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REACH spring 2010

Ice Fishing The ins-and-outs of the drill and catch

Split Boarding

Uniting two backcountry sports

Stuck in a Rut ?

Learn how to conquer the dreaded drift

Wintertime Yummies Cheap and easy food to warm your soul


COVER SHOT

Alone in the Wilderness

Brian Degenfelder, a student photographer from Casper, Wyo., shot this poto with an ESO Rebel T1i camera and an EF-S 55-250 mm f/4- 5.6 IS lens.

18 21 22 24

Winter Time Yummies

Easy and cheap recipes that will warm up any winter day

The Nightingale Know-How

A Laramie nurse tells students the skinny on hypothermia

Heated Outerwear

Learn about the gear that can keep you warm this winter

Out in the Snow on a Quarter Horse Discover the best places around Laramie to ride

Contents

08

10 12 16

Spilt boarding 101

Learn how to take on the project of building your own spilt board

Travel at the Speed of Dog

One UW graduate shares her lifetime obsession with dog sledding

Stuck in a Rut

A personal account and how-on getting a vehicle out of the snow

A Day on the Hard Water

Ice fishing can be easy with the right tools and knowledge Photo by Caitlin White


COVER SHOT

Alone in the Wilderness

Brian Degenfelder, a student photographer from Casper, Wyo., shot this poto with an ESO Rebel T1i camera and an EF-S 55-250 mm f/4- 5.6 IS lens.

18 21 22 24

Winter Time Yummies

Easy and cheap recipes that will warm up any winter day

The Nightingale Know-How

A Laramie nurse tells students the skinny on hypothermia

Heated Outerwear

Learn about the gear that can keep you warm this winter

Out in the Snow on a Quarter Horse Discover the best places around Laramie to ride

Contents

08

10 12 16

Spilt boarding 101

Learn how to take on the project of building your own spilt board

Travel at the Speed of Dog

One UW graduate shares her lifetime obsession with dog sledding

Stuck in a Rut

A personal account and how-on getting a vehicle out of the snow

A Day on the Hard Water

Ice fishing can be easy with the right tools and knowledge Photo by Caitlin White


REACH Editor Caitlin White is a junior from Cheyenne, Wyo., who is majoring in Journalism. Her favorite outdoor activity is horseback riding. Caitlin enjoys rock climbing and hiking as well as the occasional ice fishing trip. Caitlin is the editor of REACH as well as Frontiers, the general interest student magazine at UW.

REACH Contributors Brian Degenfelder is a freshmen business major. He is involved in singing within the music department. Brian’s hobbies include singing, playing piano and any kind of sport, especially running. He also enjoys taking and editing photographs. Brian enjoys doing anything outdoors especially hunting, camping and hiking. Lindsy White is a University of Wyoming graduate from 2009. She is a registered nurse with a Bachelor’s of Science Degree in nursing. Lindsey is employed at the Family Physician of Laramie. Lindsey enjoys being outdoors. One of her favorite outdoor activities is hiking. Caitlin Grandjean is a junior studying Visual Merchandising and Promotion with a minor in Apparel Design. She loves the outdoors. Caitlin loves snowboarding and also enjoys mountain biking, hiking, camping and fly-fishing. She came to UW because of the mountains and wide-open spaces. Katelyn Johnson was born in western Nebraska. She is studying Textiles and Merchandising. Katelyn is a dedicated outdoors woman who enjoys traveling, backpacking, rock climbing, skiing, fly-fishing and hunting. Katelyn has been fortunate enough to travel quite a bit throughout the United States and even in Africa where she summited Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania.

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REACH Assistant Editors Sammie Getz grew up in the incredible town of Jackson, Wyo., and has loved the outdoors ever since. She enjoys hiking, camping and bouldering. She will be graduating from the Journalism department in May.

Sonya Smith grew up at the base of the Ruby Mountains. She loves the outdoors, and among her favorite outdoor activities is bouldering, mountain biking and snow boarding. Sonya is a sophomore majoring in Journalism.

Jonathan Kawulok is a second year student who is currently an English major. He hails from Sheridan, Wyo., and cannot deny the influence of his backyard mountains. While Jonathan has a taste for most outdoor activities, his favorite is backpacking; a trip to the Cirque of the Towers cemented that particular love.

Charlynn Schmiedt is a vegetarian who loves crude humor. She is the assistant online editor for the Branding Iron and hates playing outdoors - unless it’s summertime.

Dan Kunkel is a mechanical engineering graduate student from Sheridan, Wyo. He enjoys all outdoor activities, especially mountain biking, backcountry snowboarding, hunting and backpacking. During any given weekend in the summer, you can find him up in the Snowies snowboarding into one of the lakes. Ulrike Wiehr is a 22-year-old exchange student from the UW’s partner university in Eichstätt, Germany. Ulrike is an active person who enjoys being outside for walks and horseback riding. Ulrike grew up on a farm in the countryside, so she has always enjoyed going on outdoor adventures. Ulrike’s biggest passion and hobby is writing.

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REACH Editor Caitlin White is a junior from Cheyenne, Wyo., who is majoring in Journalism. Her favorite outdoor activity is horseback riding. Caitlin enjoys rock climbing and hiking as well as the occasional ice fishing trip. Caitlin is the editor of REACH as well as Frontiers, the general interest student magazine at UW.

REACH Contributors Brian Degenfelder is a freshmen business major. He is involved in singing within the music department. Brian’s hobbies include singing, playing piano and any kind of sport, especially running. He also enjoys taking and editing photographs. Brian enjoys doing anything outdoors especially hunting, camping and hiking. Lindsy White is a University of Wyoming graduate from 2009. She is a registered nurse with a Bachelor’s of Science Degree in nursing. Lindsey is employed at the Family Physician of Laramie. Lindsey enjoys being outdoors. One of her favorite outdoor activities is hiking. Caitlin Grandjean is a junior studying Visual Merchandising and Promotion with a minor in Apparel Design. She loves the outdoors. Caitlin loves snowboarding and also enjoys mountain biking, hiking, camping and fly-fishing. She came to UW because of the mountains and wide-open spaces. Katelyn Johnson was born in western Nebraska. She is studying Textiles and Merchandising. Katelyn is a dedicated outdoors woman who enjoys traveling, backpacking, rock climbing, skiing, fly-fishing and hunting. Katelyn has been fortunate enough to travel quite a bit throughout the United States and even in Africa where she summited Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania.

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REACH Assistant Editors Sammie Getz grew up in the incredible town of Jackson, Wyo., and has loved the outdoors ever since. She enjoys hiking, camping and bouldering. She will be graduating from the Journalism department in May.

Sonya Smith grew up at the base of the Ruby Mountains. She loves the outdoors, and among her favorite outdoor activities is bouldering, mountain biking and snow boarding. Sonya is a sophomore majoring in Journalism.

Jonathan Kawulok is a second year student who is currently an English major. He hails from Sheridan, Wyo., and cannot deny the influence of his backyard mountains. While Jonathan has a taste for most outdoor activities, his favorite is backpacking; a trip to the Cirque of the Towers cemented that particular love.

Charlynn Schmiedt is a vegetarian who loves crude humor. She is the assistant online editor for the Branding Iron and hates playing outdoors - unless it’s summertime.

Dan Kunkel is a mechanical engineering graduate student from Sheridan, Wyo. He enjoys all outdoor activities, especially mountain biking, backcountry snowboarding, hunting and backpacking. During any given weekend in the summer, you can find him up in the Snowies snowboarding into one of the lakes. Ulrike Wiehr is a 22-year-old exchange student from the UW’s partner university in Eichstätt, Germany. Ulrike is an active person who enjoys being outside for walks and horseback riding. Ulrike grew up on a farm in the countryside, so she has always enjoyed going on outdoor adventures. Ulrike’s biggest passion and hobby is writing.

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“Jumping the Gap” Tony Kunkel sleds off a snow cliff into South Gap Lake. Photo by Dan Kunkel

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“Jumping the Gap” Tony Kunkel sleds off a snow cliff into South Gap Lake. Photo by Dan Kunkel

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Split Boarding 101: By Caitlin Grandjean cgrandje@uwyo.edu

Although split boarding has been around for nearly 20 years, it is just starting to creep up into the spotlight of backcountry sports. The company that gave birth to split boarding is Voile´, with other companies such as Prior helping the industry become the success it is now. Both companies offer a wide variety of boards for beginners and experts and can be checked out online at www.voile-usa.com/ and

8 reach

From the workshop to the powder

www.priorsnowboards.com/boards.php/. In the early 2000s, Burton came out with their first split board but only carried it for a couple seasons. Then around the 2007-2008 season Burton came back in the industry with their S-Series split board. In 2008, Atomic Snowboards came out with their first split board, which they dubbed Poacher. I first found out about split boarding last season when checking out boards. I was intrigued by the idea that one could take a snowboard, cut it in half, switch the bindings, slap on some climbing skins and be on their way to discovering a mountain’s most remote, untouched slopes and well kept secrets. Jackpot! Could it really be that easy? My new mission was to rent one of these beauties and find out as soon as possible. Last December, I rented a split board and took it out to the Snowy Range for the best Christmas present: a gorgeous day all to myself to play in the snow with this fabulous contraption they called a split board. Shortly after that I dropped the idea of split boarding thinking that since I couldn’t afford one of these babies, I shouldn’t get anymore attached. The price for a new split board is roughly 600 to 800 dollars. So when I began reading snowboarding articles for the 2009-2010 season that featured how to make your own split board, I was curious. It had never occurred to me that actually making my own was such a reality. With help from sites such as www. transworldsnowboarding.com/ and www. splitboard.com/ riders can read up on the subject and even watch how-to videos demonstrating the process of making a split board. Hopefully once reading this article you will have a good idea of whether split boarding is something you want to pursue or leave behind.

To get started you’re going to need the Split Decision split boarding kit from Voile´, which you can pick up at most other mountain shops for about 160 dollars. This kit includes every last piece of hardware you’ll need to build your masterpiece. What it doesn’t include, however, are climbing skins and the bindings themselves. Climbing skins are the key to being able to climb mountains on your board. By facing backward the outer fibers on skins literally “grip” the snow when opposing force is applied, and lay flat when pushed forward up the mountain. This feature allows the user to climb very similarly to the way Telemark skiers do. The other side of skins is an adhesive layer which attaches to the base of the split board and stays in place until peeled off. Some companies include skins with the purchase of a split boards, but if not you’re looking at an additional 150- to 170- dollar purchase. The slider tracks in these kits work with almost any kind of binding, although slimmer, more lightweight and more durable bindings will always be more beneficial to anyone’s split-boarding experience for the simple reason that the less your gear weighs, the less you have to carry up and down the mountain, the sturdier it is and the longer it will last. Now you’re ready to begin. For anyone strongly considering making their own split board for the first time; I give you props. It’s a fun and rewarding project to take on. But, you’d better be ready for the costs that come with this reward; this doesn’t just refer to monetary costs. As soon as that saw blade touches the board’s tip it is permanently altered so there’s really no going back. Using an old board is usually a good idea. Anytime you start out to make a split board, it’s important to remember that though small, the chance of ending up with nothing at all is still very real. However, once overcoming these obstacles, if you know your way around power tools and snowboards and feel comfortable following step-bystep instructions, your dream of that perfect virgin powder run may be closer than you think.

