementation of its activities, GRIP identifies the following 3 pillars to fulfill its mission: ‣‣

Capacity development

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Evidence-based information and baselines

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Monitoring and evaluation

GRIP requires capacity development to be one of the main objectives of every GRIP initiative in order to ensure sustainability of risk assessment activities; GRIP promotes and supports the generation of evidence-based risk information and the establishment of baselines. These are essential inputs to ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� set priorities to risk reduc­tion processes, identify the most effective measures, set realistic and measurable goals and monitor progress; The continuous update of disaster risk information is the way to measure the effectiveness of risk reduction strategies. GRIP assists in the establishment of monitoring and evaluation mechanisms at all levels.

introduction

GRIP project activities fall into 5 outcome areas:

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Capacity development

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Loss data enhancement

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Risk information improvement

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Demonstration countries

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Monitoring and evaluation

GRIP works to develop local capacity at every level (regional, national, local, community) to undertake risk assessments and apply their results. Activities include the development and promotion of standards and norms, provision of training in disaster risk analysis, development of an interactive learning-by-doing environment and associated learning opportunities, and the establishment of knowledge-generation communities of practice; GRIP works to expand and improve the documentation of disaster-related losses, which is necessary both to conduct risk assessments and to measure progress towards the HFA goal – the substantial reduction of disaster losses. Activities include developing tools and standards for damage and loss assessment and the systematic organization of disaster data into global, regional, and national databases; Working with governments and local institutions as the key partners and supported by international agencies as appropriate, GRIP coordinates the generation of evidence-based risk information and facilitates its applications to policies, decisions and investments at all levels. Activities in high-risk countries are designed to strengthen institutions, establish national risk information systems and facilitate the incorporation of risk information in the design of national risk reduction strategies and action plans. GRIP’s support to these countries focuses on the development of local capacities; GRIP has selected three countries ̶ Mozambique, Sri Lanka and Ecuador ̶ to demonstrate that information on disaster risks and losses can be applied to improve risk management decisions and development outcomes. Demonstrations are undertaken with the explicit understanding that a multi-stakeholder client base agrees to participate and intends to use the risk analyses to inform the identified priority policies, plans and decisions; Risk analyses generated through GRIP will be compiled into a periodical Global Risk Update. This update, which will be widely distributed, will contribute to a common understanding of disaster risk patterns and their causes globally. With each iteration, the risk update will be increasingly based on high resolution analyses contributed by local, regional, and national partners.


Global Risk Identification Programme - Service Package

Governance

Led and hosted by UNDP, GRIP is governed and implemented jointly by six key, not-mutually-exclusive parties: a Programme Steering Committee (PSC), a coordinating team, expert working groups (EWG), implementing partners, regional technical support centers, and a number of thematic communities of practice.

Programme steering committee (PSC) Formed by representatives of international organizations, governments and development banks, it provides direction, guidance and advice to the programme coordinating team. Besides overseeing the programme preparation and implementation, PSC member organizations contribute technical and financial resources to GRIP and provide guidance on strategies to integrate programme outputs into decision-making processes in high-risk areas.

Members of the programme steering committee

Coordinating team Mostly composed of UNDP staff, it supports core GRIP activities and coordinates programme implementation. It assists implementing partners with synchronizing their efforts and supporting each other to achieve more than each partner would acting alone.

Expert working groups They ensure technical soundness of programme activities in both disaster risk assessment and loss data collection. Working in close collaboration with the Coordinating Team, they are key players in the development of methodologies, standards and applications of disaster risk assessments and loss data analyses.

Implementing partners They are the authorities, institutions, agencies and individuals directly in charge of the implementation of the GRIP projects. They work in close collaboration with the Coordinating Team and, through the programme’s structure, interact with each other to share experiences and best practices. Implementing partners ensure that GRIP projects’ design and implementation follow a common framework. UNDP Country and Regional Offices are among the implementing partners.

Regional Technical Support Centers (RTSCs)

introduction

They are networks of prestigious academic institutions and centers of excellence that have been selected and have agreed to assist with the programme implementation. The RTSCs provide training on the risk assessment methodologies developed or adopted by GRIP, as well as technical support to the projects being implemented in their region. Additionally, RTSCs are directly involved in the development of GRIP knowledge products.

