Community Experience Work Bazaar

Page 1

COMMUNITY EXPERIENCE

WORK BAZAAR Finding extra income to fit your schedule and your passion

The Work Bazaar was created by Eleanor Rosenberg MSc Strategic Design + Management Š 2015 Parsons The New School of Design with Christian Schneider and Anasa Scott



Contents 1 Contents

63 BUSINESS CONCEPT

99 BUSINESS STRUCTURE

2 5 6

65 66 68 70 73 75 76 77 78 81 82

101 Service offerings 102 Revenue streams 104 Cost structure – income 105 Cost structure – expenses 106 Stakeholder map 108 Business Model Canvas 110 Product/outcome matrix 111 Average week 112 Experience blueprint 114 Business structure review

Why design thinking? Area of investigation Important terms

7 QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH 9 13 19 23 28

The aging western world The cost of aging Prominence of dementia Growing trends Quantitative review

29 OBSERVATIONS 31 35 38 39 40

User observations Watching and listening Retirement stereotypes Questionnaires Sharing what was heard

A different kind of career centre Logic model Theory of change Target audience Community Experience Work Bazaar Main services Client journey overview Expertise team Services outline Ongoing activities Long term vision

83 PROTOTYPING 85 91 97 98

Website Digital flyer Client flow Pivoting

115 NEXT STEPS 116 Design process review 118 What happens next

41 BRAINSTORMING 43 47 51 55 62

Video responses Expert engagement Group sessions Business ideas Design principals

Contents | WORK BAZAAR

1


Why design thinking? User-­centered design allows us to identify opportunities for innovation while we create business solutions for social problems.

2

WORK BAZAAR | Introduction

OPPORTUNITY FRAMING

quantitative Immersion

INFORMED assumptions

Identify a problem – an area of opportunity

Gather concrete data and evidence of opportunity

Formulate a vision from new data combinations


HUMAN Observation

user brainstorms

IDEAS Synthesis

Challenge the vision with real-life observations

Expand or narrow the vision based on feedback

Draw conclusions and design solutions to the problem

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Imagine feasible business scenarios

Why design thinking? | WORK BAZAAR

3


This book follows an investigation into design thinking and social innovation conducted between January 26 and May 14, 2015 at Parsons The New School of Design.

Sincere thanks for all the advice and support from many people, including: Christian Schneider Jonathan Williams Michelle Yee Saico Ozawa Eunyoung Hwang Soonbeom Jang Sean Penchoff Elizabeth Mills Juhi Sodani

4

WORK BAZAAR | Introduction

Henry Campbell Brenda Rosenberg J端rgen Rosenberg Barbara Beebe Eric Rosenberg Fiona Chung Gordon Campbell Wendy Bower

Anasa Scott Jerome Goh Ray Garcia Alice Krenitski Sylvie Anne Williams Miranda Huba Jody MacDonald Andrew Parker Aasman Brand Communications

Andrew Hume Carol McKinnon Renate Williams Soren Hammerberg Graham Ritchie Bonnie Dalziel Kate White Jennifer Nichols Murray Atherton


Area of investigation Can shifting careers later in life support the creation of age-friendly communities in Canada? Parts of the world are aging at an alarming rate. The World Health Organization estimates that by 2050 over 34% of Europeans will be over the age of 65. North Americans will follow close behind at 27%. This demographic disparity is at risk of generating startling economic costs. As older adults leave the workforce our nations’ GDP threatens to plummet. At the same time the cost of health care will skyrocket. In Canada, social security is already the largest single component of federal spending at $38.0 billion in 2011/12. It’s projected to triple by 2030.

What if I told you there was a growing workforce of highly skilled and soon to be available people keen to devote their attention to supporting our aging population? What if the current predictions of a dramatically shrinking workforce aren’t true? Trends in delayed retirement are proving that babysitting and fishing aren’t enough for today’s elder. This is good news for the workforce, but it’s also good news for the mental health for mature adults. New research tells us that working more years dramatically reduces the risk of dementia—3.2% for each year at work. This information demands a change in conversation about so called “super-aged nations”. Current media laments the price tag of our ballooning elder population, but they’re doing so with today’s infrastructure for care in mind. My area of research lies in pivoting this conversation away from treatment toward prevention. Dementia is not a normal part of aging and studies show that some types of dementia can be prevented. Here lies the opportunity: reduce the onset of preventable dementia by keeping mature adults employed longer in reduced capacity. With the pressing need for age-friendly communities on the rise, there’s plenty of work to do. The growing pool of retiring minds are uniquely poised to apply for the job—and reduce the need for elder care at the same time.

Area of investigation | WORK BAZAAR

5


Important terms Super-aged nation

Dementia

A super-aged nation is a country where more than 20% of the population will over the age of 65.

Dementia is the loss of intellectual capacity and personality integration, due to the loss of or damage to neurons in the brain.

Age-friendly According to the World Health Organization, an agefriendly community is one where service providers, public policy, businesses and community leaders: • recognize the great diversity among older persons, • promote their inclusion and contribution in all areas of community life, • respect their decisions and lifestyle choices, and • anticipate and respond flexibly to aging-related needs and preferences.

6

WORK BAZAAR | Introduction

Free agent In business, a free agent refers to someone who works independently for them self instead of for a single employer. Free agents include self-employed workers, freelancers, independent contractors and temporary workers.


Q UA N T ITATIV E R E S E A RCH

QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH | WORK BAZAAR

7


8

WORK BAZAAR | QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH

As the ďŹ rst of the baby boom generation turns age 65 in 2011, seniors will account for an increasingly larger proportion of the Canadian population (about 25% by 2036).


The aging western world What does an estimated 700 million people aged 65 or older in 13 super-aged countries by 2020 look like?

The aging western world | WORK BAZAAR

9


The first of the baby boom generation turned age 65 in 2011.

2015

By 2036 Canada will be a super-aged nation —where more than 20% of the population will over the age of 65.

2030

10

WORK BAZAAR | QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH


Life expectancy at age 65

Percent distribution of world population 60 or over

27

10

30 10 Percent

25 5 20 0 15

9

2050 14

9 24

9

2006

17

34

27

25

24 21

Africa

Asia

10

10

Europe

9

17

Latin North America America and the 9 Caribbean

Oceania 14

9 . Source: 5 United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs Global Age-friendly Cities: A Guide, Figure 1. World Health Organization, 2007

0

Africa

Asia

Europe

Latin North America America and the Caribbean

Oceania

ProportionPercent of the Total Population Age 65+ Proportion of the Total Population Age 65+

Current projected of seniors Percent and distribution ofproportions world population 60 or over 35%

Year

9

Ca n a da

0

Europe Latin 1991North Oceania 1961 1966 1971 1976 Africa 1981 1982Asia 1983 1984 1985 1986 1996 2001 2006

America America part of the second and theoldest continent Year Caribbean

22 2010 2031

2050

Women Men

20 Additional Years of Life Expectancy at Age 65

24

24

21

35% 2015%

2010 2031

17

30%

14

1510%

10

25% 105%

9

9

20% 9 15%

9

27

2520%

0

10

10

Source: Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, OECD.StatExtracts > 9 5 2011 http://stats.oecd.org/index.aspx Health: Health Status,

Source: Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, OECD.StatExtracts > . Unitedhttp://stats.oecd.org/index.aspx Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs Health: Health Source: Status, 2011 Global Age-friendly Cities: A Guide, Figure 1. World Health Organization, 2007

Current and projected proportions of seniors 25

50%

20

Life expectancy at age 65

2006

3025%

the world’s oldest country

24

21

17 1961 1966 1971 1976 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1991 1996 200114 2006 15

10

JA PAN

have a super-aged future . Source:does United not Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs Global Age-friendly Cities: A Guide, Figure 1. World Health Organization, 2007

34

10 14

24

25

16

12

CONGO

3530%

Women Men

B.C.

Alta.

Sask.

Man.

Ont.

Que.

N.B.

N.S.

P.E.I.

N.L.

Y.T.

N.W.T.

Nun.

Europe Latin North andOceania Province/Territory Sources: Africa Health CareAsia in Canada, 2011: A focus on Seniors again, Canadian Institute for Health Information, 10% America America money.cnn.com/interactive/news/aging-countries/ Sources: Statistics Canada 2010, population 1971 to 2010, and population andestimates, the Caribbean projections, 5% 2009 to 2036. . Source: 0%United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs B.C. Alta.Cities: Sask.A Guide, Man. Figure Ont. Que. N.B.Health N.S. Organization, P.E.I. N.L. 2007 Y.T. Global Age-friendly 1. World

N.W.T.

Province/Territory

Sources: Statistics Canada 2010, population estimates, 1971 to 2010, and population projections, 2009 to 2036.

Nun.

18

Current and projected proportions of seniors 16 35%

14 12 10

Proportion of the Total Population Age 65+

Percent

20

25

Additional Years of Additional Years of Life Expectancy at Age 65 Life Expectancy at Age 65

30

Percent distribution of world24population 24 25 60 or over 21 35 15

An estimated 13 20 countries will be Life expectancy at age 65 super aged by 18 22 2020 – meaning Women Percent distribution of world population Men 16 60 or over 700 million 20 2006 34 14 35 people aged 65 or 2050 18 30 older 27 worldwide. 12 25

2050

Percent

34

35

22

2006

2010 2031

30% 25% 20% 15%

1961 1966 1971 1976 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1991 1996 2001 10%

2006

Year

5%

Source: Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, OECD.StatExtracts > Health: Health Status, 0%2011 http://stats.oecd.org/index.aspx B.C.

Alta.

Sask.

Man.

Ont.

Que.

N.B.

N.S.

P.E.I.

N.L.

Y.T.

N.W.T.

Nun.

Province/Territory

Sources: Statistics Canada 2010, population estimates, 1971 to 2010, and population projections, 2009 to 2036.

The aging western world | WORK BAZAAR

Current and projected proportions of seniors +

35%

2010

11


ears lived. In 2011, the average person was just under 32, four years

mere 2.5 billion souls lived on Earth. Since then, thanks to economic

to Life expectancy at age 65 n livingaddition standards, average life expectancy at birth has leaped by 20

populationIn

Additional Years of Life Expectancy at Age 65

the growing 22 Women 2006 Men percentage of 2050projections show lation a continuation of this trend. By the end of 20 people over the 27 25 18 age of newborns can expect to live to 81. The son will be65,athe little over 42 and 17 average life span 16 14 e stabilised at just over 10 billion and those people will have is constantly 14 extending.

ars of human experience between them. Given the challenges the 12

n North ca America he ean

Oceania

n, it is to be hoped such experience brings them wisdom as well. 10

1961 1966 1971 1976 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1991 1996 2001

mic and Social Affairs World Health Organization, 2007

2006

Year

Source: Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, OECD.StatExtracts > Health: Health Status, 2011 http://stats.oecd.org/index.aspx

Aggregate age of the world’s population

35

2050

2010 2031 30

27 24

Percent

25

17 14

15 10

10

0 N.S.

P.E.I.

N.L.

Y.T.

N.W.T.

Nun.

ce/Territory

25

24

9

Women Men

20

21

20

5

22

2006

34

Additional Years of Life Expectancy at Age 65

ons of seniors

N.B.

Life expectancy at age 65

Percent distribution of world population 60 or over

9

9

18 16 14 12

Africa

Asia

Europe

Latin North America America and the Caribbean

Oceania 10 1961 1966 1971 1976 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1991 1996 2001

. imates, 1971 to 2010, and population Source: United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs

Global Age-friendly Cities: A Guide, Figure 1. World Health Organization, 2007

Source: Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, OECD.StatExtracts > Health: Health Status, 2011 http://stats.oecd.org/index.aspx Source: The economist, January 08, 2013. Aggregate of the world’s population

12

WORK BAZAAR | QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH Current and projected proportions of seniors 35%

2006

Year

2010


The cost of aging Will the remaining working-age population be able to afford the cost of supporting the aging population?

The cost of aging | WORK BAZAAR

13


A common concern is that the smaller workingage population will not be able to afford the cost of supporting the altheexpenditure aging population. mong the provinces, in

Working-age population

ealth Expenditure Trends, 1975 to 2014

wfoundland and Labrador ish Columbia ($5,865).

s)

Variations in provincial/tterritorialggovernmenthhealtheexpenditure Health spending per person varies among provinces and territories. Among the provinces, in 2014, total health spending per person is forecast to be highest in Newfoundland and Labrador ($6,953) and Alberta ($6,783) and lowest in Quebec ($5,616) and British Columbia ($5,865).

14

Distribution of private-sector health expenditure WORK BAZAARby| source QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH of finance (% share and millions of dollars) 2012

52.6%

Population Growth

-1.0%

17

51.9%

0.00

N.S.

45.2% N.B.

14.9%

Que.

Ont.

Man.

Sask.

Alta.

0.50

1983 1986 1989 Source: World Bank, Economist.com/graphicdetail

1992

Long-Term Care Insuranc (LTCI) was introduced in 2000 in Japan

65+

1995

Canada

84.0%

1–64

N.W.T./Nun.

1.50 1.00

0.0% -0.5%

2.9% 2.9%

Y.T.

0.5%

2.00

1.1% 1.1%

N.L.

2012

1.0%

2.50

Population Aging under 1

P.E.I.

(% National income)

1.5%

17

1988

86.2%

B.C.

Percentage Increase

Source: Canadian Institute for Health Information, Health Care Cost Drivers: Source: Canadian Institute for Health TheInformation, Facts. (Ottawa, Ont.: CIHI, 2011) National Health Expenditure Trends,1975 to 2014

Canada

N.W.T./Nun.