Photos by Caitlin Grandjean and Sonya Smith

The first thing to consider when getting ready to make a split board is the type of core your board has. Wood cores are preferable to foam cores because they are easier to seal. In all reality, however, the first time you make your own split board, it’s highly unlikely that your final product is going to be too pretty any ways. “You should always plan for the worst (when making your first split board) because it never goes as easy as you think it will,” Leo Pueblitz, owner of Big Hoss Mountain Sports LLC, said. Probably the most crucial part of actually making a split board is making sure that the newly formed inner edges of the board get completely sealed off. Moisture entering the board will immediately start to damage the core. Once the interior of the board is wet due to cracks or leaks in the seal there is really nothing you can do to repair it, at which point you are left with a ruined split board, and probably a broken heart to tag along. The one bit of solace in this situation is knowing that the split board hardware can always be salvaged and used on another board. As for sealing materials, Voile´ suggests using their own varnish, polyurethane spray, enamel paint (otherwise known as Varathane), or even epoxy to seal those edges. A spray such as the polyurethane spray might work better for novices because it tends to create smoother, more even edges. This is important because when the board is attached it needs to fit as closely together as possible for the smoothest ride. Whatever your choice, the objective remains the same: seal your edges completely. From this point on it’s all about reading and following the written instructions found in the board kit very closely. Of course, things like having the proper tools (table, circular, or skill saw and drill bits, for example) are still vital and can make or break your project. It’s best not take the lazy way out on your first run through. Do it the hard way to learn as much as possible, and if you ever go to make another splitty, you’ll have a better idea of what short cuts to take. 9 reach


Split Boarding 101: By Caitlin Grandjean cgrandje@uwyo.edu

Although split boarding has been around for nearly 20 years, it is just starting to creep up into the spotlight of backcountry sports. The company that gave birth to split boarding is Voile´, with other companies such as Prior helping the industry become the success it is now. Both companies offer a wide variety of boards for beginners and experts and can be checked out online at www.voile-usa.com/ and

8 reach

From the workshop to the powder

www.priorsnowboards.com/boards.php/. In the early 2000s, Burton came out with their first split board but only carried it for a couple seasons. Then around the 2007-2008 season Burton came back in the industry with their S-Series split board. In 2008, Atomic Snowboards came out with their first split board, which they dubbed Poacher. I first found out about split boarding last season when checking out boards. I was intrigued by the idea that one could take a snowboard, cut it in half, switch the bindings, slap on some climbing skins and be on their way to discovering a mountain’s most remote, untouched slopes and well kept secrets. Jackpot! Could it really be that easy? My new mission was to rent one of these beauties and find out as soon as possible. Last December, I rented a split board and took it out to the Snowy Range for the best Christmas present: a gorgeous day all to myself to play in the snow with this fabulous contraption they called a split board. Shortly after that I dropped the idea of split boarding thinking that since I couldn’t afford one of these babies, I shouldn’t get anymore attached. The price for a new split board is roughly 600 to 800 dollars. So when I began reading snowboarding articles for the 2009-2010 season that featured how to make your own split board, I was curious. It had never occurred to me that actually making my own was such a reality. With help from sites such as www. transworldsnowboarding.com/ and www. splitboard.com/ riders can read up on the subject and even watch how-to videos demonstrating the process of making a split board. Hopefully once reading this article you will have a good idea of whether split boarding is something you want to pursue or leave behind.

To get started you’re going to need the Split Decision split boarding kit from Voile´, which you can pick up at most other mountain shops for about 160 dollars. This kit includes every last piece of hardware you’ll need to build your masterpiece. What it doesn’t include, however, are climbing skins and the bindings themselves. Climbing skins are the key to being able to climb mountains on your board. By facing backward the outer fibers on skins literally “grip” the snow when opposing force is applied, and lay flat when pushed forward up the mountain. This feature allows the user to climb very similarly to the way Telemark skiers do. The other side of skins is an adhesive layer which attaches to the base of the split board and stays in place until peeled off. Some companies include skins with the purchase of a split boards, but if not you’re looking at an additional 150- to 170- dollar purchase. The slider tracks in these kits work with almost any kind of binding, although slimmer, more lightweight and more durable bindings will always be more beneficial to anyone’s split-boarding experience for the simple reason that the less your gear weighs, the less you have to carry up and down the mountain, the sturdier it is and the longer it will last. Now you’re ready to begin. For anyone strongly considering making their own split board for the first time; I give you props. It’s a fun and rewarding project to take on. But, you’d better be ready for the costs that come with this reward; this doesn’t just refer to monetary costs. As soon as that saw blade touches the board’s tip it is permanently altered so there’s really no going back. Using an old board is usually a good idea. Anytime you start out to make a split board, it’s important to remember that though small, the chance of ending up with nothing at all is still very real. However, once overcoming these obstacles, if you know your way around power tools and snowboards and feel comfortable following step-bystep instructions, your dream of that perfect virgin powder run may be closer than you think.

Photos by Caitlin Grandjean and Sonya Smith

The first thing to consider when getting ready to make a split board is the type of core your board has. Wood cores are preferable to foam cores because they are easier to seal. In all reality, however, the first time you make your own split board, it’s highly unlikely that your final product is going to be too pretty any ways. “You should always plan for the worst (when making your first split board) because it never goes as easy as you think it will,” Leo Pueblitz, owner of Big Hoss Mountain Sports LLC, said. Probably the most crucial part of actually making a split board is making sure that the newly formed inner edges of the board get completely sealed off. Moisture entering the board will immediately start to damage the core. Once the interior of the board is wet due to cracks or leaks in the seal there is really nothing you can do to repair it, at which point you are left with a ruined split board, and probably a broken heart to tag along. The one bit of solace in this situation is knowing that the split board hardware can always be salvaged and used on another board. As for sealing materials, Voile´ suggests using their own varnish, polyurethane spray, enamel paint (otherwise known as Varathane), or even epoxy to seal those edges. A spray such as the polyurethane spray might work better for novices because it tends to create smoother, more even edges. This is important because when the board is attached it needs to fit as closely together as possible for the smoothest ride. Whatever your choice, the objective remains the same: seal your edges completely. From this point on it’s all about reading and following the written instructions found in the board kit very closely. Of course, things like having the proper tools (table, circular, or skill saw and drill bits, for example) are still vital and can make or break your project. It’s best not take the lazy way out on your first run through. Do it the hard way to learn as much as possible, and if you ever go to make another splitty, you’ll have a better idea of what short cuts to take. 9 reach


Travel at the Speed of Dog Anneka Door graduated in the fall of 2008 with a degree in geography and is now living in Kelly, Wyo. doing what she loves the most, being outdoors and working for a mountain guiding company called Exum Mountain Guides. She also climbs throughout Wyoming, Colorado, Nevada, Utah, Washington and Idaho, along with doing some extensive climbing and mountaineering in the Teton Range. Skiing is another one of her passions throughout several mountains in Colorado and Wyoming. In the winter, Door is involved in the ski patrol and backcountry search and rescue through Medicine Bow Nordic Ski Patrol.

howling and barking. Suddenly two dog sleds race through the pristine By Katelyn Johnson wilderness led by six tan and white Kjohnso7@uwyo.edu Alaskan huskies harnessed to each sled. The two female mushers dressed Imagine this. It’s a calm Alaskan in thick boots, down winter pants and winter morning. There’s a slight breeze fur-lined parkas are yelling to their whispering through the tall Aspens and dogs as they pack down a trail over the blowing the pure white snow across frozen Alaskan bush. the cold landscape. The sky is clear This is a sight not commonly seen as the sun reflects off the snow, making it shimmer like diamonds. There by everyone during the winter. Some are birds chirping happily as a red fox people might think this frigid sport prichases a rabbit across the meadow. It is marily occurs in Alaska, but the truth a peaceful day today, a perfect day for is many different people dog sled all over the country. any outdoor activity. In the near distance dogs are 10 reach

ding at a young age when she and her family moved from Michigan, Minn., to Sidney, Neb. Her father visited Alaska often to photograph Jeff King in the Iditarod. King is a musher who is well-known for winning both the 1,049 mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race across Alaska, and the 1,100 mile Yukon Quest Sled Dog Race across Canada. King has won the Iditarod four times. Door’s father would come home from his Alaskan Iditarod trips with stuffed animals and books for his two daughters, which got them very interested in this great winter sport.

“So I begged my dad for some sled Anneka Door, 22, started dog sled- dogs and when I was 10 we bought a

couple,” Door said. Though the number of dog didn’t stop there. After Door had raced in a few sprint races throughout Colorado, Wyoming and Michigan, two dogs became four, four became eight and so on. The Door family had anywhere from eight to fifteen dogs at a time.

down, off the bridge, and into the hot more information go to www.dogslesprings. But I didn’t let go, so the sled dadventures.com. came with me. I stood up covered in Another company within Wyoming warm gooey muck, pulled the sled out that offers dog sledding adventures is and continued on to win the race.” Jackson Hole Iditarod Sled Dog Tours. Now that is something I would clas- For more information go to www. sify as epic. jhsleddog.com.

It wasn’t all about the “guts and gloDoor gained a lot of her primary experience racing 3-dog sprint races in a ry” of winning races. junior class but became competitive in “We did it for the dogs and they absothe 4-dog races while in high school. lutely loved it. They kept running and “At one point while I was in high we held on for dear life,” Door said school, I had one of the fastest 4-dog about what she liked most about dog sprint teams in the world, being ranked sledding. It was also a great family activity, which she said brought her fam3rd or 4th,” Door said. ily closer together. During that time, she was sponsored Interested in dog sledding? As preby Sled Dog Systems, who provided viously mentioned, you don’t have to her with the sleds she raced with. be in Alaska to get involved in this adThough mushing though beautiful for- venturous winter sport. Jackson Hole’s ests might sound peaceful and relaxing, Continental Divide Dog Sled Adventhere were definitely some “epic” races, tures is a company that gives dog sled Door said. Falling off bridges and cliffs tours through the Teton and Shoshoni and running into trees were just a few National Forests that surround Jackof the accidents across the many snowy son Hole, and the greater Yellowstone area. One can choose from a half-day, trails, but it didn’t discourage her. full day, overnight or extended trip. For “Probably my most exciting race was in Ouray, Colo., when I was about twelve to thirteen years old racing in the 3-dog junior class. I was racing three fast dogs that I borrowed from a friend and the trail took a sharp turn down and to the right and went across a small bridge over a hot spring.

There are also many dog sledding outfitters throughout Colorado. Some such as The Mountain Musher, located in Vail; Nova Guides, Inc., located in Minturn; and Wintertrax, located in Ridgeway. Looking to actually get involved in the Great Race? Become a volunteer! There are many opportunities through the Iditarod Trail Committee, Inc.from phone and computer input and communications, to merchandise sales or being at each checkpoint to transport dropped dogs, trail volunteers and handling the sled dogs. Just visit www.iditarod.com/volunteers/. Volunteering is a great thing to do to meet new people and learn a lot, especially with such an amazing sport. Plus, who knows, maybe you’ll end up loving it so much that you’ll become a musher yourself!

‘The number one rule when racing sled dogs is don’t let go because the dogs won’t stop and you’ll be dragged for miles. This time I took the turn too fast and hit the side of the bridge with my sled runner and it flipped me upside 11 reach


Travel at the Speed of Dog Anneka Door graduated in the fall of 2008 with a degree in geography and is now living in Kelly, Wyo. doing what she loves the most, being outdoors and working for a mountain guiding company called Exum Mountain Guides. She also climbs throughout Wyoming, Colorado, Nevada, Utah, Washington and Idaho, along with doing some extensive climbing and mountaineering in the Teton Range. Skiing is another one of her passions throughout several mountains in Colorado and Wyoming. In the winter, Door is involved in the ski patrol and backcountry search and rescue through Medicine Bow Nordic Ski Patrol.

howling and barking. Suddenly two dog sleds race through the pristine By Katelyn Johnson wilderness led by six tan and white Kjohnso7@uwyo.edu Alaskan huskies harnessed to each sled. The two female mushers dressed Imagine this. It’s a calm Alaskan in thick boots, down winter pants and winter morning. There’s a slight breeze fur-lined parkas are yelling to their whispering through the tall Aspens and dogs as they pack down a trail over the blowing the pure white snow across frozen Alaskan bush. the cold landscape. The sky is clear This is a sight not commonly seen as the sun reflects off the snow, making it shimmer like diamonds. There by everyone during the winter. Some are birds chirping happily as a red fox people might think this frigid sport prichases a rabbit across the meadow. It is marily occurs in Alaska, but the truth a peaceful day today, a perfect day for is many different people dog sled all over the country. any outdoor activity. In the near distance dogs are 10 reach

ding at a young age when she and her family moved from Michigan, Minn., to Sidney, Neb. Her father visited Alaska often to photograph Jeff King in the Iditarod. King is a musher who is well-known for winning both the 1,049 mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race across Alaska, and the 1,100 mile Yukon Quest Sled Dog Race across Canada. King has won the Iditarod four times. Door’s father would come home from his Alaskan Iditarod trips with stuffed animals and books for his two daughters, which got them very interested in this great winter sport.