Thematic communities of practice (COPs) They are GRIP’s adopted mechanism to generate knowledge and support the programme’s objective of ensuring that improved risk information is incorporated in sound decision making. They are composed of experts and practitioners who are interested in developing their own capacity and willing to contribute to the development of knowledge products such as standards, methodologies, tools, training packages and quality control mechanisms in the area of risk identification.

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Global Risk Identification Programme - Service Package

Service lines

GRIP is essentially a decision-support and capacity development programme in the field of disaster risk assessment. There are two types of GRIP clients in terms of their different scope of work and technical support needs. One is the decision makers and technical professionals primarily from disaster-prone countries. While national authorities at different levels (local, provincial, national, or regional) need to articulate specific needs for risk information and make decisions based on risk understanding, technical professionals need to be able to provide the technical skills required to undertake risk assessments and apply their results. GRIP’s implementation promotes close collaboration between local authorities and technical experts. The second client base, generally not country-specific, includes institutions and individuals who look for evidence-based risk information and professional advice for programming and policy making and for developing their risk assessment capacities. To serve its target audience, GRIP has designed and developed 2 service lines: Services to the Countries and Services to International Community.

Services to the countries

Provided through a comprehensive risk assessment package to be implemented by local institutions, they include: ‣‣

National Disaster Observatory

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National Risk Assessment

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Urban Risk Assessment

Sustainable institution for the systematic collection, analysis and interpretation of disaster loss data; Multi-hazard assessment to have a clear idea of magnitude, distribution, characteristics, causes and possible mitigation options of current risk; Identification of the magnitude, distribution, characteristics, causes and possible mitigation options of risks faced by urban areas in a country.

To implement these services, GRIP’s Regional Technical Support Centers team with UNDP’s network of Country Offices, Regional Disaster Reduction Advisors (RDRA), and National Disaster Reduction Advisors (NDRA) to provide the countries with the following assistance: ‣‣ ‣‣ ‣‣ ‣‣ ‣‣ ‣‣

Appropriate methodologies and tools and associated technical support; Coordination and overview for the implementation of risk assessment activities; Trainings on risk assessment and its application; Technical advice on decision/policy making based on risk understanding; Interaction with other countries implementing similar projects; Access to financial support.

Services to the international community

introduction

Delivered through three thematic service portals of GRIPweb (the GRIP website), they include:

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The Risk Informer

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The Disaster Analyst

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The Capacity Developer

To support integration and generation of risk information; To support the collection and analysis of disaster loss data; To support the strengthening of risk assessment knowledge and skills.


NATIONAL DISASTER OBSERVATORY


Global Risk Identification Programme - Service Package

This service package is designed to provide national authorities with practical guidance, technical support, and training in the following aspects: ‣‣ Establishment of a National Disaster Observatory (NDO). ‣‣ Formulation and revision of national disaster risk reduction strategy and contingency plan based on the analysis of past disasters. ‣‣ Development of the capacity for systematic collection and analysis of disaster loss data. The services coming with this package will be jointly delivered by GRIP coordination team, its Regional Technical Support Centres, and UNDP country offices, within GRIP’s National Disaster Observatory Establishment Framework (NDOEF).

Purpose

The purpose of a National Disaster Observatory is to create an evidence base of disasters and associated losses as a critical input to the formulation or revision of national DRR strategy, action plans or programmes, and contingency plans.

Specific objectives ‣‣ ‣‣ ‣‣ ‣‣

To produce a comprehensive National Disaster Profile (NDP); To establish a National Disaster Observatory (NDO); To develop the capacity for disaster analysis at both national and local levels; To strengthen the national disaster risk reduction system as a whole.

Main activities Team building and training ‣‣ ‣‣

To hold a 5-day training workshop on NDO conception, methodology and tools, and its applications; To give the implementing team the required knowledge to use the software, collect and analyze data.

Systematic collection of historic loss data ‣‣ ‣‣

To collect historic loss data dating back to over past decades; To store all the data in DesInventar Database.

Preliminary loss analysis

national disaster observatory

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To analysis the causes and distribution of disaster losses; To identify trends and patterns of historic losses.

Registration of disaster events ‣‣ ‣‣

To report and register disaster events whenever it occurs; To update DesInventar periodically.