Source: Canadian Institute for Health Information, National Health Expenditure Trends,1975 to 2014 -1.0%

Y.T.

65+ N.L.

14.9% -0.5%

45.2%

P.E.I.

0.0%

3.50

2.0%

1–64

$ $

Public social spending on certain programs

2.5%

Population Growth

N.S.

51.9%

Alta.

84.0% 0.5%

3.0%

3.00

N.B.

1.0%

Population Aging

under 1

Que.

2.9% 2.9%

Ont.

1.1% 1.5% 1.1%

$ $ Man.

2.0%

Sask.

52.6%

B.C.

2012

One potential consequence of more spending 1–64 on elders is less spending on younger 65+ demographics.

2.5% 86.2%

Percentage Increase

2002

under 1

Health care spending on seniors Contribution of population growth and aging to 12.7% growth in government health spending, 1998 to 2008 44.6% 2002

The price of The amount spentWorld per person reflects the population of each province and territory and its health Source: Bank, Economist.com/graphicdetail elder healthcare care needs, as well as the organization of health services, health personnel compensation and the sharing of costs between public and private sectors. Note that per person spending on health spending is is expected to be higher in the territories due to their small, dispersed population tions. anticipated to be Health care spending on seniors Contribution of population growth and aging to a leading strain growth in government health spending, 1998 to 2008 12.7% 44.6% on government Health care spending on seniors 3.0% resources.

and territory and its health sonnel compensation and person spending on health population tions.

$ $

National Health Expenditure Trends, 1975 to 2014

1998

2001

Source: NIPSSR website, www.ipss.go.jp.The changing Source: Canadian Institute for Health Information, Health Care Cost Drivers:shape of the care diamond: Source: Canadian Institute forchild Health Information, case of The Facts. (Ottawa,the Ont.: CIHI, 2011)and elderly care in japan Aya K. Abe, Figure 10 National Health Expenditure Trends,1975 to 2014


29.2% ($3,735.7)

48.4% ($29,197.3)

58.1% ($7,434.8)

40.8% ($24,616.5) Source: Canadian Institute for Health Information, National Health Expenditure Trends,1975 to 2014

2012

10.8% ($6,514.3)

2.9% 51.9%

under 1 48.4% ($29,197.3) 1–64

1–64

65+ 84.0% Private health 51.9% Household (out of pocket) insurance Non-consumption 45.2% 14.9% Source: National Health Expenditure Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information. 65+ 14.9%

Source: Canadian Institute for Health Information, National Health Expenditure Trends,1975 to 2014 Household (out of pocket) Private health insurance

52.6% 2.9% 2.9% 40.8% ($24,616.5) 2.9%

45.2%

Source: Canadian Institute for Health Information, National Health Expenditure Trends,1975 to 2014

Non-consumption

Source: National Health Expenditure Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.

1988 2012 Distribution of E private-sector health expenditure C AS STO RY F E AT U RE S by source of finance (% share and millions of 10.8% dollars) 12.7% • an estimated 470,000 ($6,514.3) Elder care costs in ($1,625.9) 1988 2012 elders may die alone by Japan are rising 10.8% 2030 12.7% and nursing homes • death from ($6,514.3) 48.4% neglect and ($1,625.9) 29.2% 58.1% murder are on the rise ($29,197.3) ($3,735.7) can’t be($7,434.8) built fast 40.8% • family abuse increased by enough. People are($24,616.5)32%48.4% since 2005 29.2% 58.1% ($29,197.3) alone • about 420,000 Japanese ($3,735.7)dying($7,434.8) 40.8% ($24,616.5) are waiting for a spot in a nursing home • in 1980, 53% of 65+ lived Household (out of pocket) Private health insurance Non-consumption with children. In 2010 only Source: National Health Expenditure Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information. 18% live with Household (out of pocket)

Private health insurance

Non-consumption

Source: National Health Expenditure Database, Canadian Institute for Health Information.

17

1.5%

2.0% If the cost of elder care remains 1.5%1.0% the same as it 0.5% is today when 1.0% 0.0% Canada becomes 0.5% a super-aged nation -0.5% the burden on 0.0% taxpayers will be-0.5%-1.0% significant.

IN SIG HT • culture has shifted away from home care in multigenerational homes • families can be reluctant and even abusive toward an elder in need • hired help relieves the significant strain on families • living alone in your later years is costly to the individual and the public – financially and culturally

Source: The Fac

-1.0%

Source: Can The Facts. (O

17

17

0.5%

Caring forSource: theCanadian Institute for Healt National Health Expenditure 0.0% Trends elderly comes -0.5% with a significant Contri growt price tag – much -1.0% of which is carried3.0% Contribu growth in by government 2.5% 3.0% and insurance 2.0% 2.5% companies.

Source: Canadian Institute for Health Information, National Health Expenditure Trends,1975 to 2014

Distribution of private-sector health expenditure by source of finance (% share and millions of dollars)

1.0%

Alta.

2012

86.2% 1.1% 58.1% 1.1% ($7,434.8) 1.1% 1.1% 84.0%

65+

B.C.

17

under 1

1.5%

14.9%

Percentage Increase

2002

1988Source: Canadian Institute for Health Information, 2012 12.7% National Health Expenditure Trends,1975 to 2014 44.6% 86.2% 52.6% 10.8% 12.7% ($6,514.3) ($1,625.9)

2012

29.2% ($3,735.7)

1–64

Percentage Increase

2012

2002

Distribution of private-sector 12.7% health expenditure 44.6% by source of care finance (% share millions of dollars) Health spending on and seniors

Distribution of private-sector health expenditure by source of finance (% share and millions of dollars)

12.7% ($1,625.9)

$ $ $ $ $ 45.2%

14.9% Health care spending on seniors

Health care spending on seniors

1988

2.9%

Source: Canadian Institute for Health Information, National Health Expenditure 84.0% Trends,1975 to 2014 51.9%

Thespending amount spent per person population each province andinits health Health per person variesreflects among the provinces and of territories. Amongand theterritory provinces, care needs, well as the of health services, personnel compensation 2014, total healthasspending perorganization person is forecast to be highesthealth in Newfoundland and Labrador and the sharing of costs between public and private sectors. Note that per person spending ($6,953) and Alberta ($6,783) and lowest in Quebec ($5,616) and British Columbia ($5,865).on health is expected to be higher in the territories due to their small, dispersed population tions. The amount spent per person reflects the population of each province and territory and its health care needs, as well as the organization of health services, health personnel compensation and the sharing of costs between public and private sectors. Note that per person spending on health is expected to be higher in the territories due to small, dispersed population tions. Source: Canadian Institute fortheir Health Information,

National Health Expenditure Trends,1975 to 2014 Health care spending on seniors

Percentage Increase

1.1%

B.C.

National Health Expenditure Trends, 1975 to 2014

Health spending per person varies among provinces and territories. Among the provinces, in 2014, total health spending per person is forecast to be highest in Newfoundland and Labrador ($6,953) and ($6,783) and lowest ggovernment in Quebec ($5,616) and British Columbia ($5,865). Variations in Alberta provincial/tterritorial hhealth eexpenditure

SOURCE Businesslike, February 28. 2013 In Japan, the Rising Cost of Elder Care— and Dying Alone

The cost of aging | WORK BAZAAR

15


Source: Global Age-friendly Cities: A Guide, Figure 6. World Health Organization, 2007

The impact of elder care affects communities, families and individuals in more ways than just financial cost.

Percentage of clients with a distressed caregiver

35%

A caregiver’s stress level – whether they are a family member, neighbour or friend – will increase with the amount of care they provide.

16

30%

Caregiver distress, by number of hours of informal care per week

32%

25% 20%

17%

15% 10%

8%

Informal caregivers’ dist provided. Almost one-thi expressed distress, four caregivers who provided

5% 0%

0–10

11–20

21+

Number of Hours of Informal Care Source: Home Care Reporting System, 2009–2010, Canadian Institute for Health Information.

C AS E STORY

FEATU R ES

Rising tensions from being locked inside lead a caregiving daughter to unlock her mom and let her mom wander the streets

• the community looks out for the mother and she gets exercise, is more social and is calmer • an estimated 6% of Japan’s population suffer from dementia or show early signs of it • more than 10,000 elders with dementia went missing in 2013 • dementia patients buy the same products repeatedly/forget to pay

WORK BAZAAR | QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH

• dementia patients forget bank PINS and cheque books • new programs teach sales clerks and staff how to handle customers who show signs of dementia • 5.4 million retail and bank employees have taken government-funded courses of this kind • dementia patients may cause traffic accidents • families have to pay damages if dementia patient under their care causes an accident

I NSI GHT • aid can come from communities and industries such as retail as well as health and social sectors • public education about the disease can mitigate its negative impact • wandering dementia patients have time to develop meaningful relationships • dementia patients are vulnerable to legal liability SOURCE BloombergBusiness, November 3, 2014 Dementia Crisis Forces Akiko’s Mom to Roam Osaka Streets


%

%

g %

%

Functional Capacity

Proportion

60%

in in

dividnction uals

environment

determinants

However, there exits an Early life Adult life Older age Gender Age Culture opportunity to Rehabilitation and ensuring Maintaining over life’s course Control factors of active aging and maintaining independence Source: Kalache & independence Kickbusch Growth and (12). Maintaining Maintaining independence Health and the quality of highest life Economic social services lessen the strain Global Age-friendly Cities: A Guide, Figure 4. Worldlevel HealthofOrganization, Source: Global Age-friendly Cities: A Guide, Figure 3. World Health Organization, 2007 development possible function 2007 and preventing disability determinants Early lifeAge Adult life Older age Gender by focusing on and Maintaining highest Maintaining independence Source: Kalache & KickbuschGrowth (12). Health and Behavioural maintaining Economic socialActive services Global Age-friendly Control Cities: Adevelopment Guide, Figure 4.of World Health Organization, possible level of2007 function and disability determinants factors active aging and maintaining R aindependence determinants npreventing When independence is affected by functional gecapacity of fu Aging Social independence. in in nctio determinants d Functional Capacity

Functional Capacity

Disability threshold Maintaining

60%

Mild Limitation

Rehabilitation and ensuring the quality of life

independence over life’s course

ividu

Gender

Rthreshold ange Disability Health and When independence isModerate affected by functional capacity 50% Limitation o Economic social services in in f functio determinants divid Severe Limitation uals n 32% Mild Limitation 40% Moderate Limitation 30% Severe Limitation 20% Total Impairment

Disability threshold Total Impairment Social determinants

32%

Active Aging

Behavioural determinants

als

60% SevereAging, Limitation Source: Canadian Community Health Survey—Healthy 2008–2009, Statistics Canada. 32% Mild Limitation 40% 50% 40%

Impairment Moderate Total Limitation 30% Severe Limitation

32%

Culture Personal determinants Control factors of active aging and maintaining independence Physical Source: Global Age-friendly Cities: A Guide, Figure 3. World Health Organization, 2007 environment

n

Rehabilitation and ensuring the quality of life

Age Rehabilitation and ensuring 19% 15% Source: Kalache & Kickbusch (12). Personal the quality of life determinants Global Age-friendly Cities: A Guide, Figure 4. World Health Organization, 2007 10% 10% Physical 6% 5% environmentAge 2% 4% 19% 2% 5% 15% 0% Source: Kalache & Kickbusch (12). Culture 45–64 65–74 75–84 85+ Global Age-friendly Cities: A Guide, Figure 4. World Health Organization, 2007 When independence is affected by functional capacity 10% Source: Global 5% AAge 6% Group Age-friendly Cities: Guide, Figure 3. World Health Organization, 2007 2% 2% 4% 5% 60% Source: Canadian Community Health Survey—Healthy Aging, 2008–2009, Statistics Canada. Mild Limitation 45–64 65–74 75–84 85+ When independence is affected by functional capacity 50% Age GroupModerate Limitation Proportion

%

The more elders need assistance, Mild Limitation 50% Moderate Limitation the bigger the Maintaining independence Control factors of active aging and maintaining independence Severe Limitation over life’s course strain on every 32% 40% Total Impairment level of our Early life Adult life Older age Gender 30% Maintaining independence coursehighest Control factors of active aging and maintaining independence Growth andover life’s Maintaining Maintaining independence Health and nation’s health Economic social services development possible level of function and preventing disability 20% determinants 19% 15% – from national Early life Adult life Older age Gender 10% Growth and Maintaining highest Health and 10% Maintaining 5% Behaviouralexpenditures 6%independence Economic social services Active determinants development possible level Randisability 2% 4% of function2% and preventing 5% determinants g e to personal 0% o Aging Social i75–84 n ind f func85+ 45–64 65–74 determinants ividu tion connections with als Behavioural Age Group Personal Active determinants RaDisability threshold nge determinants dependent elders. ofHealth Aging Source: Canadian Community Physical Social fu Survey—Healthy Aging, 2008–2009, Statistics Canada. When independence is affected by functional capacity

Proportion

%

Source: Kalache & Kickbusch (12). Global Age-friendly Cities: A Guide, Figure 4. World Health Organization, 2007

n

Functional Capacity

%

Source: Global Age-friendly Cities: A Guide, Figure 3. World Health Organization, 2007 Age

Behavioural Personal determinants determinants

There is a natural range of ability Culture Personal that is negated determinants Physical Source: Global environment Age-friendly Cities: A Guide, Figure 3. Worldby Healtha Organization, 2007of matrix Culture controllable Source: Global Age-friendly Cities: A Guide, Figure 3. World Health Organization, 2007 conditions. Social determinants

Active Aging Physical

environment

The cost of aging | WORK BAZAAR

17


Comparisons of long-term home care clients and seniors living in residential care facilities showed that the latter tend to have higher care and support needs. 18

WORK BAZAAR | QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH


Prominence of dementia Is dementia a normal part of aging? Is enough being done to prevent onset of cognitive decline?