“So I begged my dad for some sled Anneka Door, 22, started dog sled- dogs and when I was 10 we bought a

couple,” Door said. Though the number of dog didn’t stop there. After Door had raced in a few sprint races throughout Colorado, Wyoming and Michigan, two dogs became four, four became eight and so on. The Door family had anywhere from eight to fifteen dogs at a time.

down, off the bridge, and into the hot more information go to www.dogslesprings. But I didn’t let go, so the sled dadventures.com. came with me. I stood up covered in Another company within Wyoming warm gooey muck, pulled the sled out that offers dog sledding adventures is and continued on to win the race.” Jackson Hole Iditarod Sled Dog Tours. Now that is something I would clas- For more information go to www. sify as epic. jhsleddog.com.

It wasn’t all about the “guts and gloDoor gained a lot of her primary experience racing 3-dog sprint races in a ry” of winning races. junior class but became competitive in “We did it for the dogs and they absothe 4-dog races while in high school. lutely loved it. They kept running and “At one point while I was in high we held on for dear life,” Door said school, I had one of the fastest 4-dog about what she liked most about dog sprint teams in the world, being ranked sledding. It was also a great family activity, which she said brought her fam3rd or 4th,” Door said. ily closer together. During that time, she was sponsored Interested in dog sledding? As preby Sled Dog Systems, who provided viously mentioned, you don’t have to her with the sleds she raced with. be in Alaska to get involved in this adThough mushing though beautiful for- venturous winter sport. Jackson Hole’s ests might sound peaceful and relaxing, Continental Divide Dog Sled Adventhere were definitely some “epic” races, tures is a company that gives dog sled Door said. Falling off bridges and cliffs tours through the Teton and Shoshoni and running into trees were just a few National Forests that surround Jackof the accidents across the many snowy son Hole, and the greater Yellowstone area. One can choose from a half-day, trails, but it didn’t discourage her. full day, overnight or extended trip. For “Probably my most exciting race was in Ouray, Colo., when I was about twelve to thirteen years old racing in the 3-dog junior class. I was racing three fast dogs that I borrowed from a friend and the trail took a sharp turn down and to the right and went across a small bridge over a hot spring.

There are also many dog sledding outfitters throughout Colorado. Some such as The Mountain Musher, located in Vail; Nova Guides, Inc., located in Minturn; and Wintertrax, located in Ridgeway. Looking to actually get involved in the Great Race? Become a volunteer! There are many opportunities through the Iditarod Trail Committee, Inc.from phone and computer input and communications, to merchandise sales or being at each checkpoint to transport dropped dogs, trail volunteers and handling the sled dogs. Just visit www.iditarod.com/volunteers/. Volunteering is a great thing to do to meet new people and learn a lot, especially with such an amazing sport. Plus, who knows, maybe you’ll end up loving it so much that you’ll become a musher yourself!

‘The number one rule when racing sled dogs is don’t let go because the dogs won’t stop and you’ll be dragged for miles. This time I took the turn too fast and hit the side of the bridge with my sled runner and it flipped me upside 11 reach


StUcK In A

r

Ut

A detailed account and how-to get your vehicle out of a snowy entrapment By Jon Kawulok

jkawulo1@uwyo.edu

The tire looks exhausted as it spins, and the snow has long since been flung from it. The other three tires sit as if impatient with their dangling clone. The three of you can certainly try to push a 1984 F-150 through two-and-a -half feet of snow, but after a few comical heaves you realize that even with a person vainly revving the engine, the steel body may be just a little much for the other two scrawny men. Men may not be the right word, though. Two hail from the great state of Wyoming and like to think they know how to rough it and can teach the kid from Illinois how to drive a stick shift. Technically, the truck’s owner is nineteen and the other two have yet to eclipse the eighteen-and-a-half year mark. So by that argument, they legally qualify for that elusive title of “man.” But when the combination of the single dangling tire, wheel and axle-end weighs more than their total weight, they have a problem. Sure, they were all quickly becoming disillusioned of their true masculinity, but that would be compensated with their inclusion in the University of Wyoming Honor’s Program. If their united brawn didn’t force them out of the situation, they at least could pool their brains together and use the valuable tools provided by the vast sagebrush plains south of Laramie. Nevermind that it was three in the afternoon, with the sun already skirting the Snowies in those short January days. Forget they all decided to take pictures and video, with cell phones, in an area without service. Ignore the fact that they had only seasoned jerky with a total of three standard Aquavista bottles, slightly consumed during the excitement of the ride. Oh, and they hadn’t told anyone else what in the world they would be doing that afternoon. These, University of Wyoming, are your Honor’s students. Michael Fehr did as all responsible drivers ought to do when confronted with a hazardous road condition; he slowed down. As he crested the hill, we each glimpsed a 12 reach

small covering of snow that we figured could not have amounted to more than eight inches, at most. As this covering lay immediately beyond the hilltop, we did not have time to confer on how to address this newfound, snowy obstacle; it happened much too fast even going as slowly as we had been. Or, that’s what we like to think. As we were crammed together on the single bench of the truck, we assumed the snow was conquerable and proceeded onward. However, the truck immediately became stuck. Loren Ruttinger switched to the driver’s seat and attempted to rock the car out of its pit, but to no avail. He grew irritated and disappointed. So Fehr and I each assumed the position. Bent over, face down, breathing in anticipation, we gripped opposite ends of the tailgate and waited for Loren’s signal from the driver’s seat to push with all of our feeble might as he hit the gas. In snow less deep, this is the way a group ought to approach an entrenched vehicle. As we were pushing, we had not taken into account the fact that the snow was nearly three feet deep and the heavy, steel truck now rested on its front tires and back axle. Consequently, the tire spat less and less snow and the truck would not budge. At this moment, we realized that we may have to manipulate the truck’s circumstances by shoveling rather than shoving. We were without prior experience, so we endured a session of trial and error so that the incorrect methods may be known and not used, and the correct methods delivered without the time and toil that generates hotheadedness. First, we figured if we strategically place a large rock near the tire, it should have enough traction to propel the truck from its snowy pit. We dug a small hole in front of the entrenched tire, and placed the 120 lb. rock we had hauled from 100 meters away slightly below the middle of the tire. We repeated the pushing method, but the weight of the truck was not resting upon the dry surface of the rock. At this point, we discovered the crucial fac-

tor in plucking a stuck truck or car from snow: the problem tire must not only be touching a surface that will provide substantial traction, but the weight of the truck must be resting upon that tire. Here, a car jack is essential for emergency situations. We had to dig until we found firm ground, and layer it up with flat rocks so the jack could reach the frame. Blame it on the waning sunlight or the lack of nutrition, but we believed it to be a good idea at first to gather sticks and branches to use as our traction. After jacking up the truck, we placed our gathered branches all under the tire. Sure, it had a slight resemblance to a large pile of kindling, but we disregarded that as we assumed our roles and attempted the push method once more. Fehr and I instantly saw and smelled the results of a rapidly spinning tire on wood and ran up alongside Ruttingerto say, “No more, stop!” Only then did he smell the burning rubber and see the large plume of inky smoke rise from the rear of the truck. We jacked up the car and dejectedly removed the burnt branches, dug some more, and placed the rocks beneath the tire. This epiphany came after two-and-a-half hours of turmoil, and we wanted to be sure that it was the right decision with all the effort we could muster. We let the truck down onto the smooth ramp of rocks, used the push method one last time, and the truck was free. Free at last. Though we had only been a couple miles away from Highway 287 and had some battery left on our phones we could easily have found service and called for help. We had enough jerky to sustain us, and if need be, we could have melted snow for water. The situation was not as dire as described, but having that shovel and sleeping bag, food and water, jacket and foresight, will dramatically reduce the urgency of the situation. From this dramatic scenario, I have compiled a list of tips to help even the most stuck of cars to conquer their snowy doom.

TIP 1: If there is only one person in the vehicle, first try waving down a passerby or wandering for a cell phone signal.

TIP 2:

If pushing is involved, make sure the pusher heaves forth from a back corner instead of the middle. This way, if the car ends up rolling back, the pusher can flee quickly.

TIP 3:

Always communicate with the members of your party and make sure you know where everyone is and what they are doing.

TIP 4:

View the stuck vehicle as a pendulum. The driver should accelerate in one direction as far and briefly as possible, and then repeat in reverse. This builds momentum and eases the car into becoming unstuck.

TIP 5:

Coordinate the pusher with the driver to make sure the heaving is accordance with the accelerating.

TIP 6:

If another car and rope or chain is present, start towing. But, only in the most severe of cases.

TIP 7:

If the shoving doesn’t work, start shoveling.

TIP 8:

When using a jack, make sure that the frame is lifted off of the snow. Then fill the space with rocks to serve as traction and not branches; branches will ignite. Then take the jack out and use the pendulum method.

TIP 9:

Gloves, a small shovel and a waterproof jacket or blanket must be kept in your vehicle at all times.

TIP 10:

Let someone know where you are, just in case you can’t get yourself out. 13 reach


StUcK In A

r

Ut

A detailed account and how-to get your vehicle out of a snowy entrapment By Jon Kawulok

jkawulo1@uwyo.edu

The tire looks exhausted as it spins, and the snow has long since been flung from it. The other three tires sit as if impatient with their dangling clone. The three of you can certainly try to push a 1984 F-150 through two-and-a -half feet of snow, but after a few comical heaves you realize that even with a person vainly revving the engine, the steel body may be just a little much for the other two scrawny men. Men may not be the right word, though. Two hail from the great state of Wyoming and like to think they know how to rough it and can teach the kid from Illinois how to drive a stick shift. Technically, the truck’s owner is nineteen and the other two have yet to eclipse the eighteen-and-a-half year mark. So by that argument, they legally qualify for that elusive title of “man.” But when the combination of the single dangling tire, wheel and axle-end weighs more than their total weight, they have a problem. Sure, they were all quickly becoming disillusioned of their true masculinity, but that would be compensated with their inclusion in the University of Wyoming Honor’s Program. If their united brawn didn’t force them out of the situation, they at least could pool their brains together and use the valuable tools provided by the vast sagebrush plains south of Laramie. Nevermind that it was three in the afternoon, with the sun already skirting the Snowies in those short January days. Forget they all decided to take pictures and video, with cell phones, in an area without service. Ignore the fact that they had only seasoned jerky with a total of three standard Aquavista bottles, slightly consumed during the excitement of the ride. Oh, and they hadn’t told anyone else what in the world they would be doing that afternoon. These, University of Wyoming, are your Honor’s students. Michael Fehr did as all responsible drivers ought to do when confronted with a hazardous road condition; he slowed down. As he crested the hill, we each glimpsed a 12 reach