Capacity building at local level ‣‣ ‣‣

To train local disaster observers to use the tools; To build a country-wide disaster monitoring mechanism.

Advanced disaster loss analysis ‣‣ ‣‣

To create a comprehensive country disaster profile; To generate vulnerability and recovery functions.

Applications to disaster risk reduction strategy and contingency plans ‣‣ ‣‣ ‣‣

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To identify disaster-prone areas, characteristics, causes and driving factors; To set up priorities for disaster risk reduction actions; To prepare plausible disaster scenarios for contingency plans at different levels.


Global Risk Identification Programme - Service Package

Outcomes and applications A well established National Disaster Observatory ‣‣

A NDO is a sustainable institutionalized arrangement for the systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of disasters and associated losses, as well as the impacts of disasters.

Development of vulnerability and recovery functions ‣‣

A comprehensive set of vulnerability and recover functions is a crucial input to risk assessment at different levels.

Calibration and validation of risk assessments ‣‣

The characteristics and distribution of historic losses can provide inputs to calibrate risk models and validate the results of risk assessment.

Monitoring of disaster risk reduction effectiveness ‣‣

Trends in disaster severity and pattern provide the most immediate measure of the effectiveness of DRR measures.

Inputs to National Risk Reduction Strategy ‣‣

Data analysis allows a better definition of goals, priorities and structure of risk reduction measures in the country, by highlighting distribution and causes of disaster losses.

Implementation plan In general, it requires 24 months to complete the process of establishing a National Disaster Observatory for the first time. The duration can be shorter or longer, depending on the availability of data, the capacity of the risk assessment team, and the efficiency of coordination and governance.

activities

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Team building and training

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data validation workshop

Collection of historic loss data

Registration of disaster events

national disaster observatory

Preliminary loss analysis data validation workshop

Capacity building at local level Advanced disaster loss analysis applications for DRR workshop

Applications for risk reduction

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Global Risk Identification Programme - Service Package

Implementation team

The establishment of a National Disaster Observatory is a multi-disciplinary process unavoidably involving different stakeholders. In terms of the role and relevant duties in the process, the implementation team of a NDO establishment can generally be divided into 4 types of working groups: program coordination group, advisory committees, a working group, and implementing partners.

The coordination team Composed of a programme coordinator and a technical coordinator at minimum, it is in charge of overall project implementation. It can be a prestigious national technical institution or a group of experts dealing with disaster risk management.

The advisory committees Technical advisory committee (TAC) and national advisory committee (NAC). TAC provides technical advice on risk assessment and its applications and revises the project for technical accuracy. NAC provides overall guidance and advice on longterm project planning, project priorities, visibility to the project and ownership promotion, functioning as a program steering committee as well. In general, TAC is composed of task force universities, research institutes, and professional association, whereas the members of NAC include representatives from relevant ministries, local authorities, civil society, and industries can be the members.

The working group Composed of a group leader, disaster analysts and observers, it is responsible for the systematic collection and compilation of histories disaster loss data, data quality control and quality assurance, registration of disaster events, and disaster analysis and application development.

The implementing partners

national disaster observatory

Generally referring to public sectors such as health, education, energy, services (water, power, telecommunications), industry, urban planning, and the financial sector, they are an indispensable component of the implementation team. They are generally sources and providers of the data and information required in the risk assessment. They also play a key role in the review and validation of the results, the calibration of methodologies, and the application and presentation of the results.

Programme coordinator

Technical coordinator

National Disaster Risk Management Authority (or equivalent institution).

Technical institution or group of risk management experts.

Technical advisory committee Task force from universities, research institutes, professional associations, GRIP.

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National Disaster Observatory

National advisory committee Representatives from Ministries, Local Authorities, the private sector.

Working group

Implementing partners

Group leader, disaster analysts and observers.

Health, education, energy, services, urban planning, financial sector.


NATIONAL RISK ASSESSMENT


Global Risk Identification Programme - Service Package

This service package is designed to provide national authorities with practical guidance technical support, and training in the following aspects: ‣‣ Implementation of National Risk Assessment; ‣‣ Formulation or revision of national disaster risk reduction strategy based on risk assessment; ‣‣ Development of the national capacity for risk identification and assessment.

The services coming with this package will be jointly delivered by GRIP coordination team, its Regional Technical Support Centres, and UNDP country offices, within GRIP’s National Risk Assessment Framework (NRAF).