Prominence of dementia | WORK BAZAAR

19


One of the determinants of maintaining independence is mental health.

Estimated age-specfic annual increase of dementia

- and middle-income countries

High-income countries

Age 20

100

50

Estimated age-specfic annual increase of dementia 200

0 60 – 64

65 – 69

70 – 74

75 – 79 High-income 80 – 84 countries 85 – 89

90 – 94 Europe 95+

North America

and middle-income countries Age group Low(years)

Latin America

Median length of hospital Source: Dementia: A Public Health Priority. WHO150 2012www.who.int/mental_health/publications/dementia_report_2012 North America

stay for inpatient mental health days, 2009–2010

Median 100

length of hospital stay inpatient Age 20 – 64forAge 65 – 74 mental health days, 2009–2010 8

Age 20 – 64 50 8

Age 65 – 74

15

Age 75 – 84

18

15

Age 75 – 84

18

Sources Discharge Abstract Database, Hospital Mo Ontario Mental Health Reporting System, C Reporting System, 2009–2010, Canadian In Reporting System, 2009–2010, Alberta He

Age 85 +

18

Age 85 +

18

0 60 – 64

65 – 69

70 – 74

75 – 79

80 – 84

85 – 89

90 – 94

95+

Age group (years) Source: Dementia: A Public Health Priority. WHO 2012www.who.int/mental_health/publications/dementia_report_2012 85 – 89

90 – 94

95+

Age group (years)

Public Health Priority. WHO 2012www.who.int/mental_health/publications/dementia_report_2012 75 – 79 80 – 84 85 – 89 90 – 94 95+

20

Latin America

8

According to Europe North America the Alzheimer ntries Latin America Society of Canada dementia is not a part of normal aging.

ge group (years)

Media menta

North America

150

Latin America

However, it is prominent in 65 – 69western 70 – 74 75 – 79 80 – 84 countries.

Europe

Low- and middle-income countries

Incidence/1000 person-years

Within the diverse realm of mental health lies dementia – the loss of intellectual capacity and personality integration, due to the loss of or damage to specfic annual increase of dementia neurons in the brain. h-income countries Europe se of dementia

Incidence/1000 person-years

200

WORK BAZAAR | QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH

www.who.int/mental_health/publications/dementia_report_2012

Sources Discharge Abstract Database, Hospital Morbidity Database, National Ambulatory Care Reporting System, Ontario Mental Health Reporting System, Continuing Care Reporting System and National Rehabilitation Reporting System, 2009–2010, Canadian Institute for Health Information; Alberta Ambulatory Care Sources Reporting System, 2009–2010, Alberta Health and Wellness. Discharge Abstract Database, Hospital Morbidity Database, National Ambulatory Care Reporting System, Ontario Mental Health Reporting System, Continuing Care Reporting System and National Rehabilitation Reporting System, 2009–2010, Canadian Institute for Health Information; Alberta Ambulatory Care Reporting System, 2009–2010, Alberta Health and Wellness.


A 2012 World Health Organization seven-stage model for planning dementia services. Pre-diagnosis

Public awareness of the disease, its symptoms and where to go for help if someone is worried that they may have dementia

Diagnosis

Receiving the diagnosis

Post-diagnostic support Information and support for the person with dementia and their family caregivers to enable them to come to terms with the disease, plan for the future and make the best use of their current circumstances; continuing to do what they can still do and not concentrating on declining abilities

Co-ordination and care management Assessing (and regularly reassessing) the needs of people with dementia and arranging care in conjunction with them and their caregivers

Community services This is when care is needed at increasingly short intervals, behavioural and psychological symptoms become more prevalent and the person with dementia is less able to care for themselves; care may be provided in the person with dementia’s own home or community facilities

Continuing care Care is needed continuously, unpredictable or behavioural and psychological symptoms become more demanding; this stage should also include when people with dementia require hospital care for whatever reason

end of life palliative care This is the special form of continuing care when a person with dementia is close to the end of his or her life

Much of the current attention paid to dementia focuses on treatment and gives little priority to prevention as part of the solution.

Median length of hospital stay for inpatient

The co-ordination care management stage should apply throughout the journey of dementia care from diagnosis to palliative care. mentaland health days, 2009–2010

Age 20 – 64

Age 65 – 74

Age 75 – 84

Age 85 +

fIg 4.2 Seven-stage model for planning dementia services (3) 8

15

18

18

lonG-term Care serviCes C AS E coordination STO RY F E AT RE S care services Effective of ongoing health andUsocial after diagnosis is vital for achieving improved quality of life forand • his name is Pepper A robot that can people with dementia and their caregivers beyond$2,147 the pre-diagnoshe costs CAN treat the elderly tic and diagnostic phases which are • health-system based. A wide it has an “emotional variety of services for post-diagnostic support, serpeople’s needs engine”community for understanding Sources vices, services for continuing care and emotions end-of-life palliative care are Discharge Abstractalso Database, Hospital(Figure Morbidity4.2). Database, National Ambulatory Care Reporting System, essential • it can also babysit children Ontario Mental Health Reporting System, Continuing Care Reporting System and National Rehabilitation • some robots are Reporting System, 2009–2010, Canadian Institute for Health Information; Alberta Ambulatory Care The term “long-term care” is often useddesigned to describe range of tothe carry objects, Reporting System, 2009–2010, Alberta Health and Wellness.

services which help meet both the medical and other arenonmedical designedneed to of people with a chronic illness or disability whotherapeutic cannot care care for offer themselves. Long-term care includes: • post-diagnostic services: planning for the future; offering support, advice and information as needed; and helping maintain Source: Dementia: A Public Health Priority. WHO 2012 independence; • community services: helping people with dementia to remain at

As the aims are interlinked, coordination is required across the SOURCE IN SIG range ofHT services to provide a seamless response and a partnerThe Independent, February 8, 2015 ship approach. Long-term care can Japanese be both‘robot formal • technology can with aand heart’ will care unpaid / informal.and Unpaid provided by family and the elderly and children understand helpcare is theforcare friends. Formal care needs is care provided by paid caregivers and can with emotional include nursing care andones personal care provided in a care home or as well as physical domiciliary setting.can afford • not everyone

a robot

The majority of people with dementia live in their own homes in the community. Moreover, most people would wish to remain living in their own homes for as long as possible. This message is consistently given by the public, by older people generally, and by people with dementia specifically. In addition, economic research carried out in high-income countries has shown that the largest cost driver for dementia is the cost of institutional care (3).

Prominence of dementia | WORK BAZAAR

Most high-income countries are moving, or trying to move, away from the institutional traditions of the early part of the past century, not only for major mental disorders but also for the care of older

21


22

WORK BAZAAR | QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH

Informal caregiver support is key to enabling many seniors to remain in their communities safely and independently as they age.


Growing trends How do new research on dementia, shifting views of retirement and more lifestyle options for mature adults change the big picture?

Growing trends | WORK BAZAAR

23


A 2013 study by INSERM, the French government’s health research agency, found that each additional year spent at work reduces a person’s risk of dementia by 3.2%.

“For each additional year of work, the risk of getting dementia is reduced by 3.2 percent” Age-friendly city topic areas

Ho us

n atio

Employment and civic participation are further recognized as important components of elder health by the World Health Organization in their age-friendly communities report.

ing

ort nsp Tra Out d and oor sp buil aces ding s

ion

Age-friendlycicity pattopic areas

arti

lp ocia

ng usi Ho

d bu

p ildin aces gs

Co andmmun info icati rma on tion

Agefriendly rt city ppoces u s i nity erv muealth s m o C nd h a

ial

Soc

ion

ipat

tic par

R soc espec ial i t an nclu d sion

n atio icip ent art ym ic p plo Civ d em an

Co andmmun info icati rma on tion

n

tio

rta

n atio icip ent art ym ic p plo Civ d em an

po

ns Tra

S Agefriendly t R r city soc espec ppoces u s i ial i t an nclu d nityh serv u m ealt sion m o Out C nd h d a an oor s

Source: Global Age-friendly Cities: A Guide, Figure 6. World Health Organization, 2007

Source: Global Age-friendly Cities: A Guide, Figure 6. World Health Organization, 2007 Source: CBS.com, July 15, 2013 “Dementia risk reduced by putting off retirement”

35%

WORK BAZAAR | QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH30% nts with egiver

24

25%

Caregiver distress, by number of hours of informal care per week 35%

32%

Caregiver distress, by number of

32%


Labour force participation rates, ages 55 and over

Health scientists aren’t the only ones interested in keeping mature adults at work.

Re-employment at time of leaving long-term job,1993–2010

50%

Men males total females

40% 30%

Women

82.7%

78.3% 68.3%

62.9%

63.7%

57.2%

46.8%

41.3%

20% 10% 0% 1976 ‘81

‘86

‘91

‘96

2001

‘06

50 – 54 55 – 59 years years

‘11

60 – 64 TOTAL years

50 – 54 55 – 59 years years

60 – 64 years

Source: Stats Canada. Financial Post, January 28, 2014 Most older workers who leave career jobs return to work within a decade

Source: Statistics Canada (2014e)

TOTAL

A rising percentage of Canadians over the age of 55 are continuing to work. However, historically re-employment after age 59 has dropped off significantly.

Re-employment at time of leaving long-term job,1993–2010 The stages of retirement Men

males total females

82.7%

Women

2010 study 62.9%

78.3% 68.3%

stage 1 46.8% imagination -15 years

retirement day 63.7% 57.2% stage 2 stage 3 hesitation anticipation 41.3%

-5 years

-2 years

stage 1 stage 3 50 – 54 55 – 59 60 –imagination 64 TOTAL 50 – 54 55 – 59anticipation 60 – 64 TOTAL years years years years years years Source: Statistic Canada (2014e) 2005 study Source: Stats Canada. Financial Post, January 28, 2014 Most older workers who leave career jobs return to work within a decade

stage 4 realization

0 years

stage 5 reorientation

+1 years stage 4 liberation

Source: www.davedickinsonbenefits.com/blog/category/group%20retirement%20plans

stage 6 reconciliation +15 years

stage 5 reorientation

stage 6 reconciliation

Growing trends | WORK BAZAAR

25


1976 ‘81

‘86

‘91

‘96

2001

‘06

50 – 54 55 – 59 years years

‘11

60 – 64 TOTAL years

50 – 54 55 – 59 years years

60 – 64 years

TOTAL

Source: Stats Canada. Financial Post, January 28, 2014 Most older workers who leave career jobs return to work within a decade

Source: Statistics Canada (2014e)

Attitudes toward retirement are shifting too. In decades past hesitation was not commonly recognized as part of retiring. Adults today may hesitate to retire as they weigh their career investment, current ability and aspirations for life’s third quarter.

26

The stages of retirement retirement day

2010 study stage 1 imagination -15 years

stage 2 hesitation -5 years

stage 1 imagination

stage 3 anticipation

-2 years

stage 4 realization

0 years

stage 3 anticipation

stage 5 reorientation

+1 years stage 4 liberation

stage 6 reconciliation +15 years

stage 5 reorientation

stage 6 reconciliation

2005 study

Source: www.davedickinsonbenefits.com/blog/category/group%20retirement%20plans

C AS E STORY

FEATU R ES

IN SIG HT

Despite a set retirement age of 60 years old, 1 in 5 elders in Japan are employed— the highest in the developed world

• Japan has the world’s oldest population • the worlds longest average life expectancy at 83 years old • elders are paid less than in their younger years • retirement age will be raised to 65 by 2025

• working elders help mitigate public debt created by pensions • some employers are reluctant to keep older employees on longer because it’s perceived as expensive • pension don’t provide enough money to live comfortably

WORK BAZAAR | QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH

• an industrious culture encourages people to keep working • some elders choose to work for the sake of their health SOURCE Businessweek. August 30, 2012 In Japan, Retirees Go On Working


Employment for mature adults

Targeted employment agencies

The marketplace has begun to respond to the growing demand of mature adults seeking employment options in their later years. Many of these services are in their infancy.

C AS E STO RY

F E AT U RE S

IN SIG HT

Occupational scientists followed 5 professionals’ journey before and during retirement

• all five participants experienced mandatory retirement in Japan • four went on to have other full-time jobs; the fifth had a part-time job • all five said they experienced less stress and more enjoyment in their work after retirement • they enjoyed advising younger employees on their area of expertise

• the meaning of work changes with age: > work used to mean challenge, becoming an adult, occupation identity and social responsibility > later it became responsibility, stress, fatigue, but satisfaction > after retirement it means sharing wisdom and choosing to give back

SOURCE Retirement Experience as Transition to Old Age Etsuko Odwara PhD, OTR, Serei Christopher University SSO: USA Annural Research Conference 2011 Annual Research Conference

Growing trends | WORK BAZAAR

27


Quantitative review The benefits of helping older people prolong independence trickle into every corner of community health. Employment and civic engagement present vast potential to play a role in maintaining elder independence. The number of mature adults pursuing employment opportunities is growing.