small covering of snow that we figured could not have amounted to more than eight inches, at most. As this covering lay immediately beyond the hilltop, we did not have time to confer on how to address this newfound, snowy obstacle; it happened much too fast even going as slowly as we had been. Or, that’s what we like to think. As we were crammed together on the single bench of the truck, we assumed the snow was conquerable and proceeded onward. However, the truck immediately became stuck. Loren Ruttinger switched to the driver’s seat and attempted to rock the car out of its pit, but to no avail. He grew irritated and disappointed. So Fehr and I each assumed the position. Bent over, face down, breathing in anticipation, we gripped opposite ends of the tailgate and waited for Loren’s signal from the driver’s seat to push with all of our feeble might as he hit the gas. In snow less deep, this is the way a group ought to approach an entrenched vehicle. As we were pushing, we had not taken into account the fact that the snow was nearly three feet deep and the heavy, steel truck now rested on its front tires and back axle. Consequently, the tire spat less and less snow and the truck would not budge. At this moment, we realized that we may have to manipulate the truck’s circumstances by shoveling rather than shoving. We were without prior experience, so we endured a session of trial and error so that the incorrect methods may be known and not used, and the correct methods delivered without the time and toil that generates hotheadedness. First, we figured if we strategically place a large rock near the tire, it should have enough traction to propel the truck from its snowy pit. We dug a small hole in front of the entrenched tire, and placed the 120 lb. rock we had hauled from 100 meters away slightly below the middle of the tire. We repeated the pushing method, but the weight of the truck was not resting upon the dry surface of the rock. At this point, we discovered the crucial fac-

tor in plucking a stuck truck or car from snow: the problem tire must not only be touching a surface that will provide substantial traction, but the weight of the truck must be resting upon that tire. Here, a car jack is essential for emergency situations. We had to dig until we found firm ground, and layer it up with flat rocks so the jack could reach the frame. Blame it on the waning sunlight or the lack of nutrition, but we believed it to be a good idea at first to gather sticks and branches to use as our traction. After jacking up the truck, we placed our gathered branches all under the tire. Sure, it had a slight resemblance to a large pile of kindling, but we disregarded that as we assumed our roles and attempted the push method once more. Fehr and I instantly saw and smelled the results of a rapidly spinning tire on wood and ran up alongside Ruttingerto say, “No more, stop!” Only then did he smell the burning rubber and see the large plume of inky smoke rise from the rear of the truck. We jacked up the car and dejectedly removed the burnt branches, dug some more, and placed the rocks beneath the tire. This epiphany came after two-and-a-half hours of turmoil, and we wanted to be sure that it was the right decision with all the effort we could muster. We let the truck down onto the smooth ramp of rocks, used the push method one last time, and the truck was free. Free at last. Though we had only been a couple miles away from Highway 287 and had some battery left on our phones we could easily have found service and called for help. We had enough jerky to sustain us, and if need be, we could have melted snow for water. The situation was not as dire as described, but having that shovel and sleeping bag, food and water, jacket and foresight, will dramatically reduce the urgency of the situation. From this dramatic scenario, I have compiled a list of tips to help even the most stuck of cars to conquer their snowy doom.

TIP 1: If there is only one person in the vehicle, first try waving down a passerby or wandering for a cell phone signal.

TIP 2:

If pushing is involved, make sure the pusher heaves forth from a back corner instead of the middle. This way, if the car ends up rolling back, the pusher can flee quickly.

TIP 3:

Always communicate with the members of your party and make sure you know where everyone is and what they are doing.

TIP 4:

View the stuck vehicle as a pendulum. The driver should accelerate in one direction as far and briefly as possible, and then repeat in reverse. This builds momentum and eases the car into becoming unstuck.

TIP 5:

Coordinate the pusher with the driver to make sure the heaving is accordance with the accelerating.

TIP 6:

If another car and rope or chain is present, start towing. But, only in the most severe of cases.

TIP 7:

If the shoving doesn’t work, start shoveling.

TIP 8:

When using a jack, make sure that the frame is lifted off of the snow. Then fill the space with rocks to serve as traction and not branches; branches will ignite. Then take the jack out and use the pendulum method.

TIP 9:

Gloves, a small shovel and a waterproof jacket or blanket must be kept in your vehicle at all times.

TIP 10:

Let someone know where you are, just in case you can’t get yourself out. 13 reach


“Snow Cave”

Photo by Dan Kunkel


“Snow Cave”

Photo by Dan Kunkel


A Day on the Hard Water

By Katelyn Johnson Kjohnso7@uwyo.edu

It’s Friday night and you and some of your buddies are hanging out at a favorite pub. It’s late January in the good ol’ Wyoming, and one of your buddies is sharing his “crazy” Minnesota fishing trip story. Since you’ve heard this one many times before, instead of listening you’re thinking, “Tomorrow’s Saturday and I don’t have any obligations for the weekend! Ice fishing sounds awesome.” You know some of the guys are planning to hit the ski slopes for the day, but you decide to try and draft a few of your friends to go along with you. Being broke college students, three of them are immediately in. After you’ve set a time to leave in the morning, you decide to head home to start preparing the gear list. You’re a bit ashamed because you haven’t actually seen your ice fishing gear for two winters now, and then you discover it buried in your ex-roommate’s bedroom, which you currently use as a storage unit. By now, you’ve laid out all your ice fishing gear and can start gathering the following list of items: The Edibles: Sandwich materials, snacks, hot drinks (and cold brews), the portable grill and some seasoned chicken breasts, just in case some of the guys want to make a whole day out of it. The Can’t-leave-withouts: A fishing license, winter rules and regulations pertaining to the lake you plan to fish on, sunglasses, hand/ foot warmers and sun screen (those rays reflecting off the snow and ice can leave a wicked sunburn on your face).

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The Apparel: On this list you should have something along the lines of long underwear, waterproof/ warm pants and jacket, warm hat and gloves, waterproof boots, extra clothes in-case some get wet and hockey skates because you can never go wrong with a game of ice hockey if the fishing gets a little slow. Last but not least, a sled to carry the gear on the ice, extra mittens, a camera and two-way radios to talk to your buddies. FISHING GEAR LIST: Fishing rods and reels Fishing line, 2-8 lb. test iceline Tips-ups (5-10) Leaders for tip-ups Ice auger Ice scoop Bait; minnows, wax worms, fat-heads, ect. (depending on what you’re catching) Jigs, spoons, hooks A couple 5-gallon buckets (to sit on) Needle-nose pliers Bobber stops with beads Ice fishing bobbers Line clippers Rope The next question you might have about ice fishing is where to go. Well, if you want to stay within a few hours of Laramie, the best places to ice fish are most likely going to be where the fishing is good throughout the rest of the year. Starting around the middle of December is when the ice gets thick enough, and you’re best bet is to head to the Laramie Plains Lakes or Saratoga Lake. The Laramie Plains Lakes are a collection of impound-

Photos by Caitlin White

Above: UW junior Jacob Swan fishes for brown trout on Crystal Lake. The Crystal Lake Reservoir is part of Curt Gody State Park between Laramie and Cheyenne, left: UW junior Jacob Swan drills into the ice on Crystal Lake with his hand-powered auger.

ments about 15 miles west of Lara- nity to catch a true trophy brown in mie off of WY 230. the eight-pound range. Though, fishing at Twin Buttes is best in the fall. Lake Hattie, which is the largest of the Laramie Plains Lakes contains Galett is 34 acres, which is the smallrainbow trout, brown trout, lakers, est of the Laramie Plains Lakes. It has Kokanee salmon, and perch. The rainbow trout from 12 to 24 inches browns and rainbows range from 12- and grass carp. 30 inches with the occasional 5 to 10 pounder, and the lake trout average Meeboer is a 119-acre reservoir that grows fish faster than any of the oth5 to 15 pounds. er plains lakes. “Recent efforts by the Twin Buttes is a 250-acre impound- Wyoming Game & Fish have allowed ment that contains rainbows and us carry over fish the past couple of browns averaging 12 to 25+ inches. years, which has greatly increased This reservoir offers a great opportu- the rainbows average size. Fishing continued on pg. 18 17 reach


A Day on the Hard Water

By Katelyn Johnson Kjohnso7@uwyo.edu

It’s Friday night and you and some of your buddies are hanging out at a favorite pub. It’s late January in the good ol’ Wyoming, and one of your buddies is sharing his “crazy” Minnesota fishing trip story. Since you’ve heard this one many times before, instead of listening you’re thinking, “Tomorrow’s Saturday and I don’t have any obligations for the weekend! Ice fishing sounds awesome.” You know some of the guys are planning to hit the ski slopes for the day, but you decide to try and draft a few of your friends to go along with you. Being broke college students, three of them are immediately in. After you’ve set a time to leave in the morning, you decide to head home to start preparing the gear list. You’re a bit ashamed because you haven’t actually seen your ice fishing gear for two winters now, and then you discover it buried in your ex-roommate’s bedroom, which you currently use as a storage unit. By now, you’ve laid out all your ice fishing gear and can start gathering the following list of items: The Edibles: Sandwich materials, snacks, hot drinks (and cold brews), the portable grill and some seasoned chicken breasts, just in case some of the guys want to make a whole day out of it. The Can’t-leave-withouts: A fishing license, winter rules and regulations pertaining to the lake you plan to fish on, sunglasses, hand/ foot warmers and sun screen (those rays reflecting off the snow and ice can leave a wicked sunburn on your face).

16 reach

The Apparel: On this list you should have something along the lines of long underwear, waterproof/ warm pants and jacket, warm hat and gloves, waterproof boots, extra clothes in-case some get wet and hockey skates because you can never go wrong with a game of ice hockey if the fishing gets a little slow. Last but not least, a sled to carry the gear on the ice, extra mittens, a camera and two-way radios to talk to your buddies. FISHING GEAR LIST: Fishing rods and reels Fishing line, 2-8 lb. test iceline Tips-ups (5-10) Leaders for tip-ups Ice auger Ice scoop Bait; minnows, wax worms, fat-heads, ect. (depending on what you’re catching) Jigs, spoons, hooks A couple 5-gallon buckets (to sit on) Needle-nose pliers Bobber stops with beads Ice fishing bobbers Line clippers Rope The next question you might have about ice fishing is where to go. Well, if you want to stay within a few hours of Laramie, the best places to ice fish are most likely going to be where the fishing is good throughout the rest of the year. Starting around the middle of December is when the ice gets thick enough, and you’re best bet is to head to the Laramie Plains Lakes or Saratoga Lake. The Laramie Plains Lakes are a collection of impound-

Photos by Caitlin White

Above: UW junior Jacob Swan fishes for brown trout on Crystal Lake. The Crystal Lake Reservoir is part of Curt Gody State Park between Laramie and Cheyenne, left: UW junior Jacob Swan drills into the ice on Crystal Lake with his hand-powered auger.

ments about 15 miles west of Lara- nity to catch a true trophy brown in mie off of WY 230. the eight-pound range. Though, fishing at Twin Buttes is best in the fall. Lake Hattie, which is the largest of the Laramie Plains Lakes contains Galett is 34 acres, which is the smallrainbow trout, brown trout, lakers, est of the Laramie Plains Lakes. It has Kokanee salmon, and perch. The rainbow trout from 12 to 24 inches browns and rainbows range from 12- and grass carp. 30 inches with the occasional 5 to 10 pounder, and the lake trout average Meeboer is a 119-acre reservoir that grows fish faster than any of the oth5 to 15 pounds. er plains lakes. “Recent efforts by the Twin Buttes is a 250-acre impound- Wyoming Game & Fish have allowed ment that contains rainbows and us carry over fish the past couple of browns averaging 12 to 25+ inches. years, which has greatly increased This reservoir offers a great opportu- the rainbows average size. Fishing continued on pg. 18 17 reach


Continued from pg. 17

Prior to these efforts fish averaged 10-14 inches. Now fish in the six to ten pound plus range have been more common.

Interested in the great outdoors?