Purpose

The purpose of a National Risk Assessment is to create an evidence base of disaster risks as a critical input to the formulation or revision of national DRR strategy and associated DRR action plans or programmes.

Specific objectives ‣‣ ‣‣ ‣‣ ‣‣

To produce a comprehensive multi-hazard National Risk Profile (NRP); To establish a National Risk Information System (NRIS); To develop the capacity for risk assessment at both national and local levels; and To strengthen the national disaster risk reduction system as a whole.

Main activities Comprehensive country situation assessment ‣‣ ‣‣ ‣‣ ‣‣

To inventory existing studies, data, and national capability, as well as national DRR practices; To identify needs, gaps, and required supports; To identify information needs and requirements from stakeholders; To establish the scope and context of national risk assessment.

Probabilistic hazard assessment ‣‣ ‣‣ ‣‣ ‣‣

To create a comprehensive national hazard profile including sources; To delineate all hazard-prone areas of the country; To build plausible hazard and event scenarios; To map out all hazard zones at different scale.

Exposure assessment

national risk assessment

‣‣ ‣‣ ‣‣

To categorize elements at risk concerned in terms of the country situation; To build geospatial surface models for relevant elements at risk; To identify the exposure of elements at risk (e.g. population, buildings, critical facilities, livelihoods, infrastructure).

Damage state assessment ‣‣ ‣‣

To build a comprehensive set of vulnerability functions for relevant elements at risk; To assess the damage state of the targeted elements at risk in terms of hazard scenarios.

Risk estimation and profiling ‣‣ ‣‣ ‣‣

To estimate potential losses in a unified unit; To analyze the socio-economic impacts of the risks identified; To present the results in an easy-to-understand way, e.g. table, curve, matrix, map, etc.

Identification of high-risk areas ‣‣ ‣‣

To identify high-risk areas in terms of different criteria, i.e. by hazard and sector; To list possible risk reduction measures for each high-risk areas identified.

Formulation or revision of national disaster risk reduction strategy ‣‣ ‣‣ ‣‣

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To set up priorities for risk reduction; To allocate the resources available; and To initiate DRR programs.


Global Risk Identification Programme - Service Package

Outcomes and applications A well structured National Risk Information System (NRIS) ‣‣

A NRIS is an institutionalized information system that supports dynamic national risk assessment for all types of decision making.

A well established national capacity for risk assessment ‣‣

Both national institutions and individual professionals have a good understanding of risk theory and a comprehensive set of technical skills and expertise necessary for conducting major hazard risk assessments of the country, with a sustainable support of resources.

Formulation or revision of the national risk reduction strategy ‣‣

A national disaster risk reduction strategy is a programmatic document that sets up the goal, priorities, road map, and corresponding institutional and financial arrangement for overall national disaster risk reduction.

Strengthening of the National Disaster Risk Reduction System ‣‣

The process leading to the production of a National Risk Assessment and to the creation of the Risk Information System requires all the major risk management actors in the country to work closely together, generating arrangements, partnerships and collaborations that can prove precious to increase the effectiveness of the following risk reduction process.

Implementation plan

In general, it requires 24 months to complete the process of a National Risk Assessment for the first time. The duration can be shorter or longer, depending on the availability of data, the capacity of the risk assessment team, and the efficiency of coordination and governance. However, afterwards, the duration to complete the process will be much shorter, say, a couple of months.

activities

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Country situation assessment

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hazard analysis workshop

Probabilistic hazard assessment Exposure assessment risk assessment workshop

national risk assessment

Damage state assessment Risk estimation and profiling Identification of high-risk areas

results presentation workshop

Risk reduction strategy

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Global Risk Identification Programme - Service Package

Implementation team

A national risk assessment is a multi-disciplinary process unavoidably involving different stakeholders. Its implementation requires an extensive participation of various parties at stake, in particular decision/policy makers, who are the most immediate users of the risk assessment results. In terms of the role and relevant duties in the process, the implementation team of a national risk assessment can generally be divided into 4 types of working groups: program coordination group, advisory committees, risk assessment team, and implementing partners.

The coordination team Composed of a programme coordinator and a technical coordinator at minimum, it is in charge of overall project implementation. It can be a prestigious national technical institution or a group of experts dealing with disaster risk management.