28

WORK BAZAAR | QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH


OB S E RVAT ION S

OBSERVATIONS | WORK BAZAAR

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30

WORK BAZAAR | OBSERVATIONS


User observations The following conversations were driven by the desire to disprove the assumptions gathered in the quantitative research. Some were spontaneous interventions with strangers in public places. Others were planned meetings with potential clientele.

User observations | WORK BAZAAR

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I had a difficult time finding someone who has interested in slowing down when they retire. Some people want to continue working as long as possible. Others want to pass on their expertise through teaching. One woman said she wasn’t motivated to do the work she used to love because she doesn’t have anyone to work for anymore.

I met Tatiana on the metro one evening. She is a receptionist at a medical clinic. She says she will work until she’s gone – until she dies. She’s a people-person, and doesn’t want to sit at home with nothing to do. Tatiana prides herself in being able to remember her client’s names.

Brian is an engineer. When he retires he’d like to go back to college so that he can get his masters degree and become a teacher.

32

WORK BAZAAR | OBSERVATIONS

Miss Mary used to love to cook. She tells me this most times I visit the at the Prospect Park Senior Center. She was very popular at the elementary school cafeteria she ran. However, since her husband passed away, she doesn’t cook much anymore – there’s no one to cook for!


Some people have plans for personal projects that relate to their careers.

Dean is a chief credit officer of financial services. He’s making plans to retire in the coming months. He has some plans to develop his own lucrative initiative with his new-found free time. This project would be an extension of his career, but something he was unable to find support for at his current job. He also speaks with admiration about his peers who have retired from their demanding jobs to pursue passion projects, even though they require a lot of labour – like running a winery.

Anke is a founder and creative director of a branding agency. She retired a month ago and is exploring the balance between developing her artistic skills and the demands of looking after her grandchildren. She’s spending time with new communities of people in search of the right fit with her own creative passions.

Others see retirement as an opportunity to get back to what they really wanted to do, but that path was too risky in the past. Others still dream of pursuing those passions but still consider it too risky. Family expectations can make retirement a very busy time, making personal pursuits a priority that requires defending.

User observations | WORK BAZAAR

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WORK BAZAAR | OBSERVATIONS


Watching and listening The following observations were taken from existing published media, allowing us to leverage the relationships that other researchers have previously developed and documented.

Watching and listening | WORK BAZAAR

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The dark side of dementia can be heartbreaking. The person with dementia loses independence and self-esteem. Their personal relationships are impacted by the effects of the disease. Caregivers can experience heavy emotional burdens.

Judy has dementia and spends weekdays at the memory centre. She knows her short term memory is bad, but says it’s not so bad. She writes things down to mitigate the problems. She says Saturday’s are the most boring day of the week because there’s nothing going on – not even a good soap on TV.

Marilyn is the daughter of Judy. She quit her job in order to be her mother’s caregiver. One of her biggest struggles is the arguments she and her mother have. Anger is often a symptom of dementia. She lives with those arguments everyday, but her mother forgets them every morning.

In a RadioLab podcast I learned about a dementia care unit that installed a bus stop – not for catching the bus, but as a destination for escaped patients to wait while their minds returned to the present. The novel, Still Alice, illuminated the frustrations of a career woman loosing independence during early-onset dementia.

This Humans of New York post had this to share: “I’m going to find a job, goddammit. Nobody is going to force me into retirement at 61. I moved to New York at the age of 35 with nothing but $1000 and a cat. I’ve reinvented myself once. And I can do it again.” It was shared over 13,000 times.

On the up-swing, creative care solutions are being created for dementia.

36

WORK BAZAAR | OBSERVATIONS


These women were part of the documentary film Advanced Style about fashionable mature women in New York. Their stories revealed many perspectives on working into the golden years. One that stood out was the feeling of not having to prove anything or impress anyone like one does in younger years.

One woman got a job when her husband was sick. He passed away and she found that putting her energy into her work was a way to stay grounded through the feeling devastation and feeling lost.

One woman talked about the philosophy that handto-mouth is better than nine-to-five. She believes that making-do is a matter of being thrifty. Another woman talked about how difficult it is to get a job as a hostess. Even with a strong reputation and impressive portfolio she felt her visible age was the reason she is turned away so frequently.

Another Country is a book about navigating the emotional terrain of aging baby boomers. There are many sad stories of miscommunications and conflicting priorities. Reading it helped me narrow my target demographic to not include the “old-old” and focus on the more independent “young-old.”

Many women in the film Advanced Style said they don’t “feel their age”– that the number is irrelevant. Their attitude was that “you just carry on doing what you’re doing”. Age is irrelevant for most everyday situations. Ability, culture and environment are far more relevant in affecting a person’s day-to-day. This means our service should not have an age criteria attached but instead be based on situational need.

Watching and listening | WORK BAZAAR

37


This cloud of retirement stereotypes was developed for two reasons. One important part of brainstorming is to express the obvious in order to move beyond it. The second purpose was to share the stereotypes with potential clients and get their reactions.

Retirement stereotypes enjoy money you saved age is only in your you’ll be

mind

bored

miss having

time for entertainment and entertaining

colleagues

health only worsens

homemakers don’t retire more time with spouse or partner

frugally or go without volunteer in your community feeling irrelevant babysitting grandchildren

live

a dangerous

traveling

WORK BAZAAR | OBSERVATIONS

driver

time to relax refine

38

depression is inevitable

hobbies

short-term needing

planning

help

memory loss


Questionnaires Topic: occupation

1. For much of my life I :

These questionnaires were developed for a workshop that never materialized.

Topic: Time well spent

1. What are your favourite activities these days? (list 1 to 3)

because: 2. Why do you enjoy them?

2. Later in life I decided to:

because:

3. If I could change one thing about that transition it would be:

3. Name 1–3 of your talents or skills that you enjoy that your community could benefit from?

They were intended to understand difficulties during the transition to retirement and to understand what activities mature adults enjoy.

4. What impact can you imagine from them?

Your answers are anonymous. They will be used as research for a Masters thesis. If you’d like to know or participate further, my name is Eleanor Rosenberg. You can reach me by email at: rosee247@newschool.edu or by phone at 646-421-5349. Thank you very much and I hope you have a lovely day.

Questionnaires | WORK BAZAAR

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Sharing what was heard A complete narrative of the observations were made into a YouTube video to share during brainstorming sessions.

40

WORK BAZAAR | OBSERVATIONS


BR A IN STO R MIN G

BRAINSTORMING | WORK BAZAAR

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42

WORK BAZAAR | BRAINSTORMING


Video responses The video of observations was shared on YouTube, spread through email and presented to workshops. The following pages are an edited collection of written responses.

Video responses | WORK BAZAAR

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Many people shared positive stories about their own retirement situations and those of their relatives. Positive stories included pursuing hobbies and more time spent with family and friends.

from Mary:

from Carol:

I felt sad watching the video to think that one person felt they had to work until they died – life should end more happily than that.

Wow, watched the video...how moving! We moved our parents out here when they were 85 and 86 so we could look after them....and they probably had the best 10 years of their lives, ...my mum died just before 95, and my dad was able to stay on in their Bowen house for another couple of years, and just from 98 to 99 1/3 in a care home (which actually he adapted to pretty well....he’d been a doctor in a Home for the Aged,...a long time ago). Anyway, we were able to craft a life that supported them both in their senior senior years...my dad painted oils until the week he died, played the piano, read the Globe and Mail every day....my mother had a very sharp mind, even though she’d been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s....she could do the acrostic crossword in the NYT, and was more on top of the news than we were.

At 76 I feel more vulnerable and don’t know how much longer I will be able to do all I want to do – how much longer will this body will allow traveling, and do not want to end my life with Alzheimer’s. I guess I am later in life and do not have to balance work outside the home. I stopped working at 62, when my husband retired from his overseas job. I had worked there also. We returned to my hometown where I had not lived for 18 years. I was thrilled, it was a time to renew friendships and live in my home where I had raised 4 children. Four of my best friends still lived around. We had brought up our children together. When the children were young, none of us worked. The world was so different then. Now several of them had taken part time jobs or volunteer work in libraries or hospitals. My husband was asked to return to work locally at his work place, so I had a lot of time on my hands. I did not want to get a job and had no need to do so. However I did realize that I had to find something challenging to do. I decided that I wanted to take violin lessons. This was the most difficult project I had undertaken. I had not touched a violin since high school days (47 years ago). I continued with this for 10 years. At this time my husband retired for good, and he and I spent a lot of time together.

from Brenda: Certainly good health including brain health are critical to graceful aging. As I age it gets harder to learn new things. Newer electronics and communication devices are especially challenging. Without adequate financial security few of the other pursuits are possible. Loneliness and isolation are a major issue for many elders. Lack the feeling of belonging, I’d like to do more of the “fun” things: travel, hobbies, volunteer. Cynthia: I think one of the biggest challenges is knowing how much you need to save for your retirement years, given the soaring costs of health care and long-term care. Should we be spending money on vacations? Helping our children? Or just saving everything we can?

44

WORK BAZAAR | BRAINSTORMING


If I could do one thing over, it would be to become more proficient with computers at a younger age. When you look at changing jobs later in life you realize that most jobs now require computer skills that may be beyond you. It would be good in some types of careers if a worker nearing retirement age had the option to have reduced hours/responsibilities. In a very demanding career it may become physically and mentally exhausting to keep up with the demands of the job. And yet the person may not be ready to just retire altogether. from Sylvie Anne: What comes through in this video for me is the contrast in themes. On the one hand, basic needs must be met and on the other hand quality of life, meaning and purpose are a huge driving factor in continued health and happiness. Where these ideas can be addressed separately, there also seems such a strong connection between the two. I am interested in where these two themes intersect. How do we continue to get our fundamental basic needs met and also derive meaning in our lives as we age and as our abilities, skills, knowledge and ability to contribute evolves? from Kate: I live in a city of 26 000 in Northern Canada. I spend a lot of time hanging out with seniors and they often tell me that “there’s no such thing as the golden years”. They’ve talked about the frustrations of being let down by a body you could once depend on, or how foolish they feel when they’ve forgotten something. They assure me it isn’t all bad, they all agree that their quality of life is better if they have stuff to do; art, activities, volunteering, music or something that makes them feel valued. They talk about their ideas for housing and aging in place. They don’t want senior only housing, they want it mixed up. Make generational housing complexes, put them in buildings with families and children and single people where they have the ability to participate in life. And they

don’t want to have to live or die in continuing care facilities. They want more access to services that helped them stay in their homes...like home care nurses. The best piece of advice I get regularly from them, do the things I want to do now. Don’t wait until I’m retired or have the money. They never regret the things they’ve done, they regret the things they haven’t done. from Unknown: Certainly good health including brain health are critical to graceful aging. As I age it gets harder to learn new things. Newer electronics and communication devices are especially challenging. from Sue

Common concerns included health, learning new technology, aging in place, financial planning, feeling embarrassed about memory loss and feeling lonely.

I am also interested in the questions that you are examining especially the issue of older people transitioning to new jobs as they age. I would suggest that you might want to look at Encore.org, a neat organization that is quite busy in the US. and has been introduced to Canada fairly recently through the Social Venture Partnerships organization. I would also suggest that there are numerous coaches who are helping people define their purpose in order to plan for the next chapter of their lives. I also involved with the Toronto Foundation and we are looking at ways of connecting donors to many of the non profit organizations in Toronto - something that will probably look a bit different than the traditional volunteer route. The pilot group for this project is just beginning so I can’t really tell you much about it at the moment. I have also included a paper which you might be interested in. Susan and I wrote the paper about the research I did a number of years ago which involved talking with women from 60 to 90 years of age.

Video responses | WORK BAZAAR

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46

WORK BAZAAR | BRAINSTORMING


Expert engagement The following conversations were a way to mine for more business ideas that would suit the specific community of Bowen Island, British Columbia – the intended pilot community to develop the business.

Expert engagement | WORK BAZAAR

47


These interviews inspired dozens of service ideas and some important parameters that later helped narrow down the many possible solutions. > The service will avoid using the word “senior” whenever possible because of its negative connotations. > The service considers connecting community members an integral part of supporting an individual’s needs.

48

Colleen runs the Caring Circle on Bowen Island. I spent nearly two hours picking her brain about the needs of mature adults there. Her organization’s focus is on bringing more healthcare to the island. Her achievements toward this goal, including the creation of the organization were inspiring and encouraging.

Renate is president of an elders’ housing co-operative and used to be an active member of Seniors Keeping Young (S.K.Y.) Speaking with her I discovered that the word “senior” doesn’t resonate with many mature adults, and an organization with the s-word in its name would discourage some potential members.

Sylvie Anne is a candidate for a masters degree in counseling with a research project about group healing practices that includes indigenous healing methodologies.

Carol was introduced to me as someone with many shared interests and valuable skills. She showed me her current proposals for leadership programming in the community as well as a research paper on coaching women’s later career stages.

WORK BAZAAR | BRAINSTORMING


> The service will foster confidence and responsible risk-taking for its users as they navigate a time of transition and many unknowns. Graham is working on developing the Snug Cove house—an affordable housing initiative for elders. He warned of small communities’ tenancy to experience volunteer and donation burn-out and how the island’s proximity to a major city detracts from a united sense of local community.

Soren is the current chair of the Bowen Foundation. We discussed the advantages of a well planned transition to retirement and the scope of diverse needs that exist among the elderly living on the Island.

These interviews also produced valuable local research material.