Saratoga Lake is just a few minutes north of Saratoga, off WYO 130/230. This 300 acre lake is noted for its year-round fishing excellence. Cutthroat, brown, and lake trout are what you’re most likely to catch. The next best thing about this lake is that you can hit-up the hot springs in the town of Saratoga after a long cold day of ice fishing! Another good thing about the fish in these lakes is that they’re fun to catch, and their tasty. Remember the two most important keys; location and presentation. You could have the most appealing bait in the world, but if there aren’t any fish around it’s probably going to be a looong day on the hard water. What you present to fish is just as important as finding them. Talk to local anglers, especially at bait shops because you can save a ton of time while trying to find where the fish are, as well as what they’re biting on. Another important part of ice fishing is making sure the ice you’re fishing on is frozen solid. Due to wind and fluctuations of temperatures, ice can be unstable. Watch for and avoid lake overflow, wet areas and open water. The less the wind flows during the day and night, the faster and more solid the ice freezes. So pay attention to the weather before planning an ice fishing excursion. If there has been a lot of snow (or worse, rain) the formation of good ice is hindered. Pay attention to the amount and type of precipitation that has occurred within the past few days of your trip. Always let someone at home know where you’re planning on going, and when you plan to return. It’s advised that you use caution as you approach the ice and motorized vehicles are not recommended for most ponds and lakes. Other than that, now that you’ve got all your gear, the food and the apparel list, a list of a few places to go and you’re keeping ice safety in mind. You’re all set! 18 reach

REACH is looking for writers and photographers interested in outdoor activities.

The following is what the Department of Natural Resources recommends in reference to ice satefy: • 4 - 6 inches - Ice fishing, foot travel in singlefile lines and small spaced seating on the ice should be safe presuming ice is clear and clean. • 6 - 10 inches - Snowmobiles and ATVs can travel on good ice that is this thick. • 10 - 16 inches - Small cars and pickups can begin to venture onto the ice. However, the DNR states that it is best to avoid driving on ice whever possible.

Photo by Caitlin White

If interested in contributing to REACH contact Caitlin White at cwhite3@uwyo.edu, or stop by the Student Media Office located on the third floor 21 reach of the Student Union. Photo by Brian Degenfelder

19 reach


Continued from pg. 17

Prior to these efforts fish averaged 10-14 inches. Now fish in the six to ten pound plus range have been more common.

Interested in the great outdoors?

Saratoga Lake is just a few minutes north of Saratoga, off WYO 130/230. This 300 acre lake is noted for its year-round fishing excellence. Cutthroat, brown, and lake trout are what you’re most likely to catch. The next best thing about this lake is that you can hit-up the hot springs in the town of Saratoga after a long cold day of ice fishing! Another good thing about the fish in these lakes is that they’re fun to catch, and their tasty. Remember the two most important keys; location and presentation. You could have the most appealing bait in the world, but if there aren’t any fish around it’s probably going to be a looong day on the hard water. What you present to fish is just as important as finding them. Talk to local anglers, especially at bait shops because you can save a ton of time while trying to find where the fish are, as well as what they’re biting on. Another important part of ice fishing is making sure the ice you’re fishing on is frozen solid. Due to wind and fluctuations of temperatures, ice can be unstable. Watch for and avoid lake overflow, wet areas and open water. The less the wind flows during the day and night, the faster and more solid the ice freezes. So pay attention to the weather before planning an ice fishing excursion. If there has been a lot of snow (or worse, rain) the formation of good ice is hindered. Pay attention to the amount and type of precipitation that has occurred within the past few days of your trip. Always let someone at home know where you’re planning on going, and when you plan to return. It’s advised that you use caution as you approach the ice and motorized vehicles are not recommended for most ponds and lakes. Other than that, now that you’ve got all your gear, the food and the apparel list, a list of a few places to go and you’re keeping ice safety in mind. You’re all set! 18 reach

REACH is looking for writers and photographers interested in outdoor activities.

The following is what the Department of Natural Resources recommends in reference to ice satefy: • 4 - 6 inches - Ice fishing, foot travel in singlefile lines and small spaced seating on the ice should be safe presuming ice is clear and clean. • 6 - 10 inches - Snowmobiles and ATVs can travel on good ice that is this thick. • 10 - 16 inches - Small cars and pickups can begin to venture onto the ice. However, the DNR states that it is best to avoid driving on ice whever possible.

Photo by Caitlin White

If interested in contributing to REACH contact Caitlin White at cwhite3@uwyo.edu, or stop by the Student Media Office located on the third floor 21 reach of the Student Union. Photo by Brian Degenfelder

19 reach


s e i m m u Y e m i t r e t Win e because: im rt te in w e in th k quite a bit ty o mail.com o g c @ I y . it g n in fa k when it's thir coo y rm a jo ohthepro n w e a o tr d x I e ut se keep the hou ha Stewart, b rt d a n a M n t e o v n o m e I’ n th use to turn o c x e y n a . e k a) I'll ta hen it's cold w e id ts u o ible e. . little as poss s a o below outsid d I d to the bone o le s il t h a c e h m y a d I o hen , in b e cooking w ar expensive b) I don't reta m fe o I h . e it k e li k li p I u er s me es to time, cipe, the bett m re o e c ing else warm th it th r n o le e N p h ) w c sim d, cooking, the wine Flu. An dably not S to n s e ta e th rs m e g o d c in n h u it tc n m he f ca Ia However, w ime worker, s the horror o . a -t rt h a c p u d m n s a a t u empathize en nts o d ie y d , tu s re re e a g s in im e c c -t n ti ll fu exo Cha h of it. As a on campus. c u y a m d e e gourmet g v v n a a h h lo t 't a o r n e y ft a I don a r m e ho laborate dinn u and me, w s ASAP. I've o k y c a e n k s li d n le a p cooking an e o ls ea r pe recipes is fo t delicious m n f a o w n o d you can too. ti n c a w e t o ll e n o g k d I u b d n t a This c h n tig y own kitche ise, live on a m rt e in p s x e e ip g c in re k ese coo de each of th a m y ll fu s s e succ stay warm! Enjoy - and t

n Schmied

By Charlyn

ients: Chili Ingred ce f tomato sau o n t.) a c . z o 6 11 ey, black, ec n id (k s n a e b of 1 16 oz. can corn 1 16 oz. can 1 teaspoon n chili powder 1 tablespoo R 2 teaspoons O d e p p o h n, c 1 small onio onions dried minced

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Rock 'N Roll Fre nc This sim ple but d h Fries elic modifica tion to go ious od french fr ies is eas , old y and cheap.

on your b ag of fro ze french fr ies. Place n desired amount o ff a baking rench fries on pan. Sprin kle paprika g Ingredie enerously nts: o french fr A bag of ies. Do th ver the frozen fr e same w it h the gar ench frie Paprika lic powd s er. Bake frie Garlic po wder brown. C s until golden oo then serv l for a moment, Instruct e .S ions: over plate quirt ketchup of fries, if Preheat o desired. temperatu ven to re as des ( Recipe fr ignated om Char lynn Schmied t)

e tarian Chili orning puts m Simple Vege m y w o sn , a cold er in Waking up to letting something simm r er fo reates a bett c in the mood g in th o n day ot, and the Crock P i cooking all il h c f o t o p a big aroma than long.

and Instructions: ts into a Crock Pot. Stir n ie d Put all ingre tting all day. se w lo a n o r let simme fatfree.com) (Recipe from

00 degrees the oven to 4 t a e h re ur p tly grease yo this time, h r ig e L ft . A it e s. h te n u Fahre icksit for 10 min begin to form a to prevent st ts e e sh ld ie u k o h o o c the yeast sh into a 16-inc e of the ll c a a b e rf h ip c su c Soft Pretzels a e re e th ll is o in l ing.R length of th creamy foam into a pretze . rm sy a fo Don’t let the e d d n n a a th p a g len still che f your water. ther shape o r, salt and oil fool you; it’s o u r o fl (o e e p th a e issh in Comb dd the large bowl, d A a l. In w o ). b g g n si in o cho e : in a large mix ing soda in th until well k ir r a Ingredients a b st g e d su n th a d e te re lv la tu granu ater. out so yeast mix 1 tablespoon dough for ab g 2 cups of w d e e in th id in a d iv a d m e n r, re K te . a els (alw mixed dip the pretz into a ball. y 3 cups warm ll rm fu fo re n st a e a e e C th y ve dry 3 minutes, oiled shapes) in th y to tl h in g d li e 1 packet acti se a o rm in rp fo ugh ready water, ached all-pu Place the do wrap and ff the excess o ic e st 3 cups unble k la a p h S h it r. ie w te wa el on a cook bowl, cover bout tz a r re p fo t h c si a t flour e le e c and and pla salt. lt a damp cloth ft-free with coarse ra le d k , n 1 teaspoon sa ri rm p a S w il t. a shee utes, or s canola o two hours in rise. The 15 to 20 min n 2 tablespoon r a c fo h a e g d k u a so o B d g e s bakin ihe pretspot so th 2 tablespoon en brown. T ble in size. D ld u o o lt g d l sa ld ti e u n o u rs a t of sh o sc dough pieces and aten right ou e 2 1 st 2 tablespoon e to b in re h a g d ls u ze vide the do an freeze an ust c (d u o ll a y b t u a b , to n ce in hrthe ove roll each pie 75 degrees fa prevent 3 t to a g r Instructions: u in m o k e a fl th b h t e it a e reh se a larg your hands w utes. Lightly grea alls on a the b r e ti S th . e g c eit for 5 min in h la k n P ic e an ). st g t n in e k v ic st ured e Joy of Veg o h fl T r. y m tl te sheet to pre o a h fr g w li e r ip o (Rec cup of warm cookie sheet minutes. lleen Patrick 0 o 1 ib C sugar into 1 r tr y b is fo d g st in ly re k n t a e B een ev surface. Le Once it has b w it ady to bake, o re ll e a ’r d u n o a y st n a ye Whe uted, add the it and let k is h w n e h T to dissolve.

Cheap and Simple Photo by Charlynn Schmiedt

21 reach


s e i m m u Y e m i t r e t Win e because: im rt te in w e in th k quite a bit ty o mail.com o g c @ I y . it g n in fa k when it's thir coo y rm a jo ohthepro n w e a o tr d x I e ut se keep the hou ha Stewart, b rt d a n a M n t e o v n o m e I’ n th use to turn o c x e y n a . e k a) I'll ta hen it's cold w e id ts u o ible e. . little as poss s a o below outsid d I d to the bone o le s il t h a c e h m y a d I o hen , in b e cooking w ar expensive b) I don't reta m fe o I h . e it k e li k li p I u er s me es to time, cipe, the bett m re o e c ing else warm th it th r n o le e N p h ) w c sim d, cooking, the wine Flu. An dably not S to n s e ta e th rs m e g o d c in n h u it tc n m he f ca Ia However, w ime worker, s the horror o . a -t rt h a c p u d m n s a a t u empathize en nts o d ie y d , tu s re re e a g s in im e c c -t n ti ll fu exo Cha h of it. As a on campus. c u y a m d e e gourmet g v v n a a h h lo t 't a o r n e y ft a I don a r m e ho laborate dinn u and me, w s ASAP. I've o k y c a e n k s li d n le a p cooking an e o ls ea r pe recipes is fo t delicious m n f a o w n o d you can too. ti n c a w e t o ll e n o g k d I u b d n t a This c h n tig y own kitche ise, live on a m rt e in p s x e e ip g c in re k ese coo de each of th a m y ll fu s s e succ stay warm! Enjoy - and t

n Schmied

By Charlyn

ients: Chili Ingred ce f tomato sau o n t.) a c . z o 6 11 ey, black, ec n id (k s n a e b of 1 16 oz. can corn 1 16 oz. can 1 teaspoon n chili powder 1 tablespoo R 2 teaspoons O d e p p o h n, c 1 small onio onions dried minced

20 reach

Rock 'N Roll Fre nc This sim ple but d h Fries elic modifica tion to go ious od french fr ies is eas , old y and cheap.