The advisory committees Technical advisory committee (TAC) and national advisory committee (NAC). TAC provides technical advice on risk assessment and its applications and revise the project for technical accuracy. NAC provides overall guidance and advice on long-term project planning, project priorities, visibility to the project and ownership promotion, functioning as a program steering committee as well. In general, TAC is composed of task force universities, research institutes, and professional association, whereas the members of NAC include representatives from relevant ministries, local authorities, civil society, and industries can be the members.

The risk assessment team Composed by a group of disaster risk management experts, hazard specialists, structural engineers, economists, social scientists, and information analysts, it is responsible for the implementation of all project activities. To ensure the sustainability of national risk assessment, it is highly recommended that the implementing team be built with a long-term vision.

The implementing partners

national risk assessment

Generally referring to public sectors such as health, education, energy, services (water, power, telecommunications), industry, urban planning, and the financial sector, they are an indispensable component of the implementation team. They are generally sources and providers of the data and information required in the risk assessment. They also play a key role in the review and validation of the results, the calibration of methodologies, and the application and presentation of the results.

Programme coordinator

Technical coordinator

National Disaster Risk Management Authority (or equivalent institution).

Technical institution or group of risk management experts.

Technical advisory committee Task force from universities, research institutes, professional associations, GRIP.

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National Risk Assessment

National advisory committee Representatives from Ministries, Local Authorities, the private sector.

Risk assessment team

Implementing partners

Risk management experts, hazard specialists, engineers, social scientists, economists.

Health, education, energy, services, urban planning, financial sector.


URBAN RISK ASSESSMENT


Global Risk Identification Programme - Service Package

This service package is designed to provide municipal authorities with practical guidance technical support, and training in the following aspects: ‣‣ Implementation of Urban Risk Assessment; ‣‣ Formulation or revision of urban disaster risk reduction strategy and contingency plan based on risk assessment; ‣‣ Development of the local capacity for risk identification and assessment. The services coming with this package will be jointly delivered by GRIP coordination team, its Regional Technical Support Centres, and UNDP country offices, within GRIP’s Urban Risk Assessment Framework (URAF).

Purposes

The purpose of an urban risk assessment is to create an evidence base of disaster risks as a critical input to the formulation or revision of urban disaster risk reduction strategy, action plans, and contingency plan.

Specific objectives ‣‣ ‣‣ ‣‣ ‣‣

To produce a comprehensive multi-hazard Urban Risk Profile (URP); To establish an Urban Risk Information System (URIS); To develop the capacity for risk assessment at local level; and To strengthen the urban disaster risk reduction system as a whole.

Main activities Preparation of the project ‣‣ ‣‣ ‣‣ ‣‣

To prepare cost plan, and implementation guideline; To identify and establish steering committee, working groups, and advisory groups; To collect and compile data from different sources; To hold a kick-off meeting to raise awareness among the community and bring all the potential stakeholders on board.

Hazard assessment ‣‣ ‣‣ ‣‣

To identify all major hazards prevailing in the city and surrounding; To build plausible event scenarios for relevant hazards; To map out the geographical distribution of hazard event intensity.

Exposure assessment ‣‣

To identify the exposure of population and physical structures to hazard events.

Vulnerability assessment

urban risk assessment

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To develop vulnerability functions for exposed physical structures and population; To build realistic damage or impact scenarios (impact) in terms of hazard event scenarios; To consult with relevant stakeholders to validate the damage scenarios developed.

Disaster risk management planning ‣‣ ‣‣ ‣‣ ‣‣

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To assess the current level of risk management and disaster preparedness; To formulate risk management activities, implementation strategy, and institutional arrangement; To develop urban disaster risk reduction action plan and contingency plans for relevant risk and disaster scenarios; To consult and communicate with relevant authorities for decision making and effecting actions and with the public to raise awareness.


Global Risk Identification Programme - Service Package

Outcomes and applications A well structured Urban Risk Information System (URIS) ‣‣

A URIS is an institutionalized information system that supports dynamic national risk assessment for all types of decision making and urban planning.

A well established local capacity for risk assessment ‣‣

Both urban institutions and individual professionals have a good understanding of risk theory and a set of technical skills and expertise necessary for conducting major hazard risk assessments of the city, with a sustainable support of resources.