List of contributing experts Andrew Hume. Health Management Consultant, Andrew Hume Associates Colleen O’Neil. Program Director, Caring Circle – Health Care Services Carol MacKinnon. Leadership Coach and Certified Conscious Aging Facilitator Graham Ritchie. Chair, Snug Cove House Society – affordable housing for elders Jennifer Nichols. Communications specialist, BC Healthy Communities Ray Garcia. Entrepreneur, Venture Growth Advisor, Buoyant Capital Renate Williams. Chair, Bowen Court Seniors Housing Cooperative Soren Hammerberg. Chair, Bowen Island Community Foundation Sylvie Anne Williams. MS candidate in education, counseling program. Acadia University Marie Maratos. MS candidate in occupational therapy. University of British Columbia Jerome Goh. Senior Design Lead, IDEO

Expert engagement | WORK BAZAAR

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WORK BAZAAR | BRAINSTORMING


Group sessions Two group brainstorming sessions pushed idea generation into high gear. Nearly everyone had a different career and cultural background. Participants in their 40s were particularly valuable because they were a demographic I had yet to hear from.

Group sessions | WORK BAZAAR

51


There is room for improvement regarding agefriendly culture at many workplaces and in certain fields of work. Applying for a new job or advancing one’s career within a company is made more difficult because of negative stigma around age. Independent artists who have been free agents for their whole careers are a unique category – one where the notion of retirement is a gray area.

52

Andrew and Jody couldn’t be more different in their retirement plans. Jody is a professional artist who sees retirement as likely to be a slight shift in the nature of her work. In the life of an artist, later years often bring heightened success. We discussed the difference between two common artists paths: the edgy upstart making a big splash on the scene verses a path of slow growth and increased critical recognition later in life. Andrew works in the tech industry and talked about how professional development opportunities are often offered to younger staff. There is an expectation that older people are slower to learn. Some older staff believe this about themselves. Other times long time employees are not considered for professional development because of their stability within the company.

WORK BAZAAR | BRAINSTORMING

Miranda is a playwright and a recruiter. Her creative path shares some similarities with Jody. Her experience as a recruiter was very enlightening though. We discussed the ways employers work around direct questions about age – which are illegal – in order to find out if a potential employee is young or not. We discussed the term“culture-fit” which in many cases can mean a lifestyle that includes long work days, a common situation in start-ups and in the technology industry. Culture fit is often an excuse to exclude certain demographics – mature adults being one of them. People with families are another. Miranda explained the different pricing structures used by recruitment agencies.


Navigating an uncertain future emerged as a major topic when discussing retirement with our class of 10 graduate students. Our class of ten students watched the observation video and tried to imagine how they will feel about retirement. They revealed that knowing how many years you have to live will impact what you do with the time. Not knowing how long to plan for is a confusing challenge.

We discussed the different types of financial planning we are considering for our own retirements and the value of investing in real estate.

Concerns about “fitting in” and wanting to have a reliable peer group dominated the conversation.

Group sessions | WORK BAZAAR

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WORK BAZAAR | BRAINSTORMING


Business ideas The following pages represent all the business and service ideas that emerged during the brainstorming phase. They’ve been clustered under themes that narrow down the key elements of a valuable service.

Business ideas | WORK BAZAAR

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Legacy building: personal fulfillment and giving back

Start-up culture – finding and giving money

Start-up culture investors An incubator or accelerator for older individuals looking to turn their hobbies into a business venture. Skill-trade network: time bank Educational resources for starting a new business. Networking services for new business ideas. Business hangout spot.

Incubator.

Individuals can network with others and recruit for their business. Co-working space with divisions in: employment, travel, etc. Have a co-working space as headquarters for uber-startup. A winter incubator retreat on Bowen. Partner with co-op for the retreat space, local Air B&Bs for accommodation.

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WORK BAZAAR | BRAINSTORMING

Grant writing alliance for later initiatives.

Investor matching services for business ideas.

Proceeds go to a “switching-gears” grant.

Software sharing.

Investor network : a way to give money to an initiative, to leave your legacy.

Personal online branding help / exchange. E.g. establish/ manage your online presence.


Start-up culture — Advice exchange – advise younger intergenerational We will need to make products and services for the elderly, so lets employ them to help us develop, produce and sell those goods and services.

Elder focus group network. Partner with incubator / accelerator: Advisory group for marketing (partner with TCAAN).

technology, business advice, industry advice Retirees as mentors for interns, comes with internship. (retiree and intern can exchange knowledge when trainer is busy.

Advice /service exchange technology, business advice, industry advice Mentorship center where elders can give advice, but also receive advice from other elders/youth.

A co-working space so they can talk to one another and feel connected as they work. (people working at home)

Tech savvy adults trade education services for non-tech services.

Skill share.

Time-banking centre.

Co-working space.

Young people managing older folks’ online media – while teaching them to know what works with which industry. Pair two people. High school partnership with grade 8 class.

Business ideas | WORK BAZAAR

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Constant growth: continuing education and occupational support

Employment and recruitment flexibility, culture fit Opportunities for retired people to come together and find work or something to do on a daily basis – similar to a temp agency. Recruitment agency for fun employment choices, nothing serious.

Recruitment for part time employment. Sabbaticals from companies. Partner with University or incubator. The morning shift: recruit for morning jobs because mature adults wake up earlier!

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WORK BAZAAR | BRAINSTORMING

Staffing/temp agency for experienced workers.

Employer services Teaching employers to give older workers learning opportunities.

Culture fit pairing. Job share placement with new moms. Job share placement. Two people apply for one position. A job agency for elders, run by elders.

Recruitment coaching for HR to position the positive in finding elder employees. Outreach to younger individuals just starting their career (or well into their careers) to bring in new perspectives or new technology ideas and brainstorm ideas together.

Employer education Classes for the employers to learn about the shifting needs of aging populations. Internships placements. Service is paired with free elder education. Job share placement. Educate employers to let their younger employees share a job with a retiring employee. Caregivers give workshops of agefriendly environments.


Elder education Lectures to keep fresh on new ideas, new trends, new technologies without being thought of as too old. Classes/sessions in every school/university which includes elderly talking about their experience and young generation talking about theirs. Both generations learn from each other. Trade school for handmade crafts. Etsy education classes

Teaching An accelerated bachelor’s/master’s degree program for older learners. A service that guides elders to existing training programs etc, that gets them thinking about options. Secret questions forum – no stigma attached Technology classes: deliver life and post on YouTube channel follow up: YouTube sponsor Tech training for mature adults by youth.

Volunteering

Elders teaching arts to elders.

Volunteer placement service.

Schools or colleges collaborating with retirees. Artists can advise to classes.

Network of volunteering opportunities – a clear way to find out about them, and the expectation for retirees to be seeking them out.

Community education

WOOFing for elders.

Classes for the community to learn about the shifting needs of aging populations.

Caregivers give workshops of agefriendly environments.

Business ideas | WORK BAZAAR

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Networking: social, emotional and practical support

Personal management finances, relocating, healthcare A program that will help retirees make sure they have everything in order. A retirees branch of Ten Thousand Coffees. Lifecoaching for retirement. Help with demystifying healthcare and/or finances.

Health care Filling the gaps left by our shrinking health services. The Caring Circle is doing a good job on this issue.

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WORK BAZAAR | BRAINSTORMING

(Re) location management

Networking and communications

Re-location services for people wanting to move after they retire.

Having people to share their lifestory or conversation partner.

Making phone call. So that elders receive more phone calls.

Re location services for families needing to plan for closer care.

Spend time with lots of people. They have someone to keep talking to.

Art School partnership: pair an elder with a artist to share “a lifetime of material.”

Help manage living situation: family counseling.

Social transportation Reliable transportation: hire elders to drive. A carpool service to events that involves phone calls to announce community events.

Connect with others in a similar state of transition (identify people to ease and support the transition).

Elder run taxi service where proceeds go to more benches. Part of the ride involves seeing a community social calendar.


Personal management– emotional health Retirement “therapy” for coping with leaving a long term career and how to continue a life with purpose. Support group for working elders. Support group for mature consultants Explore the emotional aspect in people who are transitioning into their retired lives.

Recognizing different types of individuals and their levels of comfort in accepting and starting their transitions could be helpful, because I feel like there is quite a variety of elders with different types of self identities. Intergenerational art or music therapy.

A place to be A place to interact with younger people. (even though they also like hanging out with peers)

Mentorship centre.

Co-working space. a place to go, meet people, network and find something to do. Resource centre.

on weekends Offer weekend programming (when not much is offered for elders).

Job agency.

Incubator.

Caregiver support Support group for care givers.

Business ideas | WORK BAZAAR

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Design principals These categories are our Design Principals and provide a clear path toward value for our clients. Our service will need to: • Enable legacy building by supporting personal fulfillment and ways to give back to the community. • Allow for constant growth by creating opportunities for continuing education and occupational support. • Help our clients develop networks that provide social, emotional and functional support.

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WORK BAZAAR | BRAINSTORMING


BU S IN E S S C O N C E P T

BUSINESS CONCEPT | WORK BAZAAR

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WORK BAZAAR | BUSINESS CONCEPT


A different kind of career centre Western countries have an aging population to care for and that same population has vast untapped potential. Why not create a business that benefits society by increasing our tax base and offers mature adults work on their own terms? A career centre that helps people find part-time work or become self-employed can do this.

A different kind of career centre | WORK BAZAAR

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If we create more flexible employment options, mature adults will keep working longer, which makes the tax base larger for longer. The cost of caring for the elderly will go down because additional years at work improves the chances of good health.

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Logic model

Lower health care costs larger tax base

Outcomes

more financial stability

Outputs

more income for individuals

Activities

advising individuals

Inputs / resources

community partners and alliances

WORK BAZAAR | BUSINESS CONCEPT

larger working population

more economic activity within the community

part-time employment recruitment

external partners and sponsors

more exchange of knowledge and culture

less social isolation

a client database / skill inventory

more part-time and age-friendly employment opportunities

more community engagement

pair individuals within the community to create opportunities

programming community and member workshops

manage our location space

staffing and consultants

rental space

office equipment


Individual’s lives will benefit from earning extra income, networking with inspiring peers, prolonging mental health through personal challenge and passing on skills to other community members.

Benefits to individuals

Created by Blake Ferguson from the Noun Project

financial security

peer engagement

cognitive challenge

intergenerational culture

Logic model | WORK BAZAAR

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result of engagement

Ambition: Reduce onset of dementia in Canada by 10% by the year 2035.

More employment for aging adults, new parents, and anyone needing a more flexible schedule

More financial security for aging adults, parents, and anyone needing a more flexible schedule

user engagement

Theory of change

Employers offer part time employment options

Individuals seek parttime employment with optimism

Workshops for employers about agefriendly workplaces and promote the benefits of part-time staff

Recruitment pairing service that helps individuals seek employment options

Educated members able to teach workshops

Partnership with recruitment agency

building blocks

PROJECT INTENTION

Establishing the building blocks required to deliver value to mature adults.

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WORK BAZAAR | BUSINESS CONCEPT


More cognitive challenge. Less fear of career shifts. Confidence in capability and support

More people mentally and physically engaged in generating income from their own business for more years of their life

Small businesses advance

Reduce dependence on government-support for income

Individuals network at resource center, offer workshops and invite external connections to give workshops

People seeking diverse income sources access resources for first-time small business owners

Members post their project pitches. They are shared with members only and participating potential investors

Small business owners advancing their project apply

Online and in-person resources (information and workshops) for skill development and skill sharing

Online and in-person resources (information, workshops, support group) for helping individuals start their own income generating initiative

Investor matching service where members present their initiative and we target potential investors

A philanthropic grant for mature individuals starting their own initiative

Web programmer

Mentorship/partnership from an incubator

Communication strategy for reaching potential investors

Knowledgeable nonprofit focused staff member

Investors contribute to a legacy product/ service

Theory of change | WORK BAZAAR

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We specialize in serving the growing number of mature adults who are leaving long term careers but keen to stay engaged.

Target audience Our primary target audience is a mature adult who is hesitating to retire from a long-term career. Our user is an mature adult who is contemplating the right time to leave a long-term employment situation. They are hesitant to leave the stability of their current job but they have a small bucket list of career ideas that have yet to be explored. They are interested in making an impact on a community they care about but they’re also interested in enjoying new freedom. A quiet inner voice that reminds them of passions they’ve neglected is getting louder as retirement planning comes into focus. They are aware of the potential that their years of experience can offer but are unsure how to make the most of it. They’re interested in connecting with the right people that could support a fulfilling vision of their future. They feel intimidated by the career shift. To understand where their contribution can fit best, they are looking for guidance in navigating the new landscape of resources and technologies available.

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They are financially secure – mortgage responsibilities and their children’s education have passed. They have savings for retirement but they’re interested in some extra cash because they don’t know how long they’ll live for. They have reasonable physical and mental health but they know they must actively work at maintaining it. The know that anything can happen, therefor they hesitate to make long term commitments. They’re also aware that their time is limited which becomes an inspiration to act on their bucket list. PARENTS, YOUTH and limited capacity Parents, youth and those with limited capacity would benefit from flexible part-time and self-employment opportunities as well. Although the initial Work Bazaar will focus on mature adults, there is potential to expand the service to serve these segments as well.


parents

limited ability

looking after children at home

health restrictions

full-time working population

elders

youth in school

• assure financial stability • assure stability • freedom andfinancial flexibility in their schedule • freedom and flexibility in their schedule • peer engagement • peer engagement • personal challenge andand fulfillment • personal challenge fulfillment • giving• back theirtheir community, building givingto back to community,legacy legacy building MOTIVES

MOTIVES

after leaving a career

Super-aged nation = 20% are 65+

Target audience | WORK BAZAAR

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WORK BAZAAR | BUSINESS CONCEPT


Community Experience Work Bazaar The Community Experience Work Bazaar is a different kind of career center. By bringing together under one roof: a self-employment incubator; a co-working space; and an employment agency we will help mature adults find flexible work situations that respect the freedom they value and makes the most of the experience they have to offer.