on your b ag of fro ze french fr ies. Place n desired amount o ff a baking rench fries on pan. Sprin kle paprika g Ingredie enerously nts: o french fr A bag of ies. Do th ver the frozen fr e same w it h the gar ench frie Paprika lic powd s er. Bake frie Garlic po wder brown. C s until golden oo then serv l for a moment, Instruct e .S ions: over plate quirt ketchup of fries, if Preheat o desired. temperatu ven to re as des ( Recipe fr ignated om Char lynn Schmied t)

e tarian Chili orning puts m Simple Vege m y w o sn , a cold er in Waking up to letting something simm r er fo reates a bett c in the mood g in th o n day ot, and the Crock P i cooking all il h c f o t o p a big aroma than long.

and Instructions: ts into a Crock Pot. Stir n ie d Put all ingre tting all day. se w lo a n o r let simme fatfree.com) (Recipe from

00 degrees the oven to 4 t a e h re ur p tly grease yo this time, h r ig e L ft . A it e s. h te n u Fahre icksit for 10 min begin to form a to prevent st ts e e sh ld ie u k o h o o c the yeast sh into a 16-inc e of the ll c a a b e rf h ip c su c Soft Pretzels a e re e th ll is o in l ing.R length of th creamy foam into a pretze . rm sy a fo Don’t let the e d d n n a a th p a g len still che f your water. ther shape o r, salt and oil fool you; it’s o u r o fl (o e e p th a e issh in Comb dd the large bowl, d A a l. In w o ). b g g n si in o cho e : in a large mix ing soda in th until well k ir r a Ingredients a b st g e d su n th a d e te re lv la tu granu ater. out so yeast mix 1 tablespoon dough for ab g 2 cups of w d e e in th id in a d iv a d m e n r, re K te . a els (alw mixed dip the pretz into a ball. y 3 cups warm ll rm fu fo re n st a e a e e C th y ve dry 3 minutes, oiled shapes) in th y to tl h in g d li e 1 packet acti se a o rm in rp fo ugh ready water, ached all-pu Place the do wrap and ff the excess o ic e st 3 cups unble k la a p h S h it r. ie w te wa el on a cook bowl, cover bout tz a r re p fo t h c si a t flour e le e c and and pla salt. lt a damp cloth ft-free with coarse ra le d k , n 1 teaspoon sa ri rm p a S w il t. a shee utes, or s canola o two hours in rise. The 15 to 20 min n 2 tablespoon r a c fo h a e g d k u a so o B d g e s bakin ihe pretspot so th 2 tablespoon en brown. T ble in size. D ld u o o lt g d l sa ld ti e u n o u rs a t of sh o sc dough pieces and aten right ou e 2 1 st 2 tablespoon e to b in re h a g d ls u ze vide the do an freeze an ust c (d u o ll a y b t u a b , to n ce in hrthe ove roll each pie 75 degrees fa prevent 3 t to a g r Instructions: u in m o k e a fl th b h t e it a e reh se a larg your hands w utes. Lightly grea alls on a the b r e ti S th . e g c eit for 5 min in h la k n P ic e an ). st g t n in e k v ic st ured e Joy of Veg o h fl T r. y m tl te sheet to pre o a h fr g w li e r ip o (Rec cup of warm cookie sheet minutes. lleen Patrick 0 o 1 ib C sugar into 1 r tr y b is fo d g st in ly re k n t a e B een ev surface. Le Once it has b w it ady to bake, o re ll e a ’r d u n o a y st n a ye Whe uted, add the it and let k is h w n e h T to dissolve.

Cheap and Simple Photo by Charlynn Schmiedt

21 reach


eese ream Ch

t

illa extrac

n van 1 teaspoo

ftened cheese, so r, softened utte ners’ 1/2 cup b confectio d te if s s 2 cup t sugar illa extrac n a v n o o p al) 1 teas g (option in r lo o c d Foo

oey C uctions: es Ooey Go ing Instr k a B 350 degre to s l n ie e il n v w o w s t o r a B wnie Prehe cious bro it. These deli hocolate craving Fahrenhe mixing bowl, stir c y d n e a d e y f e s n sati ns: In a large ur, sugar, cocoa at muchth wl, u o nstructio y e I e o m fl ti e g n mixing bo se th r, lo r m te and giv e a a iu th e w d e r e a g in m to In a chee These . Pour the cream sweet fix. y house. er and salt nd r a d e e w th c o e u p g a ix in s to m mix oil, apple blended. creamy. M r l le ti favorite in b n ta u e r g e e v y sti well and butt n graduall Add mix until e : ; h s c th t la , n il in n la ie 3 a il d 1 v n e x Ingr in a 9 the va se ’ sugar. Brownie ad evenly all-purpo ectioners e f r d d n p e o h S c c e a le th b in ed. Sprea ir s . e n d a in if p 2 cups un s g g rin s. inute bakin food colo e brownie 25 to 30 m nger th r r o e f v flour e o k a ly r n B lo ite suga the refrig icing eve top is no in l ti g n in u ic n 2 cups wh eetened cocoa 0 r e ve least 1 the ov nsw Store lefto se. ool for at c t e 3/4 cup u L . y ru shin m). rator afte e r e d r recipes.co e w ll d . o a s p w o te m p u o r g in f m n bakin (Recipe 1 teaspoo lt n sa nts: 1 teaspoo table oil Ingredie g cream in c I e eg ckages of tute a ti p s b ) e u s c n r 1/4 cup v u o ( 2 (8 o pplesauce ) il 3/4 cup a o p u er 3/4 c with anoth ies tter Cook u B t u n a Pe ke them Flourless and you didn’t ba ler Any simp yourself. nts: Ingredie nut butter 1 cup pea ite sugar 1 cup wh 1 egg ns: Instructio en to 350 degrees v Preheat o it. drop Fahrenhe ients and d e r g in okie e Combin unts of co o m a d e tten ul-siz teaspoonf a baking sheet. Fla to with the dough on crisscross pattern a utes. slightly in k. Bake for 10 min r fo cool. tines of a n and let e v o m o r double Remove f s only a dozen, so ld ery Recipe yie eanut-butt butter p e r o m r o peanut or triple f hocolate c r o F . s s chips. goodne chocolate om.) d d a , s ie cook ipies.c om allrec fr e ip c e (R

Photo by Charlynn Schmiedt

22 reach

TheNightingaleKnow-How By Lindsey White RN-BSN

While the great outdoors may have a lot to offer the adventurer and the nature lover, a day of fun in the snow can quickly turn into a dangerous situation for an outdoorsman’s health. Numerous illnesses can result from prolonged exposure to cold temperatures, the most life threatening of these illnesses being hypothermia. Hypothermia occurs when a person’s body temperature drops to a critical level, below 95 degrees Fahrenheit. Although 95 degrees still appears to be quite warm, in reality a small decrease in body temperature of merely a few degrees can cause organs and other body systems to not work properly. This drastic drop in temperature happens because the body’s ability to maintain its temperature regulation is impaired. Thus, the body loses heat faster than it can produce it. There are a wide variety of symptoms that can occur in a person suffering from hypothermia. Shivering is the body’s innate way of trying to warm its core temperature. Many people shiver from time to time but it is constant shivering that is concerning and indicative of hypothermia. Another telltale sign is a decreased amount of coordination. A person with hypothermia may fall easily or slur their words when they speak. In addition, the person afflicted is usually unaware of their condition and may exercise poor decision-making. The onset of these symptoms can happen slowly. Thus, the victim may not be aware there is problem until it is too late. Photo by Brian Degenfelder

The most common cause of hypothermia is prolonged exposure to the cold. A person may also develop hypothermia at an accelerated rate if he or she’s clothes become wet. The very young and elderly are more susceptible to hypothermia because of their body’s already decreased ability to regulate temperature. Another risk factor for hypothermia includes drinking alcoholic beverages while being in the cold. Alcohol may create the illusion of being warm, but in reality this is false. Blood vessels begin to expand as alcohol is ingested meaning that heat is more rapidly lost from the skin’s surface. As a general rule when participating in cold weather outdoor activities, liquids that are alcohol and caffeine free are the best choice for your health. Hypothermia is a condition that is extremely preventable through a few simple measures. Dressing appropriately for the weather is very important to the prevention of hypothermia. Always be prepared that the weather may change and the need for additional layers of clothing may be necessary. The outermost layer should be made of a waterrepellent material that is not only good for repelling moisture, but is also beneficial for protection from the wind. The best fabrics for inside layers are polypropylene or wool. Simple cottons fabrics are not the best insulators in cold temperatures. While keeping dry is important, it is also wise to not become overexerted during outdoor activities. Activities that would cause a person to sweat excessively can cause clothing to become damp. Damp clothing can

increase the risk for hypothermia. However, if prevention methods have failed and hypothermia is a suspected to be afflicting a friend of family member, quick action will be key in saving that person’s life. The priority when caring for someone who is developing hypothermia is to seek professional medical help. 911 should be called immediately so that emergency personal will be dispatched to the scene. As for caring for the person until help arrives, there are steps that should be taken. The person should be removed from the cold environment if possible. In addition, if the person’s clothing is wet, it should be removed immediately. Removing the clothing should be done as carefully as possible and with the minimal number of movements. Hypothermia increases the risk for cardiac arrest. By keeping the person as still as possible, the risk for cardiac arrest decreases. For this reason, it is also not advisable to massage or rub the person’s limbs. Applying direct heat such as a heating pad to the victim is more dangerous than it is helpful. If available, warm compresses should be applied to the chest wall, neck or groin. Heat should not be applied to the arms or legs. If heat is applied to the person’s limbs, it will force cold blood back towards the brain and heart. This could potentially cause the core body temperature to drop even further leading to death. The outdoors is a great way to let out a little cabin fever frustration during the long winter months, but be sure to use good planning skills and common sense to avoid injury. Hypothermia is a serious situation and should never be taken lightly.

23 reach


eese ream Ch

t

illa extrac

n van 1 teaspoo

ftened cheese, so r, softened utte ners’ 1/2 cup b confectio d te if s s 2 cup t sugar illa extrac n a v n o o p al) 1 teas g (option in r lo o c d Foo

oey C uctions: es Ooey Go ing Instr k a B 350 degre to s l n ie e il n v w o w s t o r a B wnie Prehe cious bro it. These deli hocolate craving Fahrenhe mixing bowl, stir c y d n e a d e y f e s n sati ns: In a large ur, sugar, cocoa at muchth wl, u o nstructio y e I e o m fl ti e g n mixing bo se th r, lo r m te and giv e a a iu th e w d e r e a g in m to In a chee These . Pour the cream sweet fix. y house. er and salt nd r a d e e w th c o e u p g a ix in s to m mix oil, apple blended. creamy. M r l le ti favorite in b n ta u e r g e e v y sti well and butt n graduall Add mix until e : ; h s c th t la , n il in n la ie 3 a il d 1 v n e x Ingr in a 9 the va se ’ sugar. Brownie ad evenly all-purpo ectioners e f r d d n p e o h S c c e a le th b in ed. Sprea ir s . e n d a in if p 2 cups un s g g rin s. inute bakin food colo e brownie 25 to 30 m nger th r r o e f v flour e o k a ly r n B lo ite suga the refrig icing eve top is no in l ti g n in u ic n 2 cups wh eetened cocoa 0 r e ve least 1 the ov nsw Store lefto se. ool for at c t e 3/4 cup u L . y ru shin m). rator afte e r e d r recipes.co e w ll d . o a s p w o te m p u o r g in f m n bakin (Recipe 1 teaspoo lt n sa nts: 1 teaspoo table oil Ingredie g cream in c I e eg ckages of tute a ti p s b ) e u s c n r 1/4 cup v u o ( 2 (8 o pplesauce ) il 3/4 cup a o p u er 3/4 c with anoth ies tter Cook u B t u n a Pe ke them Flourless and you didn’t ba ler Any simp yourself. nts: Ingredie nut butter 1 cup pea ite sugar 1 cup wh 1 egg ns: Instructio en to 350 degrees v Preheat o it. drop Fahrenhe ients and d e r g in okie e Combin unts of co o m a d e tten ul-siz teaspoonf a baking sheet. Fla to with the dough on crisscross pattern a utes. slightly in k. Bake for 10 min r fo cool. tines of a n and let e v o m o r double Remove f s only a dozen, so ld ery Recipe yie eanut-butt butter p e r o m r o peanut or triple f hocolate c r o F . s s chips. goodne chocolate om.) d d a , s ie cook ipies.c om allrec fr e ip c e (R