Formulation or revision of an urban risk reduction strategy ‣‣

An urban disaster risk reduction strategy is a programmatic document that sets up the goal, priorities, road map, and corresponding institutional and financial arrangement for overall urban disaster risk reduction.

Preparation or revision of urban contingency plans ‣‣

A contingency plan is a programmatic document that provides emergency managers with comprehensive guidance for their responding to expected disasters in an effective and efficient manner.

Incorporation of risk management into urban planning ‣‣

The results of the risk assessment process should be used by local authorities and decision-makers to protect the sustainability of their investments, to avoid to produce new risk through uninformed development decisions.

Implementation plan

In general, it requires 18 months to complete the process of a Urban Risk Assessment for the first time. The duration can be shorter or longer, depending on the availability of data, the capacity of the risk assessment team, and the efficiency of coordination and governance. However, afterwards, the duration to complete the process will be much shorter, say, a couple of months.

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Preparation of the project Hazard assessment Exposure assessment

urban risk assessment

Vulnerability assessment Disaster risk management planning

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Global Risk Identification Programme - Service Package

Implementation team

An urban risk assessment is a multi-disciplinary process unavoidably involving different stakeholders. In this context, the implementation of an urban risk assessment requires an extensive participation of various parties at stake, in particular, decision/ policy makers and urban planners, who are the most immediate users of the risk assessment results. In terms of the role and relevant duties in the process, the implementation team of a urban risk assessment can generally be divided into 4 types of working groups: program coordination group, advisory committees, risk assessment team, and implementing partners.

The coordination team Composed of a programme coordinator and a technical coordinator at minimum, it is in charge of overall project implementation. It can be a prestigious national technical institution or a group of experts dealing with disaster risk management.

The advisory committees Technical advisory committee (TAC) and urban advisory committee (UAC). TAC provides technical advice on risk assessment and its applications and revises the project for technical accuracy. UAC provides overall guidance and advice on long-term project planning, project priorities, visibility to the project and ownership promotion, functioning as a program steering committee as well. In general, TAC is composed of task force universities, research institutes, and professional association, whereas the members of UAC include representatives from relevant municipal authorities, civil society, and industries can be the members

The risk assessment team Composed by a group of disaster risk management experts, hazard specialists, structural engineers, economists, social scientists, and information analysts, it is responsible for the implementation of all project activities. To ensure the sustainability of national risk assessment, it is highly recommended that the implementing team be built with a long-term vision.

The implementing partners Generally referring to public sectors such as health, education, energy, services (water, power, telecommunications), industry, urban planning, and the financial sector, they are an indispensable component of the implementation team. They are generally sources and providers of the data and information required in the risk assessment. They also play a key role in the review and validation of the results, the calibration of methodologies, and the application and presentation of the results.

Programme coordinator

Technical coordinator

National Disaster Risk Management Authority (or equivalent institution).

Technical institution or group of risk management experts.

urban risk assessment

Technical advisory committee Task force from universities, research institutes, professional associations, GRIP.

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Urban Risk Assessment

Urban advisory committee Representatives from municipal authorities, civil society, the private sector.

Risk assessment team

Implementing partners

Risk management experts, hazard specialists, engineers, social scientists, economists.

Health, education, energy, services, urban planning, financial sector.


GRIPweb


Global Risk Identification Programme - Service Package

The Disaster Analyst The Disaster Analyst is an online data and information system that provides basic information on disasters losses. Besides supplying technical support and information services to the international disaster risk reduction community, the Disaster Analyst functions also as a public platform to share knowledge, skills and experience in collecting historic loss data, establishing disaster observatories and applying disaster knowledge in decision making. With the support of a dedicated Community of Practice, the Disaster Analyst delivers the following main services: ‣‣ Information services that support building country and regional disaster profiles; ‣‣ Technical support for the collection and analysis of disaster loss data, establishment of disaster observatories and applications in disaster risk reduction practices; ‣‣ Generation of new knowledge and methodologies.

Components Catalogue (DisDat) An online information system for inventorying disaster loss databases at all levels (global, regional, national, and local). It provides a comprehensive catalogue of existing disaster databases including standardized information on contents, time periods covered, major data sources, contact information and links to access the data.