Community Experience Work Bazaar | WORK BAZAAR

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Finding extra income to fit your schedule and your passion

selfemployment incubator

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WORK BAZAAR | BUSINESS CONCEPT

part-time employment agency

drop-in co-working space


Main services

Created by Sebastian Langer from the Noun Project

Self-employment advising

Part-time employment recruitment

Co-working space and networking

Are you retiring from a fulltime career and curious about consulting part-time?

Do you have limited availability but still need some extra income?

Are you the type of person that will work better with people to bounce ideas off of?

Are you an artisan looking to sell your wares online for the first time?

Do you value the freedom of your open schedule but could use a little work now and then?

When you work at home do you find yourself needing technical support now and then?

Do you have a skill you’d like to develop into a business?

Do you need help getting a job done and have no one to ask?

Do you have a full house and need space to work?

We offer advising, workshops, and resources to teams or individuals who want to run their own show. Develop a business plan, understand your market and build a team through our network.

We use our local network and national partner to provide you with options for occasional, seasonal and parttime employment as well as opportunities to work from home.

Our co-working space comes equipped with access to tech support, a boardroom, office furniture, a lounge area and other members. Drop in for a day or sign up for one of our membership options.

Main services | WORK BAZAAR

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Client journey overview awareness UNDERSTANDING

client development ESTABLISH SUPPORT LEVEL

connection identify client STREAM a Co-working member

self-starter

networking mentorship

B D.I.Y. Support

C Custom support

member guidance exchange

client

mature adult

Retiree

Soon to retire

meet leadership coach

e.g. weekend sprint

becoming self-employed

networking mentorship

Parent

member guidance exchange e.g. business model canvas

part-time employment

networking mentorship

Get mentorship and job-search tools

e.g. design templates

member guidance

resume reading

youth

e.g. Etsy workshop

portfolio workshop

C.E.W.B. Time at brainstorms and workshops

client

employer

free advertising

screening coordination

subsidy

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WORK BAZAAR | BUSINESS CONCEPT

expert advice and development brand consulting

business planning

custom job hunt

interview process

employee pitching


BUSINESS COACH +business development +marketing/ communications +branding

lead coach

program director

+leadership coach +conscious aging facilitator

+human resources +employment consultant

AS NEEDED

staff

Expertise team

Workshop PARTICIPANTS /youth +brainstormers +focus groups + other workshops

Expertise team | WORK BAZAAR

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adult wanting make the most of their skills

MOTIVES

Retiree

As a co-working space clients can get a daily drop-in package or be a monthly member. As a member they can access SkillShare program for trading professional advice.

retire

Parent

• Assure financial stability • Peer engagement • Personal challenge and fulfillment • Giving back to their community • Freedom and flexibility in their schedule

Services outline OPTION

1

co-work with us For people needing peer engagement and a place to work.

packages:

monthly member

multi-day passes

daily drop-in

Using our co-working space gives you access to networking opportunities, our resource library and office space.

OPTION

2

self-employment consulting For people who want to become self-employed.

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WORK BAZAAR | BUSINESS CONCEPT

STEP 1 BECOME A MONTHLY MEMBER


OPTION

2

self-employment consulting For people who want to become self-employed. STEP 1 BECOME A MONTHLY MEMBER

STEP 2 DISCOVERY DIALOGUE SESSION A meeting with our leadership coach will explore your ambitions, income ideas and skill set. From there we’ll recommend one of two main paths. We’ll also ask you about joining our Skillshare Program. STEP 3A SERVICE A HIRE Custom support HIRE CUSTOM SUPPORT

STEP SERVICE 3B D.I.Y. support

Our staff includes experienced brand development and communications experts that Our staff includes experienced can help you make a product brand development and or service into a business. Get communications experts that started with one of our packages can helpayou make a product or ask for custom quote.

We have an arsenal of business development tools and people with experience using them. Book an appointment with an to review your options, We have anexpert arsenal of business get recommendations, have a one-on-one tutorial or development tools and people a review. You do the bulk of the work, but with expert with experience using them. your time. guidance you’ll reduce the risks of investing

or service into a business. Initial packages

Get started with one of • Business planning 101 our packages or ask for a • Market research custom quote. report • Defining your brand • Creative marketing ideas Initial packages

B D.I.Y. SUPPORT

Book an appointment with an to review your options, • Market research strategies get recommendations, have a • Product marketing tools one-on-one tutorial or a review. Example expert

• Design thinking tools You do the bulk

of the work, but

• Building a strategic media presence with expert social guidance you’ll reduce • Graphic thedesign riskstools of investing

As a selfemployment incubator our business coach can help clients bring their business ideas to life. Whether retiring from full time work to take up parttime consulting or turning a hobby into a source of income after years of retirement, our business coach has nearly ten years of branding experience and an arsenal of business development tools to help clients do market research, develop their product or service, and establish their unique brand.

your time.

• Business planning 101 • Market research report • Defining your brand • Creative marketing ideas

Example • Market research strategies • Product marketing tools

Services outline | WORK BAZAAR

79


media presence • Graphic design tools

Of course not everyone wants to run their own show. which is why we also have an employment stream. We have a public list of part-time, seasonal and occasional work. Alternatively, clients can meet with our leadership coach and discuss their ambitions, skills and schedule – we call them when we find the right fit. The same goes for employers. They can list a job for free, or they can hire us to screen candidates and coordinate interviews.

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OPTION

3

part-time employment search People looking for flexible employment solutions. SERVICE A D.I.Y. RESOURCES

SERVICE C CUSTOM JOB HUNT

Access our on-site and online directory of local jobs.

Custom job hunt starts with you telling us what you love to do and what you’re good at. We’ll find a match and coordinate an interview. If we can’t find the right job we’ll advocate for creating one*. If we can’t find you employment within six months, there’s no cost to you.

SERVICE B MEMBER RESOURCES As a monthly member of the co-working space you have access to our Skillshare Program. You can connect with experienced professionals in your desired field and receive guidance by appointment. Mentorship may include • Industry explanation 101 • Resume review and advising • Portfolio critique

WORK BAZAAR | BUSINESS CONCEPT

*The Work Bazaar has an Advocacy program that provides employers with a subsidy for hirings elders and parents. It is dependent on grant funding. EMPLOYERS RECRUITMENT We match the job description with the best candidate(s). Then we coordinate the interview. If you’re unsure if hiring parttime employees if for you, talk to us about coordinating a reliable job-share situation, seasonal


Ongoing activities

Member events

SkillShare program

Youth mentorship

Community events

Weekend sprints, breakfast clubs and skill development workshops.

Monthly memberships come with the infrastructure to coordinate giving and receiving professional advice.

Youth looking for employment are paired with advisors in their field of interest in exchange for hours participating in brainstorm or research project.

Workshops that teach age-friendly strategies for business and community organizations.

A youth mentorship program and a community outreach program for creating more age-friendly opportunities are important ongoing activities that keep the Work Bazaar integrated with the greater community.

Ongoing activities | WORK BAZAAR

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Long term vision The Community Experience Work Bazaar will require a phased approach to implementation of the various programs and services.

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WORK BAZAAR | BUSINESS CONCEPT


P ROTOT Y P IN G

PROTOTYPING | WORK BAZAAR

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WORK BAZAAR | PROTOTYPING


Prototype • website Before the Community Experience Work Bazaar existed, the service offering was called “The Higher Experience Skill Bazaar.” A small website for the business was created and shared with potential users and some experts.

Prototype • website | WORK BAZAAR

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Prototype • website | WORK BAZAAR

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The goals of the website prototype were to test marketplace interest and pricing. Several viewers thought that “Finding new income” deserved a more central role. It wasn’t clear to many people who specifically the service was well suited to.

Carol: One of the things that Bowen in Transition is planning to do is a skills inventory of people on the island, who does what, ...and connect them with people who might have needs. I’m wondering if there’s some kind of linkage here? one of the things about a small community is that people think they already know all that the island has to offer, for free, and of course they don’t ... so I suspect there is some real value in this idea, AND...i think it would be a tough sell, in terms of the pricing. One group that I think really might be worth tapping into are the young mothers...Bowen has (I believe) the highest birth rate in Canada outside of the aboriginal communities, ...and many of them are at home with two or more kids....figuring out some way for them to launch home-based businesses would probably be helpful. I believe there are something like 1000 home-based businesses on Bowen, so there might some opportunity for them to share resources and ideas? Though of course, some are in competition with each other. That’s one thing I think would be worth talking about on your website...while there is much value in collaboration, what are the boundaries around competitors’ information? Anyway, I think for sure there is a germ of something here. Christian: My spontaneous feedback is that your fees and membership structure looks more like from a business plan for a web platform than a physical space (what it should be!) Imagine there are a few people coming around, they give you $ 30 and then what happens? While I think that this page is very well suited for a first testing (so, go ahead!), the rates structure will develop with the evolving project..

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I would work through scenarios: What does coworking really mean and how does it look like? Who guides, how do they get together, who does what and who gets what? How do you “make it a business”, how does your assessment of projects work and how do you implement those products? Royalties? Consultancy fee? And as far as the “job finding” works, how do you connect to potential employers, how do you sell your service to them? Alice: I like it—but what I’m curious about (knowing your research from last semester) is, is this still targeting older community members, or is this now a hub for the full community in the area? If it is for older people, how can you make it feel accessible to them? I love the different offerings and the type of work you suggest - I think it’s really different from other coworking spaces I’ve seen in a way that tackles issues of “retirement” and some of the pain points that might come with freelance as an older person who might not be as tech native (I like the tech support idea here) Pricing in general seems very affordable (though my NYC perspective is clearly warped from a real world standpoint); $30 for a day vs $15 for 6 hours spread out seems a bit weird though. In general the scheduling feels a bit complex. I’d almost want to have a checklist i could select of features I’d want to take advantage of and then a membership level recommended to me; right now it’s hard to see what I’m getting/missing depending on which I choose


Jerome: I had to jog my memory a little to remember the main focus on your project. That’s because other than the subtle hints with the pictures of the more accomplished people, I could not make out the value proposition of your business. _Is it a space rental business? You focused a lot on the space rental part. _Is it about helping me take care of the other more logistical parts of running a start up, such as providing a professional space, and services such as IT and meal planning? _Is it about networking so that I can plan for my next project? Not much emphasis on this aspect at all, and quite implied. When I thought a little more about your 3 value propositions to the 3 different user types, they describe 3 different types of working situations that could potentially be interesting. However the overlaps of these 3 working conditions are very different with very different measures of success that don’t overlap very much. I could see it to be interesting if startups could share a pool of freelancers that want experience and flexibility. Sorry but your intentions are not quite clear to me. Jody: The service that I feel is the most valuable is the “Find New Income” – I think this is a major concern for the demographic your aiming at, so I would feature it first.

Not sure about “The Higher Experience”, something about it doesn’t sit right, though I like the pun of “higher” and “hire”. I suggest renaming Rates to SERVICES. I see a bit of the 3rd quarter shift focus that we talked about shining through, but it’s not obvious and if I didn’t know anything about your project, I might miss that aspect entirely and just think it was an officeshare service. “People thrive when we challenge ourselves through developing our vocations, and many of us would benefit from flexible income solutions. Skills developed over time are valuable – they can, and should, be put to task!”

Others struggled to understand the reasons behind the pricing structure. It was also too early to test price points before the value proposition was more clearly defined.

I think your rates are very conservative – definitely something to keep in mind for your demographic where money may be a concern. Renate: I’ve just had a look at your site and am impressed! If you can bring this on and have a bit of time to establish, I cannot see why it would not be a success. The community here is so varied and I often feel it is the longer time commitment to establish yourself, but a good idea will bring results. No idea what the business community thinks, though. I have a couple of friends I would like to send the link to - is that ok? ....what better compliment of your work.

Prototype • website | WORK BAZAAR

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Prototype • digital flyer With the feedback from the website, a new version of the business emerged. With more acute descriptions of the services and value offerings.

Prototype • digital flyer | WORK BAZAAR

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selfemployment incubator

part-time employment agency

drop-in co-working space

The Work Bazaar combines three functions under one roof in order to serve those in our community that don’t fit the standard employment model.

COMMUNITY EXPERIENCE

WORK BAZAAR finding extra income to fit your schedule and your passion Retirees looking for part-time income and peer engagement

selfemployment incubator

part-time employment agency

drop-in co-working space

Youth looking for after school (or before) jobs

New parents looking for part-time work

HOW IT WORKS: In order to find extra income that fits your availability, we offer three types of services:

The Work Bazaar combines three functions under one roof in order to serve those in our community that don’t fit the standard employment model.

Created by Sebastian Langer from the Noun Project

Self-employment advising

Retirees looking for part-time income and peer engagement

Youth looking for after school (or before) jobs

New parents looking for part-time work

HOW IT WORKS: In order to find extra income that fits your availability, we offer three types of services:

Part-time employment recruitment

Co-working space

Are you retiring from a fulltime career and curious about consulting part-time?

Do you have limited availability but still need some extra income?

Are you the type of person that will work better with other people around?

Are you an artisan looking to sell your wares online for the first time?

Do you value the freedom of your open schedule but could use a little work now and then?