Photo by Charlynn Schmiedt

22 reach

TheNightingaleKnow-How By Lindsey White RN-BSN

While the great outdoors may have a lot to offer the adventurer and the nature lover, a day of fun in the snow can quickly turn into a dangerous situation for an outdoorsman’s health. Numerous illnesses can result from prolonged exposure to cold temperatures, the most life threatening of these illnesses being hypothermia. Hypothermia occurs when a person’s body temperature drops to a critical level, below 95 degrees Fahrenheit. Although 95 degrees still appears to be quite warm, in reality a small decrease in body temperature of merely a few degrees can cause organs and other body systems to not work properly. This drastic drop in temperature happens because the body’s ability to maintain its temperature regulation is impaired. Thus, the body loses heat faster than it can produce it. There are a wide variety of symptoms that can occur in a person suffering from hypothermia. Shivering is the body’s innate way of trying to warm its core temperature. Many people shiver from time to time but it is constant shivering that is concerning and indicative of hypothermia. Another telltale sign is a decreased amount of coordination. A person with hypothermia may fall easily or slur their words when they speak. In addition, the person afflicted is usually unaware of their condition and may exercise poor decision-making. The onset of these symptoms can happen slowly. Thus, the victim may not be aware there is problem until it is too late. Photo by Brian Degenfelder

The most common cause of hypothermia is prolonged exposure to the cold. A person may also develop hypothermia at an accelerated rate if he or she’s clothes become wet. The very young and elderly are more susceptible to hypothermia because of their body’s already decreased ability to regulate temperature. Another risk factor for hypothermia includes drinking alcoholic beverages while being in the cold. Alcohol may create the illusion of being warm, but in reality this is false. Blood vessels begin to expand as alcohol is ingested meaning that heat is more rapidly lost from the skin’s surface. As a general rule when participating in cold weather outdoor activities, liquids that are alcohol and caffeine free are the best choice for your health. Hypothermia is a condition that is extremely preventable through a few simple measures. Dressing appropriately for the weather is very important to the prevention of hypothermia. Always be prepared that the weather may change and the need for additional layers of clothing may be necessary. The outermost layer should be made of a waterrepellent material that is not only good for repelling moisture, but is also beneficial for protection from the wind. The best fabrics for inside layers are polypropylene or wool. Simple cottons fabrics are not the best insulators in cold temperatures. While keeping dry is important, it is also wise to not become overexerted during outdoor activities. Activities that would cause a person to sweat excessively can cause clothing to become damp. Damp clothing can

increase the risk for hypothermia. However, if prevention methods have failed and hypothermia is a suspected to be afflicting a friend of family member, quick action will be key in saving that person’s life. The priority when caring for someone who is developing hypothermia is to seek professional medical help. 911 should be called immediately so that emergency personal will be dispatched to the scene. As for caring for the person until help arrives, there are steps that should be taken. The person should be removed from the cold environment if possible. In addition, if the person’s clothing is wet, it should be removed immediately. Removing the clothing should be done as carefully as possible and with the minimal number of movements. Hypothermia increases the risk for cardiac arrest. By keeping the person as still as possible, the risk for cardiac arrest decreases. For this reason, it is also not advisable to massage or rub the person’s limbs. Applying direct heat such as a heating pad to the victim is more dangerous than it is helpful. If available, warm compresses should be applied to the chest wall, neck or groin. Heat should not be applied to the arms or legs. If heat is applied to the person’s limbs, it will force cold blood back towards the brain and heart. This could potentially cause the core body temperature to drop even further leading to death. The outdoors is a great way to let out a little cabin fever frustration during the long winter months, but be sure to use good planning skills and common sense to avoid injury. Hypothermia is a serious situation and should never be taken lightly.

23 reach


HEATED OUTERWEAR By Caitlin Grandjean cgrandj@uwyo.edu

Picture it: a typical Wyoming winter day on the slopes. Temperatures are reaching a mere 17 degrees Fahrenheit, winds are their usual 30-mile-an-hour pace, with the accompanying side-ways falling snow and little sunshine to speak of. To top it all off, you’re winter gear is not doing its job of keeping you warm. Under normal circumstances, this would probably fall under the “miserable” category for most of us. However, companies like Foursquare, Burton and Nomis are slowly beginning to find solutions for this problem by incorporating heating units in some of their soft goods. Foursquare, a ski and snowboard outerwear manufacturer based out of Burlington, Vt., has come out with their version of portable heat for the 2009 to 2010 winter season. They have introduced the ski and snowboard world to “Aaron,” a men’s convertible liner series jacket that has a battery-powered fleece liner. The battery can be recharged and reused so the wearer can stay warm all season long. The wires running through the jacket are insulated to keep them from damaging the jacket itself. It is 24 reach

recommended that this type of outerwear be hand washed with powder detergents to keep the fabric’s pores from getting clogged, which will help the product retain its breathability. The Foursquare team has been testing this jacket for the past few seasons to work out any design flaws, and now the company is finally ready to introduce “Aaron” to the public. “Therm-ic” technology is Burton’s take on heated gear and can be seen in a new line of boots for the season. The linings inside the boots are installed with wiring that works with a battery pack to keep your feet warm. A fully charged battery can last up to nine hours. Burton suggests setting the heat at 104 degrees Fahrenheit for maximum comfort but the heat pack is adjustable so you can choose whatever temperature works best for you. This feature can be found in the Burton women’s Supreme, Lodi, Q boots and the men’s SLX boots. There have already been reviews posted on Burton’s Web site that can give the potential buyer an idea of what these new

products are like. New products with innovative technology continue to bring what was once primitive gear, closer to the personalized equipment, made to excel in every possible scenario. The downfall: this said gear is by no means cheap. The 2009-2010 Burton men’s SLX boots starts at a pretty $569.95. If you look at it as a purchase that will last you for the next five years, then it’s a good investment. However, if you tend to use gear for a season or two and then decide that it’s time for new gear, then spending just short of six-hundred dollars for a pair of boots may not be for you. Nomis is a clothing company dedicated to combining eclectic street styles with simple artistic designs for the snowboard and skate world. The company carries street wear such as T-shirts and hoodies, but also features outerwear such as snowboarding jackets and pants. This year they have decided to apply similar new heating technology to “Melo,” one of their men’s sweatshirts. This design also uses heating coils and a rechargeable battery that can be removed so the

sweatshirt can be used during warmer months as well. “Melo” uses an 80/20, cotton/polyester fleece blend so it is fully washable. Unfortunately, because most of these products are so new to the market, few users have had the chance to test them out and provide product feedback. User comments and opinions will come as the season progresses and boarders and skiers have the chance to purchase and test these exciting new products. Who knows, maybe you’ll be the first of your crew to snag any one of these new products and be the last one out on the slopes getting in as many runs as possible while your friends wait in the lodge and try to warm up. Whether you’re an outdoor enthusiast or not, if you’re planning on spending a considerable amount of time playing out in the cold this winter season, these products might be worth taking a second look at. They may not provide a full-proof way to beat the frigid weather but could make an otherwise frighteningly cold day on the slopes, or in the backcountry, a little more enjoyable. Photos Courtesy of www.foursquareouterwear.com Both Jackets are styles of “Aaron” from Foursquare’s outerwear line for men.

25 reach


HEATED OUTERWEAR By Caitlin Grandjean cgrandj@uwyo.edu

Picture it: a typical Wyoming winter day on the slopes. Temperatures are reaching a mere 17 degrees Fahrenheit, winds are their usual 30-mile-an-hour pace, with the accompanying side-ways falling snow and little sunshine to speak of. To top it all off, you’re winter gear is not doing its job of keeping you warm. Under normal circumstances, this would probably fall under the “miserable” category for most of us. However, companies like Foursquare, Burton and Nomis are slowly beginning to find solutions for this problem by incorporating heating units in some of their soft goods. Foursquare, a ski and snowboard outerwear manufacturer based out of Burlington, Vt., has come out with their version of portable heat for the 2009 to 2010 winter season. They have introduced the ski and snowboard world to “Aaron,” a men’s convertible liner series jacket that has a battery-powered fleece liner. The battery can be recharged and reused so the wearer can stay warm all season long. The wires running through the jacket are insulated to keep them from damaging the jacket itself. It is 24 reach

recommended that this type of outerwear be hand washed with powder detergents to keep the fabric’s pores from getting clogged, which will help the product retain its breathability. The Foursquare team has been testing this jacket for the past few seasons to work out any design flaws, and now the company is finally ready to introduce “Aaron” to the public. “Therm-ic” technology is Burton’s take on heated gear and can be seen in a new line of boots for the season. The linings inside the boots are installed with wiring that works with a battery pack to keep your feet warm. A fully charged battery can last up to nine hours. Burton suggests setting the heat at 104 degrees Fahrenheit for maximum comfort but the heat pack is adjustable so you can choose whatever temperature works best for you. This feature can be found in the Burton women’s Supreme, Lodi, Q boots and the men’s SLX boots. There have already been reviews posted on Burton’s Web site that can give the potential buyer an idea of what these new

products are like. New products with innovative technology continue to bring what was once primitive gear, closer to the personalized equipment, made to excel in every possible scenario. The downfall: this said gear is by no means cheap. The 2009-2010 Burton men’s SLX boots starts at a pretty $569.95. If you look at it as a purchase that will last you for the next five years, then it’s a good investment. However, if you tend to use gear for a season or two and then decide that it’s time for new gear, then spending just short of six-hundred dollars for a pair of boots may not be for you. Nomis is a clothing company dedicated to combining eclectic street styles with simple artistic designs for the snowboard and skate world. The company carries street wear such as T-shirts and hoodies, but also features outerwear such as snowboarding jackets and pants. This year they have decided to apply similar new heating technology to “Melo,” one of their men’s sweatshirts. This design also uses heating coils and a rechargeable battery that can be removed so the

sweatshirt can be used during warmer months as well. “Melo” uses an 80/20, cotton/polyester fleece blend so it is fully washable. Unfortunately, because most of these products are so new to the market, few users have had the chance to test them out and provide product feedback. User comments and opinions will come as the season progresses and boarders and skiers have the chance to purchase and test these exciting new products. Who knows, maybe you’ll be the first of your crew to snag any one of these new products and be the last one out on the slopes getting in as many runs as possible while your friends wait in the lodge and try to warm up. Whether you’re an outdoor enthusiast or not, if you’re planning on spending a considerable amount of time playing out in the cold this winter season, these products might be worth taking a second look at. They may not provide a full-proof way to beat the frigid weather but could make an otherwise frighteningly cold day on the slopes, or in the backcountry, a little more enjoyable. Photos Courtesy of www.foursquareouterwear.com Both Jackets are styles of “Aaron” from Foursquare’s outerwear line for men.