Disaster profile A characterization of the disasters a country or region has experienced within a given timeframe. It describes systematically the disasters and losses in terms of characteristics, severity, spatial/temporal distribution, and causality. Analytical functions, such as basic statistical and time-series analyses, are available to facilitate the production of essential facts about disasters.

Disaster update A series of analytical functions to track changes in disaster characteristics, trends and patterns, and to identify the driving factors of those changes. Findings and results of these analyses will be communicated through a regular-reporting mechanism.

Disaster Observatories network (DO-net) A public platform for the community of countries and institutions around the world implementing Disaster Observatories (DO). Here, they can exchange knowledge, skills, experiences, good practices, and lessons learned in building Disaster Observatories. It is also a platform for the DO community to work together on standards and protocols, quality control mechanisms, interoperability, and data visualization.

Applications A repository of tools, guidelines, methodologies and examples on the applications of disaster analyses in the areas of risk assessment, disaster risk management, strategic development planning, programming, policy making and disaster risk reduction monitoring, among other applications.

the disaster analyst

Data sources A comprehensive online gateway to major sources of disaster loss data such as ECLAC, OCHA, IFRC, NGOs, media archives and others. Through the necessary institutional arrangements, this gateway provides access to past disaster data from multiple information systems. Powerful searching functions let users find information on past disasters available in several sites and integrate it using appropriate criteria.

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time series analysis

standard information

the disaster analyst

contact information

driving factors

causality

uploading capacities

regular reporting

trends

geographic distribution

inclusion criteria

patterns

Disaster update

analytic functions

Disaster profile

4 levels

Catalogue

visualization tools

DO interoperability

quality control

minimum standards

DO establishment

DO-net

The Disaster Analyst

real-time information

uploading capacities

media archives

damages - OCHA, IFRC, NGOs

losses - ECLAC

Data sources

The Disaster Analyst - contextual framework

development planning

policy making

DRR monitoring

thematic analysis

risk assessment

Applications

Global Risk Identification Programme - Service Package

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Global Risk Identification Programme - Service Package

The Risk Informer The Risk Informer is an online system to provide basic information on risks and risk baselines that can be applied to disaster risk reduction (DRR) activities. Besides providing technical support and information services to the international DRR community, the Risk Informer also serves as a public platform for sharing knowledge, skills and experiences in conducting risk assessments, establishing Risk Information Systems (RISs), and applying risk knowledge to decision/policy making. It has been designed as self–supporting system under GRIP coordination and facilitation. Built on a strong and extensive partnership among various stakeholders and supported by a dedicated Community of Practice, the Risk Informer delivers the following main services: ‣‣ Information services that support building country and regional risk profiles; ‣‣ Technical support for the collection and integration of risk information, establishment of Risk Information Systems and applications in DRR practices; ‣‣ Generation of new knowledge and methodologies.

Components Country factsheets A compilation of country profiles built on available risk information. It includes a methodology to perform country situation analyses that allows for the preparation of comprehensive catalogues of risk assessment studies and the compilation of information on data availability, institutional capacity, legal framework, and national DRR practices. Country Factsheets provide essential baselines in terms of the current status of risk assessment, opportunities and challenges, existing local capacity ̶ both technical and institutional, support needs, etc. These are major inputs to: ‣‣ Delineate national risk assessment programs and implementation strategies; ‣‣ Establish institutional and legal frameworks for national risk assessments and management; ‣‣ Engage all stakeholders in national risk reduction activities.

Risk profile A snapshot of the risk a place or a region faces within a given timeframe, described in terms of potential losses and probability of their occurrence. Comprehensive risk profiles may also include impacts, categorization and relative priority of the risks as well as the identification of acceptable levels of risk, high-risk areas/hotspots and risk reduction measures. Risk profiles are presented at different scales (global, regional, national and local) considering the different scopes of application.

Risk update A series of analytical functions to track changes in risk characteristics, trends and patterns and evaluate the effectiveness of risk reduction activities. Findings and results of these analyses are communicated through regular-reporting mechanisms.

Risk Information System network (RIS-net) A public platform for the community of countries and institutions around the world that are developing Risk Information Systems (RIS) based on risk assessments. Here, they can exchange knowledge, skills, experiences, good practices, and lessons learned in establishing risk information systems. It is also a platform for the RIS community to work together on standards and protocols, quality control mechanisms, interoperability, and data visualization.