When you work at home do you find yourself needing technical support now and then?

Do you have a skill you’d like to develop into a business?

Do you need help getting a job done and have no one to ask?

Do you have a full house and need space to work?

We offer advising, workshops, and resources to teams or individuals who want to run their own show. Develop a business plan, understand your market and build a team through our network.

We use our local network and national partner to provide you with options for occasional or seasonal employment as well as opportunities to work from home. Call or visit us to find out what’s available.

Our co-working space comes equipped with access to tech support, a boardroom, office furniture, a lounge area and other members. Drop in for a day or sign up for one of our membership options.

Created by Sebastian Langer from the Noun Project

Self-employment advising

Part-time employment recruitment

Co-working space

Are you retiring from a fulltime career and curious about consulting part-time?

Do you have limited availability but still need some extra income?

Are you the type of person that will work better with other people around?

Are you an artisan looking to sell your wares online for the first time?

Do you value the freedom of your open schedule but could use a little work now and then?

When you work at home do you find yourself needing technical support now and then?

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WORK BAZAAR | PROTOTYPING

For more details email ourworkbazaar@gmail.com or call Eleanor Rosenberg at 1 646 421 5349


Population in millions

of our country because the cost of caring for the aging will be high and the working age population to support that cost will be shrinking. Subsequently, our future workforce will be less able to carry the cost of supporting people under the age of 65 as well (see chart).

BUSINESS LOGIC

WORK BAZAAR

APRIL 2015

The big picture:

Canada’s aging population

By 2036 Canada will be a super-aged nation. This means that more than 20% of the population will be over the age of 65.

2014

Population in millions

men

women

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, International Programs

Inputs / resources

community partners and alliances

community partners and alliances

Activities

advising individuals

Outputs

more income for individuals

Outcomes

more financial stability

external partners and sponsors

POPULATION by age group 12.7%

HEALTH CARE SPENDING by age group 44.6%

86.2%

$ $

2002

52.6%

1.1% 1.1%

under 1

2.9%

2.9%

1–64 year old

51.9%

84.0% 14.9%

45.2%

65 and older

Source: Canadian Institute for Health Information, Source: Canadian for Health Information, National Health Institute Expenditure Trends,1975 to 2014 National Health Expenditure Trends,1975 to 2014

Activities

advising individuals

Outputs

more income for individuals

external partners and sponsors

staffing and consultants

rental space

office equipment

part-time employment recruitment

pair individuals within the community to create opportunities

programming community and member workshops

manage location space

more economic activity within the community

a client database / skill inventory

more parttime and age-friendly employment opportunities

more community engagement

more exchange of knowledge and culture

less social isolation

Canada’s increasingly imbalanced

healthcare carespending spending Health on seniors POPULATION by age group 12.7%

HEALTH CARE SPENDING by age group 44.6%

86.2%

$ $

2002

52.6%

1.1%

2012

1.1%

under 1

2.9%

2.9%

1–64 year old

51.9%

84.0% 14.9%

45.2%

65 and older

Source: Canadian Institute for Health Information, Source: Canadian for Health Information, National Health Institute Expenditure Trends,1975 to 2014

Outcomes

National Health Expenditure Trends,1975 to 2014

*NSERM Research Agency

Inputs / resources

Canada’s increasingly imbalanced

*NSERM Research Agency

This will have a significant threat to the economy of our country because the cost of caring for the aging will be high and the working age population to support that cost will be shrinking. Subsequently, our future workforce will be less able to carry the cost of supporting people under the age of 65 as well (see chart).

Our assumptions: Creating income opportunities for those who cannot work fulltime will reduce the threats that accompany super-aged nations in two ways: 1. Creating more flexible employment options will keep people working longer, making the tax base as large as possible for as long as possible. 2. The cost of caring for the elderly will go down because each additional year at work improves the chances of good health, including reduced risks of dementia.*

2034

women

healthcare carespending spending Health on seniors

2012

COMMUNITY EXPERIENCE

Our assumptions: Creating income opportunities for those who cannot work fulltime will reduce the threats that accompany super-aged nations in two ways: 1. Creating more flexible employment options will keep people working longer, making the tax base as large as possible for as long as possible. 2. The cost of caring for the elderly will go down because each additional year at work improves the chances of good health, including reduced risks of dementia.*

men

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, International Programs

staffing and consultants

rental space

office equipment

part-time employment recruitment

pair individuals within the community to create opportunities

programming community and member workshops

manage location space

more economic activity within the community

a client database / skill inventory

more parttime and age-friendly employment opportunities

more community engagement

more exchange of knowledge and culture

less social isolation

larger working population

more financial stability

larger working population

Long term impact: Improved community health — financial, intellectual, cognitive and cultural.

Created by Blake Ferguson from the Noun Project

For more details email ourworkbazaar@gmail.com or call Eleanor Rosenberg at 1 646 421 5349

Prototype • digital flyer | WORK BAZAAR

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The expanded focus on mothers, youth and elders proved to be too far and the service became too many things for too many people.

Rebecca: Very cool! Great idea and I love the logo. Is the Work Bazaar going to be in NYC? Vancouver? Elsewhere? When it becomes more real, I’d be happy to give you info on Social Venture Institute (the social entrepreneur conference I’m involved with) if you’re looking for peer support (and fun times).

However there is still room for a whole-community component as long as one demographic takes the focus initially.

I like the whole community approach you present and the cultural/societal benefits. These may well provide compelling arguments for public sector funding partners who are concerned with broader community health as well as economic health of communities and individuals. The key strategy is finding the intersection of potential public sector funders who want to see a societal return on investment and private sector funders who will want to see an economic return on investment.

Andrew: I like this. It’s smart and well presented.

As a potential “funder” the one thing I would want to know more about is just how big the potential sector is that might respond and/or benefit from this? Is there data available on the number of people who work from home or in single or small group consulting practices? Do you have any market testing results from this sector? (e.g. survey data)? Is it possible for you to push out a survey through social media to gain some level of general response to the big questions? 1. Does this concept appeal to you? 2. Can you see yourself participating in this kind of enterprise?

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WORK BAZAAR | PROTOTYPING

3. What would you be willing to pay? 4. What would you see as the greatest benefits? 5. How far would be you willing to commute to participate? You may have this addressed as part of your bigger presentation. I like the way you have first presented the “problem” you are trying to solve followed by the “how” (the business strategy) and the “what and why” the individual and community benefits. I would put a little more focus on the ‘face-to-face’ benefits. In today’s integrated, virtual world there are many ways to “communicate” but the reality is that nothing can replace face-to-face engagement. As a prospective participant, I would want to know more about what it will cost me. At one point in my consulting career I thought of starting a sort of “creative co-op” with many similar features to your idea. Although my idea revolved more around bringing together a network of similar minded individuals who could then leverage the advantage of a collective cooperative to help support their own consulting needs. This stemmed from a lot of the kind of work that I did in putting together teams of individuals for projects I took on that required a multi-faceted approach. So a team might comprise: a project manager; graphic designer; web designer; writer/editor; researcher/analyst; production coordinator etc. In this way the client benefited from having a complete team assigned to their project, while each individual on the team worked as their own consulting entity…..a symbiotic network. A sort of virtual agency. I often thought it would have been nice to have had a physical networking space for


these teams….although admittedly my teams were typically quite geographically spaced out. I wonder if some of these ideas could be incorporated into your strategy as I believe the a lot of successful individual consulting enterprises result from people’s ability to network with others and leverage the skills of others toward their own end business goals through facilitated opportunities for inter-personal engagement. It’s been great to watch this idea grow and develop for you and I hope the next stage is a great success. If you ever want to set up an enterprise in Victoria let me know! On a final note, you might be interested to know that when I was in the Yukon last year there was a new development opening that incorporated “shared office space” for individual consultants, although it was very basic in concept where you would pay a monthly fee based on: space requirements; whether you wanted to access shared receptionist and/or bookkeeping services etc. If you want to know more let me know.

Ray: Don’t discuss the pricing structure in terms of payment, present it in terms of exchange and value received. What does someone put into the business in order to get something back out of it. What’s in their mind when they pay. Consider narrowing your target audience. Caters to the specific needs of them first before expanding to serve a greater market.

Suggestions for strategies to fund the project have started to trickle in, which can be translated into a green-light to go further.

Where does the mentorship component come into play? Consider business partners that mitigate your risk. Establish a relationship where we can leverage their brand to support yours. You can exchange a standard of quality and service that matched their brand promise.

All the best with the project and hope this has been helpful. Telus: Please visit TELUS.com/communityboards to understand our local funding model and process. Ben: Your final Work Bazaar project is very cool. Seems like a great idea – very relevant in today’s job market – and a solid execution. I hope it all goes well!

Prototype • digital flyer | WORK BAZAAR

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WORK BAZAAR A poster outlining the user journey through the key services accompanied a ten minute presentation of the research and business development in May.

incubator

agency

SERVICE

SERVICE

co-work with us

part-time employment search

For people needing peer engagement and a place to work.

For people looking for flexible employment solutions.

A

packages:

monthly member

multi-day passes

C

daily drop-in

Using our co-working space gives you access to networking opportunities, our resource library and office space.

SERVICE

B

self-employment consulting For people who want to become self-employed. STEP 1 BECOME A MONTHLY MEMBER

STEP 1 D.I.Y. RESOURCES

OPTION B CUSTOM JOB HUNT

Access our on-site and online directory of local jobs.

Custom job hunt starts with you telling us what you love to do and what you’re good at. We’ll find a match and coordinate an interview. If we can’t find the right job we’ll advocate for creating one*. If we can’t find you employment within six months, there’s no cost to you.

OPTION A MEMBER RESOURCES As a monthly member of the co-working space you have access to our Skillshare Program. You can connect with experienced professionals in your desired field and receive guidance by appointment.

*The Work Bazaar has an Advocacy program that provides employers with a subsidy for hirings elders and parents. It is dependent on grant funding.

Mentorship may include

EMPLOYERS RECRUITMENT

• Industry explanation 101 • Resume review and advising • Portfolio critique

We match the job description with the best candidate(s). Then we coordinate the interview.

STEP 2 DISCOVERY DIALOGUE SESSION A meeting with our leadership coach will explore your ambitions, income ideas and skill set. From there we’ll recommend one of two main paths. We’ll also ask you about joining our Skillshare Program.

OPTION A HIRE CUSTOM SUPPORT

OPTION B D.I.Y. SUPPORT

Our staff includes experienced brand development and communications experts that can help you make a product or service into a business.

We have an arsenal of business development tools and people with experience using them.

Get started with one of our packages or ask for a custom quote. Initial packages

space

If you’re unsure if hiring parttime employees if for you, talk to us about coordinating a reliable job-share situation, seasonal work or on-call talent.

ongoing activities

Book an appointment with an expert to review your options, get recommendations, have a one-on-one tutorial or a review. You do the bulk of the work, but with expert guidance you’ll reduce the risks of investing your time.

• Business planning 101 • Market research report

Example

• Defining your brand

• Market research strategies

• Creative marketing ideas

• Product marketing tools • Design thinking tools • Building a strategic social media presence

Member events

Skillshare program

Youth mentorship

Community events

Weekend sprints, breakfast clubs and skill development workshops.

Monthly memberships come with the infrastructure to coordinate giving and receiving professional advice.

Youth looking for employment are paired with advisors in their field of interest in exchange for hours in a brainstorm or research project.

Workshops that teach age-friendly strategies for business and community organizations.

Get mentorship and job-search tools

Participate in brainstorms and workshops

• Graphic design tools

Retiree

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WORK BAZAAR | PROTOTYPING CLIENTS

mature adults wanting to make

Soon to retire

Theory of change Employment opportunities for mature adults will reduce the economic burden on aging nations. Larger tax base Creating more flexible employment options will keep people working more years, making

Lower health costs The cost of caring for the elderly will go down because additional


Client flow STEP 1 UNDERSTANDING

STEP 3 ESTABLISH SUPPORT LEVEL

STEP 2 identify client STREAM a COMMUNITY ACCESS

client

$ Access to networking, organic mentorship, recommended books and online resources

Needs support in becoming self-employed

STEP 1

An experienced adult wanting make the most of their skills

A discovery dialogue session

B D.I.Y. Support

$$ Recommendations and coaching on use of D.I.Y. tools e.g. business model canvas

Retiree

Soon to retire

Self-motivated but seeking a support network

Parent

$ same as above

Motives

Looking for part-time employment

$ same as above

EMPLOYER

Seeking part-time employee

Seasonal

Microbusiness

$$$ Custom recruitment and screening We match the job description with the best candidate(s). Then we coordinate the interview. Our meeting space is available if needed.

Your job listing will be made available in-person and online.

Shortterm

YOUTH • Low costs and increased profit • Experience and skill • Availability and meeting demand • Support local community

Seasonal

After school

that would benefit from our clients’ skills

Time exchange for job application support

Seeking part-time employment

Motives

Potential EMPLOYER

We’ll coordinate advisors in their field in exchange for their time in workshops and brainstorms.

Weekend

brand consulting

business planning

e.g. Etsy workshop

$$ Coordinate members to assist one another in positioning their application resume reading

$ Advertise an employment opportunity with us

$$$ Expert advising and tailored workshops

$$ Recommendations and coaching on use of D.I.Y. tools e.g. weekend sprint

• Assure financial stability • Peer engagement • Personal challenge and fulfillment • To give back to their community

e.g. design templates

C Custom support

A prototype of the service blueprint that included more service levels.

portfolio workshop

$$ Position advocacy We approach businesses and advocate for our clients’ value to them

$$ We search for your perfect position or advocate for creating one interview process

employee pitching

ONGOING ACTIVITIES member events and workshops Depending on membership needs and skills.

non-member events community events and workshops Primarily advocacy for age-friendly community strategies including employment.

youth mentorship youth looking for employment are paired with advisors in their field of interest custom contracts contractors available for business services Accountants, designers, etc can reach new clients through our membership.