25 reach


Out in the Snow on a Quarter Horse By Ulrike Wiehr leisli@web.de

It is calm and extremely quiet on the Two Bars Seven Ranch. The only noise you can hear is the wind rustling through the valley. The sun shines brilliantly, just as if trying with every ray of light to resist the coming winter gloom. This is Laramie, Wyoming. On one day, there can be a snow blizzard and on the next, there is sunshine just as warm and bright as on a summer day. Although, we are not exactly in Laramie. The 3,000 acre ranch owned and managed by Tolly Schaffer is situated twenty-four miles south of the town in the countryside. Schaffer and her family raise and train horses and sell cattle. Schaffer and his family are third generation ranchers. Schaffer’s grandfather started the ranch in 1912. Right now, after a major cattle sale, the ranch is home to thirty-five “beefalo” cows, a mixture of cattle and buffalo and fifteen horses. “Our animals, be it dogs, cats, cattle or horses, are happy animals,” Schaffer said. In the summer, there are usually ten to twleve ranch guests, accommodated in the ranch’s own guest lodges. Families from all over the U.S. come to celebrate Christmas on the ranch in the winter. “The people who come here mostly have this gypsy spirit,” explains Schaffer. “They are always looking for new places to see.” The landscape at the Two Bars Seven Ranch seems amazing, at least for everyone who did not grow up in Wyoming. With our horses Rascal, a pinto pony; Gayla, a Quarter horse mix;and another big horse that is a mix of Belgian and Quarter horse, we leave the ranch in the direction of the woods. We cross the little muddy creek that comes from the mountains. The horses try to avoid stepping into the cold water and in the end nevertheless jump over it, snorting heavily, one after the other. We make it up the hill and finally look over the valley. The old ranch, houses and barns built of wood and brick are situated in the middle, like in a soup bowl. It is surrounded by nothing else but pasture, hills, grass and peace. Maybe most people here are used to this everyday view. But even to their eyes, accustomed to the life in town, the view can be striking. The vast rocks piled up next to a half ice-covered lake, snowy patches that ornate the plains stretching out almost to the borders of Colorado. The two farming dogs are playing in the brush. These are views that are only blocked by faraway hills and trees, not by concrete. From time to time, the beauty of the surroundings is a relief, to the eyes of an outsider or a country-boy from Wyoming. We, a guy from Castle Rock, Colo., and me, a German girl from the city of 26 reach

Munich, came here for a horseback trip through the snow. This seemed like a good idea to explore the area and to get as close to the real Wild West cowboy feeling as one can. Moreover we thought, horseback riding is a winter activity just like any other and thus a good opportunity to go for an adventure. At least this is what is a usual part of winter culture in other parts of the world, like for example in Germany. But not here, at least not necessarily. Although all over Wyoming, there are approximately seventy-eight horseback riding businesses, only a few of them offer horseback riding in the winter time. The reasons for that are mostly based on weather issues. With the harsh temperatures, the snowstorms or blizzards and the sudden weather changes, it might not seem enjoyable to be outside in the winter. Not only is there ice under the snow that could make the horses trip or slide, but there is not much movement when one is sitting on horseback. Pretty soon, and everybody who has sat mostly still in winter for some time knows, all limbs freeze to numbness. Although it may be cold and although horseback riding in winter is supposed to be dangerous, it is still a lot of fun. Cantering over a hill with the horse’s breath in clouds before its nostrils, the frost on the tree branches, the little stream rippling next to the sandy path. There is an irresistible smell of pine needles and soil, with the warm smell of horse mixed to it. We barely talk while riding. We only enjoy the freedom and being outside. The only things that are important are being careful, awake and dressed in many layers. The good thing about horseback riding is that, compared to other winter activities, it is not only a kick for adrenaline, but also relaxing. Having a horse that works its way through the snow is just a different and more special experience. Not only can one enjoy the unity between the horse and the rider, but also it is a sport that requires a lot of concentration, ability and strength. And concentrating on the horse, the surroundings and the unusual peace takes away the pressure of everyday life. It gives us the break that we so badly need sometimes. Ranches that provide horseback riding in winter are not easy to find. Most Wyoming ranchers give their horses a winter break in an area that is far away from the main area of the ranch. This makes it impossible to offer horseback rides because it would take too much time to get the horses that are scattered on the vast pastures. Because of this reason, many ranchers do not think it profitable to offer this unconventional kind of adventure. However, here are four ranches that offer horseback rides in winter. Usually, horseback riding can be booked as a group, starting with three to four people. It is good to book as early as several weeks before the trip so that the ranchers have time to plan the trip, hire winter staff, and, most importantly, get the horses from wherever they are scattered. Moreover, it is not unusual to bring one’s own horse for a ride.

Blue Sky Sage Ranch Big Piney, Wyo. (307) 260-7990 http://www.blueskysage.com/ This ranch located near Green River has been owned by Bobbi and Mike Wade for eleven years. Their horse herd consists of ten to fifteen Quarter horses, Quarterdraft cross and mustang-cross horses. Riders have to be intermediate or even experienced, since riding in winter can be tricky on ice. Rates: A custom day-ride is $150 per person for about 5 hours in the saddle, including a saddle lunch. Ladder Ranch Savery, Wyo. (307) 383-2413 http://ladderranch.com/ This 4,000 acre ranch has been owned by Megan Lally’s family for five generations. The family business raises horses, cattle and sheep to continue traditional agriculture. Rates: $100 for 2 to 3 hours, $200 for full day; or half day + 1 night’s accommodations in the ranch’s guest lodgings. Laramie Peak Ranch Wheatland, Wyo. (307) 322-8169 http://www.laramiepeak.com/ The Laramie Peak Ranch is situated in East Wyoming, near the Medicine Bow mountain range. It extends over 3,500 acres of land with 10,000 acres of National Park added as possible riding area. The ranch offers accommodations. Rate: $25 an hour, $100 for a day trip. Two Bars Seven Ranch Tie Siding, Wyo. Rate: $35 an hour, $55 for two hours. 27 reach


Out in the Snow on a Quarter Horse By Ulrike Wiehr leisli@web.de

It is calm and extremely quiet on the Two Bars Seven Ranch. The only noise you can hear is the wind rustling through the valley. The sun shines brilliantly, just as if trying with every ray of light to resist the coming winter gloom. This is Laramie, Wyoming. On one day, there can be a snow blizzard and on the next, there is sunshine just as warm and bright as on a summer day. Although, we are not exactly in Laramie. The 3,000 acre ranch owned and managed by Tolly Schaffer is situated twenty-four miles south of the town in the countryside. Schaffer and her family raise and train horses and sell cattle. Schaffer and his family are third generation ranchers. Schaffer’s grandfather started the ranch in 1912. Right now, after a major cattle sale, the ranch is home to thirty-five “beefalo” cows, a mixture of cattle and buffalo and fifteen horses. “Our animals, be it dogs, cats, cattle or horses, are happy animals,” Schaffer said. In the summer, there are usually ten to twleve ranch guests, accommodated in the ranch’s own guest lodges. Families from all over the U.S. come to celebrate Christmas on the ranch in the winter. “The people who come here mostly have this gypsy spirit,” explains Schaffer. “They are always looking for new places to see.” The landscape at the Two Bars Seven Ranch seems amazing, at least for everyone who did not grow up in Wyoming. With our horses Rascal, a pinto pony; Gayla, a Quarter horse mix;and another big horse that is a mix of Belgian and Quarter horse, we leave the ranch in the direction of the woods. We cross the little muddy creek that comes from the mountains. The horses try to avoid stepping into the cold water and in the end nevertheless jump over it, snorting heavily, one after the other. We make it up the hill and finally look over the valley. The old ranch, houses and barns built of wood and brick are situated in the middle, like in a soup bowl. It is surrounded by nothing else but pasture, hills, grass and peace. Maybe most people here are used to this everyday view. But even to their eyes, accustomed to the life in town, the view can be striking. The vast rocks piled up next to a half ice-covered lake, snowy patches that ornate the plains stretching out almost to the borders of Colorado. The two farming dogs are playing in the brush. These are views that are only blocked by faraway hills and trees, not by concrete. From time to time, the beauty of the surroundings is a relief, to the eyes of an outsider or a country-boy from Wyoming. We, a guy from Castle Rock, Colo., and me, a German girl from the city of 26 reach

Munich, came here for a horseback trip through the snow. This seemed like a good idea to explore the area and to get as close to the real Wild West cowboy feeling as one can. Moreover we thought, horseback riding is a winter activity just like any other and thus a good opportunity to go for an adventure. At least this is what is a usual part of winter culture in other parts of the world, like for example in Germany. But not here, at least not necessarily. Although all over Wyoming, there are approximately seventy-eight horseback riding businesses, only a few of them offer horseback riding in the winter time. The reasons for that are mostly based on weather issues. With the harsh temperatures, the snowstorms or blizzards and the sudden weather changes, it might not seem enjoyable to be outside in the winter. Not only is there ice under the snow that could make the horses trip or slide, but there is not much movement when one is sitting on horseback. Pretty soon, and everybody who has sat mostly still in winter for some time knows, all limbs freeze to numbness. Although it may be cold and although horseback riding in winter is supposed to be dangerous, it is still a lot of fun. Cantering over a hill with the horse’s breath in clouds before its nostrils, the frost on the tree branches, the little stream rippling next to the sandy path. There is an irresistible smell of pine needles and soil, with the warm smell of horse mixed to it. We barely talk while riding. We only enjoy the freedom and being outside. The only things that are important are being careful, awake and dressed in many layers. The good thing about horseback riding is that, compared to other winter activities, it is not only a kick for adrenaline, but also relaxing. Having a horse that works its way through the snow is just a different and more special experience. Not only can one enjoy the unity between the horse and the rider, but also it is a sport that requires a lot of concentration, ability and strength. And concentrating on the horse, the surroundings and the unusual peace takes away the pressure of everyday life. It gives us the break that we so badly need sometimes. Ranches that provide horseback riding in winter are not easy to find. Most Wyoming ranchers give their horses a winter break in an area that is far away from the main area of the ranch. This makes it impossible to offer horseback rides because it would take too much time to get the horses that are scattered on the vast pastures. Because of this reason, many ranchers do not think it profitable to offer this unconventional kind of adventure. However, here are four ranches that offer horseback rides in winter. Usually, horseback riding can be booked as a group, starting with three to four people. It is good to book as early as several weeks before the trip so that the ranchers have time to plan the trip, hire winter staff, and, most importantly, get the horses from wherever they are scattered. Moreover, it is not unusual to bring one’s own horse for a ride.

Blue Sky Sage Ranch Big Piney, Wyo. (307) 260-7990 http://www.blueskysage.com/ This ranch located near Green River has been owned by Bobbi and Mike Wade for eleven years. Their horse herd consists of ten to fifteen Quarter horses, Quarterdraft cross and mustang-cross horses. Riders have to be intermediate or even experienced, since riding in winter can be tricky on ice. Rates: A custom day-ride is $150 per person for about 5 hours in the saddle, including a saddle lunch. Ladder Ranch Savery, Wyo. (307) 383-2413 http://ladderranch.com/ This 4,000 acre ranch has been owned by Megan Lally’s family for five generations. The family business raises horses, cattle and sheep to continue traditional agriculture. Rates: $100 for 2 to 3 hours, $200 for full day; or half day + 1 night’s accommodations in the ranch’s guest lodgings. Laramie Peak Ranch Wheatland, Wyo. (307) 322-8169 http://www.laramiepeak.com/ The Laramie Peak Ranch is situated in East Wyoming, near the Medicine Bow mountain range. It extends over 3,500 acres of land with 10,000 acres of National Park added as possible riding area. The ranch offers accommodations. Rate: $25 an hour, $100 for a day trip. Two Bars Seven Ranch Tie Siding, Wyo. Rate: $35 an hour, $55 for two hours. 27 reach


REACH spring 2010

Ice Fishing The ins-and-outs of the drill and catch

Split Boarding

Uniting two backcountry sports

Stuck in a Rut ?

Learn how to conquer the dreaded drift

Wintertime Yummies Cheap and easy food to warm your soul

Profile for Student Media

Spring 2010  

The University of Wyoming's outdoors magazine.

Spring 2010  

The University of Wyoming's outdoors magazine.

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