THE RISK INFORMER

Applications A repository of tools, guidelines, methodologies and examples on the applications of risk assessment results in the areas of risk reduction, strategic development planning, policy making, early warning and disaster risk reduction monitoring, among other applications. It also serves as a hands-on tutorial on applications development through practical case studies.

Data sources A comprehensive gateway to major sources of disaster risk data including data on hazards, exposed elements, vulnerability relations and estimated potential losses. Through the necessary institutional arrangements, this gateway provides access to disaster risk data from multiple information systems. Searching functions let users find the information they need using appropriate searching criteria.

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social impacts

economic impacts

Institutional capacity

Legal framework

THE RISK INFORMER

DRM/DRR practices

driving factors

causality

Data availability

regular reporting

trends

geographic distribution

RA studies

patterns

Risk update

4 levels

Risk profile

CSA methodology

Country factsheets

visualization tools

interoperability

quality control

standards & norms

RIS establishment

RIS catalogue

RIS-net

The Risk Informer

real-time information

uploading capacities

themes

formats

Data sources

The Risk Informer - contextual framework

early warning systems

development planning

policy evaluation

DRR monitoring

Cost/benefit analysis

baseline establishment

Applications

Global Risk Identification Programme - Service Package

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Global Risk Identification Programme - Service Package

The Capacity Developer The Capacity Developer supports capacity development for risk assessment as well as for the application of risk information in decision making. It is an interactive online learning system that has been designed under the learning-by-doing principles. Services provided by the Capacity Developer include: ‣‣ Provision of interactive learning environments and opportunities; ‣‣ Support for the generation of new knowledge; ‣‣ Access to selected knowledge products, tools, trainings, and other capacity development resources.

Components Toolbox An online repository of risk assessment tools such as methodologies, guidelines and software. It is designed to provide practitioners, decision makers, experts and general public (in the case of community based initiatives) with proper tools to do risk assessment. The contents of the toolbox is carefully classified and organized so that the toolbox is easily navigable. Appropriate inclusion criteria ensure the quality of the tools available in the toolbox.

Training modules A public platform for hosting various types of training modules (e-learning modules, videos, audios, presentations, e-documents, etc.) from different sources. It contains a comprehensive catalogue of globally available online interactive training programmes and face-to-face training packages focused on the enhancement of knowledge and skills of practitioners, experts, and decision makers on the various aspects of risk assessment and on the application of risk assessment results into decision making.

Communities of practice Providing the support infrastructure needed for the establishment and functioning of the GRIP Communities of Practice. Proper environment and various communication tools are provided to facilitate the work of Communities of Practice on the development of standards, manuals and guidelines, the establishment of quality control mechanisms and the adaptation of tools and training modules to different local realities.

Capacity development resources

the capacity developer

An extended collection of some of the most important online resources related to risk assessment such as data and information links, individual and organization contact information, events, studies and reports and academic programmes related to risk assessment.

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adaptation delivery mechanisms

tool sharing functions

sample applications

the capacity developer

applications

regular training programmes

evaluation & quality control

quality control

adaptation

manuals & guidelines

hosting capacities

Inclusion criteria

standards

academic programmes

risk studies reports

contacts

links

catalogue

Resources

The Capacity Developer - contextual framework

Community of practice

catalogue

Training module

Catalogue

Toolbox

The Capacity Developer

Global Risk Identification Programme - Service Package

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GRIP - Global Risk Identification Programme Disaster Reduction and Recovery Unit Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery United Nations Development Programme +41 22 9178399 fax: +41 22 9178060 email: info@gripweb.org web: www.gripweb.org tel:

Palais des Nations, CH-1211, Geneva, Switzerland office: 11-13, Ch. des AnÊmones, Châtelaine, CH-1219, Geneva, Switzerland mail:


Global Risk Identification Programme (GRIP)

Disaster Reduction and Recovery Unit Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery UNDP Tel: (41 22) 917 8399 Fax: (41 22) 917 8060 Email: info@gripweb.org Web: www.gripweb.org Mail: Palais des Nations, CH-1211 Geneva 10 Office: 11-13 Chemin des Anémones, Châtelaine, CH-1219, Geneva, Switzerland


GRIP Services Booklet