Motives • Extra income • Experience and skills • Credibility

Client flow | WORK BAZAAR

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Pivoting Finding the right balance between too many types of users or too specific a demographic required testing – also known as failing – early in the process. With some major pivots in service offering, the business is ready to share with potential funders as well as further stages of user testing.

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WORK BAZAAR | PROTOTYPING


BU S IN E S S STRU C TU R E

BUSINESS STRUCTURE | WORK BAZAAR

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WORK BAZAAR | BUSINESS STRUCTURE


Service offerings The following pages explain the flow of resources supporting the Work Bazaar.

Service offerings | WORK BAZAAR

101


Revenue streams D.I.Y support network and self-employment services Daily drop-in

includes access to the co-working space and on-site D.I.Y. business resources. 1-day drop-in $15–35 5-pass $60–159 (half day free) 10-pass $128–298 (1.5 days free) Memberships includes access to the co-working space, D.I.Y. business resources, member events and network resources. Monthly rate $300–800 10% off 6 months 15% off yearly

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WORK BAZAAR | BUSINESS STRUCTURE

D.I.Y. support

includes one-on-one advice in choosing the right tools for your project and/or on-site mentorship for using the tools. Per appointment $32–90 (hourly) 5-pass $155–450 10-pass $300–900

Note: values in blue represent a range to be market tested. selfemployment

Selfmotivated

Custom service includes one-on-one support in business planning – including workshop planning and execution.

Fixed cost per item Based on hourly rate $60–120 Item: Business planning 101 (3 hour value) We’ll review the basics of bringing a business idea to life. We’ll help you navigate the plethora of nuanced options and arrive at a business model that suits your idea and your lifestyle. Item: Market research (3–20 hour value) We’ll find out what makes your audience tic. Don’t have a market for

your product yet? Let us help you research who they are. Item: Defining your brand (5 hour value) We’ll plan and execute a 1.5-hour workshop with you that reveals your unique market position that – the key to standing out from the crowd. Item: Creative marketing ideas (3 hour value) Generate ideas for your next marketing initiative by harness the brainpower of many. We’ll help you assemble the right mix of inspired brains to run a 1.5-hour session of productive idea generation focused entirely on you!


Employment services and advocacy D.I.Y. support

matches you with an experienced professional who provides one-onone advice on your job application needs. Per appointment $32–90 (hourly) Half-day rate $155–450

part-time employment

Custom job hunt Recruitment starts with you telling us what you love to do and what you’re good at. We’ll find a match and coordinate an interview. If we can’t find the right job we’ll advocate for creating one*A. If we can’t find you employment within six months, there’s no cost to you.

Placement fee Employer pays the Work Bazaar 5–15% of initial contract, or set minimum cost $200–500 (payment plan).

for employers means that we’ll fulfill your staffing needs with parttime employment. We can coordinate a reliable job-share situation, seasonal work or on-call talent. Advertise an employment opportunity free Custom coordination 5–15% of initial contract paid to the Work Bazaar, or minimum $200–500 (payment plan).

*Advocacy program Employment subsidy available for elder and parent employment (dependent on grant funding). Revenue streams | WORK BAZAAR

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Cost structure – income SALES

item value

quantity

OTHER INCOME

value

drop-in fees

hourly youth time (timeshare )

- daily

member mentorship time

- 5-pass

mployment advocacy grant e (to subside created jobs)

- 10-pass monthly membership fees - one month - 6-month - 12-month D.I.Y. support services - hourly rate - 5-pass - 10-pass custom business service items - business planning 101 - market research - defining your brand - creative marketing ideas D.I.Y. job search services - hourly rate - half-day rate Job search - placement fee

104

expected ANNUALLY

WORK BAZAAR | BUSINESS STRUCTURE

office equipment (sponsorship) industry partner promotions

item value

expected ANNUALLY quantity

value


Cost structure – expenses recurring Expenses

item value

ANNUAL budget quantity

value

initial set-up Expenses

advertising

co-working space:

promotions

interior design consultant

salaries

tables/desks

space rental

chairs

internet

lockers

3 x phone plan resource subscriptions

couch

accounting

lamps

bank charges professional development website maintenance insurance: workers comp health insurance liability insurance workshop supplies: paper, markers, etc snacks taxes

item value

budget quantity

value

lounge chairs build phone booth whiteboard (glass or Ideapaint) office hardware: 3 x phone 2 x computer printer back-up drive software: Design software Word software Accounting software

cost structure | WORK BAZAAR

105


Stakeholder map Churches

Artisan Square Community

Bowen in Transition

(work in progress)

BI Community School Gr. 1–7 LOCAL COMMUNITY GROUPS

The Legion

Island Pacific School Gr. 6-9

LOCAL ELDER INITIATIVES SKY (seniors keeping young)

Snug Cove House (elders’ house)

Caring Circle (health focus)

Bowen Foundation Gibsons Chamber of Commerce West Vancouver Chamber of Commerce

LOCAL BUSINESS RESOURCES

Bowen Island Municipality

Economic Development

BCIT

LOCAL PARTNER POTENTIAL

The Boardroom

MTI Community Collage Local Contractors

Remote Contractors

WORK BAZAAR | BUSINESS STRUCTURE

Langara EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS

Vancouver Film School

SFU Andy Hume Ass.

Aasman Brand Commun.

106

Elders Co-op

ECUAD

UBC

Capilano University


Seniors Health Promotion Directorate Invest British Columbia

Small Business BC

Vancouver Coastal Health

PROVINCIAL GOV.

CARP

BC Healthy Living Alliance

Retirement Coaching Canada

BC Healthy Communities

Better Business Bureau

Economic Development

NATIONAL ELDER INITIATIVES

World Health Organization INTERNATIONAL ELDER INITIATIVES

Canadian Cancer Society Granny Au Pair

BC Alzheimer’s Org.

First Credit Union

Encore

VanCity?

RECRUITMENT CAPACITY SUCCESS Inclusive integration

Social Venture Institute

YMCA

Shaw

SunLife SOCIAL INVESTORS

Third Quarter

Banks

Vancouver Economic Commission

Private Health Insurance

PRIVATE BUSINESS Telus Internet Provider

Stakeholder map | WORK BAZAAR

107


Business Model Canvas Key partners

Key activities

COOPETITION

PROBLEM SOLVING

ThirdQuarter recruitment agency. They help us find employment jobs for our users ALLIANCE

Local schools, to find students looking for mentorship ALLIANCE

Community groups. For promotion and continuous learning opportunities

NETWORK

Understanding the situation and desires of our users, they matching them with an available income source, or inventing one

Maintain online resources website promotion phone-call program

Value proposition We will help you find a source of income that fits your life situation

CUSTOMIZATION

Continuous training

Part-time employment

Key resources PHYSICAL

HUMAN

Building, office space, furniture and supplies

ACCESSIBILITY

At least two staff

Collaboration assistance RISK REDUCTION

INTELLECTUAL

Start-up support

Customer database, partnerships

Cost structure VALUE-DRIVEN

Personalized consultancy

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WORK BAZAAR | BUSINESS STRUCTURE

FIXED COSTS

Rent Staffing Website Office supplies & furniture

VARIABLE COSTS

Advertising Replacement office wares Software and subscriptions


Customer segment

Comm. relationship COMMUNITIES

DEDICATED PERSONAL Assistance.

MULTI-SIDED MARKET

Social co-working space for networking.

Personal relationship understanding individuals needs

45+ looking for part-time income and peer engagement

CO-CREATION

Company offerings change with the membership AWARENESS

Communication channels

Youth looking for career mentorship

Signs & community partners PURCHASE EVALUATION

Website, Mailchimp, Phone calls

Website Phone Front desk

AFTER SALES

Community events Partner promotion

Employers looking for reliable skilled workers

Revenue USAGE FEES

Consulting fees for advise on career and business planning

SUBSCRIPTION FEES BROKERAGE FEE

Drop-in and membership fees for coworking space

Fee from employer foe job placement

Business Model Canvas | WORK BAZAAR

109


NETWORKING FINANCING

X

X

X

X

X

for each other

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

online tutorials (from workshops)

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

job placement

X

X

X

career/life coaching

X

X

X

start-up advising

X

new business support group

X

co-working space

X

X

m co m dl y

ag

an

X

3

X

7

X

8 7

X

6 5 6

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

3

X

X

X

X

X

7

X

X

X

4

X

X

X

X

7

X

X

X

X

5

X

X

7

drop-in space

X

phone call event updates

X

X

X

X

X

grant creation

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

8

investor matching

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

9

WORK BAZAAR | BUSINESS STRUCTURE

un it y

at e st or tb y

X

X

ci al

su

from community

X

X

de ve lo p

du re

X

X

fin ce

bu y ac le g

X

to community

efri en

pp

in es s us

sm ci ng

va n ad

ild in g

al lb

ch a iti ve

gn co e

or m

lle ng e

k w or e

rttim pa

e or m

X

work at home support group

110

cr ea te d

e at ur m

e nc

pl oy ed

em m

or

e

as re in c

an

ci al

ed

se

co

cu

nfi

rit

y

de

rs ee ar fc fin

ro fe a

X

to employers

ad ul ts

y in

hi fts

ab ilit ADVISING

WORKSHOPS/EDUCATION

le s

s

Product/outcome matrix


Average week m

t

w

t

f

s

s

6 am 7 am 8 am 9 am 10 am 11 am 12 pm 1 pm 2 pm 3 pm 4 pm 5 pm 6 pm 7 pm 8 pm 9 pm 10 pm 11 pm 12 am

Work Bazaar hours with three staff members working 30 hours a week

1

2

3

Average week | WORK BAZAAR

111


Experience Blueprint: Becoming an member Experience blueprint becoming a member sign-up for new offerings phone call

call the centre

Customer Actions

click to website

visit location

sign-up for offerings em

browse online resources Line of interaction answer basic questions

Frontstage Action Centre Staff

Frontstage Action Digital Line of visibility

coordinate new user with appropriate member

discuss interests and record. make call schedule

form field abo interests

filter user preferences using navigation

Backstage Actions Employees

promote agefriendly programs to employers

Backstage Actions Digital

compile relevant tagged info

Line of internal interaction

Support Processes

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WORK BAZAAR | BUSINESS STRUCTURE

software developer: maintain current info on website

m r r


member sign-up for new offerings phone call

call the centre

sign up to attend a workshop sign up for limited space usage

visit location sign-up for new offerings email

answer basic questions coordinate new user with appropriate member

discuss interests and record. make call schedule form field about interests

promote agefriendly programs to employers

sign up to be a regular member

newbie night for support group call/ auto-email on designated days coordinate advisors, members and outreach

map skills: member assets and member needs

canvas/network with community to fill gaps

programming promote upcoming events at centre update digital info

maintain smart database to match gaps with assets

compile relevant tagged info

maintain relationship with recruiting agency

maintain relationship with local org.s / schools

calendar software advertising

advertising support (Google/ agency)

Experience blueprint | WORK BAZAAR

113


Business structure review Each of these tools acts as a guide for planning and prioritizing services and resources. Explorations into each decision about how the business operates supports the strategy for successful implementation.

114

WORK BAZAAR | BUSINESS STRUCTURE


N E X T STE P S

NEXT STEPS | WORK BAZAAR

115


Design process review

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WORK BAZAAR | NEXT STEPS

OPPORTUNITY FRAMING

quantitative Immersion

INFORMED assumptions

Identify a problem – an area of opportunity

Gather concrete data and evidence of opportunity

Formulate a vision from new data combinations


HUMAN Observation

user brainstorms

IDEAS Synthesis

Challenge the vision with real-life observations

Expand or narrow the vision based on feedback

Draw conclusions and design solutions to the problem

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Imagine feasible business scenarios

Design process review | WORK BAZAAR

117


What happens next? The next phase of this project will be to prototype the business model in the pilot community of Bowen Island. Further research on location specific member potential and testing price points will follow. AÂ location needs to be identified and start-up funding sourced.

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WORK BAZAAR | NEXT STEPS


Pilot community Bowen Island is a municipality in the Greater Vancouver Regional District. There are daily ferry and water taxi services that commuters take to the mainland for work.

VANCOUVER

BOWEN ISLAND

The time spent commuting takes away from time spent with families and contributing to the community in general.

VANCOUVER

The Community Experience Work Bazaar will reduce the need for Bowen Island residents to leave the island for work. Bowen Island Municipality Adults aged 65–80: 420 Of those, 120 are living alone. Children four or under: 175 Youth aged 15–19: 185 Total 2011 population: 3,402 In 2006, 710 people commuted off island for work. Only 435 people said they worked on the island and 455 people said they had no fixed workplace address.

neighbouring communities West Vancouver, Sunshine Coast, and Sea to Sky Country Adults aged 65–80: 15,145 Total 2011 population: 112,875 The Greater Vancouver area is around 2.4 million people. Source: Statistics Canada. 2012. Bowen Island, British Columbia (Code 5915062), Bowen Island’s Community Profile, 2006, Bowen Island Municipality

What happens next? | WORK BAZAAR

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ourworkbazaar@gmail